The Jewish Floridian of North Broward

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Oct. 22, 1971)-v. 3, no. 6 (Mar. 22, 1974).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Dec. 17, 1971 called also v.1, no. 4, Sept. 21, 1973 called also v.2, no. 23, and Dec. 14, 1973 called also v.2, no. 28, repeating numbering of previous issues.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Vol. 2, no. 1 omitted in numbering of issues and was not published.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statement conflict: Sept. 7, 1973 called no. 22 in masthead and no. 23 in publisher's statement; Nov. 30, 1973 called no. 27 in masthead and no. 28 in publisher's statement.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44572526
lccn - sn 00229547
ocm44572526
System ID:
AA00014313:00022

Related Items

Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale


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Full Text
& Jewish Flcridiian
bam<
Number 20
ot \OHTH BROWAHB
July 28, 1972
Price 20 ?snH
Egyptian Leader Assails American Guarantees
mate DepL 'No Comment'on
\Sadat Charges Against U. S.
N'GTON (JTAi
I e t a 11- I K'|wrtment officials
laaintaim I a stony silence on
Eg)Trw:' President Anwar
I Sadat- .barges of broken
I Amen. promltea, to Egypt
Lnl An i ii an guarantees to Is-
nel r> artment spokesman
jchail-- Bray told newsmen he
Icoul.i I* I respond to any ques-
tions i ited to Sadat's four-
Ihour spe< h to the national con-
L.,.,, i the Arab Socialist
[tMon Cairo Monday on the
jocrasi"'' ol the 20th anniver-
sary ol Egyptian revolution.
Bra.v -.-lid the State Depart-
Jment had ut had a chance to
[ study > lafi speech which, ac-
[cordiiu to incomplete transla-
Itioas reaching here Monday,
ah ted at some length to
attacking the U.S. but seemed
imbii:..i as to why the Egyp-
tlan suddenly ordered
' Sovi.'t dsora out of Egypt
last m
Sadat said in his speech that
three : tors prompted him to
renviv< > .iet military advisors
from Egypt The.se he said were
a U.S. government pledge to Is-
rael that it would oppose any
Security Council resolution
which calls on Israel to with-
draw from the territories it oc-
cupied in June, 1967; would en-
able Israel to maintain military
superiority over Egypt; and
would not impose, or allow the
imposition of a settlement in
the Middle East which did not
provide for direct negotiations
between Israel ami its Arab
neighbors. Sadat said these
three |>oints formed a central is-
sue to the current Egyptian-
Soviet situation but he did not
say specifically how they were
connected with his ordered re-
duction of the Soviet military
presence in Egypt
Sadat told the Arab Socialist
Union, his country's only jHiliti-
cal party, that there were dif-
ferences in strategy between
the Soviet Union and Fgypt. He
said he had tried to dissuade the
Soviet Union from maintaining
a position that he described as
"over cautious." He said that
if Egypt and the Soviet Union
did nothing but keep on wait-
ing, it would mean acceptance
of the Israeli occupation as a
fait accompli. Sadat drew his
loudest applause when he de-
clared, "This we rejected."
He spent an hour describing
how. he claimed, the U.S. had
re|ieatedly blocked efforts for a
Middle Bast settlement. He de-
voted about the same length of
time to detailing his attempts
to bring about a harmony of
views with the Soviet Union.
Sadat charged that the U.S. has
been shipping military supplies
into Israel since last Jan. "as if
to tell us, what does the Sov-
iet Union give you? What can
the Soviet Union do for you?"
Sadat said that in Oct. 1971
the Soviet Union had promised
to implement a "certain agree-
ment" but 1971 ended without
the agreement, which the Egyp-
tian President did not describe,
being fulfilled.
Jarring Mission Lnaffected
B^ Withdrawal Of Soviet
UNIT! D NATIONS (JTA
UN. Si retary General Kurt
-aid in Vienna that
the withdrawal of Soviet per-
sonn.\ from Egypt had nothing
| to do with the peace mission of
UN as) mediator Gunnar
V. Jfcrrii ii was re|orted hero
Isesd Dr. Waldheim made
the n ark to an Austrian
Pres< Agency correspondent
when hi arrived in Vienna from
The correspondent hail
* if the Jarring mis-
s'oi have been made some-
what -ir by the develop-
""' Egypt and whether
dia.-i an interim settle-
sed by U.S. Secretary
"f Stan William P. Rogers had
Favorable.
v im said the events in
i a matter concerning
|HIAS Helps 3,000
pettier United Sf-ites
N': '' YORK (WNSl The
JWti Ma, Service helped 3.-
174 J, u ivh immigrants from
Bfrope, North Africa, the Mid-
dle East and Latin America set-
J 'n the U.S. in 1971. Gaynor
' Jacobson, executive rice
president reported. More than
w.000 other Jews with problems
jriated to immigrant and reset-
tlement, were also helped. Gay-
"r Mid 265 Jews from the
J111'' Union were aided by Hias
)*"h .-14 settled in the U.S.. 24
n Canada, and the balance else-
*here. Hias, he reported, has
current caseload of 5.000 Sov-
t Jeus who wish to join their
"la''vps in the West. Also aid-
M "i 1971. Gaynor reported,
*e,e soo Jews from Iraq.
the two countries involved and
unrelated to the Jarring mis-
sion. He said the Jarring mis-
sion was based on Security
Council I'..solution 243, would
continue on that ba.sis and the
V.N. won lit make every effort
to contribute to a solution of
the Middle East problem.
Meir Challenges Sadat
JERUSALEM (JTA) Pre-
mier Golda Meir challenged
President Anwar Sadat of Egypt
to prove his |>eaceful intentions
when she delivered a political
analysis of last week's events to
the Knesset Wednesday. They
said Mrs. Men's speech will be
Israel's official response to
Sadat's expulsion of Soviet
military advisers from Egypt.
She will ask the Egyptian lead-
er to show that he wants peace
by agreeing to negotiate with
Israel without preconditions.
At the recent Colloquium of International Jurists held
at Uppsala University. Sweden, on the subject of the
universal right to leave one's country and to return.
Jerome Shestack, (left) of Philadelphia, chairman of
the committee on International Organizations of the
American Jewish Committee, and Bertram H.Gold
(riqht) AJC's executive vice president, confer with Prof.
Rene Cassin, Nobel Peace Prize winner and president
of the International Institute of Human Rights, as they
examine the Declaration on the "Right to Leave and
to Return." adopted by the colloquium. ^Shestack
was chairman of the committee that drafted the
declaration.
Renewal of Hostilities
Is Possible In Wake
Of Russian PuU-Out
JERUSALEM (JTA I A
Cabinet minister told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency last night
that the government still lacked
clear information on several
aspects of the pull-out of Soviet
personnel from Egypt, ordered
by President Anwar Sadat last
week. The Cabinet spent four
hours Sunday discussing the de-
velopment. Assessments were
made by Foreign Minister Abba
Eban, Defense Minister Moshe
Dayan, Chief of Staff Gen.
David Elazar and Gen. Aharon
Yariv, head of military intelli-
gence. The Defense Minister's
special assistant Zvi Tsur also
participated in the discussion.
But the government continued
to maintain official silence
landing Premier Golda Mier's
address to the Knesset.
The JTA learned that one
possibility raised at the Cabinet
meeting was a renewal of limit-
ed hostilities along the Suez
Canal by Egypt. This was con-
sidered possible in view of popu-
lar dissatisfaction in Egypt with
the "no-war-no-peace" situation
and Sadat's need to bolster his
position. The departure of the
Russians may mean that the
Soviet restraints on the Egyp-
tian military may have been
loosened, sources here said.
(The Lebanese newspaper
Beirut reported that Syria was
planning to follow the Egyptian
lead and expel Soviet advisors
attached to its armed forces, i
Israeli military sources believe
there are no more than 1.000
Soviet advisors in Syria. There
has been no confirmation of the
Beirut report.
Egyptian Missiles Fired
At Two Israeli Planes
TEL AVIV (JTA> Two Is-
rael Air Force planes were at-
tacked by Egyptian ground-to-
air missiles while on a routine
flight over the Sinai peninsula
Monday. The planes evaded the
missiles and returned safely to
their bases, according to mili-
tary sources here. The attack
was the first of its kind since
last Sept. when Egyptian mis-
siles downed an unarmed Israeli
transport plane over the Sinai.
Israeli sources said it was
still unclear whether the attack
was at the initiative of a local
commander motivated by pa-
triotic feelings on the 20th anni-
versary of Egypt's independence
or was carried out on orders
from higher echelons. Some
sources here said the departure
of Soviet advisors from Egypt
may have undermined the strict
discipline maintained on Egyp-
tian officers and men manning
the Suez Canal defenses.
Israel has lodged a complaint
with the United Nations Truce
Supervision Organization
(UNTSO) over the incident. It
was learned that four missiles
were fired of the SAM-2 and
SAM-3 tyi>e from batteries lo-
cated at Ismailia in the central
sector of the Suez Canal zone.
Egyptian anti-aircraft guns also
went into action. There was no
Israeli return fire.
The type of Israeli planes
fired on was not disclosed.
(Cairo radio claimed today that
an Israeli Phantom jet was
downed, i
Tekoah Decries UN Action
Demanding Return Officers
UNITED NATIONS (JTA'
The Security Council's second
call on Israel to ideas.
Lebanese and live Syrian offi-
cers captured during a (bray
against terrorist bases in Le-
banon June 21. was described by
Israel's Ambassador Yosef Te-
koah Sunday as "the tradition
of unbalanced texts." The re-
solution, adopted 14-0 Friday
with the United States abstain-
ing, requested the Secretary
General and the Security Coun-
cil President to renew efforts to
free the "abducted" officers in
the shortest possible time." Is-
rael, insisting on a general POW
exchange, boycotted the meet-
ings leading up to the new re-
solution.
The new resolution repeated
the request tor the releai
the captured officers that was
contained in the Council's June
2(5 resolution censuring Israel
for Its attacks on terrorist bases
in Lebanon. The U.S. abstained
on the earlier resolution on
grounds that it did not consider
Israel's right to defend itself
against terrorist incursions. But
Panama, which was the only
other Security Council member
to abstain in the June 26 vot-
ing, cast its vote Friday for the
resolution asking for the release
of the prisoners. The Panaman-
ian Ambassador. Didimo Rios.
explained that his foreign min-
istry had instructed him to vote
for the measure this time on
grounds of principle.


