The Jewish Floridian of North Broward

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Oct. 22, 1971)-v. 3, no. 6 (Mar. 22, 1974).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Dec. 17, 1971 called also v.1, no. 4, Sept. 21, 1973 called also v.2, no. 23, and Dec. 14, 1973 called also v.2, no. 28, repeating numbering of previous issues.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Vol. 2, no. 1 omitted in numbering of issues and was not published.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statement conflict: Sept. 7, 1973 called no. 22 in masthead and no. 23 in publisher's statement; Nov. 30, 1973 called no. 27 in masthead and no. 28 in publisher's statement.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44572526
lccn - sn 00229547
ocm44572526
System ID:
AA00014313:00016

Related Items

Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
rJewish Floridia in
of VOIM If HROWARO
Number 14
May, 5, 1972
Price 20c
May 7 -14 Telethon To Close Campaign
Federation of North
president Alvin Gross
kunctd the appointments
Jjvin Colin and M'-s. Ls-
Ejner to serve as cochair-
the telethon which will
1972 United Jewish
uen and Israel
no. Fund
|pr CoUr and Mrs. Wag-
lone tven active mom-
the Jewish community
ire in many organizations
lion to being members of
i! directors of Fedc.a-
. will be conducted
T through May 14
I itdy 120 m^n and
be involved in thus
I "act every family in
which has not
previously contributed to the
1972 Federation campaign.
M.\ Gross u rulers cored the
importance of this effort when
he reported; "We have just re-
ceived word from the United
Jewish Appeal that, as of this
week, the total Jewish immi-
gration from the USSR, to
Israel since Jan. 1 has issed
the 9.000 mark.
"The costs of absorbing these
9000 newcomers and the an-
ticipated thousands who will be
coming later thiN year is stag-
gering. It is hard for us to con-
ceive th( costs involved.
"For example," he continued,
"the United Jewish Appeal has
requested $46 million for immi-
gration and absorption this year;
$198 million for housing; $.140
million for education: $79 mil-
lion for health services; $54 mil-
lion for social welfare, and $14
million for use in other coun-
tries
"We must acknowledge our
share in this responsibility." Mr.
Gross declared. "I urge every
family that will be contacted
through the telethon tc make a
contribution to this humanitar-
ian effort. It's important we
remember that while we are
asked to give money, Russian
Jews have put their lives on the
line to get to Israel."
Dr. Colin and Mrs. Warner
have formed a large pool of vol-
unteers to help them in this
week-long program, thro-.gh
which most families in the com-
munity will be contacted for
their pledge to the campaign.
'0% Of Soviet Immigrants
ave Found Housing, Jobs
AVIV iJTA> More
I of Jewish immigrants
i Soviet Union who ar-
I Israel last year have
Bious ng and jobs, accord-
A. Pincus, chair-
thi World Zionist Orjja-
i Kxecutive.
ArVtressing the presidium of
the Zionist Actions Committee
here, Mr Pincus said the fore-
cast of 70.000 immigrants in
1972 earned realistic on the
basis of the number who hive
arrived during the first three
months of the vear. He said
Million Allocated For Inner (Jty Jews
EW YORK (WNS1 In an unprecedented action, the Fed-
t1 f Jewish Philanthropies of New York allocated $12 million
lit.- Emergency Fund to expand its existing programs for Jewish
|and innovate others on an experimental basis. The action fol-
ar-Iong study of problems of the urban Jewish poor. The
will be supplemented with an annual $600,000 outlay from
Uon's regular maintenance budget until fiscal year 1976-77
the ongoing cost of the program will be absorbed into the
Jar Federation budget for services.
Approves Bill by Vote of 359-2
WASHINGTON (WNB) By a vote of .359-2, the House of
Sentativta approved a bill urging the President and State De-
ner.t to make the plight of Soviet Jewry a priority issue in the
an! to take "immediate and determined steps to help So .id
achieve freedom of expression, religion and emigration. A
liar bill i- awaiting action in the Senate.
Udmann Denies Winocour Allegations
LONDON i JTA) Dr. Nahum Goldmann. president of the World
phh Congress declared that he was compelled to correct
a-curate assertions" about the WJC by Jack Winocour, who re-
>** recently as director of its information department in Lon-
i Wlnocoor attributed his resignation to the alk-ged usurpation
the WJC* independence by the Israel government. Dr. Gold-
en said. In my long years as president of the WJC. I have never
fctsed any attempt on the part of the Israeli authorities to en-
tree ar. attitude on the WJC leadership."
>avid Mar-lush Begins Hunger Strike
TKL AVIV UTA- David Markish, son of the late poet
W Markish vjctim Qf ,he stalin purRe of Jewish intellectual* in
f2 has started a hunger strike in his Moscow home to protest tne
Ntlnucd refusal of Soviet authorities to grant him and WflJBtner
> visas to go to Israel. His wife. Mrs. Irina Markish, eft Israel
fr the United States to try to rally support on behalf of her nus-
fand and mother-in-law, Mrs. Esther Markish.
about half of the newcomers
would be from western coun-
tries.
He warned, however, than an
anti-immigration hark lush that
has u>v*loped in the country has
had a bad affect on immigra-
tion generally and on Sj.iet
immigrants In particular. So-
viet Jews are not Indifferent to
what go** on in Israel. Pincus
said, relerring to resentment
among the settled population
over certain privileges accorded
new Immigrants.
Despite these development g,
Israel continues to be the pre-
ferred destination of most Jews
granted exit from Russia. Only
130 Soviet Jews have gone di-
rectly to the United States, it
was learned here, and only about
40 who reached Vienna enroute
to Israel changed their minds
and went to the United States
Instead.
A few Jewish emigre families
from the U.S.S.R. have gone to
Canada or Australia from Vi-
enna. Only one family that
reached Israel left subsequently
for the United States and that
was over a year ago.
The first Jewish family Trom
Soviet Georgia to pull out of
Israel after living here a while,
departed a few days ago. it was
learned. The couple said life
here was too hard, but friends
of theirs claimed they were
chronic complainers.
Goldo Meir To Visit
Rumania Early In May
JERUSALEM Premier
Golda Meir will visit Rumania for
lour or five days early in May it
was announced. This will be the
first visit by an Israeli Premier to
anv Communist country. It was
believed the trip was linked to
President Nixon's forthcoming vis-
it to Moscow. Soviet leaders were
believed eager to learn Israel's po-
sition, through Rumania, before
his visit.
Also expected to be explored was
Rumania's willingness to act as a
mediator between Israel and the
Arab states.
It was a long plane ride from Vienna to Lod, Israel, for ih-s
young Soviet lew who arrived with his family after a stop-
over at the transit center there. Within hours of his arrival
in Israel he and his family were on their way to their new
home in a development town with help being provided by
the United Jewish Appeal, the major beneficiary of the 1972
United Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund campaign
being conducted by the Jewish Federation of North Broward.
Support For Embassy
Move Being Sought
WASHINGTON. D.C. (JTA I
American Jewish leaders are try-
ing to get the support of both
major parties for a proposal to
move the U.S. Embassy in Is-
rael from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem.
Such a move would be tan'a-
mount to United States recogni-
tion of Jerusalem as Israel's
capital, a status the United
States has refused to acknowl-
edge since the state was formed
in 1948.
The Democratic Platform
Committee, headed by Prof.
Richard E. Neustadt of Harvard,
will start hammering out its
planks for the 1972 presidential
elections here on June 22, after
receiving recommendations from
eight regional hearings. The
Democratic nominating conven-
tion opens in Miami Beach, Fla.
on July 10.
The Republican Platform
Committee, headed by Rep. John
J. Rhodes of Arizona, was ache l-
ulcd to meet Aug. 14 in i'an
Diego, a week before the con-
vention opening on Aug. 21. It
is possible, that the Republican
Convention will be shifted to
Miami Beach.
The Jewish .ea.iership hopes
to get both parties to include
planks calling on the President
to order the transfer of the Em-
bassy. The shift of pressure from
the State Department to the
two political parties is said to bo
the result of the State Depart-
ment's continued refusal, pub-
licly and privately, to consider
the latest proposal for an Em-
bassy shift.
Police Investigate Friedman Activities
JERUSALEM (JTA) At-
torney General Meir Shamgar
reportedly has asked the police
to investieate certain activities
of Mordechai Friedman who re-
signed last week as managing
director of the government-
owner Netivei Neft oil company.
A government panel investi-
gating Netivei Neft absolved
Friedman of wrong doing. Mr.
Shamear told newsmen, how-
ever, that his request for an in-
vestigation stemmed trom cer-
tain matters that came up dur-
ing the panel's investigation,
including Friedman's income tax
and foreign currency activities
and the mixing of his private
funds with public property in
the accounts of Netivei Neft.
The panel, which concluded in
its majority reDort that admin-
istrative irregularities on Fried-
man's part d'd not warrant bus
dismissal, said that the proper
authorities should nevertheless,
look into them if they saw fit.


Pcge 2-
+Je1stirk**tlan
Friday. May 5
French Social-Medical Program
Pilot Project Sponsored By JDC
30 50% off
By LOIS HACKETT
JIK <,rnr\a
OSE. the major French Jewnft
medical organization.
The Fitous bolizes the dynamic people-to-peo-
ple approach which JDC has -Hiilt
into the project. Designed to out ased people in need of help,
and Improve both their health and
liting conditions through the pro-1
>n of adequate social sen ices
and systematic care, it canv- ou
of a study the JDC and the FSJU
made in 1969 to identify the m.ijor
needs of some 3.000 aged Jews re-
in thi* day and ase most peo-
ple take their telephones for
p.anted. But not Nessim and Mai-
eelk FltouasL
lh Fitoussis mot their :eal
namet are an aging Tunisian iou-
ple who live in one of the sat -llite
eMea around Paxis. far from fam-
ily and Mends. Th. y left Tunis in
1961 after the Bizerte crisis ami.
when Mr. Fiion-- ht faiied.
had to apply for relief to the
French Jewish community.
For them their new telephone
is literally a lifeline. At 72. riearisa
is almost completely blind. His
wi.v. 10 years younger, has a se-
vere heart condition. For several
years tacy lived in constant an-
xiety about whet would hnppen
if Marctlle ever had a heart at-
tack and Nosim could not get
help for her.
The telephone ha relieved thi
fear It was installed two months' thus relieving JDC and the FSJU
Over half of them live alone,
or a* couples, since most French
apartment-; are -o small that :ami-
li.-s cannot keep their parents with
them, as was the traditional Pt-1
tern back in North Africa. Even1
when the aged live with their chil-
divn. the families ar. itlll >o :>re-
caiiously situated that they can-
not aftord the expense* of long-
teim meiiical can-.
Almost all of the elderly people
proved in need of new .-lasses and
ome kind of dental work. More
OZ
Is Having A Sale

