The Jewish Floridian of North Broward

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Oct. 22, 1971)-v. 3, no. 6 (Mar. 22, 1974).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Dec. 17, 1971 called also v.1, no. 4, Sept. 21, 1973 called also v.2, no. 23, and Dec. 14, 1973 called also v.2, no. 28, repeating numbering of previous issues.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Vol. 2, no. 1 omitted in numbering of issues and was not published.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statement conflict: Sept. 7, 1973 called no. 22 in masthead and no. 23 in publisher's statement; Nov. 30, 1973 called no. 27 in masthead and no. 28 in publisher's statement.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44572526
lccn - sn 00229547
ocm44572526
System ID:
AA00014313:00024

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Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale


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Full Text
ffJemsti Floridian
Koiun
ie 1 Number 22
of xoRjrn mawARB
August 25, 1972
Price 20 cs.-.ts
Cabinet Postpones Elections For 3rd Time
SALEM iJTA> The
-r-tponed for the
elections for the chief
I)i,> elections are now
take place Oct. 16.
A' airs Minister
i rhaftig, in recommend-
,-i;>onement to the
tied that because
hcations prepara-
tions for the election
!> completed in time for Aug.
31. the lal sel by the Knesset
last nonth for the election!
MK Mordechai Surkiss, chair-
man of the election c i
had asked him I the
postponement.
The legal complications were
cans.-.I by an appeal to tin- high
RABBI WT1 REPORTS HM
Soviet Jews Striving
For New Yiddishkeit
i.si resurgence of the
Russiai lewisn community was
report '" last week in Miami
B a Rabbi Pinchas Teitz of
NJ, one of the na-
tioni's foremost Orthodox rabbis
ind fou rider of the Yeshiva of
Eli/a
Rah i Teitz, who is staying at
the Sti jne Hotel while visit-
ine leaden of Greater Miami s
Hebrew Vademy and other lo-
cal Jewish officials, returned
last week from his third visit
to th. .-soviet Union in 1972.
He >a:d some 25 ulpanim, in-
tenjiv. -iiools in Hebrew, are
opera': clandestinely in Mos-
cow a the desire to leave for
Iirae .nntinues to mount.
"But the Soviet youth are
clamoring for freedom to ex-
press th, lr religion even if they
do not desire to go to Israel or
feel there will be no opportun-
C'onUnued On Pace 6-
Life Sentences
[Are Imposed On
Girl Hijackers
TE1 WIV lITAt The Is-
rael: tary tribunal Imposed
Vt ntences on l>oth Rima Tan-
nou- Phcrese Khalsa. the
t*0 n accused of taking
PSM S.ihena Airlines hi-
' I.yd.la Airport May
9 Th tribunal convict^-d the
on n three of four charges
tga ihem
Tli. \ received life Imprlsou-
"H-nt ntences for participating
in rroup that committed of-
fense n-ing weapon*; and bear-
In* '.i|>nns. hand grenade* and
e\plosiv,-s. On the chart;.- of
menilu i^hip In an illegal ortsa-
Utatlon, they were each riven
Vars. Both were acquitted
"" "tint of planting a bomb.
In handing down its verdict.
Mw tribunal said that the two
smt n had tried to pretend that
ttey were unaware or the hi-
jacking mission before the ter-
rorist acts were carried out.
However, their testimony could
not stand up to the facts that
We introduced by the prosecu-
tion which the court accepted
Moreover th* court had dH-
^ervd that both women had
Joined the terrorist organization
' their own free wtll. and that
**> carried out their part In
* hijaeldac of their own voli-
tion.
Prior to sentencing. Miss Tan-
nous' lawyer, Ellezer Koreo.
asked the court to impose an
easy ont>nce of short imprison-
Jjwn' on his client. He recalled
r miserable childhood. Miss
Knalsa's attorney. Jacob Hennig-
m*nn. asked the court to con-
sider hie client's young age (19)
and her relative immaturity.
m asking for a light sentence.
AMI HNCHAS TEITZ
'.....rt two waefcS ago on the part
ol tour Haifa men. who filed
protests against various decis-
ions of the election committee.
They claimed that it was un-
reasonable for the present two
chief rabbis, themselves up for
reelection, to be members of the
appeals commission hearing: ap-
peals from the election commit-
tee rulings.
The rourt upheld this conten-
tion, and as a result, three m^m-
bers of the election committee
resigned. The three, all rabbis,
claimed that they, too, might
be candidates to the chief rab-
binate council, and therefore
could no longer take part in the
election preparations. One of
the three has since been re-
placed, and the committee is
JWV Convention
Held In Houston
Bv Special Report
WASHINGTON. DC. Some
2.000 delegates of the Jewish
War Veterans met in Houston
last week for their 77th annual
national convention.
The JWV. led by Jerry Cohen,
national commander of Brook-
lyn, is baed here. Its lobbying
efforts on behalf of Jews every-
where range from the White
House to VA hospitals around
the nation.
Among its chief interests are
the upgrading of hospital facili-
ties for servicemen, the lessen-
ing of discrimination against
Jews in the Soviet Union, the
preservation Of Israel as a bas-
tion of democracy, the strength-
ening of the North Atlantic
Treaty Organization, and the
improvement of housing for the
elderly.
carrying on with a minimum le-
i quotum of three out of five.
The postponement was a suc-
cess for thus,- right wing ele-
ments in the religious party who
hope to have the election defer-
red indefinitely, and thus keep
Kahhi Shlnmo Goren, Tel Aviv
chief rabbi, out of the chief rab-
binate. Rabbi Goren is a leading
contender for the position of
Ashkena/.i chief rabbi.
The right wing circle believes
that the closer the date of the
national elections approaches in
the fall of 197."?, the less will be
the pressure to hold the rabbin-
ate elections. Meanwhile incum-
bent Chief Rabbi laser Yehuda
Unterman, who is more accept-
able to the rightists, will remain
in office.
The reasoning behind this
thinking apparently is that the
Closer the national elections are,
the less the National Religious
Party will want to anger its
more orthodox voters by press-
ing for Rabbi Goren s election,
as it is doing at present.
Rogers Addresses GOP
Platform Committee
MIAMI BEACH (JTA)
"Drastic reduction" in the United
States military strength in the
Mediterranean will end the
"close relationship" of the United
States with Israel, Turkey and
Greece. Secretary of State Wil-
liam P. Rogers told the Repub-
lican Party's platform commit-
tee last week.
After delivering a broad re-
view of the Nixon Administra-
tion's foreign policy, Mr. Rogers
was asked by a committee mem-
ber Jerrold B. Speers of
Maine to discuss the "drastic
reduction in defense" proposed
by Democratic presidential nom-
inee Sen. George McGovern.
