The Jewish Floridian of North Broward

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Oct. 22, 1971)-v. 3, no. 6 (Mar. 22, 1974).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Dec. 17, 1971 called also v.1, no. 4, Sept. 21, 1973 called also v.2, no. 23, and Dec. 14, 1973 called also v.2, no. 28, repeating numbering of previous issues.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Vol. 2, no. 1 omitted in numbering of issues and was not published.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statement conflict: Sept. 7, 1973 called no. 22 in masthead and no. 23 in publisher's statement; Nov. 30, 1973 called no. 27 in masthead and no. 28 in publisher's statement.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44572526
lccn - sn 00229547
ocm44572526
System ID:
AA00014313:00019

Related Items

Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
ot youth HROWAitn
IVolume
Number 17
June 16. 1972
Price 20 corns
p24 Nations Agree To Tighten Security
JERUSALEM (JTA1
Twenty-lour nations have al-
iponded affirmatively
- demand! for more
..,, security measure-- at
.hl,... rta and on their air-
; t,. Israel. Ttansj on
yjnister Shimon Peres and Mor-
it. director general of
: Ministry announced.
71-, irecautkMU include per-
sonal searches of passengt rs and
more thorough Inspection of the
baggage.
Israel mate its demands in
tin- .ilt.-ninth of the I.mIiI.i \ir-
port massacre to ttO countries
which have dlre:1 air links to
Israel either by their PWB car-
riers or through other airlines.
Nine out of It) airlines approach-
ed have also accented Israel'*
-------
-------------
lews Briefs
Puerto Ricans Undeterred By Tragedy
TEL AVIV (JTA) Undeterred by the deaths of 16 of their
countrymen in the Lydda Airiwrt massacre last week. 105 more
Puerto Rican tourists arrived in Israel Monday morning aboard an
Air France jet on a pilgrimage to Christian holy places. The group
*as organized by the same travel agent that had arranged the tour
which met with tragedy on arrival in Israel. Members of the group
that landed this week said they learned of the massacre while en-
route to Israel, but none of them cancelled their visit.
Moscow Activist* Complain To Brezhnev
LONDON (JTA)The nine Jewish activists who were released
from detention after President Nixon's departure from Moscow
me written to Communist Party chief I-eonid I. Brezhnev to label
their treatment "KGB provocation." according to Jewish sources.
They said they were "ploced outside the law" in violation of con-
stitutional guarantees.
Free Kosher Lunches For School Children
NEW YORK (JTA) For the first time in the history of free
Khool lunches, strictly Kosher lunches will be provided this summer
dmateiy 10.000 New York City school children aged 3 to 21.
According to David C. Farber. executive director of the Hassidic
ration for Urban Concerns, lunches will be available to any
organization requesting more than 100. A caterer will pre-
the meals, and the Hassidic Corporation will deliver them. The
ll U-ing funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture.
Ben-Gurion To Receive Herzl Award
MEW YORK David Ben-Gurion. Israel's first Prime Minister.
aill be honored at the 75th National Jubilee Convention of the Zi-
onist i 'rganization Of America in Israel this summer. More than
it. s will attend the eight-day convention opening July 12,
where Mr Ben-Gurion, Israel's Premier from 1949-1953 and from
1955-1963, will be the 12th recipient of the Herzl Award, a gold
medallion conferred by the ZOA on "parsons of great distinction
I* have helped shape Zionist and Jewish history."
Sen. Scolt To Receive Technion's Award
WASHINGTON -Sen. Hugh Scott. Republican leader of the
\VS S. nate, was to receive the Albert Einstein Award of the Amer-
ican Society for Technion i Israel Institute of Technology-1 at a din-
ner here Thursday, according to Laurence A. Tisch. national presi-
' fen! Of the Society. Sen. Scott, who is now serving his third term as
senator from Pennsylvania, is being cited for his 'steadfast a"0'""
lighted friendship for the state of Israel since its inception, and nis
led leadership in the highest councils of the Amercan govrn-
iient in support of Israel's cause."
First Woman Rabbi Receives Appointment
NEW YORK ordained a rabbi, has been appointed assistant rabbi of the Stephen
Wat Free Synagogue, a congregation of 750 families. Rabbi trie-
tnd, 25, will begin her duties Aug. 1.
I Brooklyn "Y" Relocates In Queens
NEW YORK (JTA) A "stepped-up exodus" of Jewish fanulies
from the East New York section of Brooklyn to Queens has led to a
decision to relocate the YM-YWHA of that Brooklyn section in tne
Howard Beach section of Queens, the president has nuncr
relocated "Y" is housed in temporary quarters, according to Herman
x' Met/., who said the new location will make possible ,ncrea*^
recreational and communal services for Jewish families of centra.
Queens. Until a new main building Is developed, the existing brancn
facilities of the "Y" in Queens, together with the temporary head-
quarters, will be the basis of a decentralized system of service, ne
*'ided. A fund-raising drive is planned to finance a new-. iuiiy-
*)uipped facility in the area which will include a complex or apari-
mPnts for the aged and a campus of Jewish communal and social
agencies.
demands.
Air Franco, the airline u by the three gunmen who killed
25 and wounded 70 with ma-
chinegun fire and grenades at
Lydda last Tuesday, has in-
formed the Transport Minister
that it was ready to institute
all precautionary measures asked
bj Israel.
Similar messages have been
received from Sahena, the Bel-
gian airline and West Germany's
Lufthansa, both of which have
recently been targets of Arab
terrorist acts.
Both Jews and non-Jews con-
tinued to voice shock and revul-
sion over the Lydda Airport
massacre and demanded more
Btringent security measures by
airports and international air-
lines, and an urgent appeal for
greater vigilance by air trans-
port authorities all over the
ivmid to avoid a repetition of
the I.ydda tragedy was senl to
President Nixon by the National
Federation of Temple Sister-
hoods,
Gunman Says Trio Trained Near Beirut
JERUSALEM UTA The
three Japanese gunmen respon-
sible for the Lydda Airport mas-
sacre trained openly for their
deadly mission on the outskirts
of Beirut, Lebanon and were in
close contact with Palestinian
terrorists and plane hijackers in
the Lebanese capital since last
March, it has been disclosed.
The information gleaned from
the continuing interrogation of
the captured gunman Kozo Oka-
moto. alias Namba Dal Saka,
was disclosed to the press by Lt.
Col. Mordechai Tavor at Jeru-
salem police headquarters.
(ol Tavor also disclosed the
names of the two other gunmen
who were killed Takeshi I'ku-
daira and Yasiiki. He stud all
three, in their early 20*. had
been studemts at the University
of Japan. All were members of
the outlawed Red Star group in
Japan, Okamoto having joined
ill 1970.
Col. Tavor said the three ar-
rived in Beirut last March and
took an apartment there. The
trio reportedly met early this
year with a leader of the Popu-
lar Front for the Liberation of
Palestine known as "Abu Alt"
in Japan.
Col Tavor said that the assas-
sins received Czech-made auto-
matic rifles, grenades and am-
munition in Beirut where their
mission was explained to them
May 16. While in Beirut they
were in contact with at least six
PFLP members, among them
Mohammed Abu el Haja. Yusuf
Ibrahim Tufik and Ahmed- Has-
san Hadi, he added.
Haja and Tufik participated
in the attack on an Kl Al plane
at Zurich Airport in February,
I6! and were arrested, but
later exchanged for hostages
aboard four hijacked jt*ts in
northern Jordan in September,
1970.
Police Chief Pinhas Koppel
said that when the questioning
of Kozo Okamoto is completed
at the end of the week, it will
be decided whether to try him
before a military tribunal or a
civilian court.