into a national scheme and paid
for by the French government.
ago under a pilot project that the
Joint Distribution Committee has
developed to provide better ocial
and medical care for needy, aged
Jews in France.
Mr. and Mrs. Fitou*si are only
of the ongoing financial responsi-
bility
Sines the beginning of the oro-
;iam. 753 socio-medical assess-
ments have been made B72 at
1 he OSE dispensary and *<1 in
\\\o among R20 anxi Jews two- home \isits to clients unable to
thirds of them recent immigrants
from North Africa and Eastern
;h who have benefittad
from the project since its incep-
tion in 1971.
l"-ing funds from the United
-h Apiieal. JDC allocated SH0.-
000 to finance the two-year under-
taking. It i being carried out in
a -x ration with the Fonds S
J :il l"ni(i<\ the o ntral French
Jewish social service agency, and
two of it* affiliates: COJASOR
ceiving assistance from the French j than half needed regular medical
Jewish communitv either in old care either at home or at the dis-
age homes or in their own homes. I*nsary the rest required regular.;
supervision and occasional con-
An important consideration in .. _
. ~ ,. >ultations.
undertaking the project was the.
fact that social legislation has On the social side, the additional
b-en developing in France in care funds have made it possible to,
of the aged which sliould mean implement a long overdue dc.
that in the not too distant future to ral>c ,he food allowance of th.
such services will be integrated ;is: to a barely adequate five francs a
day 'from GO cents to si.OOt
Money is also u>ed for medicines,
special examinations by private
doctors, and. in a number of in-
stances, hosaitalization.
Also, the project's lundi nave
made it possible to make emerg-
ency temporal) placements quickly
in times of cri>is. One blind man
for example who was completely
dependent on his wife could be sent
immediately to privati honv
the aged for several weeks
she had to go to the hospital for
an oi>cration.
Meanwhile, the social workers
on the team have made an inten-,
sive effort to rehabilitate the aged
people physically through pros-
theses, physiotherapy, etc. In
some cases, housekeeping help has
been provided, in oth. rs heating
\J Z-A New Boutique For Women
- Will Reduce For Sole
Batches Of:
Cocktail dresses & Evening Gowns
by Mollie Parnis
Slacks, Skirts, Silk blazers, &
Eisenhower Jackets trom Jaeger
Wrap Dresses, Embroidered Shirts,
and Caftans from Morocco
3150N.E. 9th St.
1 l Slrt" $Mth
of SchraHt'*
e-.t A A
phone
563-1406
ft. loudVdols
go out. Of those assessed. 620. or
more than 80'. were found to be
:n neid of some kind of me-Jical
treatment. In 209 of the cases
illnesses were discovered which the
clients had not known about.
Nearly half of the men and
women examined were over 70
By country of origin they reflected
the successive waves of refugees
that have come to France sine*'
World War II. Some SMI were
Trom Tunisia, 30'I from Eastern
DAY BEDS
**0~^~&m+.
**~+m+*4*0*
i*9a*+*m**+0^m+mo
T.l.pho.: 771-4064
!
the Jewish welfare agency respon- Kurope. and 6 per cent from K ;;. pt. and hot water were installed in the
siblr- for th" can of the aged and I Only 13H were French born. fiW people's rooms. The social
workers also encouraged their cli-
ents to engage in part-time work '
if they could and to get out v.ore'
to visit children or friends or at-
tend old age clubs
Not the least of the project's,
benefits has been the change for 1
the better in the outlook of the '
aged people served. The attention
and care they have been receiving
has given them a new sense of i
worth, elf-respect, improving their
status with their families and cir- j
cle of acquaintances.
Back home after a gall bladder
operation. 73-year-old Mr. Cohen
summed it up when he told th. so-
cial worker. Its not just that
I m no longer in pain I fee) rm '
part of the world again."
BOUDREAUS DELICATESSEN
lANDWICHtS PAWTY FLATTENS
LUNCMION MEATS SALADS
Gconce BOUDREAU
^OMUTOI.
******
1SOI.A COMMERCIAL SLVO
IMPCRIAL ARTS BUM.
FORT LAUDEKDALI. FLORIDA
hS>H*u9w^ih^M^i<^i
IDA
HOUSE of LORDS
MEN'S HAIRSTYLING
3110 N. FEDERAL HIGHWAY
uumwusE pom
Fort Lauderdmle'a
quality Day Bcda
at Vt to Vl the
Slip
ejection of lovely
Cap rovers ia choice 0/ plant or auOi-
*d fabric.
Why not come directly to our factory to
Day Bed pvrehaae*
e your
JaAFjfajfeu

FACTORY AND SHOWROOM
771 H. FLAGLER 0*.. FT. LAUOOOALE 74-H$5
D/tVE KERSftL *i BOB SHAW
ormerit. ol Ponpano Fashion Square Men's Hair Styling)
s IMM| prinli iMfvinl ms. fair pin sales,
loir atari* i>i ArTMOIOTMLr 943-7944
We put a lot of summer
into one camp.
I lere s .1 plat e where y'oiirkid>
(.in do iiist ,ilx)ut ever> thing undii
the sun.
\ magnificent 65 acret ami
the gentle rolling hills near Ocala
National Forest. And on the shores
ot .1 natural spring lake.
We've got ever\ water sport a kid could ask foe Boating, fishing
< anoeing, swimming and waterskting. ()n Kind, we've not a complete
programot athletics, tennis, horseback riding, drama, music and the
arts. And ue tailor it to fit each child individually We even offer
tutoring in Hebrew.
this summed ** ^^ h^ 8 ^^ ,U" caTOP>l WpifiafrOl here
But youbetter hurry up and enroll them now WeonK have
lor 125 select boys and girls. A^es 6 to 16.
\u<,kTp VV |,nc!"-1,22 to ,l,lv M Seco^ sesskm, |uK 21 to
August I OnK $$ 5 per month (), $725 for the summer.
j Camp Shalom A
I___________________________mmm_________________David and Shelley J
room
Sokol Owner/Drectcv*


Friday. May 5, 19772
* klsl fkrkfi in
Page 3
Jewish Family Service
Marks 10th Anniversary
The Jewish Family Service of
KrUard County will hold its 10th
annual mooting at 8 p.m. Thurs-
jSa,n. at Temple Beth Sh.-
BA Hollywood.
The JFS offers professional
l-ounsolinc iWVfcl to individuals
and families in such areas as man-
! conflict, behavior of children.
concerns of the elderly, and the
anxieties and pressures precipit-
ated in a world of changing values
| and standards.
More 0n S00 families so-ight
heip from JFS. a beneficiary of
tne Jewish Federation of North
Broward. the JwWl Welfare Fed-
eration of Greater Hollywood, and
the United Fund of Broward Coun-
ty, last year.
David Zeff, director of tha-De-
partment of Services Vi IrrternV-
drHtc Cities,' Council of Jewilh
Federations and Welfare Funds,
will be the principal speaker. He
will discuss "The Changing Jew ish
Community; the Enhanced Role
of the Jewish Family Agency."
Election officers and board mem-
bers for 1972-73 will take place
at the meeting Mrs. Martin Kurtz
and Dr. Edward Nacht have been
nominated from the North Brow-
ard area.
The community is invited to at-
tend this program; refreshments
will be served.
Flagler Federal Aids Big Loan To Israel
Flagler Federal Savings A Loan
I Association of Miami is a partici-
pant in a recently negotiated $50
million loan with the Tefahot Is-
rael Mortgage Bank Ltd. for con-
I itniction ol new housing in Israel.
The Federal Home Loan Bank
s| Boston and the Federal Home
Bank of New York each provided
Chai Chapter To
Install Officers
The Chai Chapter of Hada^sah
i : conduct it* installation of of-
oi th.' 1972-73 year at 11:45
ijb Thursday, May 11. in the
Coach House Harbor Restaurant.
N Fdoral Hwy. Pompano
Former president Mrs. Milton
will install the following
- Mrs. Mat B<> bier,
Mis. Abraham Tobias,
vice provident: Mrs.
non, fund-raising vice
M Isadora Meltzer,
vice president; Mrs
program vice presi-
George Moiroff. trass-
David R. Shaw, flnan-
Mrs. Marie Cassell
arv. and Mrs. Fred
idlng m Trtwry.
in to the installation of
will bo a luncl
am.
ALL PLANTS AT
WHOLESALE PRICES!
Saturday & Sunday Only
MIMS GARDEN
NURSERY
4861 S.W. 106 Ave., Davie
(Go west on Griffin Rd.
to 106 Ave.) -Call 581-4935
Party Supplies for
Larfe Small Parties,
**?! HUCTIWI OF: /
"M- NOtSEMMERS MliOOHS:
AND DCCOMTIONS
0EN DAILY 9l*.*m
SAT l:M 3*4
Novelty Sales, Inc.
KSJN. DIXIE HWY.
" LAUDERDALE
5*35022
.Hmtl*
$25 million and entered into sepa-
rate agreements with Tefahot and
with Agency for International De-
velopment.
Flagler Federal requested par-
ticipation of $500,000 in the loan
according to Herschel Rosenthal.
executive vice president of the
Miami financial institution.
According to Mr. Rosenthal. this
is the first AID. loan of this type
made through the Federal Home
Loan Hanks The first $25 million
already has been disbursed to Is-
rael by the New York and Boston I
banks. The second $25 million will I
be turned over to Tefahot within \
12 months
Temple Beth Israel
Sisterhood Installs
Temple Beth Israel Sisterhood
will install its 1972-73 officers
Monday. May 15. at a luncheon at
the Gaslight Restaurant, Planta-
tion, with Rabbi Akiva Brilliant
as installing officer.
Taking the oath of office will
be Mrs. Robert Rogoff, president;
Mrs. Max Cohn, ways and means
vice president; Mrs. Jerry Kraus.
membership vice president; Mrs.
Charles Doich, education vice pres-
ident; Mrs. Norman Cohn, pro-
gramming vice president; Mrs.
Jules Shapiro, financial secretary;
Mrs. Harry Spring, treasurer; Mrs.
David Coplon, recording secrer
tary, and Mrs. Richard Mindell,
corresponding secretary.
The new board of trustees will
include Mrs. Joel Miller, Mrs. Don-
ald Raiman, Mrs. Mark Wilson,
Mrs. Marvin Block, Mrs. Sylvan
Goldin. and Mrs. George Berman.
Margate Jewish Center
Sisterhood Installation
The Margate Jewish Center
Sisterhood will install its officers
for 1972-73 at a luncheon Tuesday,
May 16, at the Lakeside Haven.
1189 West River Dr., Margate.
Mrs. Henry Kessler will install
the new officers, including Mrs.
Lilyan Strum, president; Mrs. M
Solomon. Mrs. J. Ellner and Mrs.
Klatzkin. vice presidents; Mrs. A.
Matten, financial secretary; Mi's.
I. Kaplan, recordirli secretary,
and Mrs. M. Winett, correspond-
ing secretary.
SWAP SHOP
EVERY
FRI.SA7. SUN. WED.