Mentioning specifically only the
Mediterranean area in his re-
sponse, Mr. Rogers said a $30
billion cut "or one of that mag-
nitude" in U.S. defense was "out
of the question."
In his 2.300-word prepared
text, which he read to the com-
mittee with some modifications
as the lead-off witness for three
days of hearings preliminary to
the writing of the GOP plat-
form. Mr. Rogers spoke of the
Middle East and other foreign
policy matters mainly on the
basis of the Nixon Administra-
tion's promises and achieve-
ments.
Several Jewish organizations
also made oral presentations to
the Republican national plat-
form committee on domestic and
international affairs at the hear-
ings.
The Conference of Presidents
of Maior American Jewish Or-
gani7ations. and the American
Jewish Committee, which ii not
a conference member. Is sup-
porting proposals by the Ameri-
can-Israel Public Affairs Com-
mittee for a plank reaffirming
President Nixon's Middle East
views with continuation of his
policy of maintainance of Israel's
deterrent strength and direct
iTacl-Arab negotiations and ap-
proval of movement of the U.S.
Embassy from Tel Aviv to Jeru-
salem. The Democratic Party
Continue* on Page 5-
Extension of Military Credits Approved
WASHINGTON (WNS) A Senate-House conference on the
Debnae Procurement Act has approved the extension of m.l.tary
sales credits to Israel for a 15-month period beginning Oct. 1. The
masu"e. proposed by Sen. Henry M. Jackson (D-Wash ) ca11. for
UnlimitedI" credit, but a Jackson aide said that "in practical terms
it guarantees authorization of up to $300 million in aid The pro-
visL is expected to be approved without difficulty in both Houses
of Congress.
JDL Members Evicted From Finnish Embassy
TFL AVIV (WNS) -Thirty members of the Jewish Defense
league' staged a sit-in at the Finnish Embassy, which represents
S interests in Israel, to demand an end to all *-"
against Jews. When they refused to leave, police were called m
and they were removed forcibly. Ten were arrested.
24-Year-Old Astro-Physicist Abducted
LONDON .JTA-P.of. Evgeny Levitch the 2*-year-oh1
astro-physicLst son of academician Benjamin Levitch. *as ab-
o^ted Aug 9'while driving with friends from Moscow-to.the coun-
ITLaaod him away the sources said. The senior Levitch. a
emment when he ^xpe ^^ ^^ ^ invjta.
zrzVssttE*unwereity was cancei,ed ** he
was refused an exit permit. The 55-year-old scientist is known as a
signer of petitions calling for greater freedom and for the right to
emigrate. Members of his research staff at the university were told
to get jobs elsewhere.
30,000 Votes Cast For Racist Candidate
ATLANTA A B'nai B'rith official has expressed
shock over the fact that 30.000 voters cast their ballots in the
Democratic Party primary for U.S. Senator for John B. Stoner. an
avowed opponent of blacks and Jews. Stoner, who collected 500
votes in 1948 on a platform urging execution for Jews, was de-
scribed by Ben Hyman, chairman. Southeastern regional Anti-
Defamation League board, as a man with "intense, vulgar and
gutter-hatred of blacks and Jews." He said the 30.000 votes for
Stoner "showed us how much raw bigotry still exists in our nation."
Stoner fintehed last in the primary.
Record Traffic Toll Reported For July
JERUSALEM (JTA) Israel's Bureau of Statistics reported
a record 2,100 traffic injuries in the month of July as a result of
1.423 road accidents. The figure represents a 10* increase over June
even though there were seven less fatalities.
British Man Confesses Spying For Jordan
TEL AVIV (JTA)John Paul Glover, a 42-year-old British
subject who has lived in Israel since 1969, was detained here July
17 on charges of spying for Jordan, Israeli authorities disclosed.
Said to have confessed to maintaining contact with Jordanian intel-
ligence through the Jordanian Embassy in London, Mr. Glover was
arrested in the Arab village of Abou Diss near Jerusalem.


Page 2
9>Je*istlfkr*M!Hn Of North Broward
Friday. August 25, 1972
New Executive Director
For N. Broward Federation
A!\in Gross, pretklenj of Hm
Jewish rYderation W^Wortfi
Brov aid, announced the appoint-
ment of Irving 1- (;' -''" ,hl'
fedi'ration > Ben aneowtrwi di-
n etoi into <'<'k.
Although Mi ; laser '- ''"!
allj uwime hi* ;>-"' ",,|V
nnti October, he VM in Florida
ImI month with Mi wife, Syl-
via, and their two t-r-
pyM taking their fir-' real va-
cation I" tlmv >
-During hh vacation, Mr G to-
,,k time out o meet and
work with member* >; the com-
tmui t> for :ilannin_' Bttont,
Including Mrs. Allan Baer. in-
coming Women's Division cam-
paign chairman, and Mrs. Don-
ald Mitchpll. president >:' the
Worm n'< Division.
1 \: { i; >- : comet u> m
\> ith Just the sort >>t lLst of
ac-hi vementi that ona would
expo: of .1 man ao dm ted to
hi- work." commented Mr
Gross. "Our personnel commit-
in m lecting Mr. Geisser af-
t.-r months ol s Teening, was
hnpressjad b> hi- imp ccable
, rkground, and i>>
Hi.- 11-, s 1.. which he has put
this background during his pro-
fessional career."
I'-inj hi University of Illinois
Blaster's desrve in human and
TTBTLtfliial relation*. "TWisi-r-has
been ivsiKHisible for public re-
lations, news conference*, inter-
1,11th aomities. and urban af-
fairs. He has formulated and
executed programs for a Teen
Council, a Youn Leadership
Grout) 1 Jewi>h educational and
cnhiiral program, and a sonior
ci social welfare counsohm:, to-
ward which h.- did further grad-
uate work at the Untveiattjt al
Mlehlgaa School of Social Work
Although Mr Ci>sor. with
his Kuk^iound of graduate re-
search :it the University of Illi-
nois. i< of ten asked to he a guest
lecturer in sociology at commu-
nity colleges, he is no "ivory
tower acader.ieian. His B.A.
degree was in business adminis-
tration and political science, and.
in his previous positions, he di-
rected fund-raisin.- cam;>aigns
that double! and tripled to fa-
cilitate expanded services
Confidential inquiry in Flint.
Mich., and Springfield, Mau
Mr. Geisser's previous ]>ost.s. re-
I M1.1t these communities
were indeed soi-ry to see him
leave, We are fortunate to be
welcoming him to our evpand-
in^ Jewiaft community here in
North Broward County.*' said
Mr Gross.
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Rabbi Tarnove Conducts
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(hiets the ser\ uvs for Coral
Springs Hebrew innirresation.
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ROSH HASHANAH EVE September 8th at 8:00 P.M.
ROSH HASHANAH September 9th at 10.00 A.M.