Israel has abolished the death
penalty except for Nazis and
Nazi collaborators. But a mili-
tary tribunal with two lawyers
on the panel may impose the
death sentence for terrorist
activities
Israel's Warning
Sent To Lebanon;
Reaction Watched
JERUSALEM iJTA' Sev-
eral Western countries have ac-
cepted Israel's view that Leba-
non must be held responsible for
terrorist acts, such as the Lyd h
Airport massacre, that are plan-
ned on Lebanese soil and car-
ried out by gunmen trained in
Lebanon, informed sources aid.
and have transmitted Israel's
warning to Lebanon.
The warning was issued re-
cently by Premier Golda Meir
in an address to the Knesset;
the United Nations Secur-
ity Council and a number of
Western nations were informed
officially of Israel's position.
It was learned that Israel con-
siders the promise by President
Sulienian Franjies of Lebanon
that the propaganda activities
of terrorists in his country' would
be curtailed inadequate.
Israel has pointed out that the
operational headquarters of
many terrorist groups are lo-
cated in Beirut and training
camps for terrorists abound near
that city, and has .iemanded
that the Lebanese government
break fully with the terrorist
organizations and halt their
activities.
Israel rejects the claim that
this is not possible and points
to Jordan which effectively-
stamped out terrorist activity on
Its soil once King Hussein de-
cided to do so. According to in-
formed sources, no time limit
has been set in Israel's warning,
but the reaction of Beirut au-
thorities is being closely watched.
Fifth Anniversary Of
'67 War 'Uneventful'
JERUSALEM UTA) The
fifth anniversary' of the start of
the Six-Day War passed with
only one incident that took place
in the occupied Golan Heights;
an Israeli soldier was killed ind
another injured. The two sol-
diers were in a civilian car
which was hit by bazooka Sh ils.
Israeli officials had been on
the alert against the possibility
that Arab terrorists might seek
to stage hostile acts to mark
the anniversary, but no inci-
dents of any kind were rei>orted
throughout Israel, or the West
Bank, officials said.
For the first time since June,
1967. there were neither demon-
strations or other acts of pro-
test by Arabs in the occupied
areas to mark the Arab defeat.
In Nablus and East Jerusalem,
several women and school pupils
laid wreaths on graves of Arab
soldiers.
There was some tension on
the Lebanese border, however,
where there was considerable
activity on the Lebanese side.
Sounds of firing of mortars and
flashing lights were heard and
seen.
Officials speculated that Leb-
anese authorities were seeking
to deter terrorists from using
the anniversary as the occasion
for an attack on Israel from
Lebanese territory.
Japanese Officials Visit
President And Premier
JERUSALEM (JTA) Pres-
ident Zalman Shazar and Pre-
mier Golda Meir each received
a special delegation of Japanese
government officials last week
and were informed that symbolic
payments would be made to the
victoms of the Lydda Airport
massacre and that a sum of
money would be put at the dis-
posal of Israel's Red Mogan
David for humanitarian pur-
poses.
The delegation was headed by
KenJI Fukunaga and Included
three officials of Japan's For-
eign Ministry. They were ac-
companied by the Japanese Am-
bassador, Elji Tokura.
Speaking to journalists after-
wards, they said contributions
would also be made to the be-
reaved families of the massacre
victims. They refused to state
the sum involved or how much
would be contributed to the Red
Mogen David through the Japa-
nese Red Cross, however.
Mr. Fukunaga gave Mrs. Meir
a letter from Premier Osaka
Sato of Japan expressing the
Japanese people's sorrow. He
said Mrs. Meir was deeply moved
by the concern showed by the
government of -lapan and had
said that the common tragedy-
might bring the people of Israel
and Japan closer together.
Replying to questions, the Jap-
anese visitors said the facts re-
lating to Japanese outlaws being
trained in Lebanon were under
investigation by their govern-
ment. Two Japanese police offi-
cers are aiding in the interroga-
tion of the gunman captured in
the Lydda massacre.


Page 2
vJewistftarkJiari
Friday. Jang ]6. 1972
Mrs. Donald Mitchell Elected
President Of Women's Division
vie president for cani|iKn has
txvn elected presirf -m of the Jew-,
*K. DONALD MIT CHILL
i*h Federation of North Browadr>
Women's Division for 1972-71.
In making the announcement
Federation president Alvta Grosal
expressed hi- appreciation for th"j
outstanding Job that the Women**
,1>i\ i Mitchell's direction during the,
post two y-ars.
it is not generally know* in
this community,*' -aid Mr. Groat,
that our Women's Division led
alltHlaer communities in the coun-
try in percentage of change :rom
last year in the amount of money
raised during the annual cam-
1 >a i sin
It is to tin. Mitchells credit
thai she was able to lead a team;
of able chairmen and workers III
mobili/inu' the women of the "om-
munit) to meet the challenges
facing us. I know that Mrs. Mit-
chell will do an outstanding job
for the Federation as president of
the Women's Division in directing
all phases of its activities."
Fleeted to serve as officers done,
with Mrs. Mitchell were Mrs. Al-
lan Baer, vice president, campaign;
Mrs Louia Schwab, vice uieridont,'
education: Mrs. Edward Hyman.
recording -r-rotary: Mm. Alan
Ziffer, corresponding secretary:
Mrs Ludwfk Brod/ki. financial
ecretary. and Mrs. Jack Press-
man, parliamentarian.
In accepting the position, Mrs ,
Mitchell expressed her apprecia-
tion for the help and encourage-
ment given her by the outgoing
Women's Division president. Mrs.
Joel Miller.
Mrs. Miller has been most help-
ful in the development of the
Women's Division during its for-i
mative yean," >aid Mrs. Mitchell
with her understanding and dedi-
cation to the cause of educatin
the community to meeting its re-
sponsibilities both at home and
abroad. We are fortunate in that
she will continue to work with us
and guide us during thCM next im-
partatlt years."
The newly elected officers an-1
hoard membee* .who niU -' JP-
pointed over the cour,e ol tne
summon wllll be formally installed
at the first 1972-73 Women's Di-
vision board meeting in Soptomber
SUMMER SCHOOL
LEARN STENOSCKIPT
AIC IN EIGHT WEEKS
BEGINS JUNE 19
TYPEWRITING
SHORTHAND
BOOKKEEPING
SPANISH
BRUSH-UP COURSES
CHARM MODELING
Phone 524-8325 FOR INFO.
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FT. LAUOERDALE. FLA.
The Company that builds the
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For Free Estimate Coll
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-524-1425-
Or Visit Our Showroom Located At
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and we design to please"
Fine cabinetry and kitchen remodeling
COHQUER ARTHRITIS!!
Plus Allied Diseases.
Thousands Find Relief!
COME, ENJOY! ENJOY!!
Bathe in 87' Water
WARM "MIRACLE" SPRINGS
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Transportation Available
DO YOU HAVE A BRA PROBLEM? Custom fit Iras, Girdles, Swim wear, Mostettomie*. Call 764-5457 far complimentary fitting in year home. Irate Wilsen, Cert. Sym. dro'erte Consultant. i I 1
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4861 S.W. 106 Ave., Davie
(Go west on Griffin Rd.
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K.
fir/naive Shorthark L$t
Mean. Per/art Fit
THB PITTING SECRET OP
EVERY FOOT SAVER SHOE
gwvu-AV SPECTATOR
Son. SUPPLE UAMA CALF
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Blue i irfiite
5reon end *';'
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Pre*" aid W
Nek/a* unan aid Torioae
- SIZES 4% to 11 WIDTHS AAAAA TO C -
. EXCM 5/Vr'i V 4T. .