6 A.M. TO 4 P.M.
PHONE 5S1-42S1
L
SUNRISE SIVO *.W. Hrt
HIS! USt Of *4t
ALSO
VISIT THE
IE. Thunder-bird ^
SWAP-SHOP
SAT. & SUN.
AT THE
HI-WAY ON
U.S. 1 AT THE
AIRPORT-
FT. LAUD.
NIGHTLY
(X) RATED
MOVIES AT
Adult
DRIVE. IN THFflTRE
AND
PHOHF.
5137733
OR
9723242
<
>
DOES YOUR CHILD WANT
TO BE A MEMBER OF
THE MARCHING BAND?
We have the largest staff of
degreed and professional
music instructors in South
Florida.
Sale* Rental* n>l"
I'iuno and OrBn Uwnmm
BROWARD BAND
INSTRUMENT
111! N E * AVE FT L*UOED*L
PHONE J*J ;
PEOPLE DIE THEN
WONDER WH1T-
HEALTH FOODS WERE
FOR THE OTHER GUY-
... ut *ltMM Mil
77t4
INI
..MUMMM i0
UUKHAU
FLA.
HI W. CW0 KU.
305 W 1H4
305 311 2IU
]) L MUWTiC 1
POMPANO MACK. FLA. 33012
305 712 MM
HAUJWMlE KACM ItVO.
HAUAN0AU.
. fLA. 33*1
305 SIMM
NEXT WEEK, DURING PHONE 0 THON,
YOU WILL BE ASKED TO
MAKE A PLEDGE TO THE 1972 UNITED
JEWISH CAMPAIGN AND ISRAEL
EMERGENCY FUND.
PLEASE .
DON'T MAKE IT A MATTER Of "WILL YOU,"
BUT ONLY OF "HOW MUCH."
JEWISH FEDERATION
OF NORTH BROWARD
3905 N. Andrews Ave., Ft. Lauderdale, Fla 565-4869
lADBM :":::
Individual 'Ei.clui.ve .Imported
Woo'etii Dom.it.c
Fabric*
p*^UST0m tailor
HI34 E LAS OLAS BLVD. Alteration Service 52.V6613
CARS DELIVERED
ANYWHERE
INSIDE
AUTO STORAGE
FULL
INSURANCE
DOOR TO DOOR
SERVICE
ICC
LICENSED
524-9438
AUTOMOBILES DELIVERED .... NATIONWIDE
320 S. W. 1st AVE.
Ft. Lauderdale. Fla. 33308
522-7382
Over thirty five years
of service to the communities
in North Dade and Broward Counties.
RIVERSIDE
MEMORIAL CHAPEL. INC. FUNERAL DIRECTORS
North Miami Beach: 16480 N.E. 19th Avenue
920-1010
19th and Alton Road: 1250 Normandy Drive:
in the heart of Miami Beach
Miami: Douglas Road at S.W. 17th Street
Manhattan Brooklyn Westchester Bronx Far Rockaway
To arrange a funeral anywhere in the United States,
call the nearest Riverside Chapel
Carl Grossberg
Murray N. Rubin, F.D.
-i


Page 4
+JmisHhr*&*ri
Friday. Mcy 5 1973

OF NORTH BROWARO kk A H W (J f" f\ \^ I
l VT-1*XK .h STREET. MIAMI. VMpkMM *-?**! f 1 / *- *
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wan k SHrx-HET SKI-MA M THOMPSON
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AI.VIX GR< DAVID M AMDIR
PTMidrni EMitiv Dm-
I j i offi. *: W5 N An4r* Avenue. Ft. L*ud*rdl*. Fla JIM*
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Of The Merchandiac Advrtiad In Ita CoHwnna.
PuM.sbed Rl-Weekly
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The Jewiah Floridian haa abaorbed the Jawiah Umty and the Jewiah Weekly.
McmMr of the Jewiah TehtflrauHic Aoenty. Savon Arta Feature Syndicate.
Worldwide Newa Service. National Editorial Aaaociaton. American AaaociatiOfi
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Requeat.
-Volume 1
Friday, May 5. 1972
Number 14
21 IYAR 5732
Jews Of Silence1 No Longer
A number of years ago, "The Jews of Silence" was
written by Elie Wiesel to focus attention on the mil! ons
of jews living in the Soviet Union. But silence no longer is
the way of either Russian or American Jewry which, this
Sunday, observes Solidarity Day for Freedom of Soviet
Jewry to bring to a climax the most recent campaign on
behalf of our brothers.
In a concerted effort that has enlisted every sec/men*,
organization and institution of American Jewry, some one
million signatures have been collected on petitions calling
upon President Nixon to speak on behalf of the Soviet
Jews when he goes to Russia next month. Telegiams,
letters and other means of communicating with the White
House have let our government leaders know that support
for the Jews of Russia is great.
Solidarity Day demonstrations will take many forms
throughout the country. In Dade County, representatives
of Jewish organizations, national, state and local officials,
will participate in a motorcade from South Beach 'going by
the White House Hotel in a symbolic gesture) to upper
Coilins Avenue and then down Biscayne Boulevard to the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation building, where a press
reception and statements of support on the part of Christian
and Jewish organizations will climax the program.
The campaign on behalf of the Soviet Jews does not
close with Solidarity Day. No longer the Jews of silence, we
have learned that only through eternal vigilance can tr.ere
be freedom for all our people
Anti-Semitic Odor In Amendment
The constant assault on shechita by organized groups
in this country, ranging from animal humane societios to
cr...-Semitic organizations, has on many occasions threrr
ened the future of kashruth. The latest is contained in a bill
which would amend the present Federal Huma.ie Slaugh-
tering Act in such a way that religiously observant Jews
would find it aimost impossible to purchase kosher m
The very language of the new bill indicates that i: is
less in the interest of "humane slaughtering" than in attack
ing the long-accepted religious practice of many Jews
Iu gimmick is that any ritually slaughtered animc) may be
sold commercially only if ALL its meat and meat prod-
ucts are sold as fit for consumption by observing Jew 3. In
other words, the forbidden hind quarters could not be sold
to the general public and thus no kosher slaughterhouse
would be able to exist unless it guadrupled the price ol
kosher cuts and thus price itself out of existence.
We know that not every Jew observes kashruth. but
thi3 attack is against religious freedom as well, and thus
we all have a stake in seeing the defeat of this pernicious
amendment that has the foul odor of anti-Semitism.
We Share Meaning Of law Week'
The traditional May 1 observance of Law Day this
year becomes Law Week in Florida, celebrated by tha Bar
Association from April 26 to May 3 with the slcgan, To-
day's Law Your Heritage."
The slogan was chosen to point up the historical back-
ground of the law and no one is more conscious of ihat
than the Jewish people. During the month of May we will
observe the ancient holiday of Shavuoth, the anniversary
of the giving of the Torah an Mount Sinai. It is in that his-
torical context that we share with all Americans, not just
lawyers, in the full meaning of Law Week.
Bright Spot In Czechoslovakia
At a time when most East European governments cae
harassing their Jewish population and minimizing th? suf-
fering of the Jews during World War II, there is a bright
spot in Czechoslovakia which should be noted. The Minis-
try of Posts of that nation has just issued a stamp com-
memorating the 30th anniversary of the creation of the no-
torious Theresienstadt concentration camp showing the face
of a Jewish child surrounded by barbed wire.
HONG KONG --B> pesl stand-
ants, the Chinese Communist
reaction Ml the North Viet-
namese offensive is genuinely
Striking. The wont is being fair-
ly openly passed in Peking that
this is a Soviet enterprise: that
the unlucky North Vietnamese
have been the VaCtaim "i bad
Russian advice; ar,d
on.
Foreign diplomates and visit-
ing dignitaries are not ool]
ting i -;- tna from Chin-
lldom. In addition. Pe-
moral support for I
has been limited, at J
y, to the kind ol conventional
expression ol fa- larity
that decency requires at :
fune: I -
IT IS A dreadful thing to say
but the evidence in truth lug-
gests that Peking secretly hopes
Hanoi's great offensive will act-
ually i urn out to be a family
funeral. This is almost certainly
because for Hanoi is
seen in Peking today as being
tantamount to success f<>r Mos-
cow.
Peking obviously has no liking
lor the prospect of a Soviet-
allied. South supported North
Vietnam below China's southern
border. Even on the highest level
and in the deepest intimacy,
such a truth could never be
poken in Peking. But the Soviet
factor in the equation will ap-
{tarently be enough to console
Peking for Hanoi's defeat.
THIS 18 only one asi I
the developing Asian |>olitical
drama, moreover. Almost more
significantly. Takeo Miki. one of
the leaders in the throng of can-
didates for the next prime minis-
ter of Ja;>an. has just slipped
into Peking in a ;>:ite incon-
spicuous manner.
Former Foreign Minister Miki
is a know .1 ally ol
another prime ministerial
dictate, Kakuei Tanaka. the
ister of trade. Minister Tanaka.
in turn, is an open a .
intin Domic
and technological cooperation,
long-
term
land Chii
m visit by Miki is no
isolated phenomenon, either. So
man.. n are
ars Canton trade
fair that they are having to be
in successive ba"
to ensure hotel accommodation
Far more imjxirtant. the Jap-
anese "trade'" delegation in Pe-
king has just been permitted to
double in number. It has been
given diplomatic privileges
though not diplomatic status
and it is to be headed by a lead-
ing Japanese diplomat on
leave."
All this suggests that Prime
Minister Chou F.n-lai may al-
leady be thinking about drop-
ping the other shoe at some time
after Prime Minister Kisaku
Sato leaves the premiership in
Tokyo The first shoe, of course,
was the invitation to President
Nbun, issued on the sternest
grounds of balance of power
politics.
THE OTHER shoe to be
pad would be a Chinese
Communist move toward the
kind of relationship with Japan
already suggested by Trade
Minister Tanaka The long-term
consequences of such a Chinese
an hard to overstate.
Here the point is. quite sim-
ply, that the Chinese are every
bit as dynamic, clever and suc-
aindad as the Japanese. If
the other shoe drops, one will
haw to expect China to achieve
th kind of economic growl h in
the next 19 years that Japan
made. say. between 1952 and
1967.
THE RATE of growth is
bound to be slower, of course
But consider what the world
will look bke in 15 years if the
Chinese economy begins to grow
, ,-.-istently at even half the
Japanese rate, starting from
China's huge base of population
and resources!
The prospect is awe-insiplring
There is no other phrase. And
this really is the prospect may-
be not Immediately but at
by JOSEPH AI.N0P
for the tone term, except g on*
hideously grim cot
outlook will be altered .f Vhe
Soviets undertake the mitlm
.,-nation of Qo hma
for which they I..,.. g ZJ
paring fr>i so |,.-..
incredible expense.
sw.8
Max Lerner
Sees It
NEW YORK, NY Are we wil D m
in the intensity of acti -
ts? All th >"' :'' It
Heat: Th ition of the war by Pit :,:. \
Pa, has thu-. far brought no gfand
tiom against ;i Uke I let the Cambodian d>. -
may still come especiallywith the inevitably mount.
- Bui th, psj ramite for a mi-
proti campusea ii limply not th
Item: The other night at the National Book \
tivities I found myself in a huddle of bright young bo
it wai t diili award year. I was my*
with ,.t least two of the prim to Joseph Leah I >.-.
by of Flea nor Roosevelt, and to Allan Mevtm
volumea of hi> Ordeal of the Union." which he ha
: daring hi- own ordeal of illness. Th
posthumous award! iFlannery O'Connor for h'
Frank OHaia ilaSring 'he poatrj prfaM with Howa M
There a*M no awards to books about aetaVtem liki X
Mailers on the Pentagon and Chicago confmntav
no speeches of antiwar it. fiance as bitter a
Thi on!v endtement was the ao over the award to Th-
Catalog book of ooi ti
1 M\ own choice aild h.- i W lliam Ira
of < -- iv-. At the Eflgi
tii mythi
i I'M \v..
....
.i-t.
THBHt i> \ mm ut \( t
the oth
d of ehangii
I
; :i.
Bui
s in I i who.. A
infused with the conviction that the moral valu.- I
Ikally wrong.
The .'. tivial movem. ?ast
IS h |ttn and th.
made E uvey of the sttttnoea of th.' > ; -and
ly the new one b> Daniel Yankclovich for the J
Rockefeller III Foundation confirms this shut from i
to cultural changes. Unless I nuas mj guaas, tt>.> 1
decade of a wide ail ultural revolution, wnlch a
sarily move along the lines oi the lananlnillilliiiii" and 'con-
sdouanesi three, it is likely to be a new culture, eonvergtnganl
la-ing at tonet with the traditional. Of one thiii^- I an
It will -urpiise us all in the forms it takes.
HOW ACCOUNT FOR THE -lowing down of lbs Maaaal
ndesr The real bud to pin down, but I w nture
The j .1. v.|ih-. /r for vimihr peoplr coming out of th* f#l"
legaa. The market for Ph D.'s and other gradual,
not a buyers, market. The reality principle is pokir.c .'-> >*
back under the academic tent Fvery college teacher report*
ihat his students are more work oriented, and can^r oriented.
The trelmg; that much of the tumalt and houtinc haw
time* been counterproductive. Vote the change in the e^viTt-
room climate of the recent controversial cases, badudtng th'
Berrigans and Angela Davis Judges have learned how t run
a difficult trial sine the monstrous case of th. CJlfcagO de-
fendants. But the defense lawyers have also learned ho*
use eaaq reaoaree of the law. but to stick to law not r*oU.
tionary speeches. There is a change of mood among the BIa
Panthers, too. There juM i-nt enough support for vie: t*v.
either in the inner cities or on the campusea.
The 18-year-old vote, a* a vvmhol of gain* the young as*
made and can ntlll nuUte. This applies to the
through as well. Together the young and the *OI
form the jwlitlcs and the education of the decade.
This doesn't mean the triumph of apathy. Far front ^
it does mean that one segment of the young is f.n
on making a living and a career, a second is focusinc on maktnl
a dent in politics, while a third segment prefers to focun on
making a life. Together they add up to an Auwrica H
much in the making.