Morning Serrioe
2:30 P.M. Children's Service
(At Temple Emano-El)
KOL MDRF.. September 17th at 8:00 P.M.
YOM KIPPUR September 18th at 10:00 A.M.
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Iwdoy. August 25. 1972
*Jenisti fkridhdin Of North Broward
Pago 3
Wilkes-Barre Jewish Community
"| To Receive Financial Assistance
1,1 %........"''
v ,, than $2 million In finan-
I jpistam* ft* U le\asttod
Ly, community <>f WHkes-
Le pa.. will be provided by the
Trith F Fisher, president of^th*
JewWl Federations and
ure Fun* (CJF). hu an-
paved
Tte assistance program wu
i ',.k,,| out in consultation with
th<> Jewish Federation of Wlikea-
torR, iThr Wyoming Valley Jew-
mmittee) and the CJF and
fga, approved by the Executive
IflBmnittee of the CJF.
The approval and the spsad with
|.h.,.h || was givan, Mr. Fisher
M.,. is indicative of the daap con-
jrfr' ,,[ the Am.ri.an Jcuish
gpununit) to the plighl of the
,n institutions of Wilkcs-
^nr. the liardest hit of the oon>
s stricken by the t-alamit-
Ifl June. The CJF im-
. iy requested community
to approve and trans-
-it th ii grants. Hut even before
this official action, $325,000 had
>,. committed by the first )0
lions to ait.
The bean coordinating
assistance to Wllkea-
: ,i~ tu other storm-
munitiea In Pennsyl-
York. The pro
meet the Ji Ish
needs m er a two
inilr.iiiual needs,
i. -h communal
in of the Ji Ish
hi i Initial Interest
isinesi loans, <
total required to
i- amounts to
i II this, the Will
ish community Itseli is
i i provide $295,000
TV ai ( projections are based on
i xpei lence of the CJF
i :t< Jamea Young,
CJF director of Small Cities I
Herbert KatuM of the
Joint I > strihution Committee.
Max Pearlman of the Chicago
Jewish Federation and Mrs. Mol-
lie Specter of the Philadelphia '
Mush Family Service who
have been working with the Jew-
ish community to define the aid
fr-eiLd on both a short and long j
term basis
More than 200 families have1
" t on Immediate counselling1,
and special financial Bid, and the
Jewish federation's business and
Industry committee made loans
totalling almost $500,000 :n the
fii^st seven days of its work. Case-
workers hajVo Itch supplied b}
Jewish agenda In TPnfladelphll,
New Yoik. Essex County.
Pittsburgh and Baltimore.
N.l
The full extent of the damage to
the u/llkes-Barre Jewish commun-
ity presents a tragic picture of de-
vastation, Mr. Fisher reported
following his \isit to the com-
munity with Philip Bernstein, CJF
executive vice president, Of the
Community's 1.800 Jewish fam-
ilies, 1,300 were evacuated, Less
than 100 have since returned to
their homes. Most of the 800 Jew-
tan businesses were either dam-
aged or destroyed, Including the
offices of Jewish professional men
and women.
"Nothing can describe the
damage that we saw there. It's
'he worst disaster in America's
history. And the worst destruction
was in the Jewish busbMBi and
residential areas," Mr, Fisher said
We sa\i. houses swept off their
foundations and crushed. People
have mortgages on hoir.es that
don't exist. The furnishings ol
main are a total loss |ust heaps
I of debris The machinery of fac-
toi les is caked w nh mud
or smashed as are the build-
ings.
"'I'll' and
community ed the
same way and must lx> repaired
and rebuilt.
"Jewish families, their liveli-
hood, their community, must he
restored."
The Jewish community of
VVilkes-Barrc Is determined to do
everything possible through its
own resources to help \\s people
and reconstruct the community.
Mi. Fisher said. The Wilkes-Barre
Jewish Federation, with the as*
s stance of the CJF team, has re-
sumed its operations and has set
up special emergency committees
on individual assistance, business
and industry and institutional and
organizational requirements, all
ol which are now in operation.
Whatever special Jewish help is
being given and projected Is to
meet special needs not met by the
government, the Red Cross and
other agencies, and m no sense toi
.substitute for them. Mr. Fisher j
pointed out.
The CJF is the association of
central community organisations
Federations, Welfare Funds.
Community Councils serving
800 Jewish ((immunities in the
United states and Canada. It aids
these communities to mobilize
maximum support for the UJA
and other overseas agencies, as
well as for major national and lo-
cal services involving financing,
ning and operating health,
\f Ifare, cultural. educational.
community relations and other
: ams benefitting all residents.

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Page 4
+Jeistincrtdfiar> Of North Broward
Friday, August 25,
wJewisti Floridian
OF NORTH BROWARD
Telephone S7S-44P5
l-37S-405
OIFFICE and PI.ANTltO KB th STREKT. MIAMI.
ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT
MIAMI ADDRESS: P O. Box 2JTJ. Miami. Florida U101
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Volume 1
Friday, August 25, 1971
Number 22
15 H.UL 5732
Soviet Extortion Disappointing
If agreement was reached at the Moscow summit to
permit Jews to leave the Soviet Union, it is now becoming
apparent that a high price was set.
According to the New York Times, the Russian authori-
ties have begun a new system of heavy exit fees ranging
from $5,000 to 525,000 for educated Jews who want to
leave for Israel. The old general fee was about $1,000.
charged for the costs of state-financed education, which is
apparently the excuse for the new fee.
While this latest example of Soviet extortion is a dis-
appointment, the world continues to be inspired by the
courage of Russian Jewish intellectuals and scientists. In
openly charging that they are in danger of "becoming a
new category of human beings the slaves of the 20th
century" as the result of Soviet policy in denying them
their rights, they are giving the world another new insight
on Communist inhumanity.
Policy Change Is Surprising
Despite the support of two national Orthodox groups,
majority Jewish opinion continues to oppose the latest
move to provide federal financial assistance to parochial
schools.
Proposed by the powerful Rep. Wilbur Mills and sup-
ported for the first time by the Nixon administration, the
legislation would grant income tax credits of $200 for each
child enrolled in a private school.
The basic issue remains no matter what form the latest
proposal takes, and it is on the issue of adherence to the
constitutional principle separating church and state that
most Jewish groups, joined by leading Protestant denomi-
nations, maintain their continued opposition.
Presidential year politics being what they are. it is
still surprising that the administration has changed its
stand of general opposition to the practice of tax credits.
And, while the budget director of the U.S. Treasury has
endorsed the idea, he provided the opposition with addi-
tional ammuntion. The effect of the Mills bill would be,
Casper Weinberger pointed out, to reduce federal tax
revenues by S750 million a year. The government, he said,
could not afford the educational program over the next
five years unless "some major reductions are made in
existing programs." In other words, the public schools
would suffer.