7112 K US OfA.. T. Ml MaltAtl
IMHiNK ttSltiS
A surprising number
of professional investors
live at
PoinU I
Maybe they know something
you dorft know.
The successful investor has learned what tc '00k
for: location, living space, luxury, quality construc-
tion and potential resale value.
That's Point II. Located directly on the ocean
at the Port Everglades Inlet. As for spacious luxury
from oceanview balconies to all electric kitchens and
laundries to custom fixtures and costly materials it s
hard to find a better investment in elegance. And the
construction is so sound (and sound-conditioned) that
you'll never know you have neighbors unless you in-
vite them over. Resale value? Our prices have risen an
average 15% per year. Our sales have risen, too A lot
of successful people have seen the point.
Point II. A wise investment in the good life.
It's as far as you can go.
.'."00 Soul* 0<.< lam fort la.KlmJaia
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OUTSTANDING
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Our complete collection of furs including
the newest classic and sport furs are
REDUCED TO 50%
Buv Now and Save1
IM tHatcM? MCiaV '
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>>y MR-HERMAN
257 E Sunrise Blvd.. Ft. Lauaerdale
PHONE 565-4874
Caribbean cruise sensation
to be continued.
Florida's grand and glorious Nieuw Amsterdam
now cruises into summer and bevond
R'e per person, beted on double occup*n<> *na
She's elaborate, engaging, and is she wbiect to availability. .
ever popular. So popular we've ex *.V Y. toou
tended our Florida Nieuw Amsterdam
10 day cruises through June. July and >' ?J", ;
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wonder people have taken to the Nieuw Mediterranean Crolaae.
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She is quite the majesty of Florida
cruiseships and now. lona will she reiqn.
10-DAY CRUISES TO 5 CARIBBEAN!
AND SOUTH AMERICAN PORTS
From Port Everglades to Aruba,
La Guaira (for Caracas). 111111
Isja de Marqarita Martimaue St Thomas. j^aa>jWraBaBBLa^aaar Ll^llAi'in
June 16: From a ^j^^ f\0\\3V^^
$265 to $785. June 26, July 7, July 17, ^^j^Mj^V- A mPriC3
July 28, Aug. 7, Aug. 18: From $285 to -^ ^^ MmCI **
$895. Oct 6, Oct. 16, Oct. 27, Nov. 6, Wgr C.XU\SQ$
Nti '?' N^ 27' D.*C 8: From ^280 to $840.'-**-'^^ i^t
We re Dutch and we want everything to be perfect


Mdoy. June 13. 1972
*-Jenitiflcricfiatrj
Pago 3
is 1972 Dr- Gerson Cohen Assumes
Total Seminary Leadership
By Sim-*':'' KM"""t
nr GerMB D. Cohen, his'onaii
has been ekctrtctan.
|>PMi enl of th,- facul-
... jewtoh lteologo.1
0f America. On July 1.
Loft* TtTHcft *,.*, bo-
I rhanceUor emeritus, Di
: succeed him as chief
officer ,. the Seminary.
r Bernard Mandelbaum ha*.
lu, resignation aa presi-
Kit. take effect June 80, 197.?.
!!'. returns from year-.
He u.i hit reasons tor
were both administra-
te ai
1 en||l iftl-i person to
position of i Wei i nocutivi
i ihe Seminary, iucceed-
inc Sabato Morals 1195-1887
Solomon Schechter (1902-1915)
Cyras Adler 11915-19401 and Loin.
Finkelatein (1840-1851*. Dr. Fink-,
elsteins title was chancod to chan-
cellor in 1881, and in 196t;, Dr.
.tjandf Ujaup became president, |
bin not chief executive offi<- p,
Dr. Cohen, a noted historian i
Jacob II. Schlff professor of his-
tory ;it the Seminary, pott whici
he will retain He mi ordained bj
the Seminary in 1948. and hold*
its bachelor atari masters degrees
in Hebrew literature. Dr. Other l
alto rei elvad a bachelors dctfrvi
with special bonon from Citj, Col-
lege ol New York, where be was
elected to Phi Beta Kappa. Hi
earned a doctorate in Semitic lan-
guages from Columbia University '
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3 bedroom from S4S0
Laroe rooms, ell Electric
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-V
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Hered pool, saunas boat
docuge. To see pleas* tll
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2 BED RM. and DEN
$41,500 FURNISHED
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iUll in 772 9194
UNIOUELY DIFFERENT ACCENT PIECES
AND OLD WORLD FURNITURE
The Romance of Old Spain in beautiful
wrouqhtiron scrollwork wall decor and lighting
fixtures original oil paintings Rich hand-
carved furniture and candle sticks glazed and
hand painted pottery Spanish Galleons onyx
and hand-carved chess sets Numerous other
imaginative pieces to enhance any interior at
unbelievable low prices.
PRICED FROM $2.50 to $295
ACCENTS & IMPORTS
2202 E. Oakland Park Blvd. at the comer of Federal Hwy.
Browsers are always welcome Telephone 563-7833
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Serving Members and Non-Members Since 1970
3 and 4 Year Old Program
Limited Class Sizes
Insure Maximum Individual Attention
For Complete Details Call 731-2310
TRANSPORTATION AVAILABLE
WANTED
cr-'-e, glasv silver, furniture,
rugs, & c'her fine antiques.
HHMITACE ANTIOUES
236C Commercial Blvd.
Isuderdale-by the-Sea
Tel: 566-5278
Ceramic Tile
-beautiful first impression
5 x Porch PL.
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LISTINGS REQUIRED
Your property receives our personal-
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MARY IAVEATT
Reg Reel Estate
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100 f. Oakland Pk Blvd.
563-5936
DOES YOUR CHILD WANT
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We have the largest staff of (
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-


Page 4
Friday, June 16 Jfri(
^JewisliJWJP,atl ImATTER OF FACT
OIFF1CE *nd PUANT-120 N B 6th STREET. MIAMI. TelephoneJ7S-05
^sratarasw .* A M ^mpson
SKS 5-TOS5? A^U to Publisher
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Volume 1
Friday. June 16, 1972
Number 17
4 TAMUZ 5732
Tragedy Can Be Duplicated
In a world where so many madmen seem to be loose,
the massacre at Lod Airport is another reminder that the
best of precautions are no match for the fanatics who will
risk all in the name of their mission.
But the fact is that precautions by governments and
airlines are not what they should and can be. With the
exception of the Japanese government, which provided an
example to the nations of the world by accepting "total
moral responsibility" for the tragedy which resulted in
the death of 25 innocent persons, the other governments
and airlines involved fell over themselves in blaming oth-
ers for what happened.
The petty annoyances of thorough baggage inspec-
tion and more careful checking of passengers must be
instituted in the name of safe travel. Nations which extol
the deeds of terrorists and hcrbor air pirates must be boy-
cotted by the airlines until they become responsible mem-
bers of the world community- The rash of hijackings is
evidence that this is not the sole concern of Israel but ev-
ery decent nation's, for the tragedy of Lod Airport can be
duplicated at every airport.
We May Soon See Movement
Although the Moscow summit statement indicated
that the two superpowers were prepared, at this time, to
set aside the tensions between them over the Middle East
and Vietnam, there is solid reason to believe from that
same communigue that they may be ready to play a
role in peacemaking efforts, at least in the Middle East.