Pnntk
rage 2
vJenist lk>ridk*r>
Friday, July 28. 1972
Author Liebman's
'History of Jews*
Banned in Spain
The Spanish translation <> \
mar B. Liohman's hislr.iv fW Hi
em in Me\i< and Central A aer-
, i hi < lnvn ruin***! fro"i il>i"-a-
lon arid imoomtl -ii in SttaflC
Tais fact wa x--t-i"i-^: foi Mr
\ Mr. \v. J ihmon '.V-
Ati i iv of the Amei an
EwtxKft) hi Madrid
Mr. Uetpnan vwtM M Spain in
Jure ii airier to conmi.-, nante
. ,-'.i in th.' Ai-h/vo MUt-vici
N* I rial i hit no\t book '> be
THjh'iSh.rl by the tJnrveralty 0?
Miami Pn --. 'Th.' Inquisitors and
. in th,' New World"
''I'l VX'n.^'i" 'A kW HiMonoal R,-
S .; ,h .. i,'.> rf his M-\ic:in ;h-
thi i > ,:,< XXI rl<> Efenana nnri view." "B America*," an.-* other
i ; : rtwt the BpanMi M' Is- historical journals. Dr. Salo W
- bifnrmatkiii a:-..i T.n s'" |^;i,., s,at.-d that ho regarded
StYMWK B. UIBMAH
wtijeh miwl rfwnvo nil hortlf.". hi
Sri in had releehr' MLoa Jitnoa en
M xi \ An* rl n Cantral" .th-
Tho Jews in New Spain" the
"definitive history oi th<' Jew* in
..; fning m r .T-.>r>. Tiv v,>. ih.it area." Ht* refers to l.iebman'si
- 'Mat tba book < m- gporka in numerous footnotes in
: for sale in Spa i. hU monumental "Sods! and Re-.
The English edition of tin bookj llgtoue History" of th.- Jews. Cod
npeflri under the t't'a "The Jew* Rota oornkjerad I Ii lanan'i worta
in New Spain." r*ibttah"d by thi ..:maUuil,Ie contriButiom to Isw-
, nit\ oi Miami Press. New ___ ..
.. ... c,.n i xh ;l< wi'l as general hiMii \
S.mi wtu the n.-ime of the Sun-' ___. .
,. ,. ,, .,, n^ The unnortanee of his work ha
-h \ieei-ovalf. for M-Aieo. < Ml-J .___ .
: .. __,..,., _I been attested b>-giants from v*n-
Irnl America, the southu-'st in
... ous touiKlation>.
ni i .i MtiM is now the i 'led.
State* and the Philippines drm Soma Spawloh aeadamlriam and I
,! p, riod. WbBopWlai have un,i. mk.-n mo *;
o secto* a n vcrsal ot the I an-
Mi- l.i'ii;iian. lead 114 autho It? niiv: so thai the Spanish raadukt;l
11 ih h'stoii of the Jevw in l...in PUhUc may learn how Iha aernat
a b a university l-,. ^* ***&** '' '
lea live the n Ir.; ous as pec's arid .
1 .djpncl research achofcr a- ,nckll.n of Ilu>il. d.lilv livos ..,,,
hi Institute of tater-American ih i:- encejuntees "ith the New
m airs. Hi- books have bees ><- World branches of the Spanish
claim .1 by Uv leading Hispon .- Inquisition.
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ridoy. July 28. 1972
+Jewist ncridiaw
Pago 3
Electoral Reform In Israel

