The Jewish Floridian of North Broward

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Oct. 22, 1971)-v. 3, no. 6 (Mar. 22, 1974).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Dec. 17, 1971 called also v.1, no. 4, Sept. 21, 1973 called also v.2, no. 23, and Dec. 14, 1973 called also v.2, no. 28, repeating numbering of previous issues.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Vol. 2, no. 1 omitted in numbering of issues and was not published.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statement conflict: Sept. 7, 1973 called no. 22 in masthead and no. 23 in publisher's statement; Nov. 30, 1973 called no. 27 in masthead and no. 28 in publisher's statement.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44572526
lccn - sn 00229547
ocm44572526
System ID:
AA00014313:00023

Related Items

Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale


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Full Text
pJewisti Floridian
Number 21
oi WORTH BROWARD
August 11. 1972
Price 20 cents
van Urges Control Changes
kt'SALEM JTA) A
[challenge to ,hc religious
qUl, in Israel was made
ok by Defense Minister
)ayan who declared that
n,> (s ripe for a change
status Quo and that hi*
party should go into its
Hl 1973 elections with a
bnent to change the sit-
under which Israel's Or-
r.ibbinate controls all is-
\l p rsonal status.
Itiiu: at ne**lng of the.
Outer on state and re-
I (i.n. I);iyn SjlPSi the
It rhimsjea in the religious
but urged against any
,!. imoiis to avoH any
|ol rndangering the Labor
continued partnership
NIP.
Day an said he would
ipported the Independent
Party's proposal for a
[introduction of civil mar-
|in certain cases, now
by the Orthodox rab-
|Hr added, however, that
dependent Liberals want-
ed to make such a change, they
should have don-' so in accord
with the government and the
prime minister and "not push
the government to the wall."
This was not the proper pro-
cedure for a working coalition,
he declare!.
Ota. Dayan waa referring to a
battle within the eoalltion over
the limited civil marriage pro-
posal on which the Knowwt
presidium voted July 11 to post-
pone consideration until next
fall when the Knesset recon-
venes after Its MunmiT recoss.
Gen. Dayan also suggested
that yeshiva boys, now exempt
from military service should bo
recruited for training and brief
military' service and then per-
mitted to return to their stud-
ies. He said he could see no
reason why the NRP should pull
out of the coalition over that
proposal which ho argued "even
they must accept."
Rabbi Menahem Hacohon, who
is head of the department of
supply of religious needs in the
|S. Was Surprised By
issian OusterEban
DSALEM UTA> For-
lir.ister Abba Eban de-
t a recent army radio
iw that he thought
|t.; States had been sur-
1 by Egyptian President
lat'a ouster of Soviet
from Egypt. He re-
I st ions that the ous-
of a prearranged
l .-tween the United
knd the Soviet Union.
-aid also that re-
ved diplomatic ties
United States, and
. Israel*! long-held
thai it is possible
t'nited States to build
t: the Arab world while
I to i ipport Israel.
who say that ten-Jon
the United States and
i.mi trios is not aaOBed
fn ;i's support of Israel
\t." he declared, adding
had BSSa no change in
li< v toward Israel since
|M pullout from Egypt
m Post oorrcspon-
I from Cairo that
i Union, "apparently
I to minimize the loss
II already suffered
> -i i's other tanport-
- in the Middle East.
has mounted its military retreat
from Egypt with a speed and
thoroughness that has surprised
experienced diplomatic observ-
ers" in Cairo.
Mr. Eban stressed that the fi-
nal scope of the Soviet with-
drawal from Egypt was still un-
clear. Asked whether ho thought
the Soviets would "punish" Sa-
dat by pulling out more air-
plane- thai Sadai has stipulated
or by denying him supplies he
admitted this was a possibility.
Mr. Eban declared that "the
dynamics of departure" might
result iii leaving Sadat with less
timn ho had bargained for. He
las sid he would not like '"
think that BadafB rejection
Prime Minister GoMa Men", ap-
peal for prompt aefottatlons
was Sadat's last word on thesttb-
jcot.
i rypi -has several options
for communication, such as has
occurred between the two
manies, between India and i ak-
istart and between North
h Korea." he added, and
a certain lessening oi extrem-
ism or wm.h" noted m Sadat s
,..,, speech in Alexandria when
h, rejected Mrs Melr". bid tor
___________
dal Willing To Talk If
Four Have 'Final Say'
IS President
Sa Ia1 of Egypt has In-
- ready to meet with
r Coida Heir, pre-
paacs talks, but
condition that raprasen-
1 I the four major pow-
nt at the meeting
. the final say," it was
d h
. Sadat made that Ute-
ti> a five-member FretM'h
Mi.ntary group which vt-
Ihini recently In Cairo, ac-
;1 Jewish depntj named < Inww
Gerard Man us.
M, M|UTU1 told the JTA that
Presidenl Sadat said n. was ail
but that he was
prepared to give up a sngl. inch
;,. territory. "1
told the group he had been the
first Arab chief of state to reC-
,. [Srael and that "I have
-.:.. did not explain the
nature of the recognition.
Histadrut, expressed total op-
position to the present "rab-
binical establishment." He de-
clared that what Israel needed
M as a rabbinate which would
function within a "religious, tra-
ditional and historic Jewish
framework." a rabbinate which
would be "a living body that
lives the problems of the pub-
lic of today ar.'< not remote as
it has turned out to le when
whoever is greater in saying
no' is regarded as a better
rabbi."
Rabbi Hacohen urged that the
Labor fiarty insist on removing
religious and traditional prob-
lems from the "political game."
Party officials said that more
meetings would be held on the
Issue
Jordanians Refuse
To Cooperate For
Safety Of Planes
TEL AVIV (JTA) A rep-
resentative of the International
Aviation Organization visited in
Elath last week to inspect the
problem of air safety created
by the opening of a Jordanian
airport in nearby Akaba.
The Israelis claim that the
Jordanian* aiv refusing to co-
operate with the Elath Airport
control tower regulating both
takooffs and landing of planes.
Repeated request* by the Elath
authorities have been turned
down. Elath ofttcials said, cre-
ating a definite hazard.
The international aviation of-
ficial spent the cay in Elath and
then took a light plane over the
approaches to the Elath runway
to evaluate the dangers pre-
sided by the Akaba Airport
The offfieial went to Akaba
following hi investigation to ar-
range tor the safety of planes
at both airports.
The Akaba Airport son ices
two dally flights to Amman, be-
sides small aircraft and army
planes.
Scientists Find
Possible Clue To
Leukemia Control
TEL AVIV (JTA> A Welz-
mann Institute research team
under Prof. Leo Sachs, director
,' ,i. genetics department, has
I through tests with
. scientists h i
,, at, effective tool in ar-
., 5tjng leukemia and other white
blood-cell diseases.
The team of biologists has been
working since 1967 on B protein
substance know-, as MGI. which
brfuce, maturation and Miter-
mtiatkm of the white Mood calls,
Dr. Sachs said.
Leukemlfl in its most severe
Involves an *essive J*-
tfuction by the body of white
blood ceils, or leukocyte*, mainly
in the bone marrow, spleen anrt
until they swamp the mar-
unction it U to pro-
dm '-' (,'1!s-
Continued on Page ^
Officer Sentenced In Eilat Blast Case
TEL AVIV (WNSl The commanding officer of the Israeli
unit which suffered 25 dead and many others wounded in Jan. 1970
when munitions, captured in a raid on the Egyptian held island of
Shadwan in the Gulf of Suez, exploded during unloading at Eiiat,
was found guilty on various technical counts and received a four
months suspended sentence from the military tribunal hearing the
case. The officer was not named.