In Israel (here is satisfaction that the talks could signal
a Soviet endorsement of United States efforts to arrange
the partial settlement between Israel and Egypt that sepa-
rates the front lines and re-opens the Suez Canal. Israel
agreed four months ago to American proposals for in-
direct talks on this limited agreement but the Egyptian
government, reportedly at the behest of the Soviet Union,
turned it down. The attitude of Moscow may have softened
as a result of the talks between President Nixon and Brez-
hnev the reaction of Egypt to the summit would indicate
this and we may soon see some movement here.
The Arab nations as Abba Ebon has pointed out, have
tried everything since 1967 warfare, international pres-
sure and attempted isolation and now could be the
time for them to realize that only direct negotiations with
Israel can bring peace to the Middle East.
South African Jews Protest Rule
Sometimes the guestion of Jewish self-interest is an-
swered by events which prove that our fate is tied in with
others. Racist South Africa, whose laws are directed at
denying rights to blacks, now has turned its attention to
religion. New regulations have directed that religious
instruction in state schools shall be "Christocentric" in
order to prepare the pupil to accept Jesus Christ as the
Saviour. The large Jewish community there is, of course,
protesting this rule which seems a natural extension of
thought control in a nation so close to Fascist ideology.
Restoration Slow But Welcome
When the largest and most prestigious Reform syna-
gogue in the world announces that it will conduct Bar and
Bat Mitzvah ceremonies, it comes under the heading of
important news. The custom was abandoned in 1875 by
New York's Temple Emanu-El and while its restoration was
a little slow in comparison with other Reform synagogues
there are only four of almost 700 in the nation which
still do not have Bar Mitavah the recent action is to be
hailed as another evidence of the desire for more tradi-
tional practice in all our synagogues, although not neces-
sarily orthodoxy.
WASHINGTON At least
one of Hanoi's five main re-
gional commands in the south
has already urged the North
Vietnamese high command to
seek a political deal to end the
war without delay because of
the deteriorating situation at
the front.
That being said, it must also
be noted that Kontum City came
within an ace of falling last Fri-
day. Indeed, it may have fallen
before these words can be print-
ed for the odds on the fighting
there currently api>ear about
even either way.
KONTI'M'S FALL, if it hap-
pens, will make bad headlines;
but it will be anything but a
decisive setback. The war ran
also be pretty well lost on the
approaches to Hue. however;
and with the odds in that area
now about two to one on ARV N.
looking into the future is still
like watching the ball in motion
at a very high stake roulette
game.
Predicting the future, then, is
still a mug's game. But it is just
as much a mug's game to go on
repeating all the old cliches of
fashionable pessimism about
Vietnam when the fads of the
present are like the one cited in
the first paragraph.
THERE IS NO doubt that one
of the enemy's regional com-
mands and not the least im-
portant, either is already ef-
fectively eager to throw in the
sponge. The U.S. government
has means of knowing about
such matters that sometimes
work. When they work, the re-
sults are solid fact.
In the case noted, the re-
gional commander made *he
following points: First, the
ARVN was fighting well on the
defensive; second that North
Vietnamese losses were in a
ratio of at least three to one,
as compared to ARVN- losses;
third, that the local population
was hostile, and even when im-
pressed into the North Viet-
namese units, the men ran away
immediately; fourth, that his
own units were hideously weak-
ened; fifth, that he would soon
have to break off the attack
and seek refuge in his most re-
mote base areas.
IF YOI* EXAMINE the tale of
woe of this particular regional
command, you can understand
a great many seeming anomolies
of the fighting since the great
offensive began. There is he
prolonged failure to take An
Loc, although nearly three en-
emy divisions were used against
it.
There is the failure, twice re-
peated, to press forward alter
seemingly decisive break-
throughs in the two northern
provinces. There is the extreme
slowness with which the attack
on Kontum has developed, ind
also the total failure to exploit
the early breakthrough there
three weeks ago. All these mys-
teries, and several more besides,
are now far less mysterious.
IN OTHER WORDS. mUSt
not forget that in this particular
roulette game we do not yet
know the winning number. Bui
one must not forget, either, that
even without the mining of Hai-
phong and the attack on all
North Vietnam's roads and rail-
roads, the North at the front
are having a ghastly time of it
By now, it is officially esti-
mated that Hanoi has already
lost 40,000 of the 124.000 men
who were coldbloodedly bud-
geted for the present offensive
Such figures are never fully de-
pendable.
BIT QI'ITE dependable tes-
timony from prisoners of war
has revealed that just two of
the enemy divisions attacking
An Loc. the 5th and the 9th.
have lost over 5,000 men. And
on the approaches, to Kontum,
Just one division, the 320th has
lost 2.000 men, again according
to POWs.
If anything, in fact, the 40.000
figure is probably rather low.
!>y JOSEPH ALSOP
This explains, in turn, the n>
markabje character of the rn!i
reporting from Hanoi The real
reporting, ** -
/%S ? f
Max Lerner i
Sees It
NEW YORK N.Y. The locale and decor were carat, in
St Catherine's Hall of the Great Kremlin Palace. The scrip;
of the agreements between the two superpowers was v,;:hj
modern on space, pollution, trade and technology ant or
missiles. Between the lines of the script you don't need slaw,
to read power how to balance it. how to set limits to it
cise. how to keep it from exhausting the economies of both em-
pires and wrecking the world.
The two men who faced each other at the long table have
a good deal riding on the success of the agreement-
horse that had better not lose. Brezhnev and Nix m run
staked the rest of their careers and their place it. hisl
tin bet that a global power balance will not betray the nstkail
Interests of either country.
As is turned out. Brezhnev was as avid for the -ummit u
Nixon was He carried off the problem of the "humiiiatioa" o!
Russia by the simple device of not recognizing it, and Nix
oi>eration became a nonrvent in Russia,
Nothing gives a man as much self-confidence a- sittii j -
top of a huge pyramid of power, especially when he cor.tro;i
tin press, too. and when no one can write anythr ,
his decision without landing in a labor camp or being sent >::' to
a looney bin.
OF (OIRSK THERE IS AN OPPOSITION even in 'he
smoke-filled backrooms of the internal councils Brczhnm
his Pyotr Shelest, Nixon has his John Alhbrook
the Ukrainian party N>s> who stam|>ed his Jaekbool AJ
der Dubeek's socialism with a human face" in Pi an
ongoing feud with Brezhnev. He counts less than thi
and there is no sign that they are in revolt.
Aahbrook counts for very little, for it is hard to mtkc a
soft-on-communism charge stick against a Presi i*-
cided to bring peace to Vietnam by mining the enemj
and bombing the bridges and industrial plants. But behind A~-
biook's leak of the missile agreement there mual be I
of the American military which does feel that Nixon i
American nuclear power naked to the Russian enemy
The fellow on the street- at the gas Station
among the airport workers tells me I am crazy to tl
Moscow agreements mean anything. He didn't bust the Chines!
much, hut he trusts the Russians far less. Besides. h- gives me
his version of "Look Homeward, Angel." and SB)
prices are bigger headaches right now than are missi I b>
read some columnists who egg him on to enragement over a-.
this peacemaking blather.
They are wrong. Sure, inflation and abortion, pot and crim
and busing have all become words to stir the gorge, ant
have to settle these unquiet spirits. But the world has lived WO
long under the shadow of nuclear fear.
The hideous thing would be to make further mi-iV buM-
ups a permanent part of the landscape, to get used to them thv
way we do to press headlines Freezing the offensive missflU
limiting the defensive ones this isn't disarmament, but it n "
least a step away from nothingness, not toward it.