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r4 forr~|>'>n4*ent In Jerusalem
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM JTA) Ac-
ton last week to ^"R J>#H*1 ,
L editorial writers here as an
fetorr occasion for Israeli
fcmocracy. The Knesset approv-
bv the narrowest of margins
I introduet regional "?lec-
Itjons'''<' ,h'' Israeli Parlianr l-
I lem Eight Labor Knes-
I tted the bill which
I -tion of the major-
I i members by rc-
Igiona! constituendat, with on!y
|. Cbotcn from the
part;. "I proportional
I boll
At presenl all the 120 Knes- I
I it; ire allocated by the
I The bill won Gl i
E then Inlmuin neoenary
I, first reading. The
I of the pr <-
I Its Inherent In-
I ,'h healthy le- I
I MVP gOV'V
Itjien- evefully demon- I
une Krtaaatt a-
omo Lortnca i)f
I Israel preaenfed his
1 lew?" ML The !)-ll
|n-.. le weeks of
ter-party hi
|. ekn ail eu-
"a coalition
m last month when
| ; the tiny In-
eral Party wo-
Utti ited civil mar i-
pgci the Knesset, it
I marrl i
I red Tom marry-
I icha Ireil
lawi mierGolda Meir wa ru-
led thr ILP that the MU *U a
I religioui il
go I to by all the coaii-
|: the I.al>or-Ma^am
.it-: the Nat- m-
I*
AUTO PARTS
Giant Discounts Open
HOURS
|24 WE NEVER CLOSE
APOLLO AUTO
PARTS
4316 N. Dixie
Ft. Uoderdale- 566-0426
I*
a! Religious Party-12 feats; the
labor affiliated Arab Party.
four seats; and the ILP-fo.tr
seat*). She kpr! ,the|-Hn from the ,rpaliti<"
if it presented the Hausner hi 1.
knowing that the lanreat of her
partners in the NRP violently
objected to it although many n
her own Lat>>r Party would gup.
port it in a free vote.
But Hausner got supoort frm
an unaxoected quarter
Mapam decided to hack his
Mr- Mclr'i Labor Party wa. ,n
a quandary: If it th~ew o it
both the ILP and Maps
would be at the mercy of the
Religious l'"tv i k.....i B
eminent majority. In the
Ha'*sner and M loam
vailed upon to postnone the ote
on the bill, and la-t w eh I
was postponed oi
the rail.
Lorincz of V- ; i
the s'uatim to embaenw bis
party's arch rivn P. He
pi i sente his bill,
ndment In the Lav. of Re-
turn t'i defl conversions i> >v
Halacha onlv, knowing full well
that the NRP supoort d It in
iple but would b- U' i le
to vol ll since they '!> mi
would n thi -' i'
qt and would face e\
from the coalil
Utterly b*i1
one ..; the NRP n rs eb-
.... | ,....., in
was put to the ite h e ;
joined with A
the bill. I lit ion
ma saved.
Zeev the Haaretz cartoon-
ist, commented trenchantly on
-I,, w i n '-on h
i dra via i >i a Mapam membv
and NRP nember firmlj at-
tached to their seats, their
knotted round th H th h*
ind th '','--
.. | round the arms Between
them stands a garbage ean la-
beled 'principles" piled hfch
with good resolutions.
In that same Knesset session,
T.Mial' dpwoshiyn leader Mena-
hem Bcigin presented a bill rail-
ing for the dissolution of the
Knesset and immediate general
elections. The government, he
-aid. was falling apart at the
teams, with each coalition patty
tugging in a different direction.
Deputy Premier Yigal AlV.n
replied that the government's
record was excellent. Differences
of opinion were healthy, he de-
dared, and were certainly no
on for the government to ;-e-
sign.
'i men were right of cou
The coalition partners are con-
stantly battling with ea ih other
in an uneasy marriage of con-
venience as Beigin charged On
the other hand, it has never be ffl
therwise in Israel, because the
Labor Party has never won
nn absolute majority and ha; al-
ways had to rule through a coali-
tion, with all the frictions tbit
this unsatisfactory situation :n-
volves. And the main reason why
no pai tj ha I ever won 61 Knes-
-. t the Israeli system
tporl inal representation,
whi h soawns and nurtures the
Mon of small pnrtles
i- the ILP of A r'ld.i Israel
vhose nportance lies only ,n
their nuisance value
Labor's frustration at the svs-
heightened by the events
of the past three weeks, -
.....ed by the tenacity will
vi hich it fought for th.- regional
el......ons bill. Labor members
summoned from their si rk-
beds and from trips abroad o
vote. Almost all the other par-
ties, from Mapam toHerut, wre
ted in their oppositl Ml to I "'
bill which would mean the !eath
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The creation of a small num-
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expect to obtain an absolute ma-
jority, and effective opi^siti'.n,
because the party in opposition
would have a real chance of re-
placing the government in an
election.
The bill is only the beginning
of a long struggle. The bill it-
self speaks of the new system
coming into force for the 1977
elections. Before then, the de-
tails will have to be worked out
"* in particular what percentage
of the seats will be elected by
constituencies. The most diffi-
cult task of all will be drawing
the constituency boundaries, for
on this will hinge the fates of
many of the small parties. Is-
rael's politicians are girding
themselves for the bitter battles
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+Jm-tolinor*&*'1
Friday, July 28. l^l
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"J^JtaM'3'!. MATTER OF FACT
Volume 1
Friday. July 23. 1972
Number 20
17 AB 5732
Mergers A Sign Of The Times
For most synagogues this is the time of the year when
there are stirrings of interest in affiliation despite the
summer doldrums. The past several years, however, have
not been happy ones for reasons that are not as yet c'.oar
Diminishing membership and increasing deficits are plain
fo: far too many.
A sign of the times is thai estaolishment of new Con-
servative and Reform synagogues in the United States is
virtually non-existent and that the merger of an increasing
number of synagogues a new development in American
Jewish life has been taking place in recent years Not
only is the synagogue building boom of the last two
decades over, but actual attrition in their number is taki.ia
place as the result, it would seem, of a shifting population
and the pressure of economics inflation and unemploy-
ment.
One cf the unusual features in the merger development
is that several have involved Conservative and Reform
congregations and a number of otheri cutting across what
would seem to be ideological grounds are in the work*, h
hc:s been apparent for some time, even among some of thf<
rabbinate, that the new generation of Reform and Conserva-
tive Jews are not cs concerned with denominational dif-
ferences as their iorebears. It is too early to forecast a trend,
but those interested in the future of liberal American Juda-
ism are watching the signs with great interest today.
Future Uncertain In Latin America
The rapid growth of nationalism, and the changing
economic and social structure, but not anti-Semitism, are
the major factors causing uncertainty about the future
of 800,000 Jews and their communities in Latin America.
The main problem is how the mostly middle-class
Jews will fit into the new society that is emerging in Latin
America, according to scholars from that area who met
recently in a seminar conducted by the World Jewish
Congress. Immigration of Jews to Argentina, Brazil and
Chile, in particular, has come to a halt while emigration
to Israel has accelerated because of that uncertainty.
Press reports did not indicate that the subject was dis-
cussed, but a continuing problem in Latin America is the
lack of Spanish-speaking rabbis to meet the religious edu-
cation needs of a younger generation that knows no other
language. This neglect is a challenge to the international
bodies which speak for world religious Jewry but continue
to ignore the needs of our neighbors to the south.
Group Fights Anti-Semitism
The Jewish population of Italy is small some 40,000
in a nation of 55 million but there are signs of a revival
of anti-Semitism traced to neo-Fascist and Arab sources.
An encouraging factor has been the formation of an inter-
fa th committee, led by Catholic priests, laymen, Pro'es-
tants and intellectuals, to combat the rising movement.
i
Urban Concerns Brought To The Fore
The Democratic Convention brought to the surface
again a number of Jewish urban concerns. Such problems
as preferential treatment for minorities, the merit system,
scatter-site housing and cross-busing were not taken up
during the official proceedings but they were topics that
many of the more than 200 Jewish delegates and countless
number of non-delegates representing Jewish organizations
discussed in hotel lobbies and suites.
These problems are not solely the concern of the Jew-