Fridcy. May 5. 19772
*knisfirk*JJfrw
Page 5
FIRST VISIT TO ISRAEL IN APRIL 1973
Queen Elizabeth II Will Make
Two Silver Anniversary Cruises
NF\V YORK The luxury ship j On the April 14 cruise, a tradi- the traveler can concentrate sole-
LgD | lizabeth II will visit Is- [ tional Passover Seder will be ob- ,'ly on the enjoyment of his trip."
K[,t>
the 0*t tinie.bl .APrl^, seryedwjth hoUday foods and cere-
king two Israel "Silver roony. Both cruises will be high-
,,,\ cruises, Cunard Line | lighted by special Silver Anniver-
' A \... .red Travel Service, Inc.. j sary celebrations.
Worcester, Mass.. have an-1 The PaaMwer-Easter cruise nro-
| erani will begin (April 14-15 with
consecutive 14 day flights from the United States to
a.\BU. SMfiUJ Southampon. The ship will leave
The
two
Travel which has chart- [this United Kfalgdom port Of) the
15th and cruise to Lisbon for a
isjure
66.000-ton Queen KU/a-
eth I! from April 14 through Maj
ril] [g| ,. 25tb anniversary
I .hjtageJ will be
, i j travel agents
j nittd stales. Can-
. idl Kingdom and Prance.
iaj i uiaat, which will
e during Passover I April
iter \;>ril 22), will in-
h,|,. md trip air trans|HH-ta-
J oi scheduled carriers from
Li,.: ties in th.' Ignited States;
| anean .raising, extended
Israel from the ports of
nd Aattod, an |-! ti rs ol Jerusalem. Tel Aviv
points of interest. Ashod
the port city fOT Jerusalem and
l; I, for the complete package
i, i ninhnum of $1195
i to 12890 par person for
| i luitt n>oms.
For All Types Roofing
... let An Expert Do It! ..
Roof Repairs Re-Roofing
A. A. ROOFING
1' 260 S.W. 22nd Ct.
Phone 527-9381
one-day visit \pril 17. Passengers
will arrive in Aehdod on April 21
for a four-daj stay then proceed
to Haifa on April 21 for a four-
day layover, Passengers will fly
from Israel direct to the United
States on April 29.
The second cruise will begin
April 28-29 with flights from the
United States to Israel, where the
ship will be in the Port of Haifa.
The proposed itinerary will in-
clude Haifa. April 29-May 4; Ash-
dod May 4-7; Palma. May 10. and
Southampton. May 13.
A comprehensive program of op-
tional land tours to Tel Aviv. Jeru-
salem and other locales will be
provided.
In announcing the cruise pro-
gram, Oscar Rudnick, president of
Assured Travel Service, said:
"These Silver Anniversary cruises
will be among the major travel
eventa of 1973. They will combine
a cruise vacation on the great
Cunard Line flagship with an in-
augural \. i--.it to Israel during a
holida;. period for which hotel
loace is already in heavy demand.
This will ik> a quality vacation
with its various elements conven-
iently packaged and arranged so
THE ONLY
FUNERAL HOME
Serving Broword County
1171 N.I. 81st AVE.
Within your means now. .
With peace of mind always.
Telephone 584-6060
nettle Jfi CReek
SHOP
Bedroom Decorating
is our Business
Let our professional decorators help you to create a
more beautiful home There is no charge
for their talent. You pay only for the mer-
chandise you buy Draperies, carpets, fur-
niture and those so important accessories,
all selected to create the incomparable
Nettle Creek look Come in or ask about
an at home appointment.
NETTLE CREEK SHOP
.9'~ E Los Olos Blvd. Ft. lauderdole Flo.
Assured 'TraVel Service'/ Tnc.,
which s|>eciali/.es in organizing in-
centive travel, package tours and
group travel, maintains its head-
quarters at 11 Millbrook St.. Wor-
cester. Mass. 01606.
The Swill's Most Modern Lapidary Workshop
s0>'
Looking for something to creative-
ly occupy your leisure time?
Maybe we can help. The Mine
Shaft instructs in the art of gem
cutting, faceting, gold and silver
smithing. Original supplies for
hobby sold here too. Black Coral
Jewelry. Navaio Jewelry. .
UNUSUAL ROCKS. JEWELRY, SCULPTURING
421 NX 3rd Avenue Ft laederdalt, Florida
763-7851
NO CEASE FIRE ON
HOUSING
'-
Providing decent housing for
hundreds of thousands of immigrants
has always been a critical problem for
the people of Israel.
From the make-shift tents thai
sheltered the first new arrivals to
temporary shacks of canvas, tin and
wood to more permanent structures..
during '.he past 23 years these were
home to many of the hundreds of
thousands who came to Israel seeking
life and the fulfillment of a dream.
There's never been enough money to
house all these people properly.
So today, housing has become the
number one human problem people
in Israel face. At a time when the
staggering financial burden of
defense continues, too many families
live in conditions of dangerous
overcrowding. Too many families
live in inadequate facilities.
At least 70,000 Israeli familiessome
10% of the total populationnow live
in substandard housing, housing
which must be replacedsoon.
And this year, with the anticipated
arrival of 50,000 new immigrants, a
minimum of 15,000 new immigrant
housing units must be built.
All of this is our responsibility.
Our promise.
For those who are to comeand those)
already there, trying to carve out a
decent life for themselvesthe future
can hold little promise without a
decent place to live. A place to call
home.
527-9233
GIVE TO THE ISRAEL EMERGENCY FUND
OF THE UNITED JEWISH APPEAL
THROUGH THE 1972 CAMPAIGN "^
OF THE
JEWISH FEDERATION OF NORTH BROWARD