RRE/.IINEV IS t'SING THE NIXON TRIP to get more
popular, and spread the scarce consumer goods, and show him-
self in command, just as Nixon is using Brezhnev to add to W
China prestige and get re-elected. This is a new form ol oi-
rolling between the imperial Mr. Bigs.
No one can doubt that they are imperial, in the nse tna
each rides a power mass or perhaps better, each is I
it. The picture in my mind is of two imperial Jugglers
it.g to balance his world on his nose as they cross R "ha^
rickety bridge over a chasm. If they go tumbli:
tumble with them.
Yet it isn't a wholly true picture. Brezhnev 9
true He was shaken by Nixon'l Peking trip, and Hi"
tige China got from It. He wants the world to lo '"_
polar world again, as it did in the Stalin-Truman an Khrus
chev-Kennedy days.
But those days are over, as the cold war era is Bver. Cnm
has made it a tripolar world, even if it is not yet a Each of the three can swine, the balance in a atruggle betwe
the other two. Each of them can be the balancing third on s
global saaaaw. When Japan and Europe are brought into tl
picture the three become five; the balance gets more COfflP**
The wildest part of the Nixon story is that he got his ear >
training in world ai.a'.r; under Dulles and Eisenhower. Dam
would stir in his grave if a medium could reach him wltl f
news of the Peking and Moscow conferences, for he was a cow
warrior who thought that Iks1* peacemaking impulses
naive. Nixon would like to feel he learned from both, to c*nW"
peacemaking with power. It will be a hard appeal for McO*
to match.


1 Jrriday. June 16. 1972_
+Jewisti fhrktlar
Page 5
Nixon 'Aware' Of Petitions
On Soviet JewsKissinger
Ijwmy Wtach. president of the
Irkan Jewtoh Press Assoeia-
accompanied President Nixon
L trip to Russia. Iran. Poland
j Austria According :o some of
u'&patches:
fnr Henry Kissinger said in a
L-keround "briefing that the Presi-
K> aware of the more than
L million petWoM seeing bet-
L treatment of Soviet Jewish
[."2,.ns and would look for an
trtuni:y to present this."
fThe Sovi< ts placed copies of a
Lan ir.acazine carrying nosi-
KTaipectsof Jewish We in the
= SR Bboard a Pan American
I ^ missed a TWA aircraft
1 even more American
I
The rabl I of Kiev has been dead
lor more than a year and a hah
! heen replaced, rher-
[ person! present for daih
(he Ukranian capital?
..... Some 250 persons wor
irday, according to thr
atinn's president.
. ,u Jewith imputation was
.1 150.000 by Russian
or only one-fourth of thr
I times Klven by Jewish
The Soviet officials in Moscow
said there were only nominal de-
lays in processing applications for
visas to Israel and in actual move-
.rnent, to Israel. They said that
Israel was delaying the return to
the Soviet of Russian Jews who
wished to leave.
Jewish citizens throughout the
country appear to be most reluc-
tant to c'iscuss Israel or specific
aspects of treatment of Soviet
Jews. They hoped the visit of
President Nixon would improve
relations of the U.S.S.R. with Is-
rael and with the Uuited States
In Iran, the President again
discussed the Middle Hast situa-
tion. No summary was issued of
the results
11
CANDLELIGHTING TIME
4 TAMUZ 7:54
MARWESCIEWCESUslMER PROGRAM
JUNE 26th to JULY 28th
Offered by the University School
SoutK Florid*.
For additions* informotio* write or plwii
DR. MMB CENT1NI. DIRECTOR
Marine Science Summer Program
The University School
3351 College Ave., Fort Lauderdale, He.
Tel. 583-6185
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LANDSCAPE
Rabbi, Mrs. Skop I
To Be Honored With
Triple Celebration
Friday evening the Sisterhood
and affiliate groups of Temple
Sholom. Pompano Beaeh. will
honor Rahbi and Mrs. Morris A
Skop at a triple celebration mark-
ing their Ittth wedding anniver-
sary, the ,15th anniversary of heir
service in the Florida rabbinate
and the rabbi's birthday
Rabbi Skop, who previously
served congregations in Orlnndr
and Coral Gables, is beginning his
seventh year at Temple Sholom.
He has headed the North Broward
Board of Rabbis and the Create'-
Miami Rabbinical Association, an1',
is a member of the Central Con-
ference of American Rabbis and
B'nai B'rith, and secretary of the
Pompano Beach Ministerial Asso-
ciation. Mrs. Skop has been ar
art teacher in the Dade .nd Brow-
ard County school systems for th>
past 15 years.
Saturday, following the Sabbath
services, the Skops, who are bless
ed with four children and 'four
and a half" grandchildren will host
the birthday Kiddush at 11 a.m.
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4


$&'&
Page 6
+JmU9ilk*****
Friday. J^ l8
^WWWWV^^^^***AA******A***
Quoth the Maven
by Beverly King Pollock
*^^^^^^^^^^^*A*******A***A*AA
The Impossible Dream
Wh.'n i"< daughter readied 17 ia couple yean back), it was
spring and the crab gran was a beautiful grain and the dandelions
good and together she and I looked out on the backyard and
felt the beautj ol the world.
My daughter looked as if -bo wanted to make a sage comment on
Dia Ii turn d oul to be in particular.
ok, Mora she said, "in one more year I'll graduate from high
<- i Phei there four years of college. And alter that I'll probablx
led "
! smiled because ll was spring and because (at that point! she
ha mg with "What's-his-name" for onl) year or two. And
thoi jh i was in love" at it with the guy who turned out to be mj
husband well, with me ii a- different.
My daughtei continued. "I wam to get married in a white com:
in the -bill and have n reception in our back yard. Now no mattei ho*
you add it. that giVes you hut five years to fix up tin- place!
I was :i nervous wreck. I called in a landscape man for the >.i
end mj neighbor had her house painted sad the drivewaj
in ca
And time passed and we just sort of forgot and then my daughter
ped oil a couple years from her time schedule and now tl
ban ly a year left:
What dee -ion- we have to make! 'One doci-ion my daughter al-
ide i- no! to have a reception in the back yard."
There are all sort- of vital problems. Like big wedding, small
reception, whether a dinner, what time, cuo-t hats twe
-1 si ;d with out-of-town relat ... I need a maven'j

. main problem Is we haven't been to enough weddings. '.Vnl-
-,-. we have seen before. But now I want to lo
... ,i having ;> wedding soon and you have an opening foi
please don't hesitate to invite us. We promise not to eat And if
-, or wisdom. I'm not too proud to accept i
We'll have to start thinking about flowers and the photographer
Whi t with tin- year's confirmation, college graduation, and the coming
Bai Mlttvah plus our 2.>th anniversary irm young; I was married
when I was oinel and our daughter's wedding, mebbe we -hould en-1
a photographer on a retainer ba- -'
My neighbor said to me. "You know, those bridal pictures hang
iround the family for generation- |
And.all of a sudden I had visions of a great-great-great-great-
EiHndchild pointirv.; to the wadding picture and saying, "Who's that
lit tie fit lacy?"
And someone an.v.fering. That s the mother of the bride "
Like immediately I renewed my diet club membership and I now
:k to you five pounds lighter.
But why am I '.retting so excited? The weddiim i- almost 12
months away. First I have to live through the Bar Mimah. First
things first.
Which reminds me First I better bake cookies for my younger
il nation.