ish community, for they cut across the entire nation at this
time. They have brought into conflict sometimes open
the aspirations of other ethnic groups in our society. They
are the result of what one speaker has called decay at
home and destruction abroad and will have to be dealt
with by whichever party takes the leadership of this coun-
try far the next four years.
.MIAMI BEACH Mas* *,,(l
more, one gats the feeling that
the secret purpose Of the Demo-
cratic National Convention is to
ensure the re-election of Kich-
I ant M. Nixon.
During one of the more vkl-
; oils procedure] squabbles, the
i chairman of the rules commit-
i tee. Rep. James G. O'Hara of
Michigan, was even heard to
wonder aloud whether the
Democratic Party was "worth
preserving "
that was going pretty far.
Yet the real question seems to
go even further. Is it in fact |*>s-
slble to preserve the Democratic
Party at least in anything
like its dormer guise as this
country's sell-confident major-
ity party0
At a gUSSS, the answer to that
question will prow to i>e "No."
In the political history of this
century, in fact, what happened
to the English Liberal Party be-
tween 1900 and 1935 probably
offers the best analogy tor what
Menu to be hap|>ening here. A
little ]>oem is the best place to
begin.
"The ancient power of
privilege.
"That goes with women and
chami>agne and bridge.
"Fell; and democracy
resumed its reign.
"That goes with bridge ami
women and champagne."
THIS WAS Hilaire Belloes
comment on the liberal Party*!
huge triumph of the pre-first
world war period. Belloc meant,
of course, that there WSJ hardly
a pin's worth of outward dif-
ference betweeh the Liberals |
and the Tories of that time in
England although they were
at dagger! drawn on many is-
sues.
i
By that time, to be sure, the
Liberals had already lost the
great landed magnates like the
Duke of Devonshire. These had
taken a walk years before when
w. E. Gladstone committed the
Liberals to home rule tor Ire-
land. Put when Asquith was
prime minister, there weir still
only a handful of Labor Party
members In the House of Com-
mons.
IN SI M. the grand Liberal
Coalition Of different gioups.
classes and interests Mill seem-
ed fust as powerful and prosper-
out as ever. Yet the seeds ,.t Its
own destruction were deep-
planted, nonetheless. The coali-
Uon had lasted overloog. In the
post-first world war period, the
Liberal Party all but disappear-
ed, and the Lai 04 Party took
over in England.
If >ou had suggested this re-
sult In England In, say, 1912,
you would have been regarded
as half-lunatic. Maybe it is In
fad half-lunatic to suggest a
Somewhat similar result for the
Democratic Party in the United
States in 1972. Yet the whole
drama ol this convention is
surely the rending dissolution of
the grand Democratic coalition.
T1IK I'KOI'LK who have been
fighting so hard to stop Sen.
George McGovsrn are the |eo-
ple. Including Gov. George C
Wallace, who want the grand
\v JOSEPH ALSOP
coalition to sntsnur .Thai
means not wanting i push the
whole South into President
Nixon's arms; not wanting to
kick Mayor Richard Daley |J
the teeth; and not wanting to
endanger large numbers of
Democratic governorships, sen-
ate and House nts and the
like.
B) the same token, the ami-l
McGovtrn i>eople deeply car*
about such longstanding Demo.
crat assets as the Irish, SlavicI
and Italian votes and the ci
support of organize I
up the foregoing list
will see that these |ople are
fighting to hang on t
things that have made the
Democratic Part) thi
majority part} lor |
years
THK BRILLIANT young zea-
lots who pul i'nether Sen.!
IfeGovern's formidable nrgani.J
/.ation could not can l< is, mean-l
while, about all these thing!
anti-McCi<>vern forces arc fifht-
ing to preserve. The> want con-
trol of the Democratic Pai |
no matter what COSl
If they gain and retain con-
trol of tiie party, all the krwr.|
rules oi American politic! say I
that the Democrat! cannot re-l
main the majority party. A!in-|
ate the South, organized labor.]
the ethnic and middle-class vot-
ers and a few more besides andl
just what do the DemocratsI
have left? There is only owl
answer unless the rules of our
politics are also being rewrltttaj
here
PART II THE PASSIONATE MOVEMENTS
What Happened To The Revolution?
My MAX LBNU
NEW YORK. N. Y. The j
three passionate movements of
the 1960s the antiwar marches,
the black movements. the
campus revolts still evoke
deep feelings but no longer hold
to the center of the stage. Each
of them aimed at a radical
change in the power structure.
Each tried to use the students
to that end. Kach stirred up the
dust, each achieved some imme-
diate objectives, none got its
long-range ones.
As for the hard-core revolu-
tionaries, they stoptied at noth-
ing in either aim or means, and
achieved nothing. I include the
SDS, the Weatherman, Yippies,
Black Panthers. They fed on the
antiwar mood, the frustrations,
the enragements, the absolutes.
Their tactic was to identify with
each passionate movement
blacks, the students, militant
women, the march on the Pen-
tagon, the Chicago convention
demonstrations and push it to
extremes.
IN A TIME of violence, they
increased the violence they fed
on. They developed a mystique
of violence, as if there were
something cleansing in it of
and for itself. At one point, in
the case of the Weatherman,
they even used the terrorism of
bombing, in the tradition of the
Russian nihilists.
It was a short-lived, if lurid,
chapter of the '60s. It got no-
where. Its extremism boome-
ranged and made every militant
movement harder. Partly it fell
victim to a policy of contain-
ment by the authorities which
at times became repressive, but
which never reached a full-scale
repression. Mainly it ran afoul
of the rage it set in motion
among the large mass ol ordi-
nary people.
THE ANTIWAR movement
hasn't ended the war. but it
kept L B, J. from running
again, put Nixon on the defen-
sive ami helped McGovern on
his road to the nomination.
.Mostly it sparked the Other at-
tacks on the power structure,
gave a special passion to the
passionate movements and
served as their accelerator and
multiplier. Its chief effect, how-
ever, was the erosion of author-
ity all through the society, for
war Itself is actually the enemy
of all authority, and cats away
respect for law and the social
fabric.
Tlie movement of the blacks
(and this applies to some other
ethnic movements as welli had
three aspects. One was revolu-
tionary nationalism. It exploited,
If it didn't spark, the inner city
riots. It hurt itself badly by a
violence of brother against
brother. There seems to be a
law of fractional revolutionary
poUtica that the violence turns
inward and becomes fratricide.
In the end, the black people
themselves rejected it.
A PROFKHMOR of in-Afri-
can studies. J. K. Obataia. wrote
recently in the Los Angeles
Times that "there never was a
black revolution" in the '60s,
that It was mostly radical rheto-
ric and symbolism and that "the
campuses continued to be train-
ing grounus for the traditional-
ly conservative Afro-American
middle class."
This strikes me as too sweep-
ing. It doesn't do justice to th-
second tSOSCl f the black move-
ment the prideful assertion
of black identity, which doesn't
have to he either si paratlst "
violent in order to have means**!
for young blacks ami jlv* their.
a new .sense ol ielf-confMel
Malcolm X and Martin I-i:ther|
King Jr, became folk heroes notj
because one was a rewlutiooi*H
and the other a champion <*l
nonviolence, but because bothfl
them touched a deep own re-
ligious pride of ldentir/li
their people. To call thai "mw*
class" is to narrow it unne>-|
tartly.
THK TiHKi) aspect is t*M
concrete gains that the bldtf
movements have made
omic. legal, political, w*
tional. As I interpret what
grosses the black students t.W
in their studies, it is not to in-
come "middle class" or c*H
.servative" but to .v.tfolida
these gains ami push "*"'
the wav to a de facto equjwn
in the whole of American m
For the students as JjJ
white as well as black, the c*
lege revolution brought w |
concrete gains in l'oa
tional restructuring P*1 ^
the campus. But when tne
ruirtions of college life a H
nority became extreme, *
large student majority F"
either angry or bored*
both
The thrust of reality n*j
serted itself. The students k^l
that if they want to do *l
thing with their lives n*J|
to find good work or raise P
children or lead a good
whether to transform socie M
themselves they must
pare themselves by s,u I
what men have done in the p*-l
and what they can do
future. TiiH