Split Widens Over Electoral Reform Bill
TEL AVIV tWNSI Gahal, Israel's largest opposition party
faction, threatened to come apart as its partners Herut and the
Liberals fought over Liberal support of a Labor Day electoral
reform bill which would provide for a combination of direct election
to the Knesset by constituencies with a minority of MKS to be se-
lected from a party slate. The liberal votes provided the bare ma-
jority needed for passage on the first reading. If finally adopted,
the reforms will go into effect in 1977. The measure is opposed by
Herut. the National Religious Party and most of the smaller parties
which'stand to lose seats or to disappear altogether if the reformB
are adopted.
H-U Specialist Conducts Tokyo Research
TOKYO lWNSl Prof. Daniel I. Hillel of the Hebrew Uni-
versity's School of Agriculture will conduct a joint research study
with Prof. Tomoo Cho of the Agriculture Department of Tokoyos
Tottori University, on a new irrigation system Hillel developed in
Israel. The research will be conducted in the Kunisali Peninsula in
Oita Prefecture and in plastic greenhouses in Kochi Prefecture.
Israel Told To Negotiate Directly
AMSTERDAM (WNSl Expressing resentment that Israel
had sought to use the Dutch government as an intermediary, a
spokesman for the Netherlands West Indies government said Israel
should negotiate directly with the Netherlands government if it
wanted landing rights at Curacao for El Al Airlines.
Weizmann Institute Receives $1.5 Million
NEW YORK (WNS) Chicago industrialist Arnold R. Meyer
has presented the Weizmann Institute of Science with a $1.5 million
gift for cancer research, it was announced here. The gift will be
matched by the Israeli government to build the Arnold R. Meytr
Cancer Research Institute.
Okamoto Goes Berserk, Chained To Bed
TEI AVIV (WNSl Kozo Okamoto went berserk in his cell
and was Chained to his bed by his legs, prison offlciate **"
ta .pending much of his time writing lengthy letters to his amily
| Japan. A plea by Max Kritzman. Okamoto's attorney, that Oka
noteWees regret for his part In the Lydda Airport
pTovid, the basis for an appeal against his life sentence, was re-
jected by the Japanese gunman.
Tekoah Protests Renewal Of Jarring Mission
UNITED NATIONS i WNS)- Israel's ambassador to the
United Nations Yosef Tekoah, has protested to Secretary General
L against the resumption of the Middle EM peace
Son headed by Dr. Gunnar V. Jarring. *~**^X2
a renewed Jarring mission will disrupt:" *J "
Egyptian reaction to Premier Golds Metrt plea lor ducct ncfcotia
,,ns for a Middle East peace settlement.
U.S. Sending Diplomatic Mission To Iraq
WASHINGTON (WNSl The United States which has not
ha.itonna.-dip.oma.ic ties with Iraq since the *Day Jar.^
a-ndine two foreign service officers to Baghda to estawisn an
A ; la, inu,v< section at -he Belgium "^jj** <
v.--......in interest, in Iraq. A spokesman -''<> ,h\.^
p,:;. ..very pleased with the state of relationships with
countries in the Middle East, including Israel.
Tax Reform Bill May Affect Bequests To Israel
WASHINGTON (WNS' The Nelson Tax Reform Bill, now
in : SE *L* Finance Committee, may;^TS
made by American, to foreign insHtut.ons me u, n MlM
Th,> hill states that a bequest by an .American shall Dt dertucimu.
The hill states tnai a i predominantly
.for Income tax purposes! only it it is m ue u-<^
within the United States or any of its possessions.



Pcge 2
Jewish rkrk&w
Friday, August
Israel Expo 72 Attracts Families From U.S., Canada
One of tho focal points of the
expo was a special e*sion devon-d
to housinc in Israel. HflMftiBg Mi-
istrr Zocv Share', in his open me
addro*s. discussed tho cunvnt sit-
Over 1.000 families from North business investments. In addition
America participated in the Israel to tho activity held in Hechal
A: yah Expo 72, which took place, Shlomo. daily tOUM to absorption


in Hechal Shlomo, Jcrusakm, from
July 16-19.
The expo, which will move on
to Tel Aa.iv and'-then to Haifa. i<
sponsored by the Joint Aliyah
Comnlttee of the I'nion of Ortho-
dox Je\vih Congregations of
America ajid the Rabbinical Coun-
Cfl of America, and Tour V.-aleh
T\vi-nty-*i\ information booths
were vper fawd by a staff that
supplied up-to-date information on
all a-nect* of ;.-ttlement in Israel
Inducting h *ntn, education, tad
renters, schools, and Upanim were
ill y ultwl
Rabbi Joseph Karnsick. presi-
uation and problems that the Oleh
U part of Israels 25th anniver-
dent of the I'OJCA. and Emanuel, and the Israeli face*. .
Gruss. chairman of the Joint Ali- The npxt Alivah Kxpo u to Iak,-
vah Committee. reirted that 'the ___ ._.,
;,K>cial .-essions and workshops ; P* in Jerusalem in August 19.3
* r *____.1" >~eV. nnnuni'.
which were well attended by the
delegates of the congregations | sar>'
from North America dealt with j
the various problems encountere.i .
in the abcorption of western ali- j
yah today."
Tl \I>FR GARDENS M HsFRx
>g t\D Ml f %m: CEYrep* "
10HN.E.7MiAv. (offSunri*)
763-7531
$18.00 First Child, Per Week
7 a.m. to 6 p.m. Mon. thru Fri.
ARTS & CRAFTS EDUCATIONAL CURRICLUM
HOT LUNCHES INCLUDED
YOUR INSPICTI0N INVITI0
Open daily from 11:30 a.m.
til 7 a.m. Serving your
favorite cocktails and
delicious steakburfar
reubin. corned beef
snishkabob sanoVrtchas
521* North Federal Highway (U.S. I)
Fort Laudordalo phona 772-449S
e Cafe&ePazU
AUTHENTIC FRENCH CUISINE
- OPEN YEAR ROUND LUNCH t DINNED
PRE-THEATRE
v DINNER %A Q|
L SPECIAL H.U%.
FOR INFORMATION AND RESERVATIONS:
CALL LOUIS 523 2900
715 E. LAS 0LAS BLVD. FT. LAUDERDALE
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK a
TREES
^ pumnn
0eaVer TRIMME0
POMPIRS BEtCM FLA
TOPPED
REMOVED
Play it safe-Keep expenses down.
Get your trees trimmed before the
HURRICANE does it for you.
''BEAUTY IS MADE,
IT JUST DOESN'T HAPPEN."
781-6850
QUALITY EDUCATION
FOR PARENTS WHO CARE
EMPHASIS ON \C\DKMH: WOKk IN
PRIMARY GRADES
Special Readiness Classes For Children Whose Birthdays
Fall Too Late For Entry Into First Grade
First Thru Third
Unrraded
Child Advances
li All Areas
Accordmf To
Nis Abilities
All Levels
Vnfradefi
lp A
Modified
Open
School
rear
Round
Summer Camp
Snacks
Summer Program
Reading t Math
Qualified
Certified
Teachers
Advanced
Teaching
Methods
Winter
Visitors
MRS.
newcum Program
523-9875
ONE BLOCK NORTH OF
I7tn ST CAUSEWAY
Harbor Beach School
1015 S.E. 16 STREET
J
Caribbean cruise sensation
to be continued.