Nan iou run Irnicl h ohip front I'orl Ctrl'*
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JOSEPH I1SDP
Continued f -am Pan* 4
come from passionately : ro-
Hanoi newspapermen being fed
a daily did of I'olemkin villages
tiik REAL reporting comes,
at least Indirectly, from diplo-
mats and i'Hi. r person* of 11
ous experience stationed In Ha-
iidi ioi long periods. Thaaa ien
tell of grim reports that the
North Vietnamese losses in 'he
few weeks of the present often-
sive have alread) exceeded all
the enemy losses of the last
three years. They tell, too. of
rising dissension within the
North Vietnamese government.
This last is the fascinating
point The Hanoi government
was bit te Ij dh Ided about the
right conduct ol the war after
the VS. Intervention in l%>. It
has again bittet v '' Ided i -
fore Tet This offensivi divi i
it. no doubt, just a.- bitter!} a
third time
ALL THREE nes h at
lie called the "double-our-b ts'
faction won the srgumant. Hut
ii and always it "Ik-
present offensive fails as Tat
tailed iii 1968, one ran now
look for meat governmental
Changes in Hanoi.
And great governmental
changes, if they occur, will
bring great policy chances at
long last.
,'.
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ANNOUNCES
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FOR FURTHER INFORMATION


. June 16, 1972
> kHistrhridTiar
Page 7
Institute For Jewish Life
Selects 73 For Its Board
jrttoguished and diversified
_, ol North American Jews.
E*nting a uusssctton of
Lh eommunittas throughout
A'nitttl States and Canada.
(help guide the newly created
Lite for Jewish Life, aceord-
1. Max M Fisher, president of
Council "' J,'*ish ^"derations
Welfare Funds iCJF who
the announcement of th>>
K^tioti "i "><* Instituted
I ol tni-tees.
Lselei" group of 73 outstand-
Ijtnti at I women appointed to
Iboard ,.minimal leaders.
L lead' is of national Ji-wish
[,!.,,. Jewish Federation and
n ,v itives, >iucators, fac-
. .,i. i is and representatives
L. art- and letters were
In from more than 400 excep-
g! iixiiv duals nvommended by
tminili" and other SOUIt
osition of the InstJ-
I lakes it one of the
|t dinting tishe I panels of Jew
bled," Mr. Kisher said.
i range of experience.
t expertise' that these 73
Xidiia to th< board is
[ to the Institute's success
I fa vital to carrying out the
which it was e,tab-
i strengthening and
In the quality of Jewish
Dong the prominent communal
I ointcd are Manci-'li BST-
I> iroit, Mich.; Mrs. Joseph
.". N!( Orleans. La.; Dr Leon
pi. Washington, D.C.; Marlej
Winnipeg, Can.; Mrs.
Itri Green, Worcester, Mas-;
Ipern, Pittsburgh, Pa.:
Ian D Hockenbertr. Del
ne>. Iowa; Dr. Norman Kap-
Dallas, Tex.; Samuel Kanlan.
keapolb Minn.; Marvin Kllts-
1 Milwaukee, Wte.; Philip Klut/-
Chicago, III.: Boris I.evine.
|n..r. Can; Mrs. Jacqueline
i, \v,-st Orange, N.J.: Dr.
Tulsa, Okla.: Elmer
Cleveland, Ohio, and Mi-
A Pelavln ol Flint, Mich.
I) Barney Radov. Erie, Pa.;
enberg, Roanoke, Va.;
i Rubenstcin, St. Paul,
. Edward Sanders, 1-os An-
t alii Robert B. Slnton,
;- ci, Calif.; Harry B
h, Miami Beach, Fla.: I. Jo-
- rn Philadelphia. Pa.:
. South OranRe. N.J.:
ncc Tisch, New York
i awrence J. Weinbarg
rlj Hills, Calif.; Mai hall
New York. NY.; Lewis
Boston, Mass.; May-
tt ishner Ihieago, ill.: (tor-
Columbua, Ohio-
W, Zeltzer, Southlield
Mrs Louis Zorensky,
r^ Mo.
on tiv
; Manuel Bat h i
R i e,t Miller Ba
: in Kessler,
M mtj Pomm, Nash
Jamei Rice, I !h
in B. Roi
' ; '. V-.\
N 'i m, :. la Stein, Port-
: Sidney Vln :ent
Ohio.
| 'i appointees are Israel
l Orthodox) and Dr. Abra-
ii schel (Conservative j of
fork City, and Jordan Pearl-
in of Toronto, Can.
lines >f the North
I i student body include
|Hiiie] Levins of Cambridge,
Richard Narva of Chestnut
Hill. Mass., and Sam Wakso] of
Columbus, Ohio.
Among the faculty representa-
tives nre Dr. Manor II. Bernstein
of Brandeis University: Dr. Eu-
gene BorowitS of Hebrew Union:
Collage; Dr. William Brinner or
University of California; Dr. Dan-
iel Kla/ar of Temple University;
Dr. Leonard Fein of Brandeis Uni-
versity; Dr. Marvin Fox of Ohio
state University; Dr. living (l.e^n-
oerg of Y< shiva University: Dr
Baruch Levine of New York Uni-1
varsity; Dr. David Sidorsky o!
Columbia University; Dr. Herman
I Stein of Case-Western Reserve
University; Dr, Mervin F, Verbit
of Brooklyn Coll>
Among the local Jewish agencj
executives are Mrs, Frances Beat-
man of the Jewish Family Service
New York and Irwin Shaw ol th'
Jewish Community Center, De-
troit Appointees from nat onal
Jewish agencies include Dr. HariA
L Barron of the National Founda-
tion for Jewish Culture: Dr. Al-
fred Jospe of the B'nai B'rith Hil-
lel Foundation; Herberl Millman
of the National Jewish Welfare
Board, and Rabbi Daniel Jeremy
Silver of the National Foundation
!oi Jewish Culture
Among tin' Jewish educators on
the boar' are Dr. Alvin Schiff ol
the Jewish Education Committee
and Isaac Toubbi of the American
Association for Jewish Education.
Appointees from the arts and let-
ters Includa Dr. Chaim Potok,
Charles E. Silberman, Philip Slo-
movitz and Eli Wiesel Max M
Fisher, Detroit, Mich.. ..nd Philip
Bernstein of New York are ex-
cios.
Irving Blum, Baltimore com
munaJ leader and chairman ol
the Task Force on Jewish Identity,
which was responsible for the es-
tablishment of the Institute, had
pn v'iously been named chairman ot
the Institutes board. Prof. Leon
A. Jiek of Brandeis University
was recently appointed as director
of the Institute.
The Institute, with national
headquarers in Boston, is a divi-
sion of the CJF charged with seek-
ing and developing innovative pro-
grams that will "strengthen and
enhance the quality of Jewish life.'
Created at the 40th CJF general
assembly in Pittsburgh last No-
,,,.,!,., "..'',, i,,.' two vears of
intensive study and: community
dialogue, the Institute was ^iveti
an initial three-year life-span to
carry out its Charge which en-,
compasses the total fabric of Jew-
ish life. The board held its first
meeting in conjunction with the
CJF quarterly board of directors i
and national committee meetings
in New York City last weekend.
Among the areas of concern for .
which projects will be initiated'
are Jewish family life. Jewish edu-
cation, the influence of Israel
Jewish leadership and organiza-
tion, and the relationship of Jew-'
ish teaching and values to current
issues and problems.
To initiate and finance accept-,
able projects the general assem-
bly gave approval for a $2.25 mil-
lion "risk capital fund" for its
initial three years life-span.
In addition to national projects
which will be tested in local com-
munities the Institute iii place
special emphasis on local pro-
mains initiated, conducted and fi-
nanced directly by individual com-
munities with national guidance
and evaluation by the Institute to
assure the most wide-spread in-
volvement in innovative projects
and the broadest replica.ion of the
most successful ones.