Fliday. July 28, 1972
' "r-'wi rqg i vi m ?r
Pago
77iis Wee A; /ii History...
(K,. lh< "!- "f >'" JTA)
,0 rests Aft* This Week: 1962
hneVi CaMntl unanimously
I entry under the Law of
for Dr. Robert A. Soblen,
ninitl,, i the U.S. of Soviet
gying
Brazil'' Justin* Ministry or-
,,i confiscation of a tttw cdi-
, ,. ,,| M, in Kampf." for lack of
ation permission.
Rabbi Edward Liastnan, tenioi
rhaplaln of New York City's Fire
,hH|>lain-in--hiof of the
. War Vcte-ram slni e World
H'ar I. chaplain <>f the Jewish Pos-
I Ifare Worker* and founder
,l Riverside Synagogue, >ii.' 5-'
I irju.'s sluilics show
is no significant correlation
,,-, i s aid and I'.A.R.'s
ases," aaJd Aaat Sec-
French Report
Readied For
Council Group
JFRl'SALEM fJTAl J.i-
irces here said ill it
. i ing a new pro-
conaMeratlon i>y the
Ij C ! to comply with the
" '( the council's June ;ti
I nan ling thai it ?e-
Sj i ian Intelligence of-
ired daring a foi iy
on June 21. Tlie sourc-
Fn nch prop >-al doc*
' tanctlona should i i-
to comply. Hut eon-
tern was expressed feofc that the
h move could disrupt
ma presently heinj* con*
I through the Interna- :
Red Croai for a garters!
prisoner-of-war exchange 5e
Israel, Egypl and Syria.
Israi; insists that th-- release
c th. captured Syrian office !
can be effected only through a I
ion, -., POW exduuige. The
Security Council-; revolution
Iticized here as nne- it calling tor such an ex- '
chance while demanding fhnl
Israel tree Ita caottwe. The r
olution stipulated that the co'in-
neet agatoi in the evenl
tplianee by lsra I
That -t'pulation was the hauls
for last week's request by Si ..'
on for a new Scruriy
ei ting.
retar> Frederick G. Dutton.
"There is no question but that,
in view ol the Nasser threats, Is-
rael this year ami in the coming
years will have to devote the best
of her strength and wealth to
maintain a reasonable balance <>f
forces whose tit si objective will be
to deter and. if there is no other
choice, to win," said Labor Min-
ister Vital Alton.
The Knesset's Finance Commit-
tee. ov< i President Ben-Zvi's ob-
jections, raised his salary iron:
115,000 annually to Sfi.OOO.
"JERUSALEM MinUter of
Commerce and industry Pinhaa
Sapir told the Knesset he would
not oider an Israeli firm making
uniforms for West German sol-
1 dicrs t,, cancel Ita conn act. Sai ir
declared he did not think that the
supply of uniforms to the Bun-
deswehr constituted an affront
to Jewish workers.' "
Hamburg District Court Judge
Friti Pull was arrested on
charges ol helping execute 40
.lews in Russia m 1943.
Mrs. Bessie Gotsfield, Austrian-
born co-founder of Mizrachl Worn-
- Oi Banizatlon of Amei ica,
; died in Jerusalem at 74.
Ft. Worth gol its first Jewish
councilman, Republican lawyer
Bayard II Friedman, 35.
Jewish and government leaders
: ilored increased neo-FascIsm In
England.
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Page 6
+Jewls*nt***x>
Friday. July 23,
^y^WWW^^^WAA^M^W
^^ Quoth the Maven
by Beverly King Pollcck
1 *m
^WWWV^^^^^^^^*****^********
Ajz*
THE THIEF
I was cleaning out the hall closet when the doorbell ring. It was
my neighbor down the street with her first grade son. "Okay,
Jimmy." she said. Now you apologize."
He mumbled. "I'm sorry." And he looked at the floor and shuffled
his feet. "I didn't moan to take 'em." He handed me two small sea-
shells which must have disappeared from our gameroom table.
My neighbor continued. "Apparently he came in your house with
some of the older boys and saw the shells and ."
I told her not to worry and that I'd love to chat but nobody
was home but me and the closet and she understood and left.
"He'll probablv turn out to be a criminal." I thought. Imagine
coming to somebody's house and deliberately stealing. I went back
to the closet.
And I probably would have finished cleaning it if I hadn t come
upon the old photo album, the one with all my baby pictures.
I found myself wandering in and out of the past when I spied
Nancy Lee and me, barefoot near the sandbox on the hill in front
c-f her house. *
Funny the sandl>ox wasn't as big as I remembered. It was just
a hole in her yard filled with sand left over from one of her father's
cement-laying jobs.
Now how could I remember that? I turned the picture over to
see the date. Could I have been only six years old?
Wonder what happened to Nancy Lee? She was a year younger
but we used to make great castles in the sand. There was a si>ecial
trick to get just the right amount of water. And you had to wiggle
your toes out real easv so you wouldn't break the tunnels.
I was an only child at the time and Nancy Lee and I were in-
separable. Kxcept for that day Nancy Lee went to visit her grand-
mother.
I remember how lonely I was.
Nancy Lee's sandbox across the street looked so inviting. I bet
myself I could walk up her hill blindfolded. And I did. I had to
pen my eyes only four or five times.
But the sand was no fun by myself. Maybe it was "cause I didn't
have any water. And it was too much trouble to go home and get
some. And anyway I knew I'd spill it before I got up the hill.
As I clambered out of the sandbox to leave, my toe hit something
in the sand. In the whole world I had never seen anything so beau-
tiful. It was a tiny toy toilet.
It didn't hold much sand and it was dirty and I took it home
to clean it. I dried it on my slip and shined it on the hem of my
dress. I thought, "Nancy Lee should be ashamed of herself for not
taking care of a toy like that." >
It would serve her right if somebody stole if somebody took
it from her.
I found the perfect hiding place. The hollow post on my brass bed.
I should have felt good, but there was this funny ache that went
from my stomach all the way up my throat.
And suddenly I knew. If I kept the toilet. I would be a thief
forever and ever.
I raced up the hill to Nancy Lee's house, dropped the toy toilet
in the sand and dashed home without looking back.
I closed the album just as the doorbell rang. It was little Jimmy
of the seashells with a sad look on his face and a home-made flower
in his hand. I patted his head and phoned his mother.
Y'know." I said, "I was just cleaning out my closet and came
across some notes I once took in a child psychology course. And guess
what I found?"
"All six year olds steal at one time or other." I said. "But they
get over it."
Judge Tyson Candidate
Court of Record Judge Robert
W. Tyson Jr., 40. has announced
his candidacy in the September 12
primary election for Broward
County Circuit Court Judge.
Jiklee Tyson assumed the bench
in 1968. He has since reduced his
caseload to one of the smallest in
this area.
Pledging even speedier disposi-
tion of court cases in the future.
Tyson said the anticipated increase
of cases can be handled most effec-
tively through the continued use
of efficient methods in court pro-
cedure.
During his 4V4 years on the
bench, Tyson has never had a fel-
ony conviction reversed by a higher
court.
Prior to his election as judge
Tyson was in private law practice
and had also been a prosecutor in
both Fort Laudnrdale and Oaklani
Park. He is presently qualified to
practice law in Florida and the
federal courts, including the U.S.
Sipreme Court.
'Anniversary Salef
CJunrise i/\rt fj/ulUry
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Computer-Matching Sen ice
For Singles At Grossingers
robin seating enabling 1
guest to sit at a different tahl
every meal a depai
the usual practice of a
seating; nightly therm
numerous DO
For the third successive summer
unmarried men and women a- end-1
ing the two special "Singles;
Weeks" scheduled at the Oros-
singer Hotel in New York state"*
Catskill Mountains will be match-
ed according to their individ.ia 1
preferences through the eompu-|
ters "Operation Match." the na-
tion's oldest and largest computing ,
matching service. Over 1,(0 > sin-
gle men and women a re expected
during each of the two-week peri-
ods July 9-16 anu Aug. 80-27.
As an ice-breaker and a method
of bringing people together, com
puter-matching ha' proved to be
one of the most successful and pop
ular devices VMC employed by the,
Catskill vacation spot, renowned
;, boy-meets-girl mecca. After
filling out a lengthy detailed
luesttonnatee upon arrival, each
will i-eceive a list of "com-
patible persons" of the opposite
s.'\ the Following morning. Steve
MUgram, president of Operation
Match." snd s large craw of Mao-
dates will be on hand to supcrvisr
the entire enterprise.
In addition to compu'er-match-
in" the hotel is also planning an
elaborate series of social activities
to make the business of meeting
n,.w friends simple easy, natural
and unforced. These Include round-
lectures, discussions snd r
sions on subjects oi special!
est to single peo
continuous dan
provided by fivi
As at aii Grossing
events, special efl
to provide a wi
of men and worm
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. July 28. 1972
-Jowls* flvrklton
Page 7
SELECTED COMMERCIAL AND SPONSORED FILMS AND AUDIOVISUAL MATERIALS OF JEWISH INTEREST
UnOY'H < OMPUJWt
,i!, Hi.li-'nl ItenjMnla, Karon
C I... <;r;int. Ja-k KomiM'k.
Mo ad Mdurrr and dlnvtor: Krn-
i/fenmn- Scweaptafi IimsI
Win: based on a novel hy
C Kolh. I"! minute*. Color.
l\ K.
. fjim made of Philip Roth's
v wil| ilamoen the spirits of
Cwho found some sort of vi-
,n Alexander Portnov. As
Ejaycd bj Richard Benjamin.
[ lyish type, a mrvoua
elf-confldenl
nh no trace .if the
Kt Jewish sensibility Roth
| Uex
not very Interacting
motif of the movie.
J Jewish setting does not seem
the matters at hand
a family whose
with stars rather
l- s, and rahbis rather
I appean purely acci-
htal. A: Ihe idio.s>neratie be-
in the hook, rightly
[wrongly and it was wronjrly
sumed tendencies
| appears here as if
]a ra| riee of fate. It could just
I e happened to the DO
next door to have an overbearing
noteclne moth, i and minimal
father
The movie, then, la not of the
leeef Interest as a comment on
fewiah life. The hook was, to
\tini ai an Indication of the de-
ree r.f distortion oi the most
popular kind with which Jews
nd Jewish family life are viewed.
Not for nothing lines little a
ander Portnoy complain of living
ir. the middle of a Jewish Jo
For that is what the novel was
a Jewish Joke.
Like SO many other Jew [ah jokes,
this one was told coarsely: but
like many another coarse enter-
prise, it waa funny. The movie.
while far more coarst. lacks even
the redeeming power ol humor:
it lacks verisimilitude; it lacks
acting skill, it does, however,
have splendid aerial sluts .if Is-
rael for those who have nevt
seen the place.
Dorothy Rabinowit;
KRITZ THE CAT
A full-length cartoon, studio i
Steve Krant/ Productions. Diatli
butor: Cinemation Industries
Producer Steve Krantz. chief
animator: Ralph Bakshl TS min
utes. Color. Rated X.
"Fritz the Cat" is based on one
nl the best known of the irrever-
ent, obscene, often hilarious car-
tixin books known as "comix,"
which have caught on among
many ol today's young like Joints
at a lock conceit: an animal
fable i'. !:. Crumb, depicting the
adventures of a raunchy, turned-
in New York feline.
In the film, Fiitz is an N.Y.U.
Iropout in search of kicks. We
see him at a Lower East Side hip-
uie orgy, being busted by po'ice
depicted as pifta, of course; in a
synagogue, amid aging I.ions of
h'aah with taleialm and peyes; in
Harlem among black crows.
where m his eagerness to please,
h) sets off a riot that Is finally
nit down by Air Force bombers;
nroute to the Coast, with a
luilt-slinging Brooklyn Jewish
ill i.i dog) bent on marriage; in
the end. seemingly dying after
lowing up a power plant too well,
rtirougho t. he remains un-
scathed, shallow and phony.
The Brooklyn yente may annoy
tome Jewish viewers. So may a ri-
liculoua Jewish coo, or the
synagogue scene iwhich includes
a funnv broadcast about the oc-
cupation of New York and Los
Angeles by Israeli. Actually, the
yente stereo-type is hardly news.
More important, Jews aren't
singled out for caricature; a
jaundiced eye falls on all. includ-
ing the hero. Anyway, ethnic
stereotypes aren't the point of
the movie; the point, if any, is to
show how shallow much of the
youth culture is.
The translation from comic
book to screen does not wholly
Succeed. The soft, rounded anima-
tion a I a Walt Disney turns
raunchineas into cuteness, which
clashes with the abundant seatol-
Ogy, In short, neither fish nor
flesh; yet mildly amusing.
- J. J. Goldberg
SI.AfMITKKHOrsK FIVE
With Michael Sacks, Ron I.rlb-
man, EJogene Roehe. Sharon (Juris.
Studio and distributor: I niwrsal-
Vanadas. Producer: Paul Monsish.
Director: Oaotge Roy Mill.
Screenplay: Stephen (idler; based
on a novel by Kurt Vonnegut, Jr.
MM minutes. Color. Rated K.
Dresden in the firebomb raids of
1945.
Dresden is Billy's personal holo-
caust, and it poses a crucial ques-
tion: Are life's horror and ap-
paient meaninglessness part of a
larger, meaningful design or is
life pointless and absurd?
| The film implies that thera la
! no higher order in which e\il ul-
timate!;.' makes sense. Life is oily
the moments we experience
; disjointed fragments without pat-
terns or logic. (That is why one
can leap about in time, i It is
not an answer any Western reli-
' gion can accept least of all Ju-
daism with its faith in the moial
meaning of history.
How. then, can one live? Sur-
1 prisingly, Billy's solution is not
I bleak or nihilistic. It is to savor
. the good memories and forget the
; bad on the chance that the joy
! of the good moments will trans-
cend the meaninglessness of the
bad. It doesn't always work;
I Dresden keeps haunting Billy. Vet
the film ends with the birth ol
his son amid a Fourth-of-Julyish
< i lebration of life.
This fantasy film hinges on
events ol the Second World War
and features some cruel Nazi
t/pee. But theie are deeper rea- istential predicament somehow.
:ons why it should interest Jews.
Each human must face the ex-
The hero. Billy Pil.nim. is a
kind of Everyman on a "trip
through time." He jumps from
east to future and back driven
by memories of his empty life as
a business success and of the
seemingly senseless destruction of
But in communicating this pre-
dicament through traumatic his-
torical memories, the film seems
to speak especially to Jews with
j their long, pain-filled history; and
when, in spite of everything it
1 culminates in a song to life, it
strikes a chord in those who re-
tain Judaism's spirit of joy.
Marcla R. R.nlin