We have long supported the Jewish day school pro-
gram as an important factor in the development of Jewish
scholars and committed Jews. The financial under-pinning
for these schools must come from the parents and the Jew-
ish community which, in recent years, has become aware
of its responsibility.
Christian Leaders Speaking Out
Christian leaders, criticized in the past for their failure
to speak out in support of Jewish interests when they con-
flicted with those of Arabs, have not been silent on the May
30 Lydda Airport massacre, particularly in editorials in
important religious publications.
The director of the Institute for Judaeo-Christian Studies
at the Catholic Seton Hall University summed up most of
the statements with the observation that, "a so-called libera-
tion movement that no longer possesses the courage to fight
its battle but needs hirelings to shoot innocent victims has
lost the last shred of dignity."
MATTER OF FACT
WASHINGTON The real
story of Sen. George McGov-
ern's handling of the Democrat-
ic chairmanship is doubly in-
teresting. It casts i-ter-aMigRt
on the man himself. And it
casts a lot of light on the leal
character of the alleged Mc-
Govern drive to unify the Demo-
cratic Party.
THE STORY begins during
Miami Beach's bleary morning-
after, when chairman Lawrence
O'Brien had already called the
new Democratic National Com-
mittee to order for its first
meeting. At this belated junc-
ture, Mr. O'Brien received a
hurried call from the party's
nominee, who asked him to re-
cess the committee meeting so
that they could have a talk.
Obediently, Mr. O'Brien sug-
gested that the national com-
mittee meet again in two hours
and he went down the street to
Sen. McGovern's suite in the
Doral Hotel. In one of the sit-
ting rooms of the suite, he was
asked to continue as national
chairman.
initially, the senator
pressed for a co-chairmanship,
"to take care of the women."
Mr. O'Brien replied that he was
not sure he wanted to continue
in a situation of divided author-
ity. Whereupon the offer was
amended by Sen. McGovern. to
make it a chairmanship with no
strings attached.
Mr. O'Brien said he was fa-
vorably inclined, but would have
to consult Joseph Califano and
one or two other staff members
who had accompanied him to
the Doral. Sen. McGovern said
that he, too. would have to con-
sult with his own people, who
were in the next room.
BEFORE Sen. McGovern re-
turned, Mr. O'Brien had decided
to accept the offer, but in the
meanwhile, there had been hell
to pay next door. Sen. McGov-
rn' brilliant .organizer and
campaign manager, Gary Hart,
was apparently determined to
teach his candidate that he had
no right to take such independ-
ent steps as the offer to
O'Brien. The lesson had sunk
home. too.
When Sen. McGovern rejoined
O'Brien, therefore, the formerly
unqualified offer turned out to
be heavily qualified. So natural-
ly, O'Brien bowed out.
BOTH Mrs. Jean Westwood
and Pierre Salinger next got the
senator's blessing, these two ac-
tually accompanied O'Brien and
McGovern to the resumed na-
tional committee meeting.
Even there, however. Sen.
McGovern's announced will did
not prevail. The New York
black leader. Basil Patterson,
was nominated in opposition to
Pierre Salinger reportedly on
the behind the scenes suggestion
of members of the Hart faction
of the McGovern staff. Sen.
McGovern somewhat weakly
said he had no preference be-
tween Salinger and Patterson.
Not surprisingly, Salinger also
bowed out. since he had been
told that he was the senator's
own choice.
SO SALINGER, the most
faithful of the faithful, has gone
home to France. O'Brien, the
one man who might have given
a bit of substance to the great
alleged drive for "unity," has
retired to private life. And cam-
paign manager Gary Hart has
got a national committee ap-
paratus which he can fully con-
trol.
The foregoing story closely
by JOSEPH ALSOP
parallels the strange brines, J
the intentional humihat.on nfl
Mayor Richard Daley ,,f Qiir I
ago. Initially, Sen. M(0,veri
tried to avert the chal.enge to I
the Daley delegation.
ONLY A moat* ago, Frai
Mankiewicz was savin- fr thJ
record, that even if the Cha|.
lenge could not be quashed,
enough McGovern delegate I
would be seated anyua> But in
the upshot. Gary Haits ant;.|
Daley arguments prevailed.
In both cases, the pattern watl
the same. Ideological |>:r:tygot
priority over Old-fashioned polj.
tical common sens.' Purity's I
prime promoter waa also Can>
paign manager Gary Hart, and
purity's triumph, against the
initial inclination of Sen. Mr. I
Govern himself, was again the|
triumph of Hart.
IT MUST be adder! that thisI
sort of thing can come prettyl
high, even within the McGoven>|
organization. One sign uas the |
Important, though .innoti<
departure from Miami Reach ofl
the biggest McGovern cintribu-|
tor. Max Palevsky. who has ball
his bellyful.
fi the other hand, the Dem.|
cratic National CommlttM si
now the mere playth.ng of the!
purists in the McGovern orgao-l
zation. They are goini; to havel
another commission !:ke thel
one that produced th-- McGov-l
ern rules. They are sjoing tol
have an "interim" D-T.ocrtticl
convention in 1974.
When they get through, thejl
will surely have arranged mat-
ters to ensure their o*r contrail
of the real national convention!
in 1976. And thus there will beI
some consolation, even if Sen.|
| McGovern is defeate:
What Happened To The Revolution?
(EDITOR'S NOTE: This it the
fourth in a series of five articles.)
NEW YORK. N.Y. What has
happened to the revolutions that
nave raged around sexuality, mar-
riage, morals and the social role
of women?
This is the area of American
life where i>ower, class and race
count for relatively little, and
where the strongest drive is to-
ward pleasure and happiness, and
toward a freer emotional expres-
siveness. It is also the area in
which people have been most
deeply shaken up by the convul-
sive changes of the last decade.
MANY HAVE felt the pillars
of the temple being torn asunder.
As they have watched the changes
in pornography, in the break-
ing of sexual codes, in "swinging"
group sex, in the sexual permis-
siveness of film, theater and
books, in public sexual exhibitions,
in the sexual experimenting in
communes and in the attacks on
the nuclear family they have
become convinced that the age of
erotic breakthroughs has also be-
come the age of decadence and of
social dissolution.
This is, I suspect, too pessimist-
ic a judgment.
IT IS TRUE that a society
whose moral codes are dissolved,
along with the religious belief
that gave them a base, is a society
whose cement is likely to crumble.
If the erotic revolutions were only
what they seemed for a time to
be a search for new sensations
by a desensitized disbelieving gen-
eration then the darker view
would be justified.
But there are signs that this
phase of a deadened, repetitive,
mechanical sexuality is waning.
There are also signs that the
breaking of old codes and beliefs
has been a necessary clearing of
the ground in the search for new
codes and for new beliefs to base
them on.