The CJF is the association ol
central community organization*
Federations, Welfare Funds
Community Councils serving
soo Jewish communities in the
United States and Canada. It aids
these communities to mobilize
maximum support for '.he United
Jewish Appeal and other overseas
agencies, and the major national
and local services involving financ-
ing, planning and operating h( alth.
welfare, cultural, educational, com-
munity relations and other pro-
grams benefiting all residents,
VA Offers New Reduced
Premium Insurance Plan
Veterans who have continued
their term life insurance will l)c
able to reduce premium payments
in advancing vears through a new-
plan announced by the va. The
program provides for reducing
lienefits by 50X at age 70, 'has'
ivoiding future premium increases,
The Miami Veterans Assist ince
Center at 51 SW 1st Ave. will
provide additional Information up-
on request.
IMPERIAL POINT
COLUNADES
d"n. 2 Bts. dtlsu Apt
}ned pores pets welcome
iisiisti $27,500 -
flttel) 4 beaut.fulU-
$32,500.
K.MtftCUNRY
REALTOR
K4477B
m. m-iiM
RIE'S
505 North Slate Road 7
Plantation 581-5533.
-Ilaiun & Wood tt h Barf"
DINNERS FROM $2.25
Real Veal Scunjilt!
VISIT OUR NEW LOUNGE
'jst Remodeled & More BeauWui Than .or
yt\< /N. Il\l E.NTKK1 U\W.M
FOOD SERVED TIL A.M.
CLOSED TUESDAY
COZUMEU!
MEXICO
4 DAYS 3NITES
M55 KR mSON tXXltlt OCCUPANCr
INCLUDES: ROUND TRIP JET AIR FARE
HOTEL MEALS TRANSFERS
ROAT TRIP TO SAN FRANCISCO BEACH
OLWELL
TRAVEL SERVICE
FORT LAUDERDALE
4751 N OCEAN DR. (A1A) 231 S.E. 1st AVE.
SEA RANCH CENTER DOWNTOWN
942-8181 522-0685
S/S STATENDAM
MEDITERRANEAN EXPLORERS' CRUISE
DEPARTING NEW YORK OCT. 6th
Returning Port Everglades Nov. 18
25 UNUSUAL PORTS JNJJLUDING
GREEK ISLANDS
RATES START AT $1,440.
Ph. 565-1859
Hyde Travel inc..!!'">*
^KMBm ^^^ ft.liricrfcit.FH.

TOUR IRA.II IS 0'iP BUSINtS'
WESTFORD
ACADEMY
Weitford Academy of Connecticut
comes to its new quarters
in Coral Springs
t. GRADES 9-12 .. SMALL CLASSES .. (tUTUCtflONAL
.. STUDY SK1U.S .. HONORS I'ROGRVM
. CERTIFIED TEACHERS INDIVIDUAL AI'IOTHM
. TRANSPORTATION O\FET0RIUM
.. PREPARATION FOR COLLEGE BOARD EXAMMTWM
Tlu' WN'fWM f WeslfonT$ Program i rvUmeti
by Colli'iu- placement of all it* prai/iiafrs.
APPLICATIONS ARE NOW BEING ACCEPTED
FOR SEPTEMBER ENROLLMENT
3251 N.W. 101 AVE.
CORAL SPRINGS
TELWMB0
AJ. GENUA Ph.D^ DIRECTOR
"\Hirre College Preparation Assure*
College) Admission"
nettLe Iw CReek
SHOP
PILLOW CLEARANCE
Instant redecorating
at bargain prices
I
Ove'500 sup lous -
savings. Silks. Velvets. Emoroiflenes. Furs ... all
those ex-: letns you wanted but thought too
expensive. All first quality but we must dear our
shelves to make room for next seasons fashions.
Regularly priced S6 to SI3 NOW $5.00
No mail or phone orders. Hurry while the
selection is good.
NETTLE CREEK SHOP
914 East Las Olas Blvd.
Ft. Lauderdale, Florida


Page 6
Page 8
+Je*is*ncrk/tor
Friday, June 16, <
Rabbi Jaffe New President
Of Broward Board of Rabbis
At the annual spring meeting of
the Browanl Board of Rabbis, Di
Samuel Z. Jaffe. spirifial leader
of Temple Beth El, Hollyvood
was electee* president for the com-
ing year. Serving with him will
be Rabbi Arthur Abrams of Tem-
ple Emarut-El, Fort Laudfcrdak
vice president, and Rahbi Avmir
L. Drazin of Temple Uriel. Mira-
mar. secretary-treasurer.
The Broward Board of Rabbis
comprised of Jewish congrega-
tions in Broward County, encom
passes Orth-xlox. Reform and Con-
servative rabbis. The chaplaincy
program at South Florida State
Hospital is served by the board
which also coordinates religious
activities of the Jewish community
at large.
Col. Yerocham Amitai, 45, a
veteran Israeli Air Force com-
mander, has been appointed
director of the Israel Aliyah
Center of the World Zionist Or-
ganization, which has 14 of-
fices in the United States and
Canada. Col. Amitai succeeds
CoL Ncrhum Golan in the post
2450 E. Commercial Blvd.
NBXT TO MOTHER
TUCKERS
Phone 771-9391
300 S. Andrews
CORNER LAS OLAS BLVD.
Phone 524-3144
WE STOCK
GIFT BOXES
524-4387
Holland America's S.S. Nieuw Amsterdam anchors off one of the South American islands as colorfully dressed native
fishermen watch with undisguised curiosity.
Florida Tourists Never Had It So Convenient!
Between June 5 and Dec. 8.
Florida's Port Everglades will
be the port of departure for 16
Caribbean cruises aboard the
S.S. Nieuw Amsterdam.
Each of the new cruises, with
the exception of the one on
Sept. 27, will be 10 days lone
and will follow identical itiner-
aries. Ports of call are varied
and feature some of the most
interesting islands in the West
Indies and South America.
Among these will be Pampetar
on the island of Margarita, a
new port of call this season for
the Nieuw Amsterdam.
Margarita is a resort island
off the coast of Venezuela that
the Venezuelans have been try-
ing for years to keep to them-
selves. Serene and >teepec in
history I it was one of the ori na'. outposts of the Old World
in the new), the island is re-
garded by the Venezuelan-; a*
a South American Tahiti Ot: er
ports included will be Oran-
iestad. Aruha: La Gua-a 'for
Caracas'. Venezuela: Fort de
France. Martinique: and Char-
lotte Amalie. St. Thomas.
Prices, which vary acv>Hing
to the season, start at S2G" to
S310 an' range upward to $785
and $995 for deluxe cabin
And we know of no other tyne
uf arrangements which include
__ in one price air-ondi-
tioned shipboard accommoda-
tions, all meals. ente.-Ta'nrn-^t.
other extras and all gratui-
ties aboard ship.
The exception to this new
serin of cruises is the one of
Sept 27 which will be eight
day* long. It will call at the
rorts of Charlotte Amalie. St.
rhorr.as: PhiliDsburg. St. Maar-
en: and San Juan, Puerto ".vie >.
Rates on this cruise start at
S210 and range upward to Sf 10.
Cruise dates to mark on your
calendar for the "Friendship"
Nieuw Amsterdam are: June
5. 16 and 26: July 7. 17 and 28:
Aug. 7 and 18: Oct. 6. 16 and
27: Nov. 6. 17 and 27: and Dec.
8. 1972.