r'^e 6
Douglas Kaplan Appointed
l-F Residential Chairman
Douglas C. Kaptan has beer, p-1 jrees from the University of Miami
putted 1972-73 United Fund cam-1 --. 1953.
pa: -T residential chairman fo Mr Kaplan is a member of the
Sonno Memorial Award as ->ut-
.ta.-vlmg senior in his class and
ftvwwl the Moot Court Pro-
gram for the Miami School of
Law. A licensed member of the
Florida Bar Association since 1963.
he b presently senior prosecuting
counsel for the City of Holly-wood.
Mr Kaylan a member of the
United Fund of Broward County,
president of the board of Jewish
Family Service of Broward Coun-
ty and has served extensively vith
:he Jewish Welfare Federation of
Broward County and its various
committees.
He and his wife, the former Mar-
lvne Weiss, are the parents of
:r.ree ch:!drer.. ages 11. 8. and 3-;
NCJWS Officers
To Be Installed
The North Broward Section of
the National Council of Jewish
Women will install its new officers
for 1972-73 at a 11 JO a.m. 1-nch-
^on Wednesday in the Tamarac
Country Club.
Taking office wiU be Mrs. Sam
Glickman. president: vice presi-
dents Mrs Florence Brooks, com-
.-numty affairs: Mrs. Harry Stern.
?ducation: Mrs. Lila Selby. mem-
bership, and Mrs. Isidore Harris
jnd Mrs. Joel Miller, legislation:
also Mrs. Edward Maged. financial
iecrerary: Mrs. Stephen Gero.
treasurer: Mrs. William J. Gien-
non. corresponding and recording
secretary: Mrs. Sam Bernstein
hospitality chairman: Mrs Herman
Nathan, tours chairman, and Mrs.
Louis Lansky, publicity chairman.
MoialiwS Residents Form
Jewish Center AssecMtien
A group of residents of the
Mainlands of Tamarac Lakes, in
Fort Lauderdale. have banded to-
gether to form the Tamarac Jew-
ish Center Association.
This group is committed to the
goal of erecting a temple in Tam-
arac and is seeking dynamic, dedi-
cated people. For further informa-
tion, please contact Irving Feni-
ehel. president, or Mrs. Sam Milch,
secretary
DOUGLAS KAPLAN
h Broward County for the
third <-onsecuti\e year. E. A. Ado-
n^at. general chairman, annour^ed
Ecm in New York City. Mr Kap-
lan came to Florida in 1944 and
has been a Hollywood resident
s;rce 1959 A graduate of Miami
Btach High School, he .evened
his B.B-A. and Juris Doctor de-
Temple Enianu-El
Sponsoring 3-Day
Bahamian Cruise
Temple Emanu-EI i> sponsoring
a three-day. two-night cruise to
Nassau and Freepor* on the new,
M.V. Frwport leaving Por* Ever- !
zlades on June 9 and returning
June 11
Program chairman Robert Her-
mann reports that th:< >hi? is |
your note1" cruise will feature
gourmet meals, a nightclub *how.
two orchestras, games and other
attractions to make shipboard life
entertaining.
In Nassau and Freeport there
will be time to shop and visit the,
nightclub shows and casinos. Ac-
commodations are for two in a
cabin and Mr. Hermann urged
both temple and non-temple mem-
bers to sign up for this ten-
sponsored fund-raising projert.
For information and reserva-
tions contact Mr. Hermann. A'
Roth, or the temple office.
Temple let. Israel Plans
F'nre-Dey Nursery School
A five-day nursery school pro-
gram for three-and four-year-
by Temple Beth Israel.
The congregation will be in
new building on MM Oakland
Park Blvd. by then and will offer;
new facilities for the children.
There will be a limit of 12 ch'Kiren
in each class. Interested parents
are urged to call Mrs. Jerry Z.p-
rus at the temple office without
delay.
Friday, May 5, j^
The new Gran Torino, mow on display at all Big Ten Ford
dealers from Pompano to Perrine, otters a wide array of
options: a buyer literally has the opportunity to build bis
own custom car. Available in nine different models, the
new Gran Torino is powered by engines ranging from tr
economical 250 cubic inch "six" to the road smooiizg 423.
Options include air conditioning, various interiors cad
power assists.
NATIONAL COUNCIL TOURS
"Are Better Thm lv"
Israel brape Africe; Mexico Orient, etc
NATIONAL COUNCIL OF JEWISH WOMEN
Jtheo D. Nathan Telephone 942-1449
laem Mow!
Toot Chairman North BrowoH Section
MAGNIFKENT
POINT Of AMERICAS
Treat yoorsc? to the Best.
1 bedroom 1 Vi baths.
Unf jrrushed Only $450.00
per month yearly.
Two other yearly rentsH
available. $650. per month
Attractively furnished
Deluxe 2 bedroom 2 bath
Oceanview Lovely
carpeting and drapes yearly.
For details call
Dorothy P. Welch. Realtor
Phone 523-1015
90S S. Andrews Ave.

\
..A
WALLPAPER IN STOCK
QUALITY AND SERVICE a. .
FOR 21 YEARS MuOl"C.
PHONE FOP. APPOINTMENT 763 4433 \
JERVEY'S PAINT & WALLCOVERING
615 NE 3rd AVE FT LAUDERDALE '
CLEARANCE SALE
REDUCTIONS UP TO 60%
LONG DRESSES SPORTSWEAR
STREET LENGTH DRESSES
ijaJuon cJrouiz Line.
SALE AT ROTH LOCATIONS
North Miami Beach Ft. Lauderdale
2150 N. E. 164th Street
No. Miami Beach. Fla. 33162
Tel. 944 7105
Hours 9 to 5
2661 E. Oakland Pk. Blvd.
Ft. Lauderdale. Fla. 33306
Tel. 563 1394
Hours 9 30 to 5
COME EARL Y FOR BEST SELECTIONS
WORLD WIDE TRANSPORTATION SERVICES

UNDER NE*
MANAGEMENT
Come r> and meet Sally William*, the rve* o*rer. S*e
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See rhe comp*e*e has of g'eeing cards. setora-.
invitations. iee)ry. gtassare. candtes. imported
gifts for all ages. Gift wrapping, of course!
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217 E. OAKLAND PARK BLVD. FT. LAUOERW
PHONE 5646381


Friday. May 5, 19772
*k*isl fkrMkin
Page 7

TT
SELECTED COMMERCIAL AND SPONSORED FILMS AND AUDIOVISUAL MATERIALS OF JEWISH INTEREST
Ml 1 J I W !'r *^^
wmwvv jmrn,
" A Hi 'M m AM km
m SORROW AND TIIE PIT*
[ProdiK^d by Norddfutiwher
Bundfiuik. SocWte Sab** rt> R*- I
dlodifiission, mnd Television Be- :
Lontrc. Distributor: t inenut >
Ltd. Director: Marcel Ophuls.
' Script: Marcel Ophub and An- ,
dre Harrl*. 260 minute*. Blu-k
I ,nd white.
J as mankind continues to grap-,
L|e with the meaning of the Hit- \
|ler era. it will always look to ac-;
Icounts like those by Anne Frantt j
land Raoul Hilberg. To this age-1
lless testlmoiiyi now add "The Sor- |
|row ami the Pity," Marcel Uphills''
I massive documentary of France
under Na/i rule.
The film focuses on Clerniont-
iFerrand. an industrial city near
Vichy, during both the partial
land complete Na/i occupation of
(France. Dozens of men and women
L FROM
r -75c.
GOLF BALLS
Like New And Used
over :ceo in stock _^**%_%^
X/f
EACH WK\ \
Big Discount 4#y
On All Golf
Equipment And
Supplies
STOP IN AND
SEE US FOR
BIG SAVINGS.
Pha*. 564-2700
Top Flight Golf Ball
1298 E. Oakland Ml. Bl.d.
Men. Thru tat. -
lntervlewd 30 yars later. Inter-
spersed are film clips ahd stills
dating from the earlier period.
We thus are shown both what
actually happened, and how peo-
ple good, evil and in-between
people remember it now that
time has smoothed or distorted
their recollections. As one after
another is asked the central ques-
tion, "Did you suspect what was
happening to the Jews?" the cam-
era almost turns into a lie detec-
tor.
Out of these interview sin
French and German, with an Kn-
glish overvoice geared to the per-
sonality of each speaker come
new insights into the horror of
totalitarianism. And we are com-
pelled to answer the ultimate ques-
tion we always come back to in
the dead of night: What would I
have done?
Appropriately, a Jew is on screen
longest and casts the longest
shadow: Pierre Mendes France,
later Prime Minister, too often re-
membered only for trying to
switch Frenchmen from wine to
rr'lk. Mendes France, who was
jailed in Clermont-Ferrand and
escaped to join de Gaulle, emerges
as one of the era's truly great
figures--a courageous, warm, su-
premely intelligent man.
"The Sorrow and the Pity" (It
might have been called "The
Memory and the Warning") should
revive the documentary as a his-
torical source and also as an art
form after the cheapening it has
undergone on television. A de-
manding film, it will need strong
organizational support to give it
the success it deserves.
Morton Yarmon
6 & 988ALIZA THE POLICEMAN
With Edna FUdel, Avner Chez-
kliir. Ark- Lavi. Distributor:
Mo Mi BaruchMaytalr Theater.
Producer and director: Mena-
hem Golan. 104 minutes. Color.
To start with a caution: "999
Aliza the Policeman" is not the
same film as Kphraim Kishon's
comedy. The Policeman." which
is about to be released as this is-
sue goes to press and has been
nominated for an Academy Award.
As for "999--Aliza": If slapstick
comedies were assembled by com-
puter, this Israeli import would
be a typical product. All the
cliches, or reasonable facsimiles
thereof, have been fed into its
laucous plot about the search for
a murderer: pie throwing, wild
chases, teetering on the eaves of
tall buildings. Still, for the young
and uninitiated 1,1 the trices of
'ttltf'coniMy Irani', "Were Vnay"Te
some laughs here.
Comedy can be, and often is, a
great vehicle for conveying under-
standing of a people's culture, but
in this film there is nothing char-
acteristically Israeli. Nor does Ed-
na Flidel, hard as she tries, suc-
ceed in convincing us that Aliza
is a North African Jew. The other
actors, too, while trying hard,
nren't able to do much with the
material they are given to work
with.
Samuel D. Freeman
6 it -Cr
HIE TEX COMMANDMENTS |
Revival (1956). With (harlton
Mrs to it. Yul Brynner, Anne Bax-
ter, Edward G. Robinson, Yvon- i
ne De Carlo. Studio and dlstri-
luitor: Paramount Pictures. Pro-
ducer and director: Cecil B. lit
Mille. Screenplay: Aeneas Mac-
kenzie et al. 219 minutes. Color.
Rated G.
At the start of this huge relic
from another era, we learn from
Cecil B. DeMille's own lips that !
the film will tell us whether men j
are free or to be controlled by the
state. But, somewhere between the
bulrushes and Sinai, the lesson is
lost amid the gimmickry.
Billed as a spectacular, the pic-
ture fails spectacularly in almost ,
every way. The Red Sea may in- '
deed have parted but hardly as de-
picted here. The script sags with |
cliches: the score is best described j
as loud. As for the performers,
none of them ever turns the view- j
er's spiritual engine on.
The giving of the Command-
ments is sadly anti-climactic. The
finger of Goda flame a la Buck '<
Rogers inscribes them on the ,
mountainside, while down below j
the masses enact an orgy just like |
the Roman ones in movies based
on that other well-known book.
The end falls even flatter. The
potential high drama of an aged
hut still charismatic Moses anoint-
ing Joshua to lead the people dis-
appears in a close-up of Charlton
Heston's beard, whichfor all the
millions spent on the production
looks exactly as if it had been bor-
lowed from a sidewalk Santa.
Like most of this old genre, the
film simply doesn't come off. It
fails to teach and falters in trying
to preach. Its latest revival, timed
for Passover and Faster, plainly
rests on the assumption that the
public still can't tell what's holy
from what's Hollywood.
Gerald S. Strober
pywiiiiiiiiiiiiMoniiflnnQO^ '"T
SPANISH
IMPORTS
CRAZY LOW PRICES
Furniture, lighting, pottery,
wrought iron, glass, oil
paintings, boats, chess sets,
armour .
JUST OPENED
ACCENTS & IMPORTS
2202 E Oakland
(Com*, of U S. 1)
OPEN
MON.
THRU
SAT.
IS f to 5:30
hxmccA trairifer
On 3O0VO KT. I.A1 KKMDAI.K
I'HONK "> 7 Mil
OCEAN CLUB
OWNER MUST SELL
REDUCED $1000
DRASTICALLY BELOW
PREVAILING PRICES.
1 Bedroom, m Baths, bund
new Condominium.
133,500 cut to $32,500
THEO DAVIS
-^ REALTY
U^ REALTOR
44-6320
^
:
8