Florida's grand and glorious Nieuw Amsterdam
now cruises into summer and bevond
Reree per pereon, beted on double oc^pj^y j^
She's elaborate, engaging, and is she **** j^wutj^
ever popular. So popular we've ex-
tended our Florida Nieuw Amsterdam
10 day cruises through June. July and
all the rest of the year. There's little
wonder people have taken to the Nieuw
Amsterdam. She's a majestic ship.
37,000tons. and every bit as palatial
as cruiseships were meant to be. She
has balconies, terraces, the grandest
of grand ballrooms. She has the grand-
est service too. and no tips are required.
She is quite the majest, of Florida
cruiseships and now lono will she reign.
10-DAY CRUISES TO 5 CARIBBEAN
AND SOUTH AMERICAN PORTS
From Port Everglades to Aruba.
La Guaira (tor Caracas),
Isja deVarqai"3 Martinique. St.Thornas.
P.er 40. N Rivtr. N. Y.. N. Y. 100M
Tel: (212| 620 5101
Gentle" e- Pieese ruin me free Q ComeJeM '
'dai We-' :
? "Summer North Cepe Cruitei ? f||
Mediterreneen Cuitei.
Aug. 18: From $285 to
$895. Oct. 6, Oct. 16, Oct. 27, Nov. 6,
Nov. 17, Nov. 27, Dec. 8: From $280 to $840.'
We're Dutch and we want everything to be perfect.
Holland
America
Cruises
GRAND OPENING
CAUSEWAY MARINE SALES
FACTORY AUTHORIZED DEALERS FOR:
DONZI HIGH PERFORMANCE BOATS
^JjACAPRI THE TIFFANY OF CRUISING
BOATS
FISHERMAN 19. NEWPORT 22. TORINO 22. HOLIDAY 25
CERTIFIED TRAILERS OUTBOARD MOTORS
,Cv9Ms,!tETE SE*VICE DEPARTMENT
, -ie Y,EA* F,NA*K'NG 60 MONTH LEASING
1401 STATE RD. 84. FT. LAUDERDALE, FLA.
.__________________ 522-3732
INK YOIf/7/M/
THE GOLDEH RULE
WAY AMD SAVE!
SUS^JTffnKyou want $0flt$ vour need$ and yoor
i,.,M.!?,il,r{50.IT,0',S P0RCH" PATIOS
jjgg r*CIA t SOFFITS GARAGES CARPORTS
Financing Available
FREE ESTIMATES
OLOKN RULI CONST. CO. IMC.
OCNENAL CONTMACTOK
'' t"tee- mi lemerf
CAU
T0DAYI
t
781-1222


.August 11 1972
+Uist Fit, kite
If?
Pago 3
12 DAYS ABROAD WITH PRESIDENT M\n\
ipinions On Future Varied
L (OflEPH POLAKOFF
[ WsdrJagton Bureau. T.T.A.
|ish Tel--KritpliK- AK-'M.y)
In the Sovi.-t Union
bidzhan Star. the semi-weekly
Yiddish newspaper, are now be-
ing printed in Russia, too at a
cultural sop
Soviet spokesmen ad 'ressing
the foreign con
,' ,\ xS'ricd as the rei**** tMe'SoVletiache rleim-
isked to give 1;"'d as if it were a publication
Strangely, only a Com-
Yiddish specialist and
am Jew ex-
. ; optimism.
. down hill all the
I me oi the most
( eabli resident corre-
ii m.... ow. He ob-
p, that the ques-
ih.'i the outlook for
cligious life would be
Less '' ""' to r*preaatd
[ [ghi i( the omnipotent,
nent,
Ihr .ill reUftoe* are anathrnm.
I tin- j;o\ eminent h*s ftMied
Irmk -li<1:iim s that it
l> 11, more rap&Aj and there-
hteM full a-inilbttlon of
, count r\'s Jam. The rook I*
sspreaaloa <>f MM -
instruction for religious
without which Juda-
IS list
latt then ol Jewish culture
V ii-li-; il .' Soviet leaders.
even the tourist guides in
|KOW, !- nincvad and Kiev,
refer to Birobidzhan
\i hsven for Jews to practice
};r culture What they mean
at in other areas of 'he So-
ji a were destine I
I issimilate ami dis-
i. as li a -
the Jewish Auto-
v Region has never been
lince its establishment
1926 as B colon) in Kastrrn
ia to help suard against in-
k Japan. The latest
I Interest the remaining
lOQO Jews in that province in
I -here include improve -
pit- in peneral cultural eon-
ins of the Biro-
Seufood specialists
t 1959
RESTAURANT t LOUNGE
1619 N.E. 4th AVE.
FT. LAUOERDALE
763 8922 763-7211
AUTO PARTS
Giint Discounts Open
.. HOURS
H WE NEVER ClOSE
APOLLO AUTO
PARTS
4316 N.Dixie
r- Uwderdale 566-0426
WE SPECIALIZE a-
IN ONE THING, KITCHIN KMOMUIW AND WE DOIT WELL 51
ol M a < X si sT 1
as ** 1 583-1705 HltlH
of tremendous circulation avidly
demanded by the Soviet Union's
three million Jews A controlled
organ whose salient virtue is
that it is printed In Yiddish,
this monthly's official circula-
tion is only 25,000 copies. Ol"
those, about 7.000 are shipped
abroa '. 2.000going to the United
State- and a similar number to
Israel. This leaves 18,000 o.....-
for the 388,000 Soviet citia ns
who. according to Pravda, de-
clared in the 1970 census that
Yiddish was their first language
A conservative estimate is that
at least hail as many more read
Yiddish fluently.
Resides the Sovietlsetle Helm-
land and the Birobidzhan Star.
Which i* about as interestinj; to
the Russian or I krainian urban-
ized Jew as vi\ an Alaskan
county newspaper would he to
urban American -lews, there are
no Yiddish language newspapers
or magazines.
Book- in Yiddish by authors
long gone are hardly absorbing
to young people revered as
those writer- mav be but
Soviet propagandists refer to
these books as it the) were do-
ing great favor to Yiddish-
rea uiL- folk everywhere
The only activist" Jew en-
continued during the Nixon
visit since So\ let jmlice -ought
to make contacts Impossible
saw things differently. To him.
Judaism was alive in the breasts
of voting people who know little
or nothing of the faith of their
great-grandfathers but who, as
even an official Jew in the Mos-
cow synagogue said, have within
them a spark of Jewtahness that
cannot is- extinguished.
Here, if one youth's can be
rofjaoded ai ganaraHring for the
many, ls the miracle of Jewry -
survival. Ritual circumcisions,
weddings, Bar Mitzvah's, syna-
gogue attendance may lie becom-
ing extinct in Russia and the
Ukraine but Jewishnesa con-
tinue- nevertheless Young Jews
feel, the activists -aid, assimila-
tion i- not the way. as their
fathers now know To them,
therefore, tin re la only one an-
swer emigration.