A cruise on the Nieuw Am-
sterdam K simply. jut r'ain
fun. Completely refurbished in
1961 and recently recaroeted.
the vessel is as modern today as
instant coffee but has still
managed to retain her Old
World charm. She il air-on-
d tioned throughout and stabil-
izer equipped. The vessel has
the opulence of 25 different
kinds of hardwood, many of
which have been created into
exquisite designs, not to men-
tion th beautiful hand-rubbed
panels in the cabins.
Although the Nieuw Amster-
dam is a beauty in the classic
sense, she is just as much of a
"fun" ship as her sailing com-
panions, the flagship Rotter-
dam and S.S Statendam. Be-
her ballrooms with soaring
ceilings, balconies, and spiral
staircases, right alongside is a
little discotheque for people
who are under 30 or want to
be. The ship has the great ad-
vantage in that it lets passen-
gers choose their own era.
The vessel offers passengers
all of the usual parties, sports
avtivities. midnight buffets and
indoor and outdoor ]>ools that
one expects to find an a luxury
cruise liner. Over cocktails the
first night out" you'll meet
new friends before going to the
dining room to select from the
many fine courses offered Next
morning you can have break-
fast in bee or in the warm
morning sun on deck.
The rest of the day is yours
to soak up the pleasure of ship-
board life. Sit and do absolutely
nothing at all. Or join :n a
game of deck tennis, shuffle-
board, miniature golf or tran
shooting. An experienced ciuise
staff is right there to keep
things running smoothly
If you prefer you can work
out in the gym. take a swim in
one of the pools, or unwind
with a massage, sign up fjr a
dance lesson or see a first-run
movie in the Nieuw Amster-
dam's theater. There il lOfM
thing to do every minute it
you wish and somehow the
days will seem too short.
in addition to the ships many
colorful lounges, dining rooms
and coxy bars, other facilities
include a boautv parlor and
barber shop, swimming pools.
drug store, gift shop, turkish
bath. a fully equip;vd modern
laundry and pressing service
an:. an experienced me lica'.
staff.
Many first-time passengers
land repeat passengers as well!
will still want to sample what
the Nieuw Amsterdam had to
offer becaue from her grace-
fully curved, flared bow, to her
streamlined rudder, she pro-
claims her aristocratic breed-
ing. Every line of her super-
structure sweeps back with
modulated grace. She sits com-
fortably in the water, as though
she were built in it. and was
supremely happy to be there
which she is.
Now. about those ports. On
the Nieuw Amsterdam's 10 day
cruises the first stop after leav-
ing Port Everg'aoVs will be
A run*. Newest of the Carib-
bean resorts. Aruba is one of
the principal islands of the
Netherlands Antilles group.
Your cruise will call at the
capital citv. Oranjestad. This
is a Quaint, tidy Dutch citv
slashed with gay colors if the
Caribbean. In fact, '.oca! tradi-
tion dictates that no home be
the samp color as i neighbor
The resulting kaleidoscope of
pastel* is one of the most
charming facets of the island's
jnique atmosphere.
A walk through cV>wnown
Oranjestad offers exciting shop-
ping possibilities. Fine products
from the world over are avail-
able at free-port prices. You'll
also want to see Queen Wil-
:.na Park and Fort Wiihelm
III. which was built in 179S.
All of Aruba II easily acces-
sible from the city and the
island's peculiar windswept ter-
rain offers many an intriguing
sight. One of the most interest-
ing o! these is the di\ l-divi ?ree.
Sculptured by the constant
trade winds, this tree defies
nature's norms by growing side-
ways.
From Aruba the Nieuw Am-
sterdam then is for La ^ua-
Ira, the port city of Caracas
the capital of Venezuela. It is
separated :nto two distinct sec-
tors the ancient city, with
its charming Spanish archit.se-
ture. and the new Caracas with
enormous superblocks regular
squadrons of cement bui'din -
painted in vivid 11 -'read
over the hillsi Id
The heart of new Cara**! is
th- ('< ntro B divar the P.ock-
er Cei 'er of Vi m >t> n
an Imposing group of buildings
culminating in two "V'-s'o-v
is. ar>d the ehr-'.ane
Avenida Bolivar, which nxtsei
through the center, f^'it ("a-a~-
as is not all ultra-modern. In
the old section you can viit
Simon Bolivar's honv where
this freedom fighter was ;>om.
and the Nathional Par.theon.
h: .....v>
The cruise next call> at Pam-
pur <>n Ixhn de Marearita
which ls only 24 miles off the
coast of South America. Some
say that Margarita i- trulj
last of the undiscovered Crib-
bean islands To ecstatic Vene-
zuelans, who regard the island
as a South American Tahiti, it
has been a familiar place al-
most since Columbus dJarovi re I
it. But for Americans, Marga-
rita remains uniquely unknown
and untouched. The fishing and
snorkeling off its shores are un-
beatable and its b aches are
excellent and virtually umtaed
Pampatar. where 'he Nieuw
Amsterdam arrives, has a fam-
ous colonial church and the
Castle of San Carlos Borronco.
a jewel of colonial architecture
Not far away is Porlamar, the
island's largest city, which has
an interesting open-air market.
Here you'll find odd-shaped
natural pearls since the island
was once the world's major
source of these lovely items.
After prowling through gentle
Margarita's quaint ullages.
you'll probably decide that there
is no better place to absorb the
sun. sand and sea
Martinique is next where the
ship arrives in Fort de France,
its capital. This island is tat]
former home of Emprcai J&.
sephine. wife of Napoleon, and]
Mt. Pelee, the \o\-ano that]
erupted in 1902 and destrojll
the entire town of .;\ Pierre,
leaving 30.000 dead and oae|
survivor.
Fort de France, a ehsrrrmit
city of yellow-tinted luildugs,
offers a number of sites for thr 1
visitor such as ol i Fort Si
Louis and the Cathedral with [
its ornate, open spilt. But
there's more to Martinique, too j
high domed mountain, n>
perb forests, vast lugar cane |
fi Id*, banana and pineappi.
plantations and lush tropical I
vegetaton As for
Fort de France there are the ]
streets of Rue Viet
Antoine-Siger and R le Schoel-
cher where one car. find bar-
is in porcelain, crystal ui
French perfume.
Next you arrive In ("harlotte
Amalie on St. Th mat, the
"shopping para I thr
Western Hemispl
the pier you can d
bea.- i Cattle once >rtrj
now a hotel. Here 5 *
Tower, carefully
cording to the on:
Leaving Blu h. a- I y -u can
com'nue up Mai
Drakes Seat, a
which gives you a lo\
Magens Bay ami 0
Francis Drake Cl
rranv American
Virgin laiai I- nee
Then it's on to M
Hotel where you *' '^ \
the "speciality of the
their wortdVfamo *"
quiri. Charlotte A
ping Center Ls next Its '
cult to enumerate the *m
tvpes of bargain a ''**_
and most of them r Mff\
prices And. don't forget rl
customs still allow an
$100 of duty-free
this port and you can m*
one full gallon of "piritl -* I
dutv-free as well. .1
Although St. nxxnai boxj
last port of call, the advenwj
is not over yet. There are
cral more days and nights"
sea time to reminwee a*
ab-orb what has been seen ip
to exchange experiences
wirt I
fellow passengers and
friends. ,-. i
Finally, when the M^-^
sterdam sails into the hartj
at Port Everglades, your ean_
bean cruise may be over, but t
happv memories will ;"-'er |
for many years to con
For complete information and brochures on the '6
bean cruises sailing from Port Everglades, write Hoi
America Cruises, Department P, Pier 40 North River. Ne*|
York, New York, 10014, or phone Ft. lauderdale 565 5588


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