3
SPRING SALE
FURTHER REDUCTIONS ON
SELECTED MERCHANDISE
20% 30% 50%
We've selected beautiful fashions from our
regular stock of distinctive clothes
Sizes S to 44... Half Siies 124 to 224
PALM BEACH
WINTER PARK
I FT. LAUDERDALE DELRAY BEACH
NAPLES "CH
Liii........................r~ ...........' ....................................""""""
NEXT WEEK, DURING PH0NE-0-TH0N, YOU WILL
BE ASKED TO MAKE A PLEDGE TO THE 1972
UNITED JEWISH CAMPAIGN AND ISRAEL EMERG-
ENCY FUND. YOUR ONE PLEDGE WILL HELP ALL
OF THESE LOCAL, NATIONAL AND OVER-
SEAS AGENCIES:
United Jewish Appeal
i American Association for Jewish Education
> American Jewish Committee
American Jewish Congress
American Jewish Historical Society
Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith '
B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation
i Broward Board of Rabbis (Chaplaincy Program)
i Council of Jewish Federations & Welfare Funds
i Hebrew Union College
) Histadruth Ivrith of America
i Jewish Family Service of Broward County
i Jewish Telegraphic Agency
? Jewish Theological Seminary
i Miami Bureau of Jewish Education
i Natl. Jewish Comm. Relations Advisory Council
i River Garden Home for the Aged (Jacksonville)
i Synagogue Council of America
i Torah Umesorah
United HI AS Service
i Yeshiva Theological Seminary
i YIV0 Institute for Jewish Research
THE JEWISH FEDERATION U
OF NORTH BROWARD
MAKE YOIR PLEDGE
A GOOD 0\E .
MAKE IT COUNT!
3905 N. Andrews Avenue, Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. 565-4869


P=3 8
9-MMstntrktkw
Friday. May 5. 1973
BRIEF SKETCHES OF PORTS OF CALL
From Port Everglades to
ports of call with Dutch. Brit-
ish. Spanish. French, and South
America heritage r is now oaiy
a short cruise away for Flor-
This summer and fa!L the
S-S- Xieaw Amsterdam will of-
16 diiTerert Caribbea-i
cruises. Some of the exotic
ng places are as follows:
AEIBA Oranjestad New-
f the Caribbean resorts.
Anita is one of the principal
islands of the Netherlands
.p. We u-i:: call at the
capit.: ranjestad. This is
a q a i n t. tidy Dutch
T1"*^ with fay colors of the
team. In fact, local tradi-
tion dictates that no home be
the same color as its neighbor.
The resultant kaleidoscope of
pastels is one of the most
charming facets of the island's
' atn
A walk through downtown
."Vanjestad offers exciting shop-
ping possibilities. Fine products
from the warM ovvr an? avail-
able at free-port prices. TouTl
also want to see Q^een WUbet-
rmna Park and Fort Wifaean
in. which was built in 179*. All
raaa is easi.y accessible
from the city and the island's
peculiar windswept terrain of-
- intriguing -
On af Ufa most interesting of
is the LV tree.
ant
~ 6?5es
B\H\M \<
n the is-
Irand Bahama one of
the as

>; from
the coast of Florida. In
Freepcrt is only some 80 miles
Freepoit
.iat -
a free port- that
shopping there is an interna-
tional adventure
The 12-acre m
International B a a a w-fcic -.
res rows of
'.heir shops setting the w ares of
Another of Freeport's big at-
traction is its gambung and
Bad this sport at the FJ
Casino. In the evenings n-any
of the luxury hotels offer ex-
cellent floor shows and alto
well worth seeing is the native
.show called Junkeroo. In addi-
tion, the island is surrounded
by superb white sandy beaches.
especially at Lucaya. and its
colorful waters provide a para-
dise for min issnfc. boating and
fishing tnthiianmi.
BAHAMAS Nassau--Nas-
sau, capital of the Bahama Is-
lands, is located on New Pro-
vidence Island and is very Brit-
ish, indeed. You'll want to see
its Government House which is
located on Mt. Fitzwilham and
is approached by a long flight
of steps in the middle of which
is the famous statue of Chris-
tooarr Cotambus. On Georze
Street stands the Christ AngS-
can Cathedral while the heart
of the city is Rawaon Square
which eanaaos the government
The main shopping street is
Bay Street which runs (aralle!
to Ike wat. rfront and boasts
a coUxful pubar market. Off
shone at the mmu end of the
harbor glass bottomed boats
are available for
A iastra Gardens also
many rare tropical plants alaog
with kcauajful^erajrrning flam-
ingoes- The powder-soft beaches
and :nr'erSbl.v Hear seas are a
swimmer's paradise, especially
on Paradfee Island winch is
linke! to oV>w mown Nassau by
a bridge. Here Is where you'U
find many of the newer luxury
hotels. However, water sports,
probably the Masai's mast pop-
ular attraction, are available
everywhere.

