The Jewish Floridian of North Broward

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Oct. 22, 1971)-v. 3, no. 6 (Mar. 22, 1974).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Dec. 17, 1971 called also v.1, no. 4, Sept. 21, 1973 called also v.2, no. 23, and Dec. 14, 1973 called also v.2, no. 28, repeating numbering of previous issues.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Vol. 2, no. 1 omitted in numbering of issues and was not published.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statement conflict: Sept. 7, 1973 called no. 22 in masthead and no. 23 in publisher's statement; Nov. 30, 1973 called no. 27 in masthead and no. 28 in publisher's statement.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44572526
lccn - sn 00229547
ocm44572526
System ID:
AA00014313:00014

Related Items

Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
'*Jewisti Florid fan
Number 12
of XORTH BMOWARB
April 7, 1972
Price 20c
hIus Of Soviet Jews
le Of Many Messages
(WNS) Many
ssagcs by national
organizations this
3ted to the themes
ius of Jews from
ilon and the desire
vs who remain in
live as Jews with
style, culture and
bkerman, general
[the United Jewish
ribed the new exo-
but a proud
one." Sam Roth-
chairman of the
I Organization said,
(Jewish people are
through a Pass-
{present. The open-
Ites of the Soviet
for so many years
|king to leave for
an obvious paral-
exodus of 2.000
Sinsburg, general
[the Joint Distnbu-
noted that the
itlnuc to aid these
ly Jews in Israel,
ica, Europe and
We wiU pro-
heaith and wel-
eir vocational and
it, and above all
to help them
ler, president of
the Council of Jewish Federa-
tions and Welfare Funds, ob-
served, "At Passover we recall
the long march millenia ago by
a people who could be satis'ied
by nothing less than liberty.
The act of recall at this season
reaffirms our generation's in-
sistence on Jewish continuity
and a society fulfilling the prom-
ise of freedom for all men."
Philip E. Hoffman, president
of the American Jewish Commit-
tee, pledged that "we cannot
and will not forget" the 40 Jew-
ish prisoners who languish in
severe-regime labor camps in
the Soviet Union. These people
are in jail for committing no
crime but merely for "express-
ing the age-old longing of the
Jew, expressed in the Haggadah,
'Next Year in Jerusalem.' "
Harold Friedman, president of
the United Hias Service declared.
"At Passover our hearts and
minds turn to our brethren in
c'istant lands who still live in
conditions of fear and degrada-
tion."
Meyer Pcsin, president of the
Jewish National Fund of Amer-
ica, said. "The Jewish National
Fund has earned and needs the
continued and increased support
of world Jewry ... in the res-
toration of Israel to its chal-
lenging place in the world to-
day."
\da Embassy Closing;
il Break Expected
(JTA) Israel
{Embassy in Kam-
Friday, two days
deadline set bv
Amin last week
the withdrawal
iplomatic mission
ip of IftraWi Em-
returned here
|ht. AmlMMador
and the rrst of
tprctrd home by
[expected home by
week are the laat
I civilian employee*
their families.
Foreign Mini>try
Jy to handle Is-
in the East Af-
although there
>rmal break yet in
lations between
Ida.
not annotnce *
he ordered the In-
closed and some
lIs claim that e.os-
Kmbasty does Bt
the termina-
itic relations with
rever, other offl-
formal break will
ll of Israel's diplo-
lion followed last
ition of the Israeli
ssion from Uganda at
Amin's demand. He had accused
Israeli personnel of constituting
a fifth column that was trying
to overthrow his regime.
la addition to the diplomatic
and military missions, several
hundred Israelis were employed
by private firms on various con-
struction projects in Uganda.
These projects were terminated
by Amin last week and most of
the employees and their fami-
lies haw returned to Israel.
The Israeli interests which
Italy has been asked to look
I after in Uganda include heavy
mechanical equipment left be-
hind on the interrupted con-
struction work and a debt of
some $20 million owed Israel by
Uganda.
Israelis Vaccinated
Against Smallpox
JERUSALEM (JTA' Hos-
pital and port workers in Israel
were vaccinated against small-
pox following an outbreak of the
disease in Yugoslavia. Syria and
other Middle East countries.
The disease was reportedly
carried to Yugoslavia by a Yu-
goslav Moslem who contracted
it while on a pilgrimage to
Mecca in Saudi Arabia.
Secret Documents Said To
Reveal Jordan's 'Dual Policy'
PARIS (JTA) The French
weekly "L "Express" has pub-
lished the texts of three top
secret letters said1 to have been
written by Jordanian officials
:n October of 1967 which, the
Jiagazine says, establish the
fact that "secret agreements"
exist between Israel and Jordan
and that their respective rep-
resentatives met several times.
"L 'Express" says the docu-
ments prove that the day after
the Six-Day War, in June, 1967,
Jordan chose to practice dual
policy towards Israel outwardly,
solidarity with the other Arab
states, but covertly, a policy of
the Jordanian ambassador in
Washington is from Premier
Bahgat Talhourj.
It reads: "Will you establish
negotiations with Israel. The
magazine published copies of the
three letters. The first, marked
"confidential and urgent," dated
Oct. 11, 1967, and addressed to
urgent contacts with United
States Secretary of State Dean
Rusk to discuss pressure to be
put on the Israeli government
to renounce its policy of creation
of a Palestinian state in which
Palestinian deputies and notables
of the West Bank would partici-
pate. Let Dean Rusk know that
if Israel persists in this project
we will be obliged to annul the
secret and non-secret agreements
which tie us to Israel, and. to
assure our rights, cooperate with
the Arab states and the Eastern
European bloc."
Another letter, marked "se-
cret and urgent" was dated Oct.
10, 1967 and was from Talhouni
to the Jordanian ambassador in
Rome. It says: "In reference
to what was published in the
Rome 'Daily American' (Rome's
English language newspaper) I
Benjamin R. Epstein, national
director of the Anu-Detaniation
League of B'nai B'rith, wili be\
honored for his quarter of a
century of leadership at a tes-
timonial dinner in New York
City Monday. April 17 accord
ing to an announcement made
bv Seymour Graubard, national
chairman of the League.
pray you to establish contac* in
a very confidential manner with
the Italian Minister of Informa-
tion to convince him to induce
the Italian press to refrain from
publishing anything about the
secret encounters between the
k.ng of Jordan and representa-
tives of Israeli authorities. Also
establish contact with the direc-
tors of the large Italian news-
papers to deny the information
in any manner possible, even if
it would cost 5.000 dinars." The
latter letter further asked the
Jordanian ambassador in Rjme
to convince the Israeli ambas-
sador "to deny what was pub-
lished in the Daily American'
about the encounter between the
king's envoy and Israeli Premier
Levi Eshkol."
Talhouni also instructed the
ambassador to inform the Israeli
ambassador that Jordan's for-
eign policy will not be affected
by the new Jordanian govern-
ment and that "the secret agree-
ments concluded with Israel are
still in effect."

Briefs
Two Nazis Freed, One Sentenced
DUSSELDORF (WNS) Franz Joseph Swidewski, 50, former
SS guard at Treblinka, was sentenced to seven years imprisonment
for helping murder 371 Jewish inmates. But former Nazi police
commissioner Friedrich Niehoff, 67, was acquitted of the charge
of murdering a child in Mogilev, Russia, in October. 1941. And in
Hamburg, former Nazi police commissioner Walter Becker, 74,
was found not guilty of murdering six persons in Starachoice.
Poland. Former SS officer Friedrich Bosshammer, 65, accused of
murdering some 3,000 Italian Jews during 1942-43, who went o:i
trial last week was a member of Adolf Eichmann's "Jewish De-
partment" and in charge of the "Final Solution" it Italy.
Post Office Destroys Matzos
WASHINGTON (WNS) Postal authorities have disposed
of" 20,000 pounds of matzos which had been mailed to the Soviet
Embassy here for transmission to Soviet Jews. The mail campaign,
organized by B'nai B'rith. was meant to dramatize the plight of
Soviet Jewry. The Embassy refused to accept the packages which
had piled up in the basement of the main post office here. Team-
sters Local 701 of North Brunswick N.J., had offered to pick up and
deliver the matzos to charitable organizations. Sen. Harrison A.
Williams, Jr., (D.-N.J.) is asking post office officials for a "full
explanation" of why the matzos were destroyed.
85% Participation In Elections
JERUSALEM (WNS) Despite the opposition expressed and
the threats voiced by Jordanian officials and terrorist spokesmen,
85% of the eligible voters turned out for the first municipal elec-
tions since the Six-Day War. held in 24 towns in the occupied West
Bank. In the last general election, held under Jordanian rule, 75%
of the electorate voted.
Hussein Meets With Nixon, Rogers
WASHINGTON (WNS) King Hussein of Jordan met with
President Nixon in the White House and then lunched with Secre-
tary of State William P. Rogers at the State Department last week.
One topic of discussion was the king's plan for a federation of the
Israeli occupied West Bank and Jordan, but White House spokesman
Ronald Zeigler told newsmen after the meetings, "We are not
commenting on the substance of the plan at all." He also said that
Hussein's proposal for an autonomous Palestine "is a reeorganiza-
tion plan after a peace agreement is reached in the Middle East
or between Israel and Jordan."
Syrian Official Cancels Discussion
NEW YORK (WNS) Dia-Allah el Fattal, counselor of the
Syrian Mission to the United Nations, cancelled a scheduled discus-
sion on the situation of Syrian Jewry with members of the World
Union of Jewish Stuc'ents, when he learned that one of the three
was an Israeli. Fattal said he would meet with "any Jewish person"
other than an Israeli. Martin Salowitz, North American representa-
tive of the World Union of Jewish Students, said a new meeting,
without an Israeli in the delegation would be asked for.