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tX
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Low. fastback styling-l.ke a sports car. Choose from coupe, sedan or the first 'otaryengme
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reclining bucket seats. Radial tires with full wheel covers. Tachometer, tr.p meter, electric
clock. Tinted glass e Door to door carpeting and all vinyl interior.
Locking fuel filler door. Make us prove the rotary difference with a
test drjve The rotary engine people.
MM4Z0A
>X
Wm&
The RX-3 Wagon
Another Mazda first: vvith the rotary engine.
man wmuu.
Finally A station wagon with the amazing rotary engine.
Mazda built the RX-3 Wagon to carry your load. Or your
family Or both. Smoothly. Quietly. Powerfully. The
Mazda RX-3 Wagons nice to look at. too. Styled tor today
and tomorrow. Hi back reclining bucket seats. Thick
door to door carpeting. Radial tires with full wheel
covers. Power assist front disc brakes. Tinted glass. Anc.
more. All at no extra cost, the Mazda RX-3 Wagon.
Another Mazda First Make us prove the naj UijnM
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i* K
Page 8
*Jt*1t> fhrldlian
Friday '..;-. :;

(A/hat 9 K^ookingi
bv RUTH SIKKIS
Okamoto
Gets Life
Kvery occuiMition ha* its own hazards. Even mine As a itoA
: ;tcr I lace two ma.jor risks, OOC is the dancer of becomim; very
fai while trying out all those recipes. The second, which is more
tout, w the hazard of not being invited to people'* honv for
dinner. Many hostesses told me frankly that they feel uneasy to
have a food editor at their table. This uneasiness is understand-
able, but unnecessary. Food writers can be wonderful guests I.
fc' one, low I '": and enjoy everything that li offered. I cannol
think of any dish that I dislike, and I never see myself a* a
Judge or critic, but as a guest with a healthy appetite. i>> sides,
I like tn gel acquainted with new ways Of cooking, and always
learn something new. Not once did I call up the hostess the next
daj anlthig her to shave the recipe with me. The following recipe
i- based OK an idea from a recent partv I attended. The bllnis,
which are thin pancakes, are filled with meat and mushro
and rolled up. They can be served hot as a buffet dish, first
Course, or luncheon.
Kor tlVll Minis: 1 cup flour
2 e 1 tsp. salt
1 cup water Oil for frying
Put eggs and water in blender for five seconds. Add flour
and salt and blend on medium speed for two minutes. Scrape
si is and blend again. The mixture should be smooth and quite
Ihin. Let it rest in the refrigerator lor 30 minutes, stir before
using.
Oil a five-inch pan and heat on mediunv-high heat. Measure
ore-quarter cup of the batter and pour into the pan. Tilt the pan
to spread the batter evenly Pry until the batter looks dry and
has a pale yellow color on the bottom. Using a metal s>at.ila
turn the blini and fry lightly on the other side. Remove to a ->l ite.
Oil the pan frequently and continue frying the bllnis. (You
ma) have to regulate the heat for best results. I
Make the filling, and put one heaping tablespoon along .he
c. nter of each blini. Roll the blini around the filling and put in
a-, oven-proof eloncated serving dish. Put the dish in a .".50 degree
oven for about 20 minutes until the Minis are heated thoroughly
and become slightly browned.
Ffflfcag!
Oil
1 small onion
Salt, pepper
\-i lb. fresh mushrooms
\. !b. ground meat
Rinse and dry' 'he mushrooms. Cut them into quart STB.
Saute in oil until brown, remove from pan.
Chop the onion and fry lightly in the same pan. Add the
meat and fry, separating the pieces with a fork, until brown
Add the fine mu>hrooms. salt and pepper, stir and cook to-
gether on a low heat for five minutes in a covered pan.