EROS HAS a double thrust
one in the direction of love as
pleasure, the other in the direc-
tion of love as the basis of hap-
piness. Americans have been in
pursuit of happiness ever since
Jefferson proclaimed it, in the
Declaration of Indei>endence, as
a natural right.
In the Puritan generations, they
felt too locked in to assert the
primacy of sexual plcasre as an
instinctual goal. In the '50s. the
Kinsey era, there was a breaking
of this crust of repression, 'n the
'60s. the Masters-Johnson era, the
breakthrough was carried further.
BIT IN BOTH decades, the
hope was never lost that greater
sexual freedom would lead to
greater happiness. The most
damning thing one can say about
American society, from the Amer-
ican viewpoint, is that it is an un-
happy society. Just as the effort
in Freud was to hold together the
frame of Viennese enlightenment,
so the effort in the last two Amer-
ican decades has been to redis-
cover the lost American happiness.
There is considerable truth in
the conclusion of Arno Karlen's
massive survey "Sexuality and
Homosexuality: A New View"
(Norton! that "the important
revolution of our time is not in
sexual behavior but in the scienti-
fic study of sex." The behavior it-
self has probably changed more
than he is willing to admit. But
the focusing of research attention
on sexuality, and the resulting
change of attitudes, has been more
far-reaching.
THE CHANGED attitudes in-
volve a new perception of what is
"normal" and what is "abnormal"
and "perverse" in sexuality, a
more tolerant view of homosexu-
ality and lesbianism, a greater
sexual freedom among young peo-
ple, a willingness to recognize
partnership without as well as
within marriage and a new con-
sciousness among women about
their role in the partnership,
I suggest, bowev
new attitudes would not be
cepted if it were not
ly American view
| have the right to fin i '
' happiness in their own i>'. Ofli
we stretch this t<- il I'?""
search for it in ii --*
! ways H think of th.' il I dr
! that hurt themselves I '.be**
iety, too. But the ip'e
mains, and Americans with it.
IT IS THIS view.
\ some form of self
that makes so man. rvfflX
I males not only sci i,ut
' brace the American I
i to be liberated fron
jof dependence, hei
her new self-imag<' ivnetnst
business or k;\>
board room or the be
If today's angry
are the product of their repn
and enraged moth.
if they can be ha;
expressive then
turn out to be leu
my man a >s an0,h
movement may ha\e to come
to help the pro, thaI
growth centers in the "'.!"?n 3
tentials movement
group-confrontation sW* 1
Gestalt and group
mind-body CMPsOral
on learning to relai
ly. this movement if i *W
a decade old. I sus "
time it will gtrengthen, rair
than dissolve, th
unit, in one form or '-f^-
What is most hop" ar*2
is that it reaches bej
ness and sexualitv 1 > the
person which Is '' '
reaches beyond Era- I > *tn
yond the pleasure P:1n' gj
that of value and meaning i"
NEXT: What hapr*'*0
New Culture? ~af$
Copyright 1ST?. I** Ant*'*' T'


August 25. 1972
*,Mni$HTkridfiair7 Of North Broward
Pag 5
i
^Sff
i!*AAAAAAAAAAA< a^m^^^^^^^^j^^
Quoth the Maven
by Beverly King Pollock
j"".....* *i^^^**^*MVUVVUVVArVUiJVi.
Rogers Addresses GOP Platform Committee
Years aeo when my daughter turned 12-years-old. I saw her turning
(atwn-atf hody with a toon-ape mind. And all at once our lines of
unication faltered, oven in life's most simple processes. Like the
of acrer-iriK on a new dress.
Why ihe needed a new dress for camp. I'll never know. Bui she
I me and I took her to our favorite store. I tried not to say any-
as my daughter dawdled between a blue denim and a white
. oth.
But the minute my mouth opened, an opinion came out "The blue
is more practical." I said. My daughter cleared her throat and
] nothing.
I couldn't help thinking how things had changed since my day Go-
[shopping- then was a thrill in itself. But to have the luxury of mak-
- your own decision? Why I wasn't allowed to .
The store noises faded into the distance and my daughter grew
m Instead I saw another 12-year-old buying a new dress! Me.
"It's for Shavuous," mother said And I was so excited I jum]>ed
How many dressed I tried on! Some that mother liked and a
pie the salesgirl mentioned. Mother's favorite was the red checked
I couldn't keep my eyes off the white seersucker with the red and
trim on the neck. It fit fine. Just a little big in ease it should
nk. Expensive $5.98. But the whKe was so white and the skirt
"I love this dress." I said.
Mother tried to change my mind. The price was high; the full
didn't do a thing for me. And besides it needed a lot of fixing.
lybc 50 cents worth.
But I had decided and mother gave in. I felt like dancing out of
.'tore.
No doubt about it, that weekend I had the prettiest dress in
day School. And that night I paraded my dress at Bubbeh's for
r. And that night I spilled chicken soup on the white, white skirt.
The next time I put on the dress J, noticed the blue trim had faded
th. neck, just a little bit. from the washing.
Thank coodness it didn't shrink. But nobody had told as that seer-
uckcr material grows. Like from two to four inches
1 cried to mother who tsk-tsked and sent me for the needle and
hrod. But every time my beautiful dress was washed, it stretched
Two months must have passed before I realized we could not
(.'ford the luxury of my seersucker dress. Mother was tired after
rking in the grocery store every day. How could I ask her to keep
ighting with a dress?
I made another decision. I decided to hang my beautiful dress In
Ihe closet forever.
A< I saw my dress droop in disgrace. I thought of the glory that
Nhl hav been ours together. A talent BCOUl might have seen us and
made me famous Hollywood star. I could meet Jeanette MacDonald
11 N I Or maybe I could have been a famous girl detective. Or maybe
rince Charming woulda come along to grant my slightest wish and
e'd al! livi happily ever after. Even my Uttletale lister.
But n ..v all I 'had was the remnant of my firs! real decision. No
Ifreax. and no dress. .
H th. r eame in to kiss me goodnight. And she smiled. With winter
pt around the corner, you really wouldn't get much use out ot a
|hite seersucker dress anyway. Tell you what." she said "Maybe soon
I y.m another dress And you can dee.de which one yourseu.
IVoure getting to be a big girl now and learning more every day .
M> da ighter touched my arm and I jumped. "Mom, I really ao
[iiko the sailcloth better," she said.
Then I want you to buy it."
Sh hesitated. "You won't be mad.
"Of course not." I said. "Seersucker doesn't grow anymore.
My daughter said "Huh?" Then she repeated. "You're sure you
|*ont be mad. ." .. ...
1 wondered what we had been arguing about to make me man.
* I thought of our other shopping expeditions. And my evei-reaay
|*dvice ..
"It'i about time for you to start making your own decisions." I saia.