<-


Pag 2
*Je*islFkrktian
Friday, April 7 J
Kassewitz To Chair
ADL's Regional Board
The Anti-Dotamation Leag io of, Ossinsky. Jr.. E. Albert Pallid.
Bnai BYith has announced th
fomptatloa of le udge William Paiiot Samuel I'as-
for, Jmivc Morton Parry, Saul
undik. A. David Rayvis. Hi. rVli\
Reyler, Hon. Barry Richard, Burn-'
etl Roth. Haivey Ruvin. Al Sohiui-
dar, I>az Schneider, Paul SeMar*
man. Dr. Myron Segal, N nman
Sevin, Hon. Ardea Sio^endorf. Mi
Phyllis Shampanier, Judge Sam
SiKor. Richard Swaebe, Sanford j
Suordlin. George Talianoff. Joseph
Teitelbaum. Dr. Fred Witkoff, An-
sel \\Ittenstein, Henry Wolff.
Manual Zaiac, Arthur Zimmet,
and Hairy ZukernkK.
l:->:i"?i:*l I'.o.ircl members are Harry
Ai.t; a .\ Abrueowits, Edward. Ad-
Mr*. I >n \ i J Alpir, Alan Altshultr.
Mi- Lester Arkin. Suln.-y ArOItOVlU,
til Austatn, Leonard Brr, Dr.
s. \ mi--ur i;. i-. l'l Bernard* B>
Arthur Iti-r^. !-'> BMf, lkhili|> Herko-
viii, Joseph Berkowtta, Steven n. r^-r.
Mr* r.iuiiiK' Berman, Paul Blau, Ben
BotWlnlk, Arnold ltruun. AU-x Brest,
in i.i. Brtcker, Ben Bash, aad My-
rmi m Cohen.
UAHC Color-Slides Depict
Problems Of Three Million
Miami
Loon-
JACK KASSEWI1Z
pointmenfs to its Florida Region-
al Board and Executive Commit-
t.. mi 197_-73.
Chatmu of the Regional Board
k Jack Kasseuit/, chief editorial
anile "f The Miami News. Vice
da.llllMlll of the board a<-e Dr.
Herbert M. Baumgaid. Arthur
Hip wit/ of Jacksonville, Sylvan
Meyer, ami Mrs. Morton Perry
Honorary h a irman is
banker and philanthropist
aid L Abate.
Miami attorney Burton Young
is iliairman ol th' Board's i:.\eou-
ttve COtnmftlee; insurance ixecu-
tive George Bernstein is its vice
chairman.
Elected to the Executive Com-
mittee ware William Alper. Wal-
ter A|ifelbaum. Herman Binder.
Al Block. Jomme Bo.-nstein.
Joseph Brechnar, Morton Brown,
Judge trying Gypen, Eugene Kisen.
Paul Kjistein. Richard Kssen, Jack
Fink. Judge Milton Frie Richard Gerstein. Nathaniel Glick-
man. Alfred Golden. Sam Gold-
stein, David Gorman. Hon. Rhea
Grossman. M o i e n 0 Habii. Dr.
Arthur Hirsch. Morton Kesior and
George Kroncngoid.
A No Dr. I; vim; I., hi man. Jack
Ldrvin, Mrs. Sylvia Lewis, Allan
MargoUa, Benjamin Meyers. Louts
'In.lrd RENT *"
WE RENT
Most Everything
Including Hertz Trucks
1831 N.E. 45th St.
PHONE
771-1822
Uao Arthur Covrshon, .Mr- Ruth
hi.in, Ludwig Enaler, Pm( Sam
i i Essen, .iii'im- Jack Palk,
Mi> Harold Fetdman, Mrs jui>- Pier-
man, In Abraham Plachler, Bamuel
i.iii'l, Ben Friedman, EUehard
Uardn.r, Rabbi Btaale) Qiirfelu, Irwln
OoMbera, Joel Qoldman, Chartea Ooid-
stein, .mi- Roac Gordon, H<>n Alex
km, C h a r I e Gottlieb. Jerome
Oreene, Hon Robert Qrover, Ni
Gumenlck, laaa< Hablf, B. J Harris,
Hmi. Marshall liarrU William 1>
Horvtta, Richard Horwlch, and Rabbi
Leon Mam itz
Ai-.i Bob Jaoobeon, Rabbi Bamuel
Jaffe. Richard Jaffa, NauHo Kaller,
Joseph Kaplan, Judge Edward Klein.
In Al. \ Ki.l.b. Mi- Ju.lilh Ki-
Hymen laUce, Bernard Ijmnb.rp. Mrs
Laufsaan, Jeffrey Lefcoort, Rab-
bi Sidney Lefkowtts, WIRIam Leh-
man, sr. Mdjorto Lei Han, Bhepard
Leaaer, Bam Levenaon, Edward Levin,
Ben Levin, Herb Levin, Btdney Levin,
Btanle) Levin. Robert Levy, Dr. Brunn
Under, Rabbi Max Lipechlta, Joaeph
Upton, Robert Mai hi. Abraham Mnil-
' man. Oaraon Meyer, Hank Meyer, Sen i
Kenneth Myers. Btephea Mean, judge ,
Raymond Kathan, Robert Newman. I
mm Michael Orovtts,
Alan Rlchnrd Pallot. s Ronald Pai-
nt. Leonarild Pepper, Ji.-.-ph I'.rl-
Plnaley, Jack PopicE, Pro! Bam Pit* -
t.,r. Michael Radln. Sidney Raffel.
m. in. Dr. Richard Pfeffer, William !
Robert Rapapoit, Sidney (titter. Ham
Marshall Rosenberg. M ark,
Rubin. Rabbi All, i. Rut.hiU. Ben Bai> ,
ter. liemard Kaoks, Mo.. Krhatsman.
Irving Si hinill.-r. Mrr- Beanor Bcho-
chett, Sol .1 Schrelber, Simon Shaftal,
J J. Bhepard, l>r William Silver, Hon
Robert Sluvin. Kred K. Shochet. and
Robert Silver.
Alw) l>r. .lam.- Blmia. Siuart
Simon, N'ed Sinder. Hoi,, ri Slewett.
Noah Sniyler. licorue BOaX. l>>ui.-
Spector, Mr- Rhoda St. in. Hon. Rich-
ard Stone. Bayard BtreO, Jerry Buaa-
man. Mi- I'lulip Susmikhi. Robert
Buaaman, Mrs Aaron Baapocsnlk.
Loaia Tapper, Robert Tur. hin. Dr.
; ii Weldbera, Richard W
Bander Weinatock, i>r Qerald Wer-
nlck, Oscar White, Hon Loula Wolf-
son, Mltchel Wolfson, and Stephen P.
Wolfai
Norman L. H&hn of Oniahc
Neb., president and chair-
man of the board of AGC
Industries, Inc., has been
named chairman of the 45-
member committee plan-
ning the 66th anneal meet-
ing of the American Jewish
Committee, scheduled May
4-7 in New York. More than
1,000 persons are expected
to attend the four-day ses-
sion.
For All Types Roofing
... Let An Expert Do It! ..
Roof Repairs Re-Roofing
A. A. ROOFING
11260 S.W. 22nd Ct.
Phone 527-9381
ST. REGIS
REINFORCED TAPE
QrcwaroQapir Qackaging
FORT LAUDERDALE TtLESMONE
524-4387
HERE'S
POLYUNSATURATED
NATURAL OILS
DELICIOUSLY IDEAL
FOR LOW
CHOLESTEROL DIETS!
GOLF BALLS
Like New And Used
OVER 10 0* IN STOCK >,*'
FROM
2C 75c.
EACH
Big Discount
On All Golf
Equipment And
Supplies
STOP IN AND
SEE US FOR
BIG SAVINGS.
Phons 564-7700
Top Flight Golf Ball
1798 f, Oakland Pets Blvd.
Man. Thru tat. -*
NEW YORK. NY A n.-u ml
ar-ettae rjreeentatkni tag
both the historic and rontcm-
ajj problems "f the three mil-
lion Soviet J* has keen pro-
duced for adult ami yOUttl OnlCUB-
iton gTOupa by the Union <>t Am-
piuiiii Hebrew Congraialiona, The
slide! are available through the
' \!H"\ Publication Depailllt
Tho 70 photographi and art
rnontagea have Ihhh produced in
an uabound package (unlike a
flbratrip) perndtting updating t<>
acconMnodate tho ?onatantly ohane
dig situation of the Soviot Jew
The graphics are accompanied by
a detailed discussion guide luggested narration. Also in
eluded ai ios nf local ac
tions and fbUoa > pro
grams for reUgSoui n ti'-'l teachers
and adult en.
The work an ,rfhe|,
written by it. Theodo
. Bovlet .,!ki !iMn
' ni versus in ,, ^
diiccd by Sam Gra
Aeknowledgri
rial baa bai n given to th.
Imtltuta fin ,earch
iional Caaferei .
iv. th.- Student -1
vlet Jewry. I:
Rabbi Jack
wakj and Mamie G C^rmna
One shdc Ihows
first Israeli Ami
i-m. surround. s JsJ
IMS, An entli js ^.
to the S'imi fn%3
Israt I and ,:,
arid educath n then
reaettUng .1- :