This casserole can be the main dish when company is ex-
pected. The casserole can be prepared ahead and completed at
the last minute. It has interesting flavors and textures, and will
bring you compliments; all good reasons for preparing it. Be-
eause of its elaborate seasoning the dish may remind you of
far-away and exotic places, and you will be perfectly right. The
origin of this casserole is in India "where we visited last um-
mer), and where it is served at weddings and other ccrcrmnini
affair-. The chefs in India are masters when it comes to handling
spices and combining contrasting ingredients. So don't be sur-
I rised if the recipe calls for topping the casserole with fried
nuts and raisins. Try it you'll like it.
IKSTIVK CASSEROLE
2 cups partially cooked rice (cut in 1 inch cubes)
1 cup clear broth
.' tbls. tomato sauce
Eor Qaisrish
S cup raisins
1a cup almonds
*2 cup peanuts
1 big onion, sliced
2 cloves garlic, chopped
4 tsp curry
'j tsp. cinnamon
Dash doves, ground
1 bay leaf
1 tsp. salt
1 lbl. lemon juice
2 lbs. stew meat
Heat three tablespoons oil in a large skillet; fry the jnior
until it is golden brown and remove with a slotted spoon to a
plate lined with paper towels to absorb extra fat. In the -am-
oil. fry lightly the garnish ingredients and remove to paper
towels.
In the same oil fry the garlic lightly and add the meat. Fry
while turning the meat to brown on all sides. Ad.i all the spices.
itD ring occasionally, and continue frying until the meat Ls brown
Add the broth, tomato sauce and lemon Jake. Cover (he skillet
and cook for about 18 minutes on reduce beat.
Graaat casserole and put half the rice in it. With a slotted
spoon remove half of the meat and arrange on the rice. Repeat
with a s r-ond layer of rice and top with the past of the meat
Remove the hay leaf and all the fat from the juices la the skil
I t ami pour them on the You may add a little nate-
to the skillet to soaps the browning and paur it. too, on the
casserole.
Cover the casaerole tightly I'la mum foil on the
casserole'* cover. Bake in a iven for two houi
Until the meat is fork tender. Keep warm until Serving tim<.
Just before serving, reran" the cover and turn the cas-
>:e over a large serving plate. Sprinkle the fried onion, nuts
and raisins on lop Serves six to eight persons.
YMAKW Waei*
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May 2,1973 Isft.l, 1f7)
31 days 40 days
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TKL AVIV (JTAi K >/o
Okamoto was sentenced to I'-e
imprisonment Monday by a
tffrwfnan- mumy ?rir-* *t MtTntT Biacti.FIa. 33162
that found him guilty on nil
counts relating to his particioa-
tion in the May .'> Lydda Air-
port massacre. The tent
was read to the crowded Court
by Lt. Col. Abraham Prison,
president of the tribunal as I ie
24-year-old Japanese "karai-
ka/e" gunman stood Impassl e,
handcuffed to two mititaty
policemen.
Frisch acknowledged thai the
state Prosecutor, Lt. Col. David
Israeli, did not demand 'he
death penalty but asked Instead
for life imprisonment. Earlier,
defense counsel Max l\iit/irin
asked tlie court not to Impost
capital punishment and to avuid
making Okamoto a martyr.
Okamoto received the life sen-
tence for discharging firearms
and throwing hand grenad s
that killed 20 people and
wounded more than 70 others
and participating with ethers in
these actions. On another OOU'rt
of rendering service to an 1-
legal organization (The Popular
Front for the Liberation of
Palestine) he was sentenced to i
ten years' Imprisonment
The verdict of guilty on all
Counts was rendered Mon lay
morning and sentence was
passed when the court recon-
vened briefly the same evening.
At the morning session It.
Col. Prison stated that the de-
fendant's guilt was proven be-
yond reasonable doubt and
noted that Okamoto had con-
fessed to all charges against
him.
CROCKETT-BRADLEY. INC.
PRESSURE BRaUTINB
SOIL STABILIZATION FOR NEW
CONSTRUCTION-SLAB RAISING
-SEAWALL RESTORATION
4200 Rovenswood Rd. 584-6620
Ribicoff Warns
'Nixon May Try
*
To Impose Peace'
Sen. Abraham Ribicoff (D.
Conn.I warned in a television in-
terview tatted in Jerusalem July
17 that President Nixon, if re-
elected in November, could well
make a deal with the Russians t<>
im|)Ose a peace on the Middle
East. He said he did not know
why the Israelis were making "a
great hero" of Ni\on since it was
only after Dec. 1971 that his rec-
ord became favorable to Israel.
Sen. Ribicoff, who had been of-
fered the Democratic vice presi-
dential nomination but declined
it. said he resented "the attempt
to make American Jews into poli-
tical pawns." He defended Mr-
Governs Middle Kast position as
the best for Israel-l'.S. relat-
ions."
The Connecticut Senator made
the MeGovern nomination speech
In Miami at the Democratic Na- I
tional Convention
Chamber Names Lukarr
N EW YORK JTA Sydney
Lubarr, for many years an ex-
cutive with the Israel Bsfld Or-
ganization has l>een named na-
tional coordinator of the Amer-
ican-Israel Chamber of Com-
merce and Industry. Inc.. Mas
Ratner of Cleveland, the press-
dent of the organization, an-
nounced.
llnnnilor Isristucr
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I
v July 28, 1972
* knist fkridfinr
Page 9
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Pnna ft
Page 10
rJenist ftcrMtor
Friday