This farifcag alee pwaaata a
dilemma to Soviet officialdom.
Assimilation by repression, at-
trition and reward has not yet
succeeded. "It's more trouble
to keep them than to send them
away," said a western corre-
spondent, in guessing why lews
are allov\ed to emigrate.
in hi- conversation with this
reporter, Aron VergeUA who has
edited the Sovietische Hcimland
since its founding u years a so
declared himself an "optimist*
on the future of "e'er Yiddisher
folg "
What will happen to the Jews
in Russia?" he was asked spe-
i ifically.
In a manner typical of many
Russians when a direct answer
to be avoided. Mr. Vergelis
responded with a question
"What.*' he asked, "win happen
'" ""' Jews in the United
States?"
A Jewish correspondent for
an American newspaper who
was kibbitzing on the conversa-
tion interjected "assimilation."
Mr. Vergelis voiced agreement
The same thing here." he said
Later, he contradicted himself
"Assimilation in the Soviet
I"nion won't Ih- tike in the
t nited States." said Mr. Ver-
gelis. whose two daughters, aged
-M and M. do not speak Yiddish.
"There are processes that are not
seen hut felt with Jews.
"Every 50 years the question
i- asked. I hold Yiddbhkeit will
continue. 1 am an optimist. When
Israel Ls worldly (veltish), not
religious Israel c*oes not have
a Yiddish culture Yiddish cul-
ture will return. World culture
i- without religious interest.
This comes rrom a democratic
| Communist i process which 1-
without religion." he said.
Mr Vergelis described Israel
ns a "free country" and also de-
clared "a Jewish state it must
be, naturally."
Now in his mid-Ms, Mr. Ver-
gelis said that he was taken as
a child of five or six to Biro-
bidzhan He was a cowherder
and a poet when he met the au-
thors of "The Little Golden
Calf" Yuri Ilf and Eugene
Petrol. It was the reading of
quotations from that book, pub-
lished in 1932, and particularly
the line Jews we have, but no
Jewish question" at a press con-
ference at the International
Press Center that angered au-
thor James Michener to the
point where he walked, out in
disgust. Later Michener told
JTA: "It's like a Russian look-
ing for information on blacks in
the United States being quoted
from the works of Octavus Roy
Cohen. We've gone past that "
Another optimist was an 83-
year-ofa) Jew at the Kiev syna-
gogue whose name must be
withheld. All of four ft. eight
in. tall with a square white
beard and blue eyes, this stocky,
sturdy zaida lookixl like one of
Snow White's Seven Dwarfs
without makeup. He was the
only optimist, however, among
the elders waiting for the eve-
ning service
"You have to have a heart to
be a Jew." the little old man
said, looking skyward "There
are many here who has e hearts.
What the wind will bring for
them, we do not know. Il was
one, -aid that when a Ukrain-
ian Jew went to America he
would become a goy. There came
a wind that blew good. America
I- now a fortress for Jews. What
God will do nobody knows. He
mav send a wind."
DOES YOUR CHILD WANT
TO BE A MEMBER OF
THE MARCHING BAND?
We have the largest staff of
degreed and professions
music instructors in South
Florida.
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Pag* 4
JewistincrkM&r
Friday, August 11,13
wJewisti Meridian
OF NORTH BROWARD
OIFFirE and PI-ANT-1!0 N.B. th STREET. MIAMI. Telephone -<*
ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 1-37I-W>a
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For the Jewish Federation of North Broward
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Telephone 565-4S69
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Worldwide News Service, National Editorial Association. American Association
of English-Jewish Newspapers, and the Florida Press Association.
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SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Area) One Year $2.00. Out of Town Upon
Request.
Volume 1
Friday, August 11, 1972
Number 21
1 ELUL 5732
Guessing Games Continue
The guessing games over Egypt's break with the Soviet
Union continue. One thing is certain, however, and that is
that Sadat is still not prepared to accept Golda Meir's offer
for direct peace talks, an offer that proved to the world
again that peace and not territorial gain is the goal of the
Israel nation.
One of the most disguieting reports, published last
week in the New York Times, is that Sadat is hoping that
his ouster of Soviet military personnel will sooner or later
cause the United States to put effective pressure on Israel
and make her withdraw from Egyptian territory. Accord-
ing to the report, such a shift in American policies would
amount to a fundamental change in the entire Middle East
problem just what Sadat intended to achieve. In other
words, the Egyptian leader believes, as many Americans
do, that our Middle East policy has been based more on
an anti-Soviet philosophy than a pro-Israel bias.
Despite the strong declarations of support in both the
Democratic and Republican platforms, it will be wise for
American Jewry to remain on the alert for any shift in
policy that may come after the November election. Al-
though he made the statement in a partisan context, a
slight paraphrase of Sen. Abraham Ribicoff's speech to the
Jewish seminar at the Democratic National Convention
here should act as a warning: "will the next President of
the United States listen to the president of the United Jew-
ish Appeal or the president of Standard Oil?"
U. of F. Offers Hebrew Course
The University of Florida has joined the many insti-
tutions of higher learning throughout the nation in offering
Hebrew language as a credit course in the fall quarter of
1972. The pkm is to offer a beginning course which would
continue into the winter and spring quarters.
One of the requisites is that there be a minimum reg-
istration of 25 students and, through the director of Hillel
on the campus, a drive is being made to enroll at least
that many. Local students interested are urged to contact
the Hillel director in Gainesville now, although it will be
possible even during the registration period in September.
Summer Is A Time For Learning
Summer is not only a time for camp and trips to Israel
but for Jewish learning for hundreds of Greater Miami
young people as the Bureau of Jewish Education has dis-
covered this year. An experiment at Temple Israel proved
that there were many who remained at home anxious for
continued education in Jewish areas and the new look at
the Bureau has developed an even more interesting pro-
gram.
Four groups have been meeting this summer and their
interests range from an elementary Hebrew Ulpan, Jewish
ethics, philosophy and religion on a seminar-discussion
basis to a formal course on Jewish Culture and Mysticism
for which students receive high school credits from the
Dade County Board of Public Instruction. This is part of
the quinmester program, a growing factor in our commun-
ity which our religious schools will soon have to confront
in meeting the changing needs brought on by a changing
school year.
Another Sign Of The Times
There is a significant sign of the times in the an-
nouncement of "Encore," a new black magazine which has
established an editorship in Jewish affairs. The hope of
the magazine is to unite the ethnic community by high-
lighting its common interests and problems.
MIAMI BEACH For good
or ill. the Democratic conven-
tion plainly marked the end of
the old coalition by which
Franklin Delano Roosevelt made
the Democrats the majority
party in the United States. In
consequence, a little story of
the Roosevelt years is a useful
commentary on what happened
here in Miami Beach.
It was Election Day in 1936.
In an open touring car. the Pres-
ident had made his traditional
tour of Hyde Park and the lit-
tle neighbor towns. Most of his
neighbon obstinately voted Re-
publican, nonetheles: but the
lovely countrysiik> had been as
bright with autumn color as a
cock pheasant's back.
THAT EVENING, with fairly
ill-conn -aled reluctance. the
President's mother invited the
whole presidential party to the
"big house" to hear the elec-
tion returns. Everybody re-
porters and photographers, radio
people. S<>cret Service men.
White House secretari.-. staff
and advisers, the entire group
following the President, in fact
was offered drinks and cold
roast beef.