This year in Jerusalem;..____.,
thousands of Jews from the Soviet Union will
come home to the Promised Land. Just as our v
brothers were delivered out of bondage cent jries
ago, the Exodus of today's Russian Jew
i ^.ciles the inner spirit of Jews everywhere.
This year in Jerusalem...
1 : increases in housing, eduCu,,:-\
' Bon, vocational trair' "1
l- ------- -jaged are a necessity.
This year in Jerusalem...
larebelngchalfer
* ~d r-,ore volatile threats to:
( /ethefundstoj eel
sofhun sd.
This year in Jerusalem...
n:ore than 70.000 immigrants from many C0I '- -
I ss and all walks of life will come to the F, i
Land to live in freedom and dignity. They v I
need help to become part of the ongoing dream
that is Israel.
This year in Jerusalem...
the celebration of the Seder has a special
meaning.
Keep the promisepay your pledge tcda/.
Give to the Israel Emergency Fund of the
United Jewish Appeal
Through the Jewish Federation of North
Broward-i 1972 United Jewish Campaign.


(iday. April 7. 1972
*jwist> fkridian
Page 3
'ikvah Commission Plans
Program For Retarded
Lubttstamtnt of classes in Jew
education for the retarded
,1 support of the nationui Tik-
progrsun of a normal camp
|inu f"r regarded Jew^li cNJ-
i ;,nd participation in a nition-
enfervnee on the Jewish re-
..,! child, are some of the goals
.i. newly formed Tlkvah Com-
ls,,,,, of the Southeast Region
(United Synagogue accurding
Harold C. Rivkind. president.
. national Tikvah proR.am
inaugurated two yeai i ago
r ihe Commission on Jewish
i,, ation <>f United Synagogue of
[ realised the crucial need
providing the Jewish "apecial"
( with a summer eann ing
prience that would provide so-
and cultural integration with
[nial peers, an understan.ling of
Jewish heritage through reli-
experientlal living, and par-
nation in a non-oompo'.itive
Vi-ili environment in which the
1,1 was judged not on ability,
rather on the honesty and
_:ii\ evidenced at camp.
Pic program, held at Camp Ra-
,ii Glen Spey. N.Y.. vas so
cessful that a mother of a re-
child upon vialtlag the
pip commented that it wai like
ingathering of the exiles."
! special child found a warm.
ire atmosphere, and the nor-
iliild became a more sensi-
humaa being as a raautt of
daily living with the special
lldren.
| our Mann ol Hollywood
.- on the national Tikvah
fcnmission whose task it is to
V support the Tikvah progiam
ii( h involve! tremendoui costs
. ol the high oounaekir and
\cher iaiio to camjiers. In.lei
direction of Herbert Green-
( and Rabbi Klliol Roeen, it is
I "n the second pn gram
M summer at an adilitional Ra-
.-ite.
The local commission, un ler the
I cochairmanship of Mike Exelbert
I and Bernard Greenfield, is plan-
| ning to establish classes for the
special Jewish child in boih the
north and south ends of the coun-
ty; offers of classroom space base
already been extended by Con-
gregations IJ'nai Rafael and Beth
David.
On April 9 and 10. Mr. Exelbert
will represent the local commis-
sion at the Brat national confer-
ence on the Jewish education of |
tin- s|HH-ial child in the Howard I
i Johnson Motor Lodge at Kenned)
Airport in New York City Pa- |
i rents, teachers, social workers and
, all those connected with Special
. education are also invited to at-
tend.
A s|ierial meeting to publicize
the work of the local Tikvan com-
mission will take place April 2fi
with one of the directors ot the
camp program as guest speaker,
and community awareness needs of the Jewish special child
1 as the theme of the meeting.
One other area in which the
commission h|>es to move i.s that
| of guiding the religious school
teacher to a greater understand-
ing of the patterns of learning dis-
abilities prevalent in all levels of
intellectual ability. Mrs. George
Kat/man. a graduate of the spe-
cial education program of the Uni-
versity of Miami, is preparing a
seminar for the religious school
\ teachers.
The needs of the Tikvah pro-
gram will be brought to the atten-
tion Of the religious school stu-
dent through an appeal to the
j Keren Ami funds of the schools
for support Of the Tik\ah pro-
gram. An informational bulletin Is
, being prepared by Nate Greene,
educational director of CongTOga-
i tion B'nai Rafael who previously
directed a program for the dpeclal
Jewish child at Beth David Con-
gregation.
THE ONLY
FUNERAL HOME
Serving Broword County
1171 N.I. Sltt AVE.
Within your means now. .
With peace of mind always.
Telephone 584-6060
BOUDREAUS DELICATESSEN
ANDWICHII PAHTY PUATTBFI*
LUNCHEON MKATB BALAOB
Geomce BOUDDEAU
PnopHtiTOR
1BOI A COMMERCIAL BLVD.
MPiniM AT 1LDO.
FORT LAUDERDALE. FLORIDA
Paging
Elijah
By RABBI SAMUEL SILVER
(A Seven Arts Feature!
The Passover-Reason is a goo l
time to take another look at
Elijah.
His name means "My Lord is
God." and his recorded life In the
Bibl, and his imagery in Jewish
lore tell us about what Judaism
strives to accomplish in people
and in society at large.
It was Elijah who faced up to a
cruel king and denounced him for
his iniquity and inequity.
So Elijah's feats long ago
ed Into the Jewish soul the
importance of justice. No p son
should be deemed so high and lofty
as to he unaccountable for a Fail-
ure in fairness.
Thus the Bible. But, in post-
Biblical days, Elijah became a
symbol of messianism.
In simpler terms, messianism
represents the Hebraic conviction
that society is not stagnant, and
man is capable of moving upwards
in his ethical conduct (as Elijah
was said to have soared into the
heavens at the end of his earthly
career),
Elijah became the cue-name for i
the possibility of upward accom-
plishments in the moral realm.
There are people and philosophies
which say men are anchored to
their present status, that human
nature has us anchored to strife,
hostility and Inequality
The figure of Elijah says no to I
all this We can become better.
Thousands of stories were spun
by our forefathers about Elijah (
In most of them he is the friend of I
'he poor, the champion of the op-
ed and distressed, the IMS-
! of that better world which
we can attain if only we work ai
eliminating the roadblocks to a
finer future.
And Elijah is the unseen guesi
uf the reality of the invisible, a
place setting is prepared for Elijah
and a cup of wine, augury of
Mic human sweetness which will
come to the world when it ac-
cepts the precepts of Elijah.
"THE PICTURE FRAME
YOU THOUGHT YOU
COULDN'T AFFORD"
Over 15,000 tmpty picture
frames on sole at give-a-
way prices. Most siies,
styles and finishes priced
at $1 and up. Some (oiks
like non-glare or regular
glass. We have both at give-
a-way prices. Hangers in-
stalled ten cents. Easels
thirty five cents and up.
We install custom pictures
FREE.
Be sure and bring your pic-
tures with you.
Custom framing done on
the premises with same day
delivery at low-low prices.
House of 15,000
Picture Frames
Imported Picture Frames
S.W. 13 ST.
(Jusl off S. Andrews)
PHONE: 521-18-td
Open cUiiy till 4 p.m.
^/Vw/
'a SUN CARPET
-WAREHOUSED
HI mPLUSH. SHAG. COMM. WEAVE V
$Q99 *
REMNANT
SAVINGS
COMPLETELY INSTALLED
OVER GENERAL TIRE
SPONGE RUBBER PAD
Reg. Values to $. Sq. Yd.
ISALE PRICED...........
OTHER QUALITY CARPET FROM $3.W to $H.9V Available
cumtnir
IWIUlIB
roomer m* .f
SUN CARPET DISTRIBUTORS, INC.
mom. thru SAT. 9:l A* *W "
MON. THRU SAT.
)30 N.W. 44tb S!.(Pnt Rod) Ft. LfjrVfrk
565-67K
"Go Places With Council!"
ISRAEL IBERIA SCANDINAVIA -
ORIENT EUROPE ETC., ETC.
NATIONAL COUNCIL OF JEWISH WOMEN
RHEA D. NATHAN
Tour Chairman North Broward Section
Telephone 942-1449