"You'll be 13 before you know it and you're learning more every aay.
< <>ntinui-<( from Page 1-..
and the Young Republican Fed-
eration have approved such a
shift and its recognition of Jeru-
salem as Israel's capital.
The American Jewish Commit-
tee did not testify before the
platform committee. It had ex-
pressed its views in a letter to
Rep. Rhodes. Jerry Goodman,
executive director of the Na-
tional Conference on Soviet
Jewry, offend testimony for a
GOP plank calling for relief for
Soviet Jewry, proposing action
on the problem for the Republi-
can Administration, the plat-
form committee told the JTA.
Jerome Cohen, l< i-h War
Veteran commander who was
the first Jewish organizational
witness, appealed for improved
housing for the elderly and fa-
cilities for sick and aging vet-
erans. Mrs. Philip Bloom of the
National Council of Jewish
-.-'it ^wu niiu" <> ..-- +-----
She almost danced me out of the store.
^illagei^jpools
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AND NEXT POOR TO THE POST OFFICE
Women (lis.u-.siil equal rights
for women.
Rabbi Morris Sherer of New
York, executive president of the
Agudath Israel of America, and
Rabbi Bernard Goldenberg.
speaking for the National So-
ciety for Hebrew Day Schools,
testified for government aid to
non-public schools. Dr. Joseph
Sternstein of New York, chair-
man of the national affairs com-
mittee of the Zionist Organiza-
tion of America, spoke on
strengthening Israel-American
relations.
^vwv^MW^^^r
CANDLELIGHTING TIME
15 ELUL 7:22
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Tour Chairman North Broward Section
"Brochure on Request"
Temple Emanu-EI
Reform
Of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Cordially Invites You
To Attend
1. A Cocktail Party Sunday Evening, August 27 at 8:00 P.M.
2. A Membership Sabbath Service Friday Evening, September 11 at 8:15 P M.
3 A Selichot Social and Service Saturday Evening, September 2 at 9:30 P.M.
We look forward to greeting all persons interested in affiliating
/ith the oldest dynamic congregation in Greater Fort Lauderdale.
wit
Membership Committee
Temple Emanu-El
3245 West Oakland Park Boulevard
Fort Lauderdale, Florida
731-2310
. ., Cantor Jerome Klement
Rabbi Arthur J. Abrams_________________ ________.
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as


Pago f>
-JenistincrtMun <* North Broward
Frickry, Auqust 25
Jewish quiz box
might thus bo that the term will
By RalM DR. SAM1KL 4. FOX agajn revert to one of distinction.
. i, MX Jnrlah TalaaimMc Aaancy)
What is the meaning and dr-
rivation of the term "ehevra-
nion?"
The term as it is currently used
applies to one who is regarded as
quite astute and 'sharp" in his
dealings. Sometimes it applies to
one who is regarded as tricky"
and cunning.
The term originally was one of
honor and distinction. The word
"chevra" means a group" or or-
p;ini/ation. The word "mon"
means a "man" or more specific-
ally a member of th>' organization.
This term was applied to a mem-
ber of the Chevra kadisha" who
shouldered the responsibility of
preparing the dead for burial and
actually carrying out the burial.
Such people were accorded the
greatest of honor in the com-
munity.
Actually in Talmudic literature
the term vhaver" applied to one
who was deemed a man of honor
and whose word could be relied
upon with trust Later and more
recently a "chevra" referred to
any "gang."
Since tricksters and sometimes
evil doers assembled in gangs.
members of these gang! wore re-
l< is "chevra-mon." Thus
a term which was originally one
o! honor and distinction turned in-
to one which wrought suspicion
for itl
I- sting i" not,- that a
n nt movement is developing to
. in ze a "chavurah" in a num-
of communities dedicated to
; dedication. It
\Vhv is it that in the marriage
formula the groom declare* that
I he wed* the hride "hi accord-
ance with the laws of Motes and
r Israel?"
This phrase has a very Import-
ant connotation in Jewish law.
The rabbis in the Talmud declare
that "whosoever weds executes
hit action according to the minds
of the rabbis" (i.e.. in accordance
with Jewish law as interpreted by
the rabbis*. It is by virtue of this
Bad that the rabbis have the pow-
er in certain instances to annul
or restrict the marriage.
Since the groom openly declares
' that he is marrying the bride "in
accordance with the law of Moses
and of Israel" he is accepting as
binding u|x>n him and the marri-
age any action which the rabbis
might feel necessary to execute
according to this law.
In The Mail
KIUTOR, The Jewish FlorWian:
I conducted Sal>bath serves re- '
oontly at -even different nursing j
homes and it was the most thrill-
in* experience of over 35 years |
I\e had in the chaplaincy.
I also made it my business to
visit bedridden patients that could
not attend lervkes and comfort
them I conducted services in the
Chad Nuntng Home. Oliver Manor
Nursing Home, Heritage House
Nursing Homo. Greynolds Park.
Manor. Golden i-ie Convalescent
Center, HeJlandale, Washington'
Manor Home and Hollywood Hilll
Nursing Homo. Hollywood.
I want to publicly thank my
dear friend. Leonard Zillvrt. of
Riverside Memorial Chapels, who
sponsored my visitations and sup-
plied the yaimulkas and prayer
books I distributed. C.-d willing I
expect to visit every nursing home
before the High Holy Days.
MM IS Wl RT7.KLMAN
< h (plain
Fort I-audordale
rvicc*
rKclicjioiis *^c
FORT lAUOfftDAlE
BETH ISRAEL (Temple) Comerva-
tive 547 E. Oakland Park Blvd.
Rabbi Akiwa Brilliant. Cantor Mau-
rice Neg 42
----------
EMANU-EL. STI W. Oakland Park
Blvd. Reform. Rabbi Arthur J. Ab-
rimi. Cantor Jerome Klement. 48
----------
POMPANO BEACH
SHOLOM (Temple). 132 SE lUh Ave.
Comervative. Rabbi Morria A. Skop.
Cantor Jacob J. Remer
?
MARGATE
MARGATE JEWISH CENTER. (Con.
lervative) 6101 NW 9th St.
Army Grants JWB Request
NEW YORK Jewish person-
nel in the U.S Army Reserve will
he released from their annual i
training requirements to attend'
services on the High Holy Days,
in res|Kinso to a request hy the
-ion on Jewish Chaplaincy
lie National Jewish Welfare
Board iJWB). The request grant-
bj thi' Headquarters ol the
United States Continental Array
imand, demonatrates the acu-
ity of the military to Jewish
rxl the des : c to
be as helpful a- possible.
L
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SU-HII Of M-. f M. fen SU.H
I 27 W. IPOWAt I
Soviet Jews Strivin,
For New Yiddishkeitl
Continued rrom Parr I
n > tor thorn to do so." Rabbi
Teitz assorted.