Nowadays, a convention hall
would be needed to hold such a
party. Rut in that simplier time,
there were only about 60 people
gathered in the Hyde House.
The President. Steve Early and
Marvin Mclntyre had the press
tickers in the dining room, which
was Closed off. Outside in the
large library-. Tom Corcoran
played his guitar and Mrs Roose-
velt and Ben Cohen wandered
about looking vaguely benevo-
lent.
EARLY IX the evening. Alt
I^andon sensibly conceded. The
dining room doors were opened.
All filed in to congratulate the
victor, who sat at the head of
the dining room table in open
triumph When this reporter's
turn came. President Roosevelt
picked a tiny sliver of ticker
copy from the table and of-
fered it with a great grin, re-
marking: "Well. Joe, how will
Corinne like that""
Conine, it should Ik- explained.
was this reporter's mother, an
old friend and distant relation
o; the President's. In that dis-
tant time, she was also the Re-
publican town chairman of Avon.
Conn, The sliver of ticker copy
th wed that Avon, always rock-
ribbed Republican, had gone
Democratic by a big majority.
INQITRV (by the pay tele-
phone that the elder Mrs. Roose-
velt kept in the front hall I rc-
vealed that Avon's numerous
Italian voters had changed par-
ti.-s to the last man and woman.
But the town chairman of Avon
had her own success. She had
preached ticket-split tin.: and had
thereby elected the Reinibliean
nominee to the state legislature
in the midst of the Roosevelt
landslide.
The little story from the re-
mote past has more than one
kind of point, if you reflect up-
on it. The Italian voters, for in-
stance, have been mainstays of
the Democratic Party in a whole
series of key states from 193R
until just the other day But a
by JOSEPH AUOr
leading Connecticut professs*.
now fears that 75' I (>f the statrt
Italian vote will go to Richan
M. Nixon Instea
McGovern.
THE 8AME trei I N d^J
strong among the huh. Slav,
and other "ethnic vo1
used to constitute one of
most powerful and solid wing
of the Roosevell coalition, tf
this respect, in fad as in
many others. President Ro
velt's handiwork has pretty
surely been undone
That ticket-spl rig in Aw
in the greati si I
also d< serves a pas.- ng thought!
Mayor Richard 'A
from being the ra\:|
leader with much oca] po*|
who has gone with
faintest intention
McGovern reach :'::
House.
NOTE. TOO, that
Daley-trouble ii
is baaing trouble
Jewish disaffi Sen Yj
The hUgS and
city majoritie .....
era are another asset of
Democrat!" Par;, that
now be in peril
In short. Son M Govern
his supporters hi onductcfl
campaign that dew es tlvhi?
est admiration foi holdn
shrewdness and I count,
as well as Its obvi success. |
But the ultimat -t of th
new politics wil next Ns!
veniber. and th.
clearly have theii rork cut
for them in the i!vai|
__________PART III The Ecology Revolulions
What Happened To The Revolution?
EDITOR'S NOTE: Thla it th* third
in tenet of five articles.)
NEW YORK, N.Y. What
happened to the ecology revolu-
tion? It started later than the
ones in the ghettos and on the
campuses and drew on a broader
spectrum of support and is still
going strong.
Instead of using violence, its
aim was the opposite to un-
do the violence that men had
done to their environment.
Alone among the passionate
movements of our time, it has
aimed at balance, not polariza-
tion, at hearing alienations
(especially of man from nat-
ure i, not sharpening them.
LOGICALLY, there should
have been a strong link between
the protest about the city and
the protest about the environ-
ment, for the shame of the cities
was as much ecological blight as
social blight. But this didn't
work out. The leaders of the
ethnic inner-city revolts show-
ed far less interest in the prob-
lems of pollution, population and
technology than they did in in-
come, social justice and political
power.
Yet the environmental prob-
lems abide. What makes the
cities unlivable and ungovern-
able, makes them so for all. and
no group has immunity from
the damnation of the "unhea-
venly city." Similarly, the cities
will not be saved except by
those who have some sense of
place and have put down roots
into their block and neighbor-
hood.
THE POLLUTION problem
air. streams, lakes, noise, dead
birds, vanishing species
couldn't by itself have fed the
fires of the ecology movement.
Other sources of incitement
have added to it and kept it
alive and strong.
One was the population move-
ment, reaching an intense form
in Zero Population Growth. It
provided a new cause to fight
for to help people make a life
by refusing to congest the living
space that nature had provided.
THE SECOND was the Wom-
en's Liberation Movement,
which brought a new passion to
the fight for revised state abor-
tion laws and for day-care cen-
ters.
The third was a revival of the
liberal passion against the big
corporations and big technology,
but in a new form.
IT IS LESS an attack on
their monopoly position than on
what they will do to the en-
vironment if left unchecked. And
it has broadened out to an at-
tack on the whole idea of econ-
omic growth.
The antipollution movement
itself had no heroes to build
around, unless Rachel Carson
can be counted as a posthumous
heroine. But the ZPG cause was
dramatized by Paul Ehrlich, the
women's movement by Betty
Friedan and Gloria Steinem. the
anticorporation movement by
Ralper Nader.
THE ANTIWAR movement
fed the flame further by its em-
phasis on the ecosystems that
have been destroyed by Ameri-
can bombing in both Vietnams.
The Stockholm conference on
the environment showed that
the problems are worldwide,
and it gave currency to the
term "doom watching." especi-
ally in Europe. And the Club of
Rome, in its report on the
"limits of growth." played this
end-of-the-world theme hard
calling on the world's leaders to
stop growth in every SjegllSWlt of
the ecosystem, and work toward
what John Stuart Mill called
"the stationary state."
RARELY HAS a revolution
gone so fast, broadening and
clarifying as it moved, without
the sudden deflation and col-
lapse of some of the more vio-
lent revolutions of the past de-
cade. But the general accept-
ance of its antipollution de-
mands has dulled its cuttin
edge. Those who thought in!
might be an important baue '^l
the 1972 elections have turrwij
out wrong.
Pollution has become a non
for everyone To a sser tent,J
so has population growth,
though the recent figures OH
decline of the birthrate haw]
taken some of the steam out
the issue. Technology and
omic growth also show signs
becoming no-no-.
bit the ecology revoMl
can't subsist only i ***'
It must say yes to some th
It should say yes not only tot
conserving of natural resou"
but to the kind of techno*
which can put new energy
sources to use. can cope *1D
pollution and can n lieve hum
drudgery. It says > to
mood of the colic young w
want to settle on the law
who have discovered s ne
turalism in their life values.
But it should eq lally >'*
to other young : eop* '
blue-collar and hiteo
families, who don't "
break with techr* a
want to use the skill*
and eye in vocal J cran
Should say y. f"r"-s
social creativen. and
imagination, which 'i* a"o
vironment wltliu "1 be>t
the natural emu
IT IS aVGHT I "*
,vcn""
way technology
growth. Bui I'
growth, even so. il comes stickier
claim and deman
fill, every confll.
solve.
The problem is *
growth, but control It. and
achieve balance within
natural and social environs
NEXT: The Eros R*vol>
(Copyright IMS. Lo An*'**


11 1972
I '1*1^1*1** S> A Ai*'*'*i*'*'*i^i'VVVV>ArVUVVvVLA
Quoth the Maven
by Beverly King Pollock
My Doctor, The Doctor
everal weoks the pain had beon there and I was jusl aboul
August Activities
Of Post Auxiliary
Jewish War Veterans Post and
Auxiliary 7.'<0, Fort Lauderdale,
met thus week at the City of Sun-
rise Fire House, 6400 NW 20th St.
Auxiliary president Elaine Korn-
field reported on the July 20 coun-
cil meeting at Miami Beach, and
the ward party at the VA Hos-
pital in Miami, which was at-
ten d by Elaine and Mel {Corn-
field, Rose and Harry Feder, and
Ella and Nat FoltZ.
Auxiliary 730 has planned
/e;tta bk follows for the re-
jj (o break down and make an appointment to see my doctor the main ler of August:
r. Fortunately he and I were both invited to the same dinner Sunday Aug 20 Rummage
1y. 1 decided to act very casual about getting some advice, Sale at the Flea Market. Thunder-
There was > cmubI line of people ahead of me I listened in on bird Drive-In, Sunrise Blvd., ev-
L (fold ilatt's gall bladder. Mr. Smith'* nephew In Oklahoma with 7one welcome
: Mrs. Teitelhoffs arthritis. Tuesday. Aug. 22. 8 p.m. A
Then it was my turn. I confided to him my problem. "Its my fund-raising get together an? card
M knee, doctor. For no good reason it hurts."
h<., .1 me with his "H'mm.1 So I continued. "Doctor, it
an* just liki a case I read m a magazine last week at the beauty
as this woman and she ,"
Hyd said, "Is your left shin hurting too?"
him the way cas a child 1 I used to look at my mother
enshe seemed to know everything I was thinking. "H-how did you
mr?" I seid. I JuH realized that myself!"
And hi replied, "Have your knee and shin been hurting you for
I tely 6Vi weeks?"
"Whj
I believe he could he > aware of my symptoms with no
it all Mo wonder we attribute godlike qualities to doctors.
Then ihr doctor in all nil wisdom proclaimed "It's a typical house-
, nt this time of the year. With your kids home from
0 ho ise i- a ni" ih your right knee."
H 1 rue." I thought. And what about the left shin?
Tii, doctor continued his sage advice. "You're getting your son
amp now?"
I nodded My doctor paused and put his hand to his forehead as il
Itonxv; her. Then he concluded the consultation, "The left shin
;- ii you're always tripping over the open footlocker
I kiss, t hi- hand and was in the process of bowing my way out
backwards when I realized he was stll talking to me.
"Level: party, Isn't it?" he said.
I thought to myself. Who saya that doctors no longer have hearts
Page 5
party at the home of Mrs. Korn-
field. members and guests wel-
come.
Sunday 12 a.m. Aug. 27 post
and auxiliary membership barbecue
party at Birch State Park, Pavilion
:s. members and guests welcome.
KITCHENS
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i III" I. Ill I" m/ -" w>^# ..... f --------
lily doctor talks to people almost as if they're human beings instead of _^_~
lpat;ent-
And my doctor eyed my anatomy and said, "Better zo easy to-
Jbght on the hors doeuvres and forget the pastries, '"our best Dei is
|the fruit- '
Can you imagine such a l-Wtt That"l the trouble with doctors.
I Riving advice, even at parties._____________-
,'n*? us and seeL*!
GiffErVAY
S0MER0UN0
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Pac,e6-
-JewisWcrMtor
Friday, August
Burdine's Invitational Golf Toumamenl ^*5^T"
To Be Held Jan. 3-7 at the Ooral CC T ," smu**
Th.- annual Burdine< Invita-I reason to cham:,- the pattern." T,n,n, sholo-n 132 SE 11th
tournament, hich this Mr McColloch. 1*> has beer. |; Ppom^no ted hokU tti
\.-ar opened on.- of the "most ex- in comtant contact with the LPO.\ i-jj m Fn iav and
Citing seasons Bl the history of executive office in Atlanta. say- rfjv j,hTorah read-
:.PGA.- will a?ain be beM the he is confident "our f.eM l be JJ Satur^y
fn-st weekend in January at the as jrreat as last year, and all tn.
if Coflrfitry Club. names wiil be here again.' Cantor J.> oh J. R-nzer. a erad-
\nnotin<"mef.t can.- from Sam The LPGA Is having its best uaW ^ Jew>- ctfpaitJP London
McoUodl vice president ol Bur- year ever, with lamer purses. ap(i cantona| tcbookl in Europe
lared, When you've more tournaments and conatder- and xhe United States will be
got a (real formula, there'! ro able publicity, largely Cue to the af,.stjl ^ Rabbi Iforrla A. Skop
poem ir. changing any part of it.' Javy Blalork controversy and iMy >ah'.arh ewaning serv-
In. fifth annual Burdine's e\ent substantially more TV exposure iC(.s and chanting the sacred
\... taki place Jan JJ. over Dor- Mr McColloch indicated he
al Rp,j where Marlene would nanrn th-* tournament s gen-. i-,ll|1
^W.ono event last en.l chairman soon._______; The cantor who hU a-umeo n
------------ tatto a. the temple, dlrto. J
? musk and Instructor t ha> a,in
OemcM Ba ^^^J^^T^^LS^ -
rcc//
tICIIs
The past tournament was the
best in our bettor) for many rea-
.v Mr. MeCoUovh icdd, Our
ideal we had the FOtT lAUOWDAlf
, M ;n 1 Pf.A hUtorv BETH ISRAEL (Temple) Conserva
t-'i i< '<'ld in LrTiA ni>ior> "*~ve M7 e Oakland Park Blvd
and Efc.rai's 'Red Lady" proved
t,, ,. We saw no
Canadian Zionist Leader
TORONTO IJTAI Kalmen
Berger. a national and local lead-
er of the Labor Zionist Movement
in Canada, died here last week at
the age of 73. A native of Sta<-
OW, Poland. Berger immigrated
to Canada in 1927. He was a
jeweler and a builder.
**
Rabbi Akiva
rice Neu
irilhant. Cantor Mao
42
EMANUEL. 3245 W. Oakland Park
Blvd. Reform. Rabbi Arthur J. At-
rimt Cantor Jerome Klement. 4S
----------
POMPANO BEACH
SHOLOM (Temple). 132 SE 11th Ave.
Conaervative. Rabbi Morns A. Skop
Cantor Ernest Schreiber. 4t
MAIGATf
MARGATE JEWISH CENTER. (Con.
servative) 4101 NW tth St
duct the High Holy Day services,
which will ne held in the Sea Gar-
den Hotel on Orean Dr Potnpano
Beach thil year.
Cantor and Mrs Renzer and
th. n family plan to mow to
npano Beach after Labor Day.
They will then Ik- feted at at.
Oneg Shabbat-reception hosted by
the temple's- Sisterhood.____
Red-White-Bhie
License Plates
CANDLELIGHTING TIME
1 ELUL 7:40
VWVvVWVVVWVVWV)A
ALL PUNTS AT
WHOLESALE PRICES!
Saturday t Sunday Only
MIMS GARDEN
NURSERY
4*61 S.W. Ie6 Ave., Davie
(Go west on Griffin Rd.
to 10 Ave.)-Call 581-4935
2450 E. Commercial Blvd.
NEXT TO MOTHER
TUCKERS
Phone 771-9391
380 S. Andrews
CORNS* LAS OLAS BLVD.
Phone 524-3144
A Great New Year por 75 Urged
Idea From Cunard
State Sea Ralph R. Posion Miamil has proposed that all SO
- --no red, white, and bin.
Ucen I Iga far lHTu in onler that
all citi/ens of the country will betj
able to participate in the bi.en-
tenai Set) Post-.n chairman of the
Two very special aaggestfcau for
your T3 travel plans are two "re-
turn to Israel" silver anniversary
noises on the Qupeen>Klizabeth II.
a shin many have called the "great-
est in the world Chances are
you'll agree!
Both promise to be truly e\nt-
trtdj memorable expectances., Fl..r: la Senate Committee on
Eectl i 15 days long, with nin. Tian-mntation and a member of
full dayi in Israel. The Beat rJe-l the boardof Thfcd CVnturv L.S.A.
parture Is around the i'a^v.rI sakJ this wm|)d ..al.|
hofidav in mid-April; the second
sailing is scheduled for April 28 | low every American to fly the
Both tour, include special air >e tli:oiihout the entire year
fare, transfers, bascaue handling, off 197fi '
all the fabulous facilities of the ^^^u^^'
luxurious "QK-2- plus six meal> The ^nau>r a formcr member..
daily nt sea or in port. For com- of the National Highway Safety
plete rate information, and other Advisory Committee, says he ha<
details on both of these once-in- fOIinanv roquesti-d the federal
a-Mfetlmeitrips contact yir travel lmont f Transportatlon to
agent. Or write Assured Travel .
Services, Inc.. 11 Millbrook St..'urge all 50 states to join in and
Worcester, Mas- 01B06. i-s-vie the special tag*.
UN0ERNEW
AAANAGEMENT
gift IBouUyu*

... Candles, all types and shapes, Crystal
ware, statuary, Danskin body clo'hes, Jewelry.
Party Goods and Gift Items ...
2681 EAST COMMERCIAL BOULEVARD
FORT LAUDERDALE
MaaSSf tfcri Sat.rSif *S:M St,7ll7i;__________
milt's 'Rcautij Skop
SPECIAL
S25.00 Permanent $12.50
Shampoos & Sets .....$2.25 up
Haircut......$1.25
900 NW. 46th Strsst
Ft. Lauderdal*
565-9110
804 E. LAS OLAS BLVD.
VERY SPECIAL CLEARANCE
25* to 60% OFF
n, -'ir'.--- ,).-;
04 E. Las Olas Blvd.
Phone 523-2*55
Oen v,on. thru S*i .; ; ;j
where were you when
the lights went out?
Fumbling tor matches
a'xi candles no doob'!
Ar* vou rpady wi'ti
lofriui and oil?
, A trio to CMrisl.n s
wiii lessen to Toil i
W5TI.NE
Pompano Fashion Square
Phone 781-0610
Own Mm. thru it. 10 lot.30
ONE VERY SPECIAL RACK-
250 DHESSES
- j A;.t "^-y '> i
SMEEBS. SOMt. JUSt A
VALUtS TQtMSS
NOW
*19
95
OUR FABULOUS FASHION JEWELRY-31% 50% OFF
rV^VyVVV^rV^r^r>r>r)rW*jr^AI'*VV'
FREE STORCSIDE PARKINC EAST OF BLDC I
THIS WEEK'S SPECIAL
COLOR Dioq. SO
19"
PORTABLE Mao*.
$249
Discount Prices!
5-Yr. Warraity Available in All Mar Picture Tibet
CENTRAL TV
523-1433 Op Mm. tmi Fri. Eves. 'HI 1:00 524-2152
^MaVaVaV27 W. IROWAKD BLVD |
High Holy Day Services
TEMPLE SHOLOM
Rabbi Morris A. Skop Cantor Jacob J. Remer
services to be held at
SEA GARDEN HOTEL
615 N. Ocean Blvd., Pompaao Beach
ROSM HASHANAH YOM KIPPUR
Fri., Sept. 8 7:30 p.m. Son., Sopt. 17-7 p.n-
Sat. Mom Sopt. 9-9 a.m. Mon. Morn. Sapt 18
Son. Morn Sapt. 10-9 a.m.
Reservations Now Being Accepted At
Temple Office 132 S.E. 11th Ave.
Pompano Beach Phone 942-6410
RELIGIOUS SCHOOL REGISTRATION
Sept. 5th and 6th 10 to 12
Primary and Confirmation
Fully Qualified Teachers


Friday. August 11 1972
Question Box
vJenistrhridrkM
, RABBI SAMUEL 3. FOX
Nluit N tii*- formula which \%
LrHIrtl I"10"' U"' 'hlu,,,nK ol
& Kld<"*h iMibllrly?
J m Hebr.u the .fprnuO*, .reads
|sbrev Maran. Vcralwnan. Vera-
jtai" Tivhnically translated it
lmeaa "Take no,e ,or under"
Isiaml' v lir* my ,cacnors- mV
Lbbis. etc The Sephardic Orion-
Hi jews proclaim "B'Siman Tov.
Tjabrey Maranan" which means
J-For a (>>*l(1 Omen take mite inr
luiKkTsian.1' sirs." Many trace
this custom ek to the practice
-hich is described in the Talmud
llSanhedrin -l.'la) where It is told
that ore who was condemned to
capital punishment of death would
Ibr gi\en wine to drink before his
Idcecution to calm him or bolster
lies spirit*. The one who takes up
|i cup "f wine in public for the
Iwcitation >>f the Kiddush thus
Ihokls up the cup and. more or
[lets proclaims that this cup of
mm should be understood to be
lone for tl' Yi\\nR and not the cup
LTfatality, Some say he holds it
\tf with question "Sirs. etc.. do
Ijw understand what this cup is
Ifor'" They answer "L'Chayyim"
fin life, (See Midrash Tan-
Irhuma. Pekude 2). Medieval com-
mentaries ie.g. Ahudrahami claim
that this expression is one where
one asks permission to drink first
from the cup which he is holding.
Others "Shulchan Aruch. Orach
fhayyiin n^s, rtmtn thm this
expression is used to get those
around him to pay attention so
j that they can answer "Amen" af-
j ter the benediction, and so that
I the Kiddush will apply to all those
! present, so that the others will not
lx' obligated to chant another Kid-
dush on heir cm n.
;
What Is the derivation ol the !
name "Segal?"
Many claim that this name was
originally used to designate that '
1 its bearer was a Levite i from the
j priestly tribe of Levit. When Jews '
were compelled to take last i
! names. Levites chose this name i
which was an abbreviation of
their distinctive role. The cxpres- !
ion is an abbreviation for "S'gan '
L'Cohen" which means "one who
assists the Cohen." or "one who
' is second i in distinction > to a |
Kohen." Some contend that the !
expression is an abbreviation for j
"Segulah La-shem" which refers
to a Levite as being "chosen foi i
(the s. rvice) of God.*'
(c), IS72. Jewlafe 1>t Page 7
DOLPHIN TRAVEL SERVICE. INC.
231* NORTH ANDREWS AVENUE .
WILTON MANORS, FLORIDA 33311 '
666-6539
MON.-FRI. -5 ALSO IY APrOINTMINT
losers Appoints Shirley Joseph
NEW YORK IJTA1 Tlie
\. i mndl of Jewish
VI i. announced that M. s
ph ol Buffalo, N v
,- i nted as the NCJW'a
Ive to 'lie United
Bt it ssion for UNESO >
it was made by
s State William P.
i -ion. which was
ess In 1946, con*
I distinguish) d Amer-
dtawn mainly frtra the
ducat ion, science and
culture Since its inception, the
national commission has focused
on ini n -t- and rights of youth
ity groups, which the
NCJW says has a No been its
:: ovt r the p.^t so years,
Mrs Joseph, a boan member
\'< i\v. is a leader In the
Jewish ind general communities,
servini in the lx>ard of gover-
WE STOCK
scon TOWELS
QrOW.RO 0APCR 0AOAGING
'0T LAUOERDALE TELEPHONE
524-4387
nors ol tin- United Federation ol
Buffalo, the United Jewish Fund
in of its
Women's Division I and the
\ ei ai Fii d Sen ici Commit-
tee.
Members Conduct
Worship Service
At Beth Israel
While R i ibi Akiva Brilliant is
on vacation services at Temple
Beth Israel, Fort Lauderdale, are
being onducted i>> members of
, Hi congn a itlon.
Cantor Maurice Neu assists In
the worship sei\iee< at the tem-
: pie. which i- located a: 7100 W.
Oakland Park Blvd. Friday eve-
ning, the services bcejn at 8:15;
1 Saturday's worship, beginning at
9 -,\ m., is followed b> a Kiddush.
Applications for registration of
children ages three and four in
the temple's new nursery school
are presently available In the tem-
pi,, office, it has been announced, i
\ membership tea for prospec-
tive temple membt rs will be held
In the .Imi. I Sunday, Aug. 20
The appointment of Dr. Ed-
ward T. Sandrow as spe-
cial counsel to the chan-
cellor of The lewish Theo-
logical Seminary of Amer-
ica was effective Aug. 1.
Dr. Sandrow retired last
month from the pulpit of
Temple Beth El, Cedar-
hurst, N.Y.. where he had
been spiritual leader for 35
years. j
Scientists Find
Possible Clue To
Leukemia Control
Continued from Page I-
It is mil ktin'vn w-h-it Mif'
this evcessive production, but it
baa been found that the intro-
duction of m<;i oausea white
cells to mature and hence slows
down their rate Ol multiplica-
tion.
Although tests have not yet
t> en condu ted on human be-
ings, tests have been successful-
in controlling blood cancer in
animals.
NATIONAL COUNCIL OF
JEWISH WOMEN TOURS
"An Elegant Way To Travel ."
Rhea D. Nathan Telephone 942-1449
Tour Chairman North Broward Section
"Brochure on Request"
* SEA RANCH DINNER THEATRE |
Most Enjoyable Theatrical Experience ^
of the year! -fc
"BUTTERFLIES ARE FREE"
* With Three Broadway Stars *
Gig Kramer Susan Schorer Mildred Davis
August 9th thru September 15
DINNER & SHOW DINNER: a-8 P.M.
Sunday thru Thursday CURTAIN: 8:30
$7.50 "Dark" ea Maadays
Friday & Saturday ^SSISSS'
S8.50 772-0400
4700 N. OCEAN BLVD. (A1A)
LAUDERDALE BY-THE SEA
'Don't Miss This One"
A********
MEN'S
HAIRPIECES;
FINEST QUALITY |
I HAND MADE
HUMAN HAIR
LOW
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IMPORTER
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927-0223 I
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*,!.,Jl hlsjM ,/ nil,.'
l-.iMlfn/ lot rtH|r>.
Cimt) niii.tr hy fj-ilrr /...nil
> nifilit foil MmwIii
'mI a umy In Url t HflMns
The
FLAMBE
ROOM
I.AUUY HATClir,
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CEAN MANOK HOTEL,
" Laud., Fta. &M-7101
FOR
THE CONSUMER
TIGHT INFLATION-
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NOW
WITH
FOOD STORES
RESTAURANTS
DRUG STORES
CLOTHING
BEAUTY PARLORS|
FURNITURE
SHOES
MOTEL
* HOTEL
I and
* MANY OTHERS
"FOOD
SAVINGS
CHECKS
rr
y*
COUPONS/]*
It's the All-Purpose Coupon
Its the only way to really see
what you SAVE!
rs the SMART way to SHOP
FOOD STORES FOR
MORE DETAILS:
CALL ANYTIME:
522-8585
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country to fight inflation?
Use "FOOD SAVINGS CHECKS"
#


Page 8
-JcniancrkHar
Friday, August 11
NORTON
SINCE 1924-
TIRE CO.
d
SAHTY
SERVICE
CENTER

;v>>*.
ft

r. : *1
V I
MICHEUN
RADIAL
The steel-belted
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FORDS,
CHEVYS,
PLYMOUTHS
ajj sizes, all makes
ajj models
PRICES START AS LOW AS:
66
*!Z**\
175-13
Plus F.L Tax 1.94 & Trade-in
Ask us about
budget terms
Famous Michelin X features include:
1 toi Heht X g'.es yw ecc--
omy you never thought you"d get from
a tire! They roll eas.er, use less en-
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long as conventional tires.
Mftty You get highest deg'ee of safety
against punctures-test-proven for
high-speed safety at 115 mph.
NORTON
-SINCE 192-
TIRE CO.
t-:T-<
performance Michelin X tires offer
s.peric cornering, superior braking,
Sjperi:r t-rrpike driving with no wan-
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pared to cor 'os under
s ilarcira star rfJQ.OOO MILE WARRANTY
construction Unique radial design with
super-strong steel cords make tires
grip harder-track surer-roll ease:
with minimum distortion and scuffing.
'AAichelin's Warranty for X Radial Highway Tubeless Whitewall Tire shown here covers tread life, normal
road haiards (excluding repairable punctures) and defects in workmanship and materials for 40,000 miles,
when lire is used on domestic passenger vehicles in normal service in continental United States, except
Alaska. Credit or refund (at Michelin's option) is equal to current actual selling price multiplied by per-
centage of warranted mileage not run on tire.
CENTRAL MIAMI
5300 N.W. 27th Ave. 634-155S
CORAL GABLES
Bird & Douglas Read 446-8101
NORTH MIAMI
13360 N.W. 7tn Ave. 681-8541
MIAMI SHORES
8801 B.s:ayre 6;.d. 759-4446
N. MIAMI BEACH
I70C 454
MIAMI BEACH
1454 Alton Read 672-5353
HIALEAH/PALM SPRINGS MILE
1275 W. 49th SL 822-2500
CUTLER RIDGE
20390 S. Dixie H*/. 233-5241
SOUTH DADE
90C1 S. Dixie Hwy. 667-"":''R
HOMESTEAD
30100 E. Federal Hwy. 247-1622
W. HOLLYWOOD
6017 Hollywood Blvd.
at State Read No. 7 987-C450
FT. LAUDERDALE
1830 W. Broward Blvd. 525-3136
1740 E. Sunrise Blvd. 525-7588
POMPANO BEACH
3151 N. Federal Hwy. 943-4200
WEST PALM BEACH
515 South Dixie 832-3044
LAKE PARK/N. PALM BEACH
532 N. Lake Blvd. 848-2544
FT. PIERCE
2604 South 4th St 464-8020


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