The Souths Most Modem Lapidary Workshop
Looking for something to creative-
ly occupy your leisure time?
Maybe we can help. The Mine
Shaft instructs in the art of gem
cutting, faceting, gold and silver
smithing. Original supplies for
hobby sold here too. Black Coral
Jewelry. Navaio Jewelry...
UNUSUAL ROCKS. JEWELRY. SCULPTURING
.42a H.t 3rd kmm Ft LstsJerfile, Florida
763-7851
EM HM
ftl
RENTALS AND SALES
STYLE CENTER FOR THE GROOM
THE PRINCE EDWARD
EDWARDIAN TUXEDOS WITH
FLARE TROUSERS
SINGLE BREASTED TUXEDOS
SHAPED DOUBLE BREASTED TUXEOOS
DINNER JACKETS
CUTAWAVS
STROLLERS
FULL DRESS
STYLISH RING BEARER TUXEOOS
RUFFLE Si LACE FRONT
FORMAL SHIRTS
FORMAL SHOES BOOTS
SOUTHERN FORMALSf
1111 I. LAS OlAS livn FT. LAUOCROAlt
525-1171
Of IN
MOM A 'HUM
IVI Ml HO
Till t t*.M.
AMKAMtNlCAMO ACCEPTIO
rerg:
JJBPJJ
Of nW
SPRING AND SUMMER ,
BRIDALS
Com* in ond SO* V* J^- #
for yourtoH! j( %
" I
BRIDAL GOWNS
$50 to $200
BRIDESMAIDS' GOWNS
$30 ond up
r *v*.'.Of
OPEN: Moo. & Thurt. E. 'til 00 P.M.
1311 EAST LAS OLAS BLVD.
FORT LAUOEHOALE Po 523-3232


Page 4
rmm +Jmlslincr*0ar
Friday, April 7. j<
11*Jewish FloridIan
OF NORTH BROWARD
0IFFK3B and PI^ANT110 N E th STRBET. MIAMI. Telephone J7S-4SOS
ADVKRTISINi; DEPARTMENT l-7S-40..
MIAMI ADDRESS: P.O. Box 2973, Miami. Florida 331*1
FRED K SHOCHET SELJrfA M. THOMP80N
Editor and Publisher Aoatetant to Publisher
For the Jewish Federation of North Broward
AI.VIN GROSS DAVID M. AMDl'R
President Executive Director
I Federation office: 3905 N. Andrewa Avenue. Ft. lAuderdale. Fl 33301
Telephone R6S-4869
The Jewish Floridian Does Not Guarantee The Kashrwth
Of The Merchandise Advertised In Ita Columns.
Published Bi -Weekly
Second-Class Postage Paid at Miami, Fla.
The Jewish Floridian haa absorbed the Jewish Unity and the Jewish Weekly.
Member of the Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Seven Art* Feature Syndicate,
Worldwide News Service, National Editorial Association, American Association
of English-Jewish Newspapers, and the Florida Press Association.
MATTER OF FACT
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Area) One Year 12.00. Owt of Town Upon
Request.
Volume 1
Friday, April 7. 1972
Number 12
23 NISAN 5732
Facts Belie Official Statements
One of the issues between the Jews of Russia and the
Soviet government is that there is not the same degree of
freedom of Jewish religious observance that there is for
everybody else, limited as that may be.
In Moscow, with half a million Jews, there is only one
synagogue and two shacks, and the same holds true in
cities large and small, many of which have no place of
worship at all and none are permitted. The Hebrew Bible
may not be printed, and the youth are driven away by the
police when they seek to enter a synagogue. Granting the
official anti-religious policy of the Soviets, this kind of dis-
crimination is not imposed upon any other group and
the facts belie the government's statements to the contrary.
Scope Of ORT's Work Emphasized
The scope of the work of ORT as it celebrates its 50th
yecr of service to world Jewry is emphasized in the recent
announcement that the Joint Distribution Committee will
provide close to S3 million toward the overseas program
this year, in a new partnership.
The ORT has been an effective force in Israel for many
years, but the Jews of North Africa, the Middle East and
Europe also have all benefitted. The fact is that this year
alone mere than 65.000 persons in 20 countries will be re-
ceiving ORT aid, and most of the more than S23 million
budget is raised by the dedicated women who provide the
heart of ORT membership.
Their 'Solutions' Are Repugnant
The followers of George Wallace and Rabbi Meir
Kahane would seem to have a good deal in common, partic-
ularly their belief that their loader has the simple answers
to the complex problems of our society. The fears and
anxieties they share are real, but the solutions that emanate
from Wallace and Kahane are repugnant both to Jewish
and American tradition.
The Jewish Defense League offers a challange to
those who believe that the enswers to alienation of Jewish
youth, to the demand for a change in communal priorities
that recognize the needs of the day and not the past, to the
problems of the poor and aged in our midst, do not he at
the end of a bicycle chain or in any other kinds of violence.
But, unless those who oppose the methods of Wallace and
Kahane are prepared to address themselves to real solu-
tions, they must share the onus of being part of the problem
these men and their followers pose.
Americans Prone To Return
Americans who have settled in Israel are distressed
by the fact that some 20% of those who come to Israel
from thi3 country leave there within a year. But, those who
attended the recent 18th national convention of the Asso-
ciation oi Americans and Canadians in Israel, agree that
it is not the rugged, pioneering life that turns them off 'hey
expect that but rather the reception they get from Is-
raelis, both natives and bureaucrats.
It should be noted that of the 40,000 Americans now
in Israel about half made aliyah since the 1967 war, an
event which stimulated the desire to become a part of the
great adventure. However, the North Americans are far
more prone to return than other immigrants, and a study
is being made of the reasons other than just dissatisfaction
with the notorious Israeli bureaucracy and the feeling that
the proud sabras do not want them.
WASHINGTON As others
have hastened to point out.
President Nixon's speech on
school busing gave off a strong,
not very appetizing smell of
election year politics. But it is
often possible to do the right
thing for the wrong reason. And
the real question is whether the
President is trying to do the
right thing.
With astonishing improbabil-
ity, the President's position is
now getting significant, implied
support from the liberal aca-
demic educationists and sociolog-
ists, who tend to be Nixon-
haters to a man. The sociological-
educational hive at Harvard has
had more influence in the last
two decades than any other com-
peting hive. And the Harvard
hive is in the process of dis-
creetly swallowing its own past
words, insistently spoken over
so long a time.
THE MOST startling figure
in the group is Harvard's re-
morsely articulate Thomas Pet-
tigrew. In 1966-67, Pettigrew
was the chief author of the Civil
Rights Commission report on
"Racial Isolation in the Public
Schools." The report asserted
that black children in predomi-
nantly black schools "do not
achieve as well as other chil-
dren." It was also the first pub-
lic document to advocate mas-
sive busing, including center
city-suburban busing, to achieve
racial balance.
Yet Pettigrew now appear* as
the cosigner of an extraordinary
chapter in an authorative study
of data on the school problem
that had been edited by Fn d-
erick M.isteller ami Daniel P.
Moynihan. The PettigreVi chap-
ter delayed the nook'-; publica-
tion by over a year, apparently
because Pettier, w and nil COl-
leagues took so much time for
further checking and n check-
ing. And no wond
thk CHAPTER \a extraordi-
nary, in part, because it k writ-
ten in a language hardly more
related to normal English than
the long-range communications
of the aboriginal Canary Island-
ers, which were conducted in
piercing but well-modulated
whistles, A translation was
sensed, however, from one of
Pettigrew's cosigners, Daniel K.
Cohen.
According to Cohen, the chap-
ter >imply means that school de-
segregation has only trifling''
effects on the tragic educational
retardation afflicting the a\er-
age ghetto child. Desegregation
is specifically credited with nar-
rowing the black-white educa-
tional gap at grade 12 by "one-
sixth." This gap, at the end of
the last year of high school,
leaves the average black stu-
dent ZVs years behind the aver-
age white student.
THIS THE harsh question
arises whether narrowing this
gap by one-sixth justifies the
racial tensions and other heavy
costs of massive forced busing.
Pettigrew and his cosigners till
defend the 1967 report for the
Civil Rights Commission, writ-
ten, as noted, by Pettigrew. But
that will merely serve to raise
the eyebrows of anyone who
knows the way of academics.
At Harvard, too, another pa-
per of still greater Importance
will soon be published by 11
J. Armor and Mary Jo Go
1' M what th. call
a "longitudinal study of the ac-
tual results for the black pur.ils,
in five urban school systems
that were systematically deseg-
regated by busing some time
ago.
FOR ANYONE converted by
the former revivalist ic preach-
ing of people like Thomas Petti-
grew, the Armor-Goode results
can only be described as heart-
breaking. They want a solution
for the central problem of black
retardation. But the hard, un-
pleasing statistics show that In
practice, desegregation by bus-
ing does not come near to pro-
ducing the trifling improvement
claimed by Pettigrew et al.
Educationally, desegregation
by busing in fact appears to
make no significant difference
for the black students. Socially.
ty JOSEPH ALSOPl
In regard to aspirations
image and so on, d^sejrrmZI
by busing further appe?^]
do a certain amount of Kin.I
HENCE THE author, 0*|
new report are reliably ^Z]
to be divideo about their res.]
Continued from Pg0
J\.S t
Max Lerner
Sees ft
NEW YORK. N.Y. The Fiorida primary results were not
about liberals and conservatives, nor about racists or antiracists.
They were about people who figure themselves to !- the for-
gotten men and women of the nation. The failure to see Din
distorts many of the postmortems which barely sera: s the thin
conventional veneer of political small talk.
I want to quote something which gets beneath the veneer It
is from Lawton Chiles, who did a walking tour of Florida nfctt
pot him elected senator in 1970. After his victory he said, "The
common theme of everyone I talked with young and old, nag
and city, black and white was that "No one list, ru to me. mr
vote doesn't count, no one cares any more, government is so bu
and far away.""
What Chiles was getting at is the stuff of p>
Florida primary results are not about Geoi
el>out populism. No one li-tcns to me, no one ean I
don'l count -that is the Populist mood, whether :
t definition of the alienated, thos. who :
it it it
F.D.R. FNDEBSTOOD IT in his 1933 CM
W : liam Oreham Surv.--.er the ]
' -. man." He ; \ the !'
tali of It. A 1
i and ihatten
art Kennedy knew how and to thi n
I he might haw dona what ftooaeveH did,
' Bt all clear whether |
Including Te : Kennedy can do it.
I waa a Wallace victory with a tl
ratlc vote running away from tin real
!'u' thai doesn't call for a breast-beating hate-V
by those win. dielike what Wallace stands for ''
the forgotten men and women They're n
and nexi month and forever.
it it i:
VTHA1 HAPPENED WAS that Wallace moved into the
ntibuali .v.-d it hard and avail m-n ha
customary radii attitudes. His anticourt, an-: Hit astj
antipolitician'i line helped him pile up hit votes
ystem ol national primaries now. and if they cami ^hen the
antibualng sentiment was high. Wallace might evt n win tl*
D nocratic primaries For the feeling of th ten mcr.ui
women isn't just Florida-wide, it is nationwide.
The candidate who did best was Wallace, yes. The cm*- j
dates who did worst -along with Muskie -were the left- '"'
Ing Lindsay, McGovern and Shirley Chisholm, with 17< *1
lined. But consider the candidates of the cent, i
nine per cent got clobbered, but Jackson with 1' and Hua-
phrey with IS-; did surprisingly well. Add thi **ft
Ret 40';. which is just short of Wallace's Ifutkie's candid*?
may be dead on its feet, or it could get new life breathed in
it we wont know for a while. His problem ll thai '
take account of the Populist mood. Wallace does, Bi Popafttd
the right. Jackson does, as a Populist of the center. And #*
Humphreys style is to talk directly to the forgotten -theoH.
the retired the blacks, the unemployed and *
member him they feel surer that they are th ren**i
hired.
it ir it _
AFTER THAT WALK OF HIS that I quoti d W*J
Chili ad led "My walks did say to those p.-.; '
Whoever hopM to Deal N'i\on in November BUS) CO"
that he ean about than and their children '
antibusing solves nothing Tint hi- <"ml<*lV||
th children u not oorrupted by Wallac
of the problem || sensible integration, goed sch
for the neighliorhood as aa community. If MM of th
can gel this across he can take populism awaj
la) hii racism bare and make the forgotten feel the) V* **
I
The trouble now is that Humphrey has the a'atro-JJ
I..B.J. memories riding him, and Jackson has his militaO ^j
line which enrages the young and Muskie still clin^!J j
trust theme of his 1970 TV talk when the national mood m
moven beyond it. and Lindsay and McGovern are ,r>nn*_tt
Bobby without knowing how. And all the time Teddy j' j]
it out, and right now he must feel despite Chapp*!"1*110
that there is a chance he will inherit