Car*
Caw-,- --IP .
lua,'J..
j TW 37^00-ton Uxory liner S. S. Nieow Asterdam of Hollond America Cruises glides smoothly
through a calm Cambbean Sea
*-"V
BARBADOS 3ridjetow
Barbadus is virtually 'one of
the British Isles" in a Carib-
bean setting. With a look much
Hke that of England itself, this
compact little island of rolling
bins aad ""frying" fish is one of
the most popular vacation re-
treats in the West Indies.
Almost from The very begin-
ning of the island s history.
Bridgetown has been the prin-
cipal center of population. It is
also the capital. While there
you'U want to visit Magazine
Lane where you'll find the Mon-
tefiore Fountain. tresente-
the island s people by a promi-
the art of stained glass wind-
dows can be seea in the Barba-
:-"- .. E.: r.^s in Tiafal-
gar Square. And about one and
a half mi>s from towTi :
Michael where you'U find the
Bartado* Museum which con-
tains -s of
the island's history'- At Tent
Bay. one can watch the dairy
return of the flying fish fleet
n the east coast is Sam
Lord's Castle, the island's out-
standing example of rigar pro-
turned to splendor.
ITA Hamilton I
Few people realize that the
name Bermuda actaaih; id -
to a chain of some 150 small
islands. However, only the sev-
en main ones have ever been
settled which started with the
arrival of the English in 1609.
And the mutate you step into
one of the many shops in Ham-
ilton, the capital, you'll seo
why ft erafa is known as a
showcase of British goods.
In Hamilton you'll want to
see the Parliament Building
also known as the Stuioni
House*, the cathedral and other
beautiful churches. East of the
is. Flatt's Milage which of-
fers the Bermuda Government
Aquarium. Here you'll see a
fine collection of tropical fin
more than 600 varieties ant
found in Bermuda's waters hi
their natural settings.
At the extieuie eastern end
of Bermuda is St George, once
Bermuda's capital which has a
17th century ihaiih and num-
erous rums of old forts. On the
western end of the islands are
Fort Scaur the Sea Gardens
and Somerset Bridge an 18-
inch drawbridge which is the
smallest in the world. To try
and mention all of Bermuda's
beautiful pink coral beaches Is
fnpnacio.e. Just remeinbet that
you are never more t'van a mile
from the sea and the bathing
are *JeaL And there
to be as many golf
courses as there are beautiful
beaches.
(IIMW WUtemstacK
Curacao then looms on the nor-
mal where your ship docks at
Wii>mrtad. the capital which
is divided into two parts by
Santa Anna Bay. In the city's
Punda section, you'll find gov-
ernment hniMings and banks as
nail as throngs of shoppers
tpessssj the wide mans, paus-
ing at international shops, or
sipping drinks in pahn-Hnked
sidewalk cafes. In the other sec-
tion of town, called Otrabanda.
are more shops. All of Wiiiem-
si*i is made more interesting
and colorful by its tall, authen-
tic 17th century pastel-colored
buildings as well as the D
1 nouses, clean in their nt-
:.- pnaa pfentBaa
At the Floating Market boat-
from Venezuela, only 27
away, tie up laden with f
a1 vegetables Close by is the
Queen Emma pontoon bridge
which opens up to let ocean-
going ships pass through the
middle of town. Other interest-
ing sights to see are the Mikve
Israel Synagogue the Okies;
one fa the Western Hemisphere
and Fort Amsterdam with th>->
Governor's House. Whether you
choose to take advantage of the
low prices in the city on a shop-
ping spree or just re
lemstad is uniquethe q
tidy atmosphere of the Nether-
lands set in the lush, biue-.
-ic of the Caribbean.
Gl ADFXOirE .Pointe-a-
P*tre---Although known as the
"Emerald Isle of the Carib-
bean.'' Guadeloupe is actually
twn separate islands divaled by
a narrow four-mile strait cat.-:
the Riviere Salee. The Guade-
loupe section is a lush, moun-
tainous region dominated by a
volcano called Soufnere. The
eastern portion, called Grande-
Tern, is somewhat less rugged
and is the site of our port of
call Pointe-a-Pitre.
As in most Caribbean ei>e-v
Pointe-a-Pitre's chun-hes and
eovetninent buildings rieH val-
uable insijrht into the island's
past. Among the more notable
of these are the Court of Law.
Museum and the St. Pierre and
St Paul Church. Outside of the
city Guadeloupe is girded by a
shoreline roadway which c
spectacular seascapes. The re-
gion surrounding Soufriere of-
fers many fine views complete
racing mountain torrents
hot springs and dense rain
forests Nearby Trois Ri\ieres
and its Valley of the Ancient
Caribes" b a treasury' of Carib
Indian art.
On Grande-Terre. Le Moule
Beach has caiv.d hi way into
an old cemetery where one can
see petrified skulls outhne-i in
the seaward rocks. Cosier and
La Pergola are beaches close to
Pointe-a-Pitre The town of
Basse-Terre is another interest-
ing study of the past, will
beautiful parks, historic build-
ings, a 17th century church and
Fort Richepance.
HAITI tPort-au- Prince)
-Port-au-Prince, a city of
some 200.000 people, is the cap
ital and principal port of I
As is the case with most o'
West Indies ports of call. Hai-
ti's history is as rich and color-
ful as Us breathtaking moun-
tainous beauty. It was di-
erH by Columbus in 1492 who
C the event a rather smash-
ing one- he ran his flagship
aground on the island.
Among the things you'll prob-
ably want Id see in Po. I
Pnnce are Haiti's great white
>nai Palace, the n> arby
Palace of Justice the Basilica
tre Dame and the Champs-
:ars-Park The Utter is the
1 largest square and the
kc. social and cu!-
tnral a<- Car the 1-
a sh>
tour through the Iron
a fantast>
pourri of na~ an? on
sale
and vibrant
rural
ad ol Sperus.-.. French and
Exploring Sand Cay. one of
st beauiifu! coral
reefs in a :ass-bnttome: boat
n and Kynna Beach out-
stde of the aty. offers a fine
beach for swim-ium:. Many vis-
itors to Haiti are interested in
seeing a Voodoo ceremonial
oance. a untquely different ex-
perience This int.restini reli-
gion originated in Dan- Af-
rsea and is one of the tea
ampifs of prfaa five snake wor-
ship fount :n our herrusnriere.
WSUk DT. MARGARITA
'Pampatar> The island of
Margarita is only 24 miles off
the coast of South America.
Some say that Margarita is
bate the last of the unhscov-
ered Caribbean Islands T
tatic Venezuelans, who regard
the fafaan as a South American
Tahiti it has been a familiar
place almost sire Columbus
discovered n B^t for Amer-
icans. Margarita remains un-
iquely unknown and untouched
The fishing and snorkeling off
its shores are unbeatable and
its beaches are eve lient and
virtually unused.
Pampatar where v
aTTves. has a famous colonial
church arvi the Castle of Sar.
Carlos Borrorneo. a jewe.
colonial architecture Not far
away is Porlamar. the isiarvi's
largest city which has
esting open-air market. Hen
you'll find odd-shaped natural
pearls since the island was once
the world's major sourve of
these lovely items. After teowl-
ing throueh gentle Margarita's
u'U probably
t there is no betu-r
'lace to absorb the sun. sand
1\M\U \ Montego Ba>
!n Jamaica our port of ci
Bay. The tow l^ dot-
ted with colorful shops where
one can choose from a -.i.ersiiv
of unported goods. To Cae-
and Dome are hist...-, law.
marks that date sack In the
days of slavery N arbj .. Roi*
Hall Great House sarc th
home of the notor.
Witch. Dm 'ha r-
is now being re*r
once the home .\xu*
Palmer She had an
habit of taking ber
lovers, then
when her a: I
T.iere are pre I
T -
along the |
beaches past th
piantatk r.s
Bay wnerc C
lansgm
-
Ocho Rios. Aro-j- la is-
land's too t b e I rear
Kingston was the I
old Port Royal- one of t* hell-
er; and most fataaaMa ties in
the world. Here aaa the naven
of the {lirate H
and his band that pre;
shipping el trie :
Main The city met a I
end it sank beneat
and was dest:
quake in 16H8.
PTIXTO RKO E '^ani
- San Juan son. West
cities of the New .. I wa
foondevi in UB9J and h r\Brt
Rkos capital and Urv -t nt>
Its ancient fortifirar* are
perhaia the city's must .amous
tour.st afraction. Daat
visit the impressre D r*rss of
ra Morro and of equa: interest
u rnaanve Fort San >."nstobil.
a part af the city's network of
fortresses that guar: i the
land approaches Saa Jta"
Gate, constructed fa
the entrance to the Id *:W
ess*
The city is also noted for its
beautiful churches A r.otg
tr old San Jose Church. : -ndeC
ia 1523. and the Sant
Convent which ady^r- it Sitf
Juan's Cathedral cantata the
remains of Ponce Je Lc n in *
marble tomb.
Shopping in the eft I b"*"
thng strer-U will aafab P*f*
the most discriminating MfaM
World-famous Puerto Rica*
rum is available at km rck*
and there at an a a"*J
of other gift possrbint** Th
beautiful hotels and chi*
< where you'U find th c- -
casinos 1 offer top-not*'. eaMf
tainment.
aJanaattoa and brochures on th.- If- Cjnbb*1
m Port Everglades write. Holland '
at F. Pier 40. North River !* <* >r'
Yor* phone Fort La-jriVrdale 3C5-558S.


h May 5. 19772
+Jeniti fhridian
Page 9-
^99
<***^**^**^*^**^*^^^^^^^^www*
Quoth the Mavcn
by Beverly King Pollock
M^AAMAM^A^^^^^WMWWW
'Jr.*
Before I -* married nrt grew up, i migbl have boon em*
bsrrassod by klnahlp with Tante Son. She wasn't "American
enough" lo I Mcond ncnoration irl in the "ilks and '40s. But I
,,! her at the altar two decadei back.
Today with affection I can recall her valiant attempts to be
,, iai evidenced by hoi too-red lipstick and too-vivid
But mosl f all I remember ami savor her old world
Tante Sora was a "Tevya's wife," a transplant from
I si i to Brooklyn. Hci tsorla-scarred face told of the
. ol a son and husband and ol daughters who couldn't
the transition between her world and theirs.
y/( the laugh lines showed through. "I thrive on aggrava-
h. -ii.I And to help her survive each day. she brvak-
aas ol tea with lemon and two Bayei aspirins Only
;;;. othi : wera "fake."
te Sora was a good Jew. She performed unheralded
hs and collected none} for "mine society*1 to distribute.
ie ivas genuinely Orthodox.
Whenever aba would visit us here in the suburbs, I mad" -mo
. her favorite fowls and special conveniences and we jrew
t in- I ol each other it was onlj natural we should
hei to our son's coming of age. But she wrote us a letter
Since she couldn't ride on Shabbos, she would have to
our Bar Mttzvah "for religious reasons."
vVc knew Tante Sora nio-t from her letters. She vvrol a.-
often with "yashtikees" ineedles), She was so afraid
ise by others that she unwitting!) dished ii out herself.
One letter road:
11 was by Mottoi iher sister in Vi rrnont i sorry I went there
Ik me in like a damn foul I Uatea to her because there Is
like North Pole and I couldn't stand that weather I took sick
. lURhl a cold ID i he kidiu \ ^
To Tante Sora there were onlj extremes. A hoii-e waa
u a frisjidaJre" or else "a solarium"
She would never Impose or ask favor; that's "prost" 'com-
mon tast ln-.ii ad aha would write: I hope your bi ither
actor will remind him-eli to send me the vitamins he used
ne."
>i he life wa Idaughti r's wed ling.
I nod to be In New York b I helped Tanti
". v 'tit t < her favorite haunts. Ai never we eni ed
the ill sglrls hid
i iund out why Tante Sora m i- d a half-size
i i wear one. "it maki im look I...... I S was 78.i
husband and I went to the weddin At thi oper lime
i remonj a stream ol light flashed on
rhere the lo< elj gran I "' ,'1'
h thi heart-shaped door.
In her long train she walked down the steep fli hi ol
iccompanlmenl of piano and lighting effects
Tanti Sora proudl) asked. Did you cut si e such a wed ling
ir life*"
I had to admit I hadn't.
Al the reception where the orchestra leader announced each
with fanfare i "And now the IOUp!", we sang gay
i danced bjbi dances that wa had never known before
It '.!> like finding an exciting new old world.
The last time I -poke to Tante Sora was on the phone in
Irpon In New- York. She was up t because I couldn't come
"ut to see her. We wore on our way out of the country. She
aid i have something to tell you. It's Important."
I never learned what she wanted to tell me. For she died
1 afterward*. But she had already told me a great deal
about a world that now exists only in other people's memory.
4 distinctive selection of contemporary
and traditional custom picture trjmes
JAMES SEtyTZ, Framemaker
.'400 F LAS OLAS BOULEVARD Ft lAUDtROA 1088
np aPFnv CLEANING
-------------------------------------DRAPERY CLEANING
SPECIALISTS
Wr fraturr
Pompano Beach Infant Care
Center Dedication Tuesday
The North Broward Section of
the National Council of Jewish
Women will dedicate the Carolyn
and Harry Hachcn Infant (are
< Center, located at the Peter Pan
Nursery Day Care Center, 41(1 \\V
14th St.. Pompano Beach, Tues-
, da) at 11 a.m.
The newly equipped Infant Care
Center is named In honor of Car-1
olyn Hachen, the section's recent
vice president of community af-
fairs, and her husband, Harry,
lxith of whom paased away within
the pasl month. Mr, and Mrs.
Hachen worked closely with the
National Council of Jewish Women
and government agencies tosuppl)
tching funds for food and addi-
tional facilities for children at the
a ntcr,
Women Begin Study Program
riv Fort Lauderdale-Pompano
i'.i s h Chapter of the Brand) U
Univi rsity National Worn -n's Com-
mittee will meet Wednesday al the
home of Mrs. Norman Hertz, 4OT
N Ocean Blvd., Pompano Beach,
to begin a course of study on, "Un-
derstanding Modern Painting."
Mrs. Morton Pino will conduct the
program.
NEXT WEEK, DURING PHONE 0 THON,
YOU WILL BE ASKED TO
MAKE A PLEDGE TO THE 1972 UNITED
i
JEWISH CAMPAIGN AND ISRAEL
EMERGENCY FUND.
PLEASE .
DON'T MAKE IT A MATTER OF "WILL YOU,"
BUT ONLY OF "HOW MUCH."
JEWISH FEDERATION
OF NORTH BROWARD
3905 N. Andrews Ave., Ft. Lauderdale, Fla 565-4869
W FOlO MNIVMSHG r
iWfNwsWhi*
jnyrp rlrwt Pf""">
HIhVst^tUei* I
___* >sstwnHait
Announcing...
Two Great 15 day
Silver Anniversary Cruises
to ISRAEL
(9 DAYS IN ISRAEL)
On the "Greatest
Ship in the World"
k Queen Elizabeth 2
Presented by:
L Assured Travel Services
From: $1195* to $2690.PerPereon
There's never been anything like it before.
PASSOVER/EASTER AIR/SEA CRUISE
15 days April 14-29,1973
You'll fly direct to London via El Al, TWA or other scheduled airlines on April 14th. Board the
Queen Elizabeth 2 in Southampton for cruising the Mediterranean stopping in Lisbon for a full day.
Dock m Israel for 9 days in ports of Ashdod and Haifa using the Queen Elizabeth 2 as your resort
,'iotel. You'll fly dii ectly home from Israel on April 29th.
INDEPENDENCE DAY AIR/SEA CRUISE
15 days April 28-May 13,1973
On this trip you'll fly direct to Israel on April 28th via El Al. TWA or other scheduled airlines^ Board
the Queen Elizabeth 2 for 9 days in Israel using the ship as your resort hotel in both Haifa and
Return by cruising through the Mediterranean with a full day in Palma de Mallorca. Then you II sail
on to England and board your scheduled airlines forthe flight home on May 13th.
? *
your tour includas: air fare*, transfers, baggage handling, all the fabulous facilities of the luxurious
Queen Elizabeth 2 and six meals daily at sea or in port. Optional land tours and arrangements will
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Page 11
Panorama:
By DAVID SCHWARTZ
Israel, World Far Apart On Population
ye* piCKBD IP Ol.'K S,unday Times and there
W on the front page was a big three col urn >
headline:
POPULATION PANEL
WARNS GROWTH MUST
NOW BE STOPPED
The long story which followed
recited again the familiar story
of the perils ahead if the popula-
tion growth is not halted.
We then picked up an Israeli
paper and read the headline:
SEVEN MILLION ISRAELIS BY 19W
The prediction of seven million was attributed
t Shimon Feres, Israeli Cabinet member, one of
,he best minds in Israel. Mr. Peres does not gloat
over the expected increase, but everyone knows all
Israel hopes it will come true.
It is plain that as to population. Israel and
,he world are far ai>art. To be sure. Israel is in a
somewhat different situation than most countries.
It is surrounded by Arabs who outnumber the Is-
raelis many-fold and also increased iiopulation is
a help to self-defense.
But there are other reasons. A peoples' entire
may be changed with increased num-
bers. We talk about discrimination based on color,
religion, race ahd's'cx.' HuY'fhere is" also a discrim-
ination on account of size and there is no society
to liberate these shorties. Imagine a man five feet
three and a man six feet tall applying for an execu-
tive job. The five footer is not only not given the
job, but is laughed at to boot.
Mr. Nixon goes to China because there are
eight hundred million Chinese. If there are eight
hundred million, even if they only sweep a street,
it's wonderful. The Englishman went everywhere
throughout the world and took over one country
after another because he not only had chut/pah
but because he knew there were fifty million Eng-
lishmen behind him.
Israel looks cheerfully to the prospect of in-
creased population. In the Israeli press recently
there was a story about the planting of trees in
Eilat for every baby born in that frontier town
during the year. A total of four hundred trees were
planted this year for the four hundred babies born.
Since the inception of this program, more than
6,000 trees have been planted in Eilat.
So the increased population in Israel is bene-
fitting Israel from the general ecological stand-
I>oint as well. The other countries of the world
might profit by this example; the environment, in- *
steart of deteriorating with mcYeaSetf population,
would improve.
Increase *f population has other benefits. New
people bring new ideas. One may recall back in
1020, the English planted a settlement in Virginia
called Jamestown. History tells us that these set-
tlers went all around the place digging for gold.
They found nothing and they growled and belly-
ached about everything. They longed to be back
in old England. Then Jamestown had an increase
of population. John Rolfe arrived. He showed them
where there was plenty of gold. It was in planting
tobacco. And after that, the population grew and
grew ami tliere were no more complaints.
In Israel, things like that are happening again
and again. Only a few years back, some Israelis
came up with the idea of planting flowers for ex-
port, ami the other day the Associated Press re-
ported that during 1971 Israel exported 23 million
Mowers.
That is finding gold t and that also helps
ecology. Think of all the beauty and sweet smells
and pleasant thoughts the 23 million flowers will
bring to the environments of the world.
(Copyright, IKI, Jewish Telegraphic Agency)
KRAfl NEWSLETTER By Corl Alpert
Israel's Employment Problems
IThe DESPERATE cries for 'help'' being bean
M in Israel these days have nothing to do with the
H iei (anal or the desire for more war planes. They
Ball the country's newspaper! bv
employers in frantic- -earch for
employees.
Despite growing immigration
lor perhaps because of it there
is serious and continuing short-
I age of hands in almost every
I branch of the economy. Every
_J newcomer family to Israel creates
la demand for housing, clothing, fowl and services.
ISome of the newcomers also bring skills and ex-
Lerlence which result in new industries, which m
turn require employees.
The number of Arabs being brought into Israel
rlaily from the West Bank and Gaza *s now ap-
proaching 40.000. and these perform valuable serv-
ant in agriculture, in construction and in factory
rk. Israel's demand for more and more Arab
nbo) n creating a near crisis in the West Bank,
rtlch itself now feels a shortage of hired hands.
Hie local residents prefer to work in Israel, where
higher.
In the meantime Israel is in the middle of a
ireal hotel construction boom, which will add thou-
ore rooms to meet the demands of the
tourist industry. But new hotels required
rained personnel, and one conservative estimate
hai it that no less than fc.000 men and women will
bave to be properly trained in the next three years
il these new hotels are to be operable.
The demand for help is to be found on almost
every level. I went through one typical issue of a
II, brew daily and found large ads small classifiedsi for the following: Electronic en-
gineers, computer programmers, printers, carpen-
ters, accountants, household help, errand boys, tech-
nicians, salesman, switchboard operators, metal
WOCtara, technical writers, graphic artists, nurses.
seamstresses, pharmacists, production engineers,
chemists, secretaries and typists.
The post office wants mailmen, the merchant
marine Is looking for seagoing officers, the govern-
ment wants prison wardens. How bad the situation
is may be judged from the fact that the Weizmann
Institute is advertising for scientists, the Hebrew
University is looking for educational administra-
tors, the Technion is looking for engineers.
One firm tries an eye-catching, bold headline:
A horse! A horse! A kingdom for a horse -pro-
vided the horse is also an Analytical Chemist. In
case you already own a kingdom, maybe you'll set-
tle for abundant hay ami air conditioned stables."
Most of the advertisers, however, are rigidly
conservative in the statement Of their needs. There
can be little In the way of salary competition, be-
cause wages and salaries are fixed and frozen In
Israel.
Todoy's Thought By DR. SAMUEL SILVER
Is Religion Too Expensive?
IRK SYNAGOGUES expensive to join?
Many people think so, and what is n >eded
a better public relations effort to convey to the
Public the truth about congregational life.
I re-discovered this recently in
Miami, when I went on a talk
I show and was given rude treat-
, ment by the moderator of the pro-
gram, a young woman who said
she was Jewish and proceeded to
| lambast organized religion.
She said beautiful >'-
pgjMB were unnecessary:
ple could pray under a tree. She complained
hat many could not "afford" to join a synagogue.
P1'' ventilated her protests against building funds
Fd Qted such words as "travesty" and "barbarian"
referring to various religious practices. She
spoke about "rabbis in Cadillacs."
1 stood mv ground. I told her that every rymv
mug in America will allow people to Job) and even
get holvday admittance if they can't pay the aver-
age dUSS. I said that "the beauty of holiness" war-
rants beautiful synagogues and religious schools. I
.aid that anything worth while needs to be "orga-
nhed I -aid anyone can "afford" to join a shul.
I said few rabbii have big cars and that those who
do have well earned them.
Then the hostess took phone calls, and more
listeners repeated the stories about now expensive
affiliation was. I stood my ground and said hat
iS. wT canards often repeal and that thev
w.n especially deplorable Stool almost eve,,
.,. Say has a deficit. But I came to the con-
SX that a b*t public relations endeavor ,s ,-
dicated for synagogue.
Book Review By SEYMOUR B. LIEBMAN
Exercise In Futility
LJOVY CAN THE fiilminations of a writer who
" presents a book which Robert Alter in Com-
mentary (Feb. 1972) labeled "thoroughly irritating
kand silly" be treated seriously?
We believe that any book con-
taining the words "sex" or "Jew-
ish" in the title can readily find a
1 publisher. This must be the ex-
planation for the apiH-arance of
Ellis Rlvkins The Shaping of Jew-
ish imiwrj (Chas. Scrlbner*s Sons.
S7.95>. The fact that the author
1 holds a distinguished chair at He-
brew Union College must also have been of as-
sistance.
The book contains numerous errors of fact. .
Pontification often serves as a substitute for valid
historical evidence. In one place, Mr. Rivkin writes
"I have traced the intermeshing of Christian-feudal
Judaism and Islamic Jewish forms Now I shall
go on to sketch the process by which the Jewry
of h"rance, England and Germany intertwined with
Jewries of Italy and Poland." The tracing and
sketching are more in the mind of the author than
in the printed pages, however.
There are many statements which strain be-
lief, such as:
"The United States which was founded and
.settled by the drive of the capitalist spirit."
"An enterprising farmer class strongly moti-
vated by the capitalist spirit, laid the foundation
(f American agriculture."
:
The migration of Jews from Christian-feudal
France into Spain..."
The Moslems stamped the Jews permanently
iis an urban people."
The book includes no footnotes or bibliography, ,
so the author is unfettered by the strictures of
scholasticism. Wb like a quote attributed to Mr.
Rivkin which he used to decimate another writer:
"... thousands of readers will find it much easier
to absorb the author's ignorance (we would sub-
stitute rash statements) than a res|x>nsible schol-
ar's learning. One shudders at the thought of a
generation nurtured on (the author's) fantasy."
Part of the book is a rehash of a Rivkin article
written many years ago. His structural theory'
and discussion of the Marranos were latar belittled
by the French historian. I. S. Revah. Prof. A. S.
Halkin, in 1953, advanced a hypothesis which is
now part of "the shaping of history." There is a
great deal of repetition and innumerable pseudo-
profound generalities beli.il by history'. The only
i solid parti of the book are the traditional concepts !


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