Rabbi Teitz. who vi-it<><1 Mos-
cow, Leningrad an ing ins most recant trip, said
I ha i the shift of Soviet indus-
try from t to a Bve-dey
working week ha- greatly In-
creased observance of Sabbath
and lyMgOgue attendance
"There is tremendous thirst
and desire for Yiddishkeit."
Rabbi Teitz said. The new
rabbi and chairman of th<- Mo-
eow ivnagosua have been well
received. The fonner mbbi in
Odessa has been forced to re-
sign lKvau.M- of the peneral feel-
ing that he was a irovennnent
agent," he continued.
Rabbi Teitz is continuing to
send articles of Jewish sicnifi-
cance to Russian Jewry, includ-
( ing esrottim. hilavim i,|
tlm needed to observe sil
He ha* been granted
privileges b) the Soviet i(
m.-nt l>e<-aii-e of hi
to the lat- Rabbi Yehuo,
Levin when the i
ual leader visited the i.nl
St i1
Rabbi Ti Iti who
partidJ
in the Installatj :. ,,f ^
Jacob Plshman as hiefnAM
Moscovt hut n > ih ssdd
new rabM was ,.,( h,
neJI Bteasure
r.)le in greeting P i lent N"n
duniin tb An m lea
visit to the S ivi< t oapitaj
Rabbi T.-il/ ii a lormor i
bar of th.' -, n q|
Agudath Rabonim the L'nionl
Orthodox Rabbis the L'i;;J
States an.1, Car He ha-
itel the U.S.S.R -
since 1905
4/, DOLPHIN TRAVEL SERVICE, INC.
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WILTON MANORS, FLORIDA 3)311 '
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^^t^ MON.-Fgl. 9-5 ALSO tY ANOINTMENT
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THt JEWISH DEFENSE LEAGUE HELPS PROTECT JfWj|
YOUR MONEY CAN HELP STRENGTHEN I. D.
PLEASE SEND CHECKS PAYABLE TO:
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GERALD R. SAFIER D.O.
announces the opening
of his office for
the practice of
Family Medicine
AT PEMSSl L4R BUW.-SUTE 105
4431 S.W. 64 Are. (Darie Rd. Ext.)
Davie. Fla. 33314
HOUSE CAU
Phone 79/5,500
High Holy Day Services
TEMPLE SHOLOM
Rabbi Morris A. Skop Cantor Jacob J. Renxer
services to be held at
SEA GARDEN HOTEL
615 N. Ocean Blvd., Pompano Beach
ROSH HASHANAH YOM KlffU*
Fri., Sept. 7:30 p.m. Son., Sept. 17 7 P *
Sat. Morn. Sept. 9 9 a.m. Mon. Mom. Sept 18 <
Son. Mont. Sept. 10-9 a.m.
Reservations Now Being Accepted At
Temple Office 132 S.E. 11th Ave.
Pompano Beach Phone 942-6410
RELIGIOUS SCHOOL REGISTRATION
Sept. 5th and 6th- 10 to 12
Primary and Confirmation
Fully Qualified Toothers


f, August
25. 1972
+JmlstFkridHan Of North Broward
Page 1
Jews In Sports
By: HASKELl COHEN
Correcting A Misunderstanding
iVKRAI- WKKKJ* AtJO. this colunui was de-
gated id the Ma cabiah Games and my personal
,>in^s based "" MMttty quarter of a century of
. ons and participation. Judging from re-
jon MWOUghOUt the world, it is evident that the
olumn has created a great deal of misundeistand-
e parti) tor which I am to blame
First al all, l hel that the Maecabiah Games
L, a vital ' t< program ;"id M an individual and as a mem-
vat the l Kited States Committee S|ort for Israel,
[support them to the fullest.
The original point I was trying to make, has-
I .'.<- mj
personal disenchantment uith main
the Ann ricanJewhh athletes who have been
hrddpatine In the games. Given the opportunity
lo rvpivsi : the United States in the Maecabiah
I,, >.. too man) have shown a lack of cultural or
EritUBl interest in the State of Israel.
The Maccabla* Games are a MUST, if only for
public relations purposes for Israel. It goes much
beyond that, toe, because it afforda athletea of the
Jewiah faith what could Ik- their only opportunity
evei to visit the land oi Israel.
My hi-,' complaint, and one that I shall take up
rather strongly t the next International Maecabiah
Games Committee meeting, Ls that we do not stres-
the cultural and spiritual aspects of Israel strongly
enough; our athletes who attend come back with a
little more than lust having had an opportunity to
participate in a jock' event
I am pleased to learn that the U.S. Committee
Sports for Israel, which is the American arm for
the Maecabiah Games, will henceforth no longer
permit any athlete of its delegation to curtail his
or her stay in Israel. If they accept a spot on the
Ami-riean team, athletes will be required to stay
for the duration ot the games.
Furthermore, the U.S. committee has decided
to have a strong indoctrination program Tor which
it will attempt to prepare athletes for what they
can hope to see while in Israel.
1 have long advocated a cultural type of pro-
gram for the Maecabiah Games but some of the
other members of the Israel Maecabiah Games
Committee have felt that the time involved in
preparation would encroach on other areas.
My answer is. Let's give the Maecabiah Games
the true spirit and meaning of Israel and let us not
only participate in sports but become active in
touring the country. This has to be mandatory. Let
us also have cultural evenings rather than one fast
turn on an Oneb Shabbat and feel that we have
accomplished our mission in this area.
By doing this, we can make the Maecabiah
Games a worthwhile experience for one and all
that will be cherished by participants for an entire
Ufethne.
(<>. ISTJ, Jewish Telegraphic Acn< i i
Israel Newsletter
By CARL AlPERT
W hen Kidnapping Is Legal
J1IS TO IN AI.KRT and unusually efficient ponce
in Israel today is tar li is than
i ha'.i' expected. A certain number of thieves
cspockeu may always be found in population
Ihil large but what New York papers
Iwould call a Crime wave certainly does
I not exist.
Only one offense, that of kidnapping.
I appears to flourish unchecked. As | i
ic, it lu iv kidpa|H"'"' i not carried out
by the underworld but by otherwise
. iding and respectable citizens
['he victim- sometimes acquiesce to the
I ction, not realizing what is hap-
to them, and onlj when it is loo late do they
ITHE THEATRE By George hiedman
Tiddler' Did II
IPTER SEVEN fEAJW, eight months three
and five duys following low-key re-
. Vieiehem-bascd NBUSlCal reached
the night of June 17, golfl : one
ttl "I.::,. With Father' as the longest-running
Broadway history.
Mayor John Lindsay, who once api>eared off-
John Brown's Body," hosted the
tar-curt rstlvtties, but didn't get nearly the
hand he did last July when 'Fiddler" became
' -I-running musical and he hadn't >et run
Dorothy Stlcknoy and Anna Crouse,
the authors of the previous r.-oord-
1 the "sort of Russian 'Life With
and pasaed a torch literally, if not
S to star Paul Lipeon, who Immediately
**ed it over to "the torchbearer for all of us
Pi Hurra) I,
Unds w
Fathr
Stera
tave "FiddlerV creators a plaque
pisui; us "laughter, tears and supreme profes-
ur'-i--rii- and wishing them a hearty ma/el tOV."
W foi n Tevyes Manolo Fabregaa of Mex-
r('it.v. I.' \ GoudamU of Holland and England and
pwM Rudenskj (a Ukraniani of Israel, Germany
[ !' land Joined Upaon in an all-too-brlel
faich from tradition."
The fet s highlights come when lyricist Shel-
H.uni, k. with compnaw Jerry Boek <>n piano.
*** fou songs dropped from the show for vari-
One was a love song by Motel, another
. 'tilbute t nj, ,lear sweet sewing machine." In
[Wh n Messiah Comes" the Lord sings: "You were
7^' '" reunite, but everything's going to be all
t*1"" And h. res what we might have been hoar-
's Laz;U Wolf sing all those years: "You say a
PJtcher has no soul it cuts mo to the bone. What
F*v*you the j(ll,a tha, a man who makes hi- living
h!iifi Hver and kidneys has no heart?"
Th- Broadway production has been i*n2
**> for a year (it's gotten this far with the aid
Fl*0fersi, but income from abroad and from the
rj "ill keep it coing indefinitely, a spokesman
n1 t the theater; indeed Lipson said from the
[*;* 'hat he hoped to lead the show into 1973. '74
^Ti'yond. Within davs, however, the ads were
""Wincing Last Weeks," and July 2 the fiddler
|",rt"WTi his bow for the 3.242nd and last time. But
f elodies linger on.
realize the) have been victims.
Each c.ise has its own set ol circumstances, but the
following might be regarded as a composite, parti) cxag-
iti a for emphasis.
Word reaches Israel that Mr, Zataavi, wealthy Amer-
ican Jewish industrialist, is aboard the S.S. Gigantic
scheduled to dock at Haifa. For weeks cables ha\e been
crossing the ocean from New York to the Israel repre-
sentative of the United Jewiah Appeal, the Bond drive.
the Weizmaan Institute, Hadassah, Pioneer Women, the
Hlstadruth and other organizations, The gist of them all
i- li. t Mr Zahavi!"
When the innocent victim saunters down the gang-
plank he i- met b> a small army of greeters. A flotilla
of tax.- and station aagons is available for his selection.
Mi Zahavis decision at tin- crucial moment is his
last opportunity for independent choice. To go with the
handsome young man driving the Cadillac- How about
Ihl, pleasant smile of the Haifa brunette- Here is a
Kuide who waves In his face a letter from an old friend.
He makes up his mind, steps Into one of the ears, and
the door clan,- shut The trap ha- been Sprung He has
been kidnapped.
For the nexl two weeks his every movement will bo
watched and supervised. He will go only where his guides
,.,, see only what they deem fit for him. And they
;;',!; sheave in the institutions and project, of the
a ncJ which has succeeded In capturing htm.
Competing agencies trj to muscle in on another's
captive The lobbj ol Mr, Zahavis hotel in Jerusalem or
Tel Am. is the meeting place for opposition agents. They
are always In hope that their man may be intercepted.
hke a footballs*, and run down the field in the opposite
direction.
you've got to have a lot ol monej lo be kidna
of course or at least the boys have to think you hav.
asionally they mob the wrong nun. and Mr Cin-
derella rinds himself riding on top of the world for se^
eral u,vi<. much to his pleasure and amazement.
The purpose of the Snapping clear the victim
ms, be so impressed with the agency that he w.ll re-
member it With his checkbook When next the opportune
; unfortunate* this system +* ****
vWtor a blinked view of Israel. There is no chance to
Z 'he country a. a who*, to weigh the various section.
of e economy, to appraise for himself the contnbut.on,
OI 2 -vspedve institutions, or to come to conclusions
ba.ed on the totality of Uk/> '-" '
H vml in'this category, don, permit youraolf to
be kidnapped when >ou are in Israel.
aoiTORa NOTE D......, Air,- stasat. .....
aae)
BOOK REVIEW By Seymour B. Liebman
i
A Potpourri
A itiiok Kessel Schwartz, a professor of S[>an-
ish, has compiled a two volume tour de force,
A New IlistoiA ol Spanish American Fiction il'ni-
versity ol Miami Press. $20). The
first volume covers the period from
colonial times to beyond the Mexi-
can Revolution. Volume two is de-
voted to social concern, universal-
ism and the new novel.
It was interesting to read that
Justo Sierra O'Reilly first published
his lK)k. "La Hi.ia del Judio." "The
Daughter of the Jewl in 1X48 in
serial form In a newspaper In Yucatan. Dr. Schwartz
comments that, "It may be the first plot In Mexican
fiction which combines harmoniouri) with its sub-
plots li i- the story oi inquisitional Intrigues to
deprive a young girl ol her fortune during the
colonial days w hen the Tribunal of the Holy Office
of the Inquisition held sway in Mexico. The two
volumes arc excellently written and have an index
and an imposing bibliography.
Truth is My <; Sam Goldfarfa (Operation
Truth Inc., P.O. Box 2161, Hollywood, Fla. 33032,
$1,501 is a collection ol pieces by a man who thinks.
Who has been devoted to Judaism and Israel for 28
years, and who dares to criticize Billy Graham.
Goldfarb wrote about the religious columnist in
the Herald that. "What Graham sa>> is not help-
ful to getting prophetic TRUTH to his audiences."
Goldfarb polcmiclzes against Charles Liodberg,
anti-Semitism, hate legislation, and Jewry's poor
record ol giving despite Its much publicized gen-
erosity, Sometimes the author sounds like a Jewish
Elbcrt Hubbard but he punctures a gamut ol !
BUOS with n sharp pin.
angrntw by A.H.M, Jones iW. W. Morton &
Co, $61 is an historical account of Julius Caescr's
adopted son who changed bis name from Octavkw
and who followed Caeser to power. He was a con-
summate politician and he established a form of
government that was more or kss stable for over
two eentur.es. The author never evidences the ex-
istence of the J<*ws in Rome during Augustus" reign
van his chapter Religion." If the editors had
look.-d at only the index of Harry J. Leon's The
I9WS ..t Ancient Rome they would have leam.-d
that Augustus had been moat gracious to the Jews,
extended his adopted father's favorable policies and
that he had established special privileges for thorn.
As we have queried before, "Why are English
historians so antipathetic to the Jew--
MM i

I


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