iay. April 7. 1972
vJewisfi fhrkHan
Page 5
t^MMAA^^^^A^A^y^www^
Qnoili the Maven
by Beverly King Pollock
'^^MA^^^^A^M^wyyy^v^
CANDIELIGHTING TIM!
I 23 NISAN 6:20
JDC's 1972 Allocation To
ORT Increased By $250,000
HAPFY BIRTHDAY
Last week was my college daughter's birthday, so my husbanci
I fillt d the car with presents and headed towards her school.
We met our daughter half-way, in the little town where we used
five. She was with "Whafs-his-name," the guy with the brown
who'l been hanging around our house weekends for the past two
Ibrec years (or is it four?)
It was miserably wet and rainy but we toured the town where
daughter spent her childhood and where we spent the first 10
lis of our marriage.
We saw our old store with the swayback aisles and the house with
25 once-tiny yews we planted ourselves years before.
Nothing had changed radically but the now-huge yews. I found
i.<|f thinking about them the same way as when I saw my son in his
^t tuxedo. The growth of any family member, even an inanimate one,
kei a mother "qvell."
When we were thoroughly drenched, we took our daughter and
Jhat's-his-name" to the old hometown restaurant that serves at
Ft 9.000 courses. (My diet died ignobly.) I could tell "What's-his-
hv was pleased my daughter invited him to such an elegant place
[the way he looked at her.
The next day at my daughter's school, "What's-his-name" left In
rain to return to his own university. And funny thing, my daughter
\ i look at us when we spoke. And I think she even heard some
th>' thing! we were saying.
Sine, it was also Parents' Day, we were treated to her dorm
|nch. The gals sang us a special song and gave each parent a rose
then showed our immediate appreciation: we cried. It was
ply.
I new r MW so many pretty gtrlt. Refreshing and real. They sorta
Mi lil' if I wire that young and pretty and skinny, I'd bubble
i
brunch I talked to some poo rile who sat across from us.
I r now thinks I'm old enough to converse with people noi
| ited to DM by blood. This is contrary- to the Bat Mit/vah
L the mother is not deemed mature enough to carry on
I conversation! with her child's contemporaries.)
ntallj nid something funny and my daughter*! roommate
i and said a mavens house must be filled with fun and games
I her W Just laugh and chuckle all the time.
Then it WM over. My husband laid someone should check the
en count at the school. Because loads of parents developed an
r, i tion: team In the eye, a running none. Particularly when
ro say good-bye.
W, rilled the car with my daughters surplus winter clothes and
collection of trivia. And ai we iplashed back home in the rata,
H was great for our daughter to be away from home. She
ttured so much. etc. etc.
And b-ides vacation would bring her back to us in two more weeks.
Casting reducing rejuvenation
YH0LES0ME MEALS PEACEFUL SURROUNDINGS
(ERCISE CLASSES-SUN BATHING- POOL- BOATS
WRITE FOR FREE LITERATURE Tjftk
m SlrMBSCOIIHLA^
[ONITASPRINGS.FLORIDA 33923-JF U.S.A.
"Where Healih is Taught"
Eovd J8nd Stitches
flEDDLEFOINT
Original Custom Design*
Imaginatively Handpainted
On Imported Cam s.
PATERNAYAN PERSIAN YARNS
943 M.E. 19th AVENUE
FORT UWDERDALE
764-075*
By RABBI SAMt EL FOX
Why are sacrifices mentioned
in the prayer book in the course
ot our daily, Subbath and holi-
day prayers ?
In the days of the old Temple,
prayers accompanied the sacri-
fices. Actually, the prayers ex-
pressed the motive of the sacri-
fiea and gave the sacrifices mean-
ing and objective. The rabbis say
that our prayers of today still
have reference! to the ancient
sacrifices, even though they do
not exist any more. Indeed, the
traditional Jew looks forward to
their restoration in the Messianic
age. Rosensweig once said that
prayer today is a training ground
through which the Jew can
achieve the restoration of the an-
cient glory of the sacrificial ritual
of the Temple.
The aims of the sacrifices were
the same as the aim of prayer.
First, prayer and sacrifice show
an awareness of God on the part
of the worshipper. By offering)
some possession man recognizes in j
sacrifice that his possessions as a]
whole really belong to God. By
offering the life of an animal in
sacrifice man acknowledges that
life itself belongs to God.
By offering parts of the animal
in what is called i>> some "a ;>
offering" man demonstrate! hii
willingness to share everything
with God. In asking God for sus-
tenance in the course of his pray-
n man admit! that sustenance
tea through God. By asking
life Itself in his prayera nan ihows
that life comes from God.
Thus man, in praying and in sac-
rifJce, lurrendera his right to his
poos ssions and even to his life
unto the Almighty God. This Is
why prayers mention sacrifices.
Furthermore, man in prayer and
sacrifice demonstrates his intense
, gire to be close to the Almighty.
\ feeling of closeness and friend-1
ship is practically demonstrat dby
the willingness to give something;
up for one's beloved.
Sometimes an estrangement takes
place which creates a distance
between man and God. Making
up which means closing the gap.
is affected by again demonstrating
one's closeness by sacrificing some-
thing even if necessary, ones
own life for his friend. God. who
has a right to expect our very
lives, either as a token of friend-
ship or as a surrender of the life
we forfeited through sin, is merci-
ful and allows us to substitute
either a part of our possessions or
| the life of an animal when aacri-
fices were practiced as a token of
our willingness to give up every-
thing, should it be necessary, to
display recognition of the sover-
eignty of the Lord of the Universe.
(C), l!7l, .! wi.-h Telegraphic Agency)
PETCEMETERY
24-HOUR SERVICE
Complete burial ua4 funerol
_.iaiwi" '* r,u "
types iachdiag akk-np ttrvka
Bautiful CM*ttry Ground!
Cremotijn $trkS
M***eraf Frkea
MEMORIAL PARK
[ 226-7387J
1 IttOI WEST FlACtliR
The Joint Distribution Commit-
tee will provide $2,850,000 this
year toward the overseas voca-
tional training programs of the-
Organization for Rehabilitation
Through Training (ORT) a tradi-
tional recipient of JDC funds, ac-
cording to an announcement made
jointly by both organizations.
The allocation, a $250,000 in-
crease over last year, reflects vastly
increased needs in Israel, and will
help finance ORT technical edu-
cation, youth welfare and eco-
nomic rehabilitation service in
Europe, North Africa and India
Harry A. Levy, general chairman
of the 1972 CJA-IEF campaign of
the Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion, which helps support the JDC.
said that more than 63,000 per-
sons in 20 countries are expected
to receive ORT aid this year, for
which the ORT budget is $23,116.-
800.
"Another indication of the tre-
mendous social welfare needs in
Israel is the fact that ORT serv-
ices in the Jewish state, with
schools in 50 cities and towns
comprising the biggest vocational
school system in the country, will
receive the largest portion of the
grant by far." Mr. Levy said.
The JDC allocation also includes
provision for substantial funds to
be used by ORT in France for job
skills, education and other train-
ing programs for North African
refugees. ORT trade schools, ap-
prentice program for youth and
courses for adults, have been
greatly enlarged to meet the needs
of some 300,000 arrivals in recent
years.
JDC, the major American wel-
fare agency aiding distressed Jews
abroad, receives- its funds from the
local CJA-IEF campaign and simi-
lar Federation and United Jewish
Appeal campaigns throughout the
United States.
JDC has made $43.3 million avail-
able to ORT, the principal agency
affording vocational education to
Jews overseas in ihe past 25 years
making possible the vocational
training of some 550,000 persons.
Mr. Levy pointed out that voca-
tional training assistance, thrtugh
ORT, represents only one aspect
of JDC's overseas program. This
year JDC will require nearly $28
million to provide health, wel-
fare and rehabilitation services
for 300.000 needy Jews In 25 coun-
tries, he said.
The car that started the small "personal car" bend, the
Thunderbird, has an all-new image for 1972. Available from
all 'Big Ten" Ford dealers from Pompano to Perrine, the
Thunderbird's new size is reflected in the rear compartment,
where more than four inches of legroom have been added.
Offered with an impressive list of standard and optional
equipment, the Thunderbird continues to maintain classic
luxury in a size sought after by many.________________________
A distinctive selection of contemporary
and traditional custom picture frames
JAMES SEi\TZ. Framemaker
2400 E. LAS OLAS BOULEVARD. FT. LAUDEROALE 523 3686
DAY BEDS
Fort Lauderdale'a most attractive fine
quality Day Beda and Bahama Beda
at Vi to Vi the better Bahama price.
Slip covered or Tipper covered In a
arlection ot lovely prints and aoliiU.
Cap coven in choice ot plain or quilt-
ed fabric.
Why not come directly to our factory to make your
Day Bed purehaae?
PAfTORY AND SHOWROOM