Question Box
i.i. IMS, Jewish Telegraphic Agency)
What to meant h\ "Skahbos
Chazak?"
"Shabbos Charak" is the nanv
given to the Sabbath on which
one of the Five Books of Moses is
completed in the course of the
Torah reading for that Sabbath
The name comes from the expres-
sion used by the congregation
when the last sentence of the
book is read. The congregation ex-
claims "Chazak. Chazak veNis-
chazek" (Be strengthened. Be
strengthened and let us be
strengthened at such an occa-
sion Actually in many parts of
France and Provence the con-
gregations would wish each person
who complete! the reading of any
portion or who has a portion of
the Torah read for him "Cha.ek"
i Be strengthened, i In Sephardic
congregations even today each
worshipper is greeted by the ex-
pression "Chazak-Baruch" (Be
nirthened and blessed i after
hi retires from having been called
to the Torah for a reading of a
portion. Some claim '.hat this
practice comes from a content :on
that the study of Torah weakens
the strength of the individual in a
physical sense because of the in-
tensity of study involved. Thus.
when one has ap|>eared before the
Torah to have a portion read for
him. ho is wished "strength" to
his involvement with the
Toi ill Some claim that the study
>! Torah sometimes involved B
risk, especially during days of per-
tioii. Wishing one strength
indicated the support of the com-
munity for the stud;, of Torah
even when a peril was involved.
Apparently in Western communi-
>'-n was limited to
the occasion when a complete
book of the Five Books of Moses
was completed.
What Is thp derivation of the
expression "Nature! Karta?"
The expression "Naturei
Karta." which is used in contem-
porary times to refer to the ex-
tremely religious sect in Jeru-
salem, has its origin in the Talmud
1 Jerushalmi. Chagigah 1:7). There |
it is referred to as a name for
' scholars (scribes'. Rabbi Judah
once came to a city and found no
tcholar (or scribei. He asked for
he "watchmen of the city"
(Naturei Kartai. When they,
brought him the gatekeei>ers, he
;aid these do not preserve the
ity. They destroy it. When he was
isked who the "watchmen of the
it." are. he answered "the scho-
lars" who preserve its culture, i
This extremely religious sect thus
adopted this name, considering
themselves the "watchmen of the
community." because they feel
I they that they are guarding the
I city against the encroachment of
i secularism and impiety.
Ave/fWoM* Services
FORT lAUDERDAli
BETH ISRAEL (Temple) Conservi-
.v- 547 E. Oakland Park Blvd.
Rabhi Akiva Brilliant. Cantor Mu_
rice Neu
EMANU-EL. 3245 W. Oakland Park
Blvd. Reform. Rabbi Arthur J. Ab-
rama. Cantor Jerome Klement. 48
----------
POMPANO BEACH
SHOLOM (Temple). *32 SE 11th Ave.
Conservative. Rabbi Morns A. Skop
Cantor Ernest Schreiber. *t
---------
MARGATE
MARGATE JEWISH CENTER. (Con.
servative) 6101 NW 9th St.
WILTON
SEWING CENTER
566-1391
& REPAIRS
Clean Oil & Adjust
ALL
FOR
*2
OO FULL
PRICE
Home machines only
2218 N. Dixie Highway
Fort Laudersale
SALES I RENTALS
iimtt-tt RENT *it
WE RENT
Most Everything
Including Hertz Trucks
1831 N.E. 45th St.
. PHONE
77.-1822
WE STOCK
HAND TRUCKS
QfiOWARcQAPER 04CKAGING
TOBT LAUOEMOALE TELCfHONE
524-4387
2450 E. Commercial Blvd.
NEXT TO MOTHER
TUCKERS
Phone 771-9391
300 S. Andrews
CORNER LAS OLAS BLVD.
Phone 524-3144
Kahane Sounds Alarm
AtZOA 75th Convention
TEL AVIV < JTA> The 7Vh
jubilee convention of the Zion-
ist Organization. of Aracr -a
was enlivened this morning by
the apivarance of Rabbi Mehf
Kahane. leader of the Jewish
Defense I-easue. iJDH and a
spirited rebuttal by ZOA presi-
dent Herman L. Weisman >f
Kahane'-; warnings of an immi-
nent holocaust in the Uj i
State-. Weisman catagonca ly
rejected Kahane*s thesis Hwl
Am ri an Jews must rml
to Israel en-masse to save th '.r
lives
Last night the convention w
,sed by Israel's Fore ;n
Minister Abba Eban and heard
s message .f greeting I
Nelson A. Rfl >'' N' m
. who was to have '
it in person but vi ,,lS
trip to Israel be mse ol
in his family,
The JDL leader who want
be heard at the convent
openii lion In Jerusa! -
Thursday night, agreed to
ticipate Instead at this n
, | ,r| ''. devoted to
[j .>, Earlii Kahane was
| obliquel) by Foreign M n-
later Eban who chided th -
who think that by
. ass in th- U.S. they will help
Jews to 1st
Kaha^e'n remarks today
a repetition of hi-; familiar theme
that American Jews face s new
wave of anti-Semitism He
claime that detertorattaf ecv
Domic situation in the V S
coupled with political unreal w'U
turn the population agalncl
Jews. He mentioned Presl' Hi
Nixon's sdviser, Dr. Henry K <-
singer, fern* r Supreme Court
Justice and r.N. Ambass 11 a
Arthur Goldberc and New York
Sen. Jacob K Javits as Ameri-
can Jews prominent in puh'ic
life who allegedly would be ma le
scapegoats for economic and ; >-
litical distress in the U.S.
Replying to Karmne, \V> i ' that "Aliyah from the
United States is not based on
fear but on the love of Isra 1
coupled with the opportunity to
Share in building and safe;ua:d-
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Aug. 1
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large rooms, all Electric
Kitchens, immed. Occupancy
ing a society where a full Jew-
ish life can be lived." He said
that "spreading fear and PWUC
can do nothing but harm to six
million Jews in America, can I
embarrass Israel and can ca*t
I shadow on the Zionist move- j
ment."
Eban, In his remarks. relt-
arated that Israel will not re-
turn to the old armistice Dues
On the other hand, he said, Is-
rael takes no rigid stand n-; "o
where Its permanent bortpT*'
must be but is prepared to nego-
tiate that question with her
i.>, >r8, Eban said thai con-
trary to some opinion abroad,
time i- working In Israel's favor,
He said the military picture is
much better for Israel now than
e lallj "
oi the si ns ippues coming from
the United States,
WANTED
Fine chinj. c.
rugs, & othe-
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Tel: 566-5278
L
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UNIOUFLY DlFFFktNT AC
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2 E. Oakland Park Blvd. at the
are a (ways welcome
A HIGH HOLIDAY TOUR TO HOLLAND & IS-
19 DAYS SEPTEMBER 3 TWO MEALS DAIL
ROSH HASHANAH in Tel Aviv YOM KIPPUR
VISITING ISRAEL DURING ITS 25th ANNIVE-
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MIAMI TO MIAMI VIA KLM ROYAL DUTCH AIRLINES
FIRST CLASS $1075
DELUXE $1235
PIUS $3 TAX
CALL KURT ROTHSCH'LD AT 945 749'
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YOUR ISRAEL EUROPE HEADQUARTERS
1074-1076 INTERAMA BLVD., N.M.B., FLA 33
The Company that builds the
HAPPY KITCHENS
ces the opening of
proudly
FT. LAUDERDALE'S
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For Free Estimate Call
EMPIRE DECORATORS, INC.
-524-1425-
Or Visit Our Showroom Located At
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"You state your needs
and we design to please"
Fine cabinetry and kitchen remodeling
DOES YOUR CHILD WANT
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THE MARCHING BAND?
We have the largest staff of
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phoni ms mr



1tir
Page 11
ISRAEL newsletter
By Carl Alperl
irabs Do Have \ Sense Of Humor
i WKOTI


'







I
'
the
nment
I 60' <
"I the
to destroy

la I tank
Why
end most "l
. ird gear?
Kind
R --.i.i n
It with his
. ally un-
ini -1- ith hoi
issian

ILINE JERUSALEM
Bv ROBERT E. SEGAL
imI Mill. I neasA l{i i
ling
M
BOOK REVIEW
By Seymour B. liebmon
\niv Good Histories
W"l I Ml I!
- ul < / bo-Jot.ii,i:i i Jewish
'' de-
vq world
i.'.iant
. hook
chau
i
R bart
is i ho
the*
. : .or My
not com-
I I. of
-i X his
i who

I
I
1

i
I racist
J
l
'Imp-. I
hool biui
ol the d i
I
leal* about
f
.i Har-
\ 95' is i
to 1800.
lents The
date of tne
i >r llarri-
ChristLuM
i sence of
. no.
it hoi uho
>m| tont,
e "Nothing
- presentation
i. nlng has
i oader.
i ; >.-i n con-
m ("l". '1'i's
id i\ ran
real past,
- Red Olll-
ron 'I >gi
. nalist, i ai
167 when the
- rordaniaa
the \tther
r for the
s in ids of
hting took
Is leli military
the texl II
Six-Da) War,
riio Battle (or


Page 12
+Je*isl>nr*iJiar
Friday July




Your car's only worth two-fifty, but III
give you six for it!
If I made everybody a deal like this, we'd
be out of business in a month!
He said twenty-five sixty? Ill sell you
the same car for two thousand.'
Just to move this car off the floor, you
can have it for a hundred-fifty below cost!
They're the oldest lines in the business. And believe it or not,
some of the car dealers in this town still use them. If they ever
try to hand you a line like that, turn around and walk out.
Presented as a Public Service by The Big Ten Ford Dealers.
We sell Fords from Pompano to Perrine.
DADE: Friendly MUM Street and Biscayne Boulevard, North Miami Beach. JeW FWd. Palm Springs Mile. Hialeah. Courtly Ford. Soo*
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T^'J^ZZ? TtH^'JT ^ 7* Avenue. Miami. BBOWARD: Mdlyw-d Forf. 1200 North Federal Highway, Hollywood-
North State Road 7, Plantation. ^ "


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