Pr.ge 6
*Jewisi>ncr*dfon
Friday, April 7. J
. -
k3k VJU SptaL. tjrom Follow-Up To Passover
By RABBI AKIVA BRILLIANT lowest ,'bbs in our 4.000 year hLs-
i'.iii|.i, Beth Israel tory. We had just witnessed six
A more 13 days after the con- million of our fellow Jews led as
eh rim ot Passover, which com-'sheep to the slaughter by far
memoi-iites the deliverance of our] the greatest holocaust that has
ever befallen the Jewish people
In addition, Jews not affected b\
Na/i occupation were equally help-
less to do anything about it.
FORT LAUDERDALE
BETH ISRAEL (Temple) Conferva-
tiv" M7 E. Oakland Park Blvd.
Rabbi Akiva Brilliant. Cantor Mau^
rice New
42
1LAQ(L(a
FOR MEN
* WOMEN
^'nd'viduol E*elni 'mpotiea
/*7| yl'}*T~ S.yrw Woo en. 4Dom.,.c
^GsTC* TA'LOR Fno""
K)34 E LAS OLAS BLVD. Alteration Vrs ice S2.Vhnn
Kabbi Brilliant
ancestors ttan
the land of
Egypt, we cele-
brate Yom Ha-
atzmuat Is-
rael's Indepentl-1
once Day the
establishment of
the Third Jew-
ish Common-
wealth in the
Holy Land. Yom
Ha at/man!,
therefore is the
natural follow-
up to Passover and is unqueation
tri v the single moti important
event affecting the lif;1 and des-
tfnj of our Jewish people in the
I*M 2.000 years of our history.
All of us are well aware or the
many blessings which the State
of Israel has brought to Jews
throughout the world. We know
that Israel has become a haven
of refuge for the Jewish homeless:
how she has given a new lease on
life to Jews who had lexst all bop."
bjkI of the Jewish spiritual, cul-
tural and intellectual creat.vity
that has emanated from her iieo-
ple.
There Is yet another aspect.
however, that is often overlooked
Inn is without question a prea:
contribution of Israel to world
Jewry. I am referring specifically
1o the uplifting of the Jewish
psyche.
Prior to the establishment of
the state Jews the world ovei
were psychologically at one of the
All this contributed to the over-
all feeling of helpless fust rr.t ion.
A- a result, Jewish self-pride was
nil among many a Jew and there
were those who detested being
Jewish and rejected with bitter-
nets and scorn everything Jewish
including the faith of their fathers.
In the words of Heine "Juda-
ism was to them not a religion
but a misfortune."
With the establishment of the
State of Israel, however, the aver-
age Jew now takes pride in being
a Jew. He points with pride to Is-
rael as being his spiritual home-1
land and identifies himself with
the people of Israel. Israel has
substantially helped the Jew t<>
hold his head erect and point with
pride to Israel's many accomplish-
ments with which he identifies
himself.
The rebirth of Israel has played
a vital role in the renascence ol
Judaism and the Jew. The resto-
ration of Jewish self-pride is to be
counted as one of the major ef-
fects on Jewish life which Israel
has been largely responsible for
one which should not be under-
estimated.
Whatever we have done and con-
tinue to do in Ix'half of Israel i<
minute when compared with what
the State of Israel has done foi
us.
Community Organizations
MONDAY. APRIL 10
B'nai B'rith Women, Executive Committee Meeting, (p.m.)
Temple Beth Israel Sisterhood Luncheon Donor
II KSDAY. APRIL 11
Fort Lauderdale B'nai B'rith Women, Executive Comnv'ttec
Temple Emanu-EI Sisterhood Donor Luncheon. 11 30 a.m.
WKIiXKsliAV, APRIL 12
Brandeis Study Group at home of Mrs. Milton Davis, 1535 E.
Lake Drive. Fort Lauderdale 10 a.m.
Till'KSDAY, APRIL 13
Fort Lauderdale Hndataah study Group
Sabra Hadassah General Meeting
Chai Hadassah Executive Committee Meeting
I '.TIRD.W APRIL 13
lemple Both Israel Spring Fair and Carnival
! NOAY, APRIL Hi ""
Temple Beth Israel Spring Fair and Carnival
MONDAY. APRIL 17
Temple Beth Israel Sisterhood. General Meeting
Brandeis Executive Board Meeting at Mrs. Abbotts homo
10 a.m.
Tl KSDAY. APRIL IB
Temple Emanu-E! Sisterhood Executive Mooting 9:45 a.m.
WKDNKHDAY, APRIL 19
National Council of JewMl Women. Executive Comnvttoo
Meeting 10 a.m. Book Review 1 p.m.
TIURSDAY. APRIL 80
Fort Lauderdale Hadassah. General Mooting
Chai Hadassah Donor
EMANU-EL. 3245 VV. Oakland Park
Blvd. Reform. Rabbi Arthur J. Ab-
ram*. Cantor Jerome Klement. 48
--------
POMPANO BEACH
SHOLOM (Temple). 132 SE 11th Ave.
Conservative. Rabbi Morrit A. *K0f>-
Cantor Ernest Schreiber. *
--------
MARGATE
MARGATE JEWISH CENTER. (Con- '
servative) 6101 NW 9th St.__________
flatter of \fa<< fo
JOSEPH JILSOP
Continued from Pas* 4
ommendations. Armor favors
forthright recommendation con-
demning busing for racial bal-
ance and approving the neigh-
borhood school concept! But
this, of course, will still cause a
lot of tooth-gnashing among the
virtuous.
We might better gnash our
teeth, however, over the follies
and wasted efforts of the lasl
18 years. In 1954, the Supremo
Court courageously and rightly
pointed a new road in Brown
VS. Board of Education. The
question was then, as the ques-
tion is today, how best to travel
that road.
IT SEEMS a mite late to
start looking at ihe bard facts
bearing on this all-impor'.ant
tourney. But that Is where we
are today!
SWAP SHOP
EVERY
FRI. SAT. SUN. WED.
6 A.M. TO P.M. J^2
PHONE 5SI-42S1 ^ T\
SUNRISE at> NW 31tt
Ml IUS1 EAST Of 441
ALSO
VISIT THE
5. Thunderbird A
SWAP-SHOP
SAT. & SUN.
AT THE
HI-WAY ON
U.S. 1 AT THE
AIRPORT-
FT. LAUD.

NIGHTLY
(X) RATED
MOVIES AT
Adult
DRIVE IN THFQTlfc
AND
PHONE
SI3 7733
OR
9723242
T-bWI


Jke Quert
Distinctive Gifts Custom Framing
Graphics
Vleusant shopping where your every purchtst
is beautifully wrapped at no charge.
\,u shipment in Floral Metal Sculpture.
566-3964
4400 Bougainville* Drive Laiderdalc By Trie Sea, Hi
ALL PLANTS AT
WHOLESALE PRICES!
Saturday & Sunday Only
HIMS GARDEN
NURSERY
4861 S.W. 106 Ave., Davia
(Go west on Griffin Rd.
to 106 Ave.) Call 581-4935
BEFORE A
TENSION
HEADACHE
BRINGS OUT THE WORST IN YOU...
take AnttciQ to relieve headache pain
fast and let the be through' Comp.neii to all oiher lead-
ing tablets. Allacill gives you moie
of the pain-reliever doctor! recom-
mend most. In minutes you feel
better, and act It. Next time, before
t tension headache gels on your
nerves and you're leady to snap at
people...take Anucin" Tablets and
jctib* best of you conic through'
CARS DELIVERED
ANYWHERE
INSIDE
AUTO STORAGE
FULL
INSURANCE
DOOR TO DOOR
SERVICE
ICC
LICENSED
AUTOMOBILES DELIVERED .... NATIONWIDE
320S. W. 1st AVE.
524 9438 .- aa-a- *.-
Ft. Louderdol* Flo. 33308
PEOPLE DIE THEN
WONDER WHT-
HEAITH FOODS WERE
FOR THE OTHER GUY -
DOES YOUR CHILD WANT
TO BE A MEMBER OF
THE MARCHING BAND?
We have the largest staff of
degreed and professional
music instructors in South
Florida.
Kuan K.iii;il> Repalra
I'iaiM .mil Oru-i" Lflliaa
BROWAKI) BAND
INSTRUMENT
UN N.I. tl AVE FT LAUOERDALE
PMOtrc Hi wti
PHONE
941 7235
OPEN
9:30 A.M. to
7:30 P.M.
Monday thru
Saturday
SB j$NOP
t.i <;ilcsl < swia\wi:ak
Hnilirl.r.Hli!
A selection ol over 200 styles and prints in
most sue swimsuits by a do/en ol the most
popular swimsuit manufacturers Matched by
a line assortment ol cover ups Colt &
Tennis Toij by Haymaker Arnold Palmer
David Smith Voyager Jant/en Basics
by Fiquisite Form Jant/en. Dresses,
Body Shirts. Skirts, Shorts, Stacks,
Blouses, Tops by Act III Bodm
Knits Bernardo Voyager lant/en
White Stag Haymaker. Sandals
by Bernardo.
You'll be welcomed at this fine
Store by efficient, courteous
ladies who aim to assist (not
push) you. Minor alterations
Iree.
SEA RANCH VILLAGE SHOPPING CENTER
lAUDfRDAU IT TNC 9fA
Slap Shop far Btach and SparU Wear *'*
Vaur Oo


Iiday. April 7. 1972
* knisl fhridinn
Vaqe 7
+
Summer camp is a place for making things. With greet
patience, popsicle sticks, glue and paint Debbie Fridovi-h,
(left) made a serviceable napkin holder last year. On the
other hand. Woody Alpem enhanced a plain glass jar w;;h
"do-dads." glue, and a full can of spray paint.
Camp Kee-Tov Reunion
For Old, New Campers
Sisterhood Rummage Sale
Tli.' Sisterhood or' the Marj;at,
Jewish Center will conduct a
rummage sale at the Center, fiioi'
nw 9th St.. Margate, Monday
Tuesday and Wednesday, April 24.
35 and 26. Th < doors will bo open
i ach day at lo a.m.
Margate Sisterhood Meets
A lull afternoon of cards and
Man .' ins | starting at 12:30 Is
planned for the regular meeting
of tho Margate Jewish Center1
Sisterhood Tuesday,
Beth Israel Sisterhood
Donor Luncheon Monday
The Temple Beth Israel Sister-
i hood will hold its annual Donor
I Luncheon at 11:30 a.m. Monday
in the Tapis Rouge, Seashore Mo-
tel. Forl Lauder lale.
Following the luncheon program,
Danny and the Tunesmen will en-1
tertain.
i Kee-Tov, ol Temp!.
Inanu-Kl, K.rt Lauderdate, will
, union fur old
rs in th auditor-
{ the l mpli Fi Ida) f -
p.m.
[The summer camp program ol
Kee-Tov offers '> oppor-
roup participation and
i crafts, The spirit o
daism i* an int. -".a! part ol th
j. \t and arts and craft.--.
I ictivitiei Include rwimmlng.
its, nature hikes, trips an
..... pnts.
to ages lour through uuw
|t eligible for the program. How-
ler, a child must be four yean
It b) July. 1972.
|Tho Junior Division will include
|yi and girls from four through
the Senior Division will in-
Jud.- boys and girls from seven
Iroiuih nine and a Counseloi -in-
Traintng program Is availabl. for
boys and 'I- ho an 11 and 15
>. ai oi
Under tho guidance ol Rabbi J.
A.brams, there Is a *taff of quall-
counsi Ion inclu ling Ruth
Spit/.r. c u ip director, who has
had many yean of experience In
the fi< .(1 ol education and camp-
in-, and Hilda Greenebaum, assist-
mi camp director, who is a
teacher in the UtC-achool depart-
in. nt of Temple Emjinu-El and has J
a background la the field ol
edu auon.
There are seven weekly summer
lesaiom: June 59-23 and 26-30;
July 3-7; 10-14; 17-21. 24-28. and
July 31-Aur. 4.
For infoi mation regarding res-
ist ration, contact Mrs. Leonard
Franklin or the i.-niple office.
m LOVERS
are switching to
SWEE-TOUCH-NEE
ikr Because Swee-Touch-Nee
7p Tea has quality, it is mora
fragrant, more satisfying.
Make Swcc-Touch-Nee
your cup of tea ... it is so
refreshing, so delightful, so
much better, yet it costs no
more. Try it! Buy it...at all
good food stoics.
nrab'TOS
SWEE TOUCH-NEE
THI ARISTOCRAT OF TEAS!"
Distributed By:
SOUTHERN FOOD DISTRIBUTORS
4570 E. 10th Lane MU 1-3578
business management
General Business Analysis
Complete Business Management
Total Management for Absentee Owner
Business Brokerage Services
Business Consulting with follow through
to completion by us
X.Y. Times says "doesn't seem to have
a counterpart in this country"
Absentee Owner Management Corp.
2908 E. Sunrise Blvd. 565-2600
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33304
De CANO'S
MENS APPAREL CvJ
The look tot ill seasons'
CATALINA
ARNOLD PALMEI
JAYMAR
THOMPSON
MEDICI
JANTZEN
564-8032
4349 Bougainville* Or.
Laud By-The-Sea
HOURS: M0N. SAT. 9 6
ARCHITECTURAL WOOD PANELS
\H STOCK ON DISPLAY
. i .-. b.m.,, in ,qune.rf, book match.*, plank matched, V-'0Oed
Spacialning in unusual grim patterns, in icqncn* ,
and Un grooved pantli.
PRIMA VERA
PALDAO
WHITE OAK
ASH
BRAZILIAN ROSEWOOD
ZEBRAWOOO
AMERICAN ELM
WORMY CHESTNUT
BURMA TEAK
EAST INDIAN ROSEWOOD
AMERICAN BLACK WALNUT
RED OAK
VI* W un.,.a carpal. -*** *-!- **'* f "'"** "" ,rm
Hia rained eomfart of an aaijr chair.
Bacon Showcase Gallery, Inc.
5180 N.E. 18th AVENUE, FORT LAUDERDALE 771-8262
CM _* d C--------,a, BM~4* i- -- Hwr. a., RR Ta-a.)
LWSX
jadmond
^Fashions hy ^Topmost UJesiynOiS
Telephone 522-6463 920 Eoit Ltl Ola Blvd.
&*l
! Your child is an
individual...
i
He sliould be learning as one.
At Learning Foundations he can.
'I he basis of the Learning Foundations
Concept is individual learning, individual
instruction and learning at the students
own rate.
Basically:
He test each student in 1" academic
skills and determine strengths and
weaknesses in each.
He prescribe a learning program for
each individual student from the test results.
He improve liis learning ability only in
those areas in which the student needs
help, and he learns at his own speed. We
oiler help on an individual basis.
May we explain more fully. Call or
drop by.
I II III KIIIIJ MALL
587-4544
Learning Foundations
We make it easier to learn.
-A-G4*
Do you know the inherent loys of a oar-
den? Not the silver bells and cockle
shells variety, but a low maintenance,
easy-care, custom-designed, lovelv-to-
look-at kind? Dial us tell us what you,
like. No obligation.
Mediterranean Japanese
Spanish .w Hawaiian
Bahamian Colonial
Desert Modern
LANDSCAPE
^A
NUnSEM
1315 N.E. 12th Ave., Ft. Lauderdale
Phone 763-4331 Closed Sunday



Page 8
+Jmlstilk***t>*
The General's Yarmulka
By CHAPLAIN HAROLD AXKI.ROD
When Maj. Gen. James F. Hol-
lingsworth, Deputy Commanding
General, Headquarters, XXIV
Corps in Vietnam, was introduced
an rose to speak, the Jewish GIs
of "Military Region 1 at the Break-
the-Fast Dinner at Da Nang
gasped with pleasure.
The general, representing the
Commanding General, Lt. Gen.
Welborn G. Dolvin, was breaking
in a new article of clothing a
yarmulka with two stars on it,
denoting his rank.
The audience broke out in ap-
plause, even before he spoke. They
were very much indebted to Lt.
Gen. Dolvin and to his deputy.
Maj. Gen. Hollingsworth, who had
been extremely helpful in releas-
ing all Jewish personnel through-
out their entire command for the
High Holy Days, so that they
might fulfill their religious obli-
gations.
They came from the front lines,
from supply units, from behind
desks, from flight fields they
came, to enjoy the comradeship
and the religious services conduct-
ed by the writer, the Jewish chap-
Iain of the area, whose mission of
providing Jewish coverage of Mili-
tary Region 1 in Vietnam is com-
pletely supported by Chaplain
(COL) Robert J. Piocki, Staff
Chaplain XXIV Corps. Chaplain
Piocki helped plan, implement and
assist in the High Holy Day
Services.
Now, after the Day of Atone-
ment, they were together for their
last evening of fellowship, partak-
ing in the delightful Break-the-
Fast Dinner. The Kosher food and
other supplies were provided by
the National Jewish Welfare
'Board. Special holiday items were
provided by various committees of
the Women's Organizations' Serv-
ices of JWB.
The military provided the din-
ing hall, the help, the fresh vege-
tables, the coffee, the soft drinks
and the security to make it a
gala evening. Sitting by Gen. Hol-
lingsworth was Maj. Gen. Njuyen
Van Heiu, a Vietnamese comman-
der, also sporting a two-star yar-
mulka and learning for the first
time, the meaning of the High
Holy Days and the Break-the-Fast
ceremony. The affair was organ-
ized by the writer as the Jewish
area chaplain, his assistant, SP 5
Fred Davis, and several Jewish
lay leaders.
From the time I was a young-
ster, I wanted to be a rabbi, and
studied for seventeen years in day
schools, private schools and semi-
nary in order to receive my ordi-
nation. My first pulpit was in
Greenwood, Miss., and then tor
two years, I served in New Or-
leans, where I also taught on the
Loyola faculty. I also had the dis-
tinction of serving as the New-
Orleans area chairman for the
L'nited Fund.
On July 26. 1970. I entered the
Army at a time when the mili-
tary was downgraded and every-
one spoke harshly of Vietnam.
Yet, I came because I had the
strong feeling that, no matter
what the attitude of individuals
may be towards the war, Jewish
men were serving there, and I
felt that I had a "call" to serve
their needs.
The work of a chaplain in Viet-
nam is very ardous. A chaplain is
on the road three or four days a
week, travelling from unit to unit,
from "pit to pit," looking for Jew-
ish personnel, dealing with their
problems and bringing as much
solace and comfort as possible to
Be sure to mention
vJewistiflcrkUari
when patronizing
our advertisers
W% reoWjr important!
his people.
The chaplain is the link, the
father image between the Jewish
GI and his parents at home. When
the chaplain comes, he never
comes empty-handed. It is not
only a prayer book and Bible
which he carries in his jeep or
chopper (helicopter), but also
comfort items, gifts from JWB.
and more important, a smile and
a handshake which tells the indi-
vidual man that someone cares.
The general and the chaplain
made it a great evening for the
Jewish boys in Vietnam. The men
are there for only one year, and
this is a single experience. How-
ever, it is the hope of the chap-
lain and the general that the men
will recall this event with plea-
sure, and will institute "Break-
the-Fast" ceremonies in their own
homes when they return. After
all, this is what it is all about
the preparation of men to become ,
munity and of the general com-
munity, when they return to home
and those they love.
It's a Fact...
it Costs
10 ivtfecyate a
of -foot- into ?
Israeli scciet^f
________________Friday, April 7,
(Sty CouncU Asks For Flights
PHILADELPHIA (WNS) A resolution adopted by th q.
Council requests Secretary of State William P. Rogors to he
inaugurate direct Philadelphia-to-Israel in-flight service by E|
Airlines.
CLEARANCE
SALE
REDUCTIONS
UP TO 60.
LONG DRESSES
SPORTSWEAR
STREET LENGTH DRESSES
SALE O.V BOTH LOCATIONS
FAUHON HOVSt UK.
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
2150 M.L164th Street
North Miami Beach, Flo. 33162
Telephone 944-7150
Hovrs-9to5
FT. LAUDERDA1E
2661E. Oakland Park Blvd.
Ft. Lauderdale, Flo. 33306
Telephone 563-1394
Hours 9:30 to 5
COME EARLY FOR BEST SELECTIONS
It's a little hard
to find us.
And a lot harder to leave.
Point II it Point ol Americ* iw't the tuieit pl.ee in th. world to find Unfett
Vou -e .n h~r Pomt || dlrect,v on tnf ,,. thf p<)ft yf
txclutive netjnborhood. But tht ebovf nup will ,how you how to get there
.___"*" no,h' "onr. You wont want to. Not one. you* fn just how
cieoentend comfortable our condom.nium estate hom are. . lot of Mag room, th.t don't com. do* to our bathroom, for luxury.) If, mor, than
,u,t a ma.t.r of ..pan,,,, hxtur., and d.t.1,. (Not th.t w... n^icd 3TS
design Space. From oracou, foy.r to epan liin, Ioorn, A -,-- T^1 *
.round ,.. **jmm* d.n,n, a. U^co k3l A uSHmZZZZZ
.on f*.,,,.,. And ,, prooram of ioe..l ...nt. .11 Fort l.^daThaVcomeV2
SSSS.tE25......* w ~",,om ~5WT
One you't found in, you'll never want to jo.
It's as far as you can go.
MW, open daily .t 2200 South Ocean Un,. Fort L eud.rdal.
# 0,m Et the of *. ,7th St Cu*w.y .tun, ggM fO U, you,
Bu.lt .nd Dmlopod by G* Bu.ldm<3t> Uwd Amerkan Stock Exeruno,


Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EJZLAERGF_WT9I4T INGEST_TIME 2013-06-10T21:23:21Z PACKAGE AA00014313_00014
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES