The Jewish Floridian of North Broward

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Oct. 22, 1971)-v. 3, no. 6 (Mar. 22, 1974).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Dec. 17, 1971 called also v.1, no. 4, Sept. 21, 1973 called also v.2, no. 23, and Dec. 14, 1973 called also v.2, no. 28, repeating numbering of previous issues.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Vol. 2, no. 1 omitted in numbering of issues and was not published.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statement conflict: Sept. 7, 1973 called no. 22 in masthead and no. 23 in publisher's statement; Nov. 30, 1973 called no. 27 in masthead and no. 28 in publisher's statement.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44572526
lccn - sn 00229547
ocm44572526
System ID:
AA00014313:00013

Related Items

Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale


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Full Text
fJemsti Flari'dilahi
volume -" Number il
of NORTH BROWARD
March 24, 1972
Price 2U c
MORE VOLUNTEERS NEEDED
ederation Campaign Total: $300,000
Tha Jewish Federation cf North Broward's
1972 United Jewish Campaign and Israel
Emergency Fund drive reached the 5300,000
mark this week, two-thirds of the way to the
1972 goal of 5450,000, according to an an-
nouncement made by Alvin Gross, president.
"On the one hand," said Mr. Gros3, "I
am pleased that we are running almost $100,-
000 ahead of last year's campaign at this point,
but I must temper this with the understanding
that we have a long way to go towards our
goal of 5450,000, and we need volunteer help
to do it
"Frankly, not enough men in this com-
munity have come forward to help in this
once-a-year, all inclusive campaign effori to
meet our local, national and overseas respon-
sibilities," Mr. Gross continued.
"At a time when we know about, and un-
derstand, the need to help Israel absorb the
thousands of newcomers who will be coming
in this year, mcny from the Soviet Union, we
have not been able to keep up with the tre-
mendous growth of our own community where
reaching the men and asking ihem to partici-
pate in this crucial campaign is concerned.
"As we approach the Passover season, I
hope that the moment will rekindle the spaiK
of concern so necessary today if we are to
keep Jewish aspirations and Jewish survival a
part of our way of life.
"I urge anyone who is concerned not to
wait until he is asked to help, rather, to call
the Federation office, 565-4869, and volunteer
his assistance.
"I'm sure there are hundreds of men who
DO care enough and who WILL help us. I
urge them to call today," Mr. Gross concluded.
Creek Orthodox Bishop Attacks Jews
ATHENS iWNSi A virulently anti-Semitic attack by the
|t Ishop oi Chios in a speech on Greek Orthodoxy Day to an auii-nce
luhich included the regent of Greece, Cabinet ministers and promt-
nnt members of the community as a whole has alarmed this roun-
t.\'s 6.500 Jews, Blaming t'.ie Jews and Zionists for "adversely'
[influencing Greek youth, the bishop said Greek Orthodoxy wai
threatened by Freemasonry and Rotarianism, and said both orga-
M/atioiis were "controlled" by Jews and Zionists organizations, t
Dr. Mandelbatim Urges Greater Unity
KIAMESHA LAKE. N.Y. (WNS) Dr. Bernard MandellMum.
president of the Jewish Theological Seminary of America told the
7L'nd annual convention or f.ic Rabbinical Assembly (Conservative
Irabbii) there should be greatei unity, cooperation and understand-
llng between the three branches of American Judaism. He said
here Is too much "venom in Jewish life" and that its elimination
li- "indispensable for the survival of the Jewish people here and in
Psrael."
* *
|Sovie. MIGs Make Reconnaissance Flight
TEL AVIV (WNSi Two Soviet MIG-23* (Foxbats. the
[world fastest, highest flying combat aircraft made a nine-minute
verfllgtlt of Israeli-held Sinai photographing roads and Other
tratcglc Israeli emplacements in what is believed to be the most
1 fortified area in the Middle East Israeli Interceptor! were
to make contact with the MIGs which have a ceiling of
Is 100 feet, about 10000 feet higher than that of the American F-4
phantom jet. The MIGs, which are flown exclusively by Soviei
w from Ismailia in the central lector of the Suez Canal
Pone to Sharm el-Sheikh and then across the Red Sea to Egypt.
Death Camp Designer Acquitted
VIENNA (WNS) A jury here acquitted Walter Dejaco 63.
[the Nazi architect who designed and built the gas chambers and
[furnaces at the Auschwitz death camp, and his aide, Fritz Ertl,
lo3. of murder charges. In acquitting Dejaco. the Jury accepted Ma
[plea that he did not know the use to which the chambers and ovens
I would be put, deapite the introduction of blueprints which showed
[plans for elevators to move OOTpaM from gas chambers to the ovens.
[The State Prosecutor Hugo Kresnlk. said he would seek a retrial.
it *
[Villagers Demand Removal Of Terrorists
JERUSALEM For the first time, villagers in South-
ern Lebanon have banded together to demand that the Lebanese
(government remove the Palestinian terrorists from the areas of
Itheir villages. The Amman (Jordan! radio reported that 300 vil-
lagers drove in a motorcade to the Presidential Palace in Beirut
[to demand that Pres. Suleiman Franjieh clear the so-called ratan-
|jand" of terrorists.
Jarring Asked
To Repudiate
Feb. 8 Memo
JERUSALEM United Nations mediator Gun-
nar V. Jarring has been asked
by Israel specifically to repudi-
ate his Feb. 8, 1971 memo to
Israel, He is expected to consult
with UN. Secretary General
Kurt Waldheim regarding the
request, it was disclosed follow-
ing Sunday's Cabinet meeting
during which the Cabinet had a
short briefing by Foreign Minis-
ter Abba Kban.
It was learned that the Is-
raeli request was conveyed to
Dr. Jarring by Vosef Tekoah.
Israel's ambassador to the I'.X.
ut a meeting In New York.
Dr. Janing was reportedly
asked to state that the terms
of his peace mission are laid
down only in the Security Coun-
cil's Resolution 242 and tha he i
is not bound by any subsequent
documents or resolutions.
His Feb. 8. 1972 memo to Is-
rael asked for a commitment to
return to Israel's International J
boundaries a a prerequisite of [
poaoo negotiations.
In that connection, Dr. Jar-
ring was also asked to dissociate
himself from the General As-
sembly's resolution of last De-
cember which called on Israel
for an affirmative answer to the
Feb. 8 memo. No progress was
reported in connection with the
U s effort to promote proximity
talks.
Court Orders Moscow Jew
Committed To Institution
NEW YORK (JTA> Yan
Krilski. a 20-year-old Jew. was
committed to a mental institution
by a Moscow court last week even
though a psychiatrist found him
mentally sound, it has been learned
from Jewish sources in the Soviet
Union.
The sources said KVilski stood
trial March 15-16 at a court in
the Sokolniki district on charges
of assault arising from an inci-
dent with a drunken man last
October. His commitment was or-
dered on grounds that he is a
"militant Zionist." Commitment
to a mental institution carries no
time limit.
Martin Bormann Said
To Be Hiding In Peru
PARIS (JTA> Mrs. Beate
Klarsfeld reported that she
has information that Martin
Bormann. Hitler's chief aide is
alive, hiding out in the Peru-
vian jungle, and that he has
been In contact with Klaus Alt-
matin.
Mis. Kiarsteld, who he- been
doggedly pursuing Altmann In
the belief he is actually Klaus
Barbie, a former Gestapo chi^f,
said the man believed to he
Bormann has been living at
Cuzco, in southern Peru. He
would now be more than 71
years old.
Mrs. Klarsfeld. who returned
here from Bolivia, said that un-
til she visited Peru she had
been disappointed by her unsec-
oatsful 10-day attempt to pre-
sent the Bolivian government
with documents concerning the i
identity of Altmann-Barbie.
She is still pessimistic, she |
said, about French government
efforts to have Altmann extra-
dited, because "he enjoys the
protection of the Bolivian au-
thorities, lie is free to move as
he wants and s protected by
two bodyguard*.
Mrs. Klarsfeld said Altmann
is supported in Bolivia and other
Latin American countries by a
network of former Nazis. She
P08S083CS, she said, precise in-
formation on the wealth and in-
fluence of the network and on
what she described as the asso-
ciation between Altmann and
former officers of the Third
Reich.
Mrs. Klarsfeld was welcomed
at Orly Airport by Jean-Pierre
Bloch. president of the Interna-
tional League Against Racism
and Anti-Semitism (LICA>, and
by representatives of the French
National Committee for the Re-
search of Nazi Crimes.
Jacques Torczyner
Resigns AZF Post
NEW YORK (JTA)
Jacques Torczyner. a past presi-
dent ol the Zionist Organiza-
tion of America and a member
I.'' ;:.e World Zionist Organiza-
tion Executive, resigned from the
National Board of the Ameri-
can Zionist Federation last week.
His action followed the adop-
tion ol a resolution by the na-
tional executive committee of
the AZF expressing no confi-
dence in Mr. Torcayner and re-
questing him to realign as chair-
mu of the national board. The
resolution was adopted by a vote
of 18-S.
As chairman of the national
board. Mr. Torczyner held the
highest post with the AZF among
ZOA officials.
In announcing his resignation,
Mr. Torczyner said the AZF
had been founded "with great
hopes about its future and its
Impact on the American Jewish
community. Unfortunately, these
hopes were not realized." he
said, "because the Federation,
by its very nature, was to
to reduce its ideological position
to the lowest common denomi-
nator. As a result, it has not be-
come a factor in the Jewish
community."
Mr. Torczyner. who is also co-
president of the World Union of
General Zionists, acknowledged
a need for "an overall coordinat-
ing body of American Zionist
organizations," but said the AZF
has fallen far short of fulfilling
such a role.
Instead, he said, the AZF over-
stepped its designated function
by heedlessly attempting to
"take over the specific activities
of some of its constituent orga-
nizations.


Page 2
+Je*1sti thrkfiair
Friday. March 24. ".972

s
SELECTED COMMERCIAL ANO SPONSORED FILMS AND AUDIOVISUAL MATERIALS OF JEWISH INTEREST
ishke gobs to wak -
With S.,lo Mushr. I'.ml smith.
GaM Amr:nii. Studio: Israel
Ltd. Distributor: M a> I a i r
llwatn. Writ!, n and |iro-
Iik.-i-
rif-<-tiir: ;-or;:<- Oxailia. M
niintih s. olor.
Wt la.VS-.oK a JOMing.JJUliccestftu] MttHtm iiWwqhM" ImV'/f-.Wv.
philanderer, whi '1 s cherished heraldic emblem
in bj aeries ol medical his mustache, waxed end
blunders following a simple opera- on uncertain face; finallj yields
tiontort mole on his neck, up (he remnants ol his ethnicitj
via .1 Pioiesiani v
Searching for hoapital'cation
tra, his uiio diacowrs the little
black txx'k. detaMmg wiih whom, The obUgatoty Jerftafc morn ta
ery great hfcdartc eveat gives whan, how maoj times and In played by the cOreetor's own moth-
rise to situations which fn the what poaltlona. (One would hard- jer (Katharine Cfcseave*ee). Mthrt-
uht handi can be transmuted ly expet-t less from the meticulous : |y dotteg, Jewish mother later
inta works <>f art. whether in se- "t director of one of our nation's 1 mrns int.. Greek chorus, warning
rioOS or li.-hti- vela. At least one leading magailnwa.1 All the eo- |,er prospective shnur against what
naslerpiece of film-makinp hai res|xjn.lents are her friends, which | the audience will ajrrec is her
come out of Israel's genesis: "Sal- shocks her no end. since she came oafish and scruffy son. the noth-
Kphraim Kishons iienant : W him a virgin and has presented ing-type parking lot attendant. It's
orae-iv of some \ears ago. Thus [ him with two children and no in- ; j,tst too thin to make a movie of
ago. ..,..-, ,
ih<' new Israeli comedy "' military fidelities
ire. engaging!) titled "Fishke Jews abound but their Jewish-
;.>. to War." raises all kin-ts of ness seems irrevelant. They are an
KpertafJona. unpiapossasalng bunch cocktail
Tin- Idea is antertaining enough. : party savants aagaged In clever.
Fishke. timid Hasktk ywaMva brittle. unbelievable dialogue. Par-
bucher. is drafted by mistake and ticularly ol.noxious are the Jewish
id to task force that is t > doctors, whose interest in the dy-
kkiaap s terrorist leader in Arab Ulg patient is hardly above the ca-
territory. He turns out to l>e a daver medical school level, and
'.le soldier in Ma peculiar way whose regard Tor his wife runs
f nd helps the mission succeed. The from Indifference to brutal bad
Arab leader is apprehended in a geriag.
Jewish interest. As a somewhat
well-known playwright said, there
isn't all that much in a name. Not
even if the name is Moskowitz.
Phil Baum
Representative Ogden R. Reid (R-N.Y.) former U.S. ambas-
sador to Israel is greeted by Dr. Miriam Freund. chairmc ti
of Hadassah's 60th Anniversary Committee, as Hadassah
president Faye L. Schenk. looks on. They are standing m
front of photc of Henrietta Stold. at 60. founder of Hadassah
The multi-media exhibition at the Jewish Museum .vill run
through March 26.
ttighl dub with 'he cooperation,
rally, of a luscious entertaln-
It could he funn>. but, alas, it
oes not come off. The humor is
primitive 'Fishke dressed up .is
sexj chick, dancing and smooch-
ing with another .solilier': the
iolcme is not stylized and com-
11 al as it might have been, but
literal and Ugh. 'Fishke aad the
real casuafrj machine-gun four
Aral's roll then into a ditch like
so n an\ loga, and go guffawing
hi (heir waj The dialogue is
trite, the sis vulgar.
"Fishke** may offend the reli-
I The film is rated R U\ would
11*' more appropriate. The sax la
mindless, tasteless and joyless
which is to sa> it fits vary well
into the rest ni the goings-on.
Amram Dueo\ n>
MINNIE AND MOSKOWITZ
Studio and distributor: I niver-
sal Wetlire*. I'rodui id hy Al
Kill. 111. Written and directed
by John Osaaaaaaa, 114 min-
utes. Color. Rated !..
Another of those movies that
make like they had a Jewish an-
gle), but don't. It does nothing to
convex a sense ol what it means
01 DOW it feels to be a Jew. Sey-
gious; ii win disappoint those wholnMur Moskowitz (Seymeur Cas-
love and admire Israel. If it were sell is about as Jewish as Muham-
n for the credits (which go on!mad Ali. Whan he owns up to his
iwj an .'. one might think thus
timic-boois star) on celluloid hail
been produced b) lunara sonbn.
David Geller
s| < II GOOD FKIKNIiS
With l)\an Cannon, .lames ( o-o.
studio anil ilistriliutor: I'ara-
nioiint I'icturcs. I'rodueer and
director: Otto I'ri-minurr.
sicri-ciipiax: Bather Dak*;
li.ilied on a noxi-l li\ l.ois
GwikL ltd minutes. Color,
Katcil I!
1 ;> >!
thai
-I. biolo 1.-.*l ui ge' and how U e
Man in-, n 1 Be* thai
on the sb It deals will.
Jewishnesa, he mere!) Illustrates
the (rreievanaa of all his beliefs
ami attachments.
Of all ti.at iv except ins faith
In the redeeming power of True
Love. For this M&.M" is a sugary
confection that seeks la recreate
the chlvalric legend in the terms
tit our own time
The hero wanders k -1 and un-
1 until he meets ins fated
Minnie, the blonde, bruised,
iltJve shiksa from Oregon
tutifull) played b> the beauti-
ful Gens Rowlands) He then un-
|Ulred trials of
. hi valr J rights for his lady
1 twice I; beats head mi bathroom
Plan a Vacation
"Go Places With Council!"
National Council of Jewish Women
RHEA D NATHAN
Tour Chairman North Broward Section
Telephone 942-1449
DGtS YOUR CHILD WANT
TO BE A MEMBER OF
THE MARCHING BAND?
We have the largest staff of
degreed and professional
music instructors in South
. Florida.
Haifa R< ni d- Ii. i
fi.ni.i ami orcaa Lw
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INSIKI MKM
II'.KE l VE H LUODAl
f honc ms on
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PHONE
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OPEN
9:30 A.M. to
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Monday thru
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a election ol ovet ?oo itr'e^ jnd sfinrt m
most um by do/n ul the most
pop M i.t mjnulactuie's Mjiched b
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Tennis Tojs by H h V' yf*f )jnt/en lsitv
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Bdy S: arts. Skirts. Shorts, SUtks,
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' *.lhm 01 ii iWI company Teleu-'i ^..


friday, March 24. 1972
"Jenfeftlfcritfbr
PBH 3-
Textbooks Ignore Or
Distort Jews' History
NEW YORK Dr. Gavin I.
jngmuir, professor of history- at
tanford University, reports that
cial studies textbooks now in
in US. high schools and col-
's largely ignore the contrib-
tions of Judaism and Jews to
jodern civilization.
Speaking at an American Jew-
\\\ Committee luncheon, Prof.
ingmuir charged that this "ne-1
i was directly responsible for
ignorance of most Americans
out Judaism, Jewish history.
ihe persecution of Jews
irough the ages.
Even courses in prejudice and
ice relations. Prof. Langmuir
lid, have little to say about Jud- ;
Lsni OF Jewish history. For the ,
,i whelming majority of stu- ]
lit- ihe only portrayal of Jud- !
lism and Jews at any level of i
jphisUcation is provided by the
tore specialize \m that portrayal is minimal and
lore likely to reinforce stereo-1
net than to reduce them," he
tided.
Talmudic Judaism "is almost
niversally ignored." Prof. I-ang-
luir continued. 'The greatest tal-
judic commentator of the Middle
\g<*, Kashi, is never mentioned."
Prejudice against the Jews, Dr.
langmuir feels, "has been the oW-
st prejudice in a western society
iat l- now trying to come to
mis with its propensity for pre-
Bdici There is little cener.il nn-
ling of the central pheno-
nf anti-Semitism and c.\-
mi of perseeutlcn try to
lace ol the majority," hr
Textbook! play -iCi-
imlc expti ;. \\ ion ol Jew -
i.:.':. nuir stal "d "Noth-
tid ol the fact that, from
-.t da) -. the o
ml In iislj deplete I Jew s
as Christ-killers, until hatred of
.Tews was deep-rooted in European
culture." Yehuda Rosenman, direc-
tor of the American Jewish Com-
mittee's Jewish Communal Affairs
Department, called attention to
the Committee's long-standing
concern with the failure of his-
tory textbooks to deal adequately
with Jewish themes. He outlined
steps the Committee had taken to
bring about changes:
Examination ot social studies
textbooks widely used in U.S.
schools; preparation of Guidelines
to Jewish History in Social Studies
Instructional Material for confer-
ences of textbook publishers; pub-
lication of Writings on Jewish
History: A Selected, Annotated
and Graded Bibliography as an
aid to teachers; meetings with
major textbook publishers to pro-
vide assistance in the revision of
textbooks and the preparation of
new books; and approaches to the
National Education Association
and the Federal Office of Educa-
tion to develop training programs
for teachers.
"We expect publishing houses
to develop roles of Jews in Amer-
ican philanthropy and social serv-
ices, in developing labor unions,
and in education. We would like
to see emphasis placed on Jewish
ideas in Western thought, the
holocaust. Zionism and Israel as
a Jewish national liberation move-
ment." Mr. Rosenman declared.
"The American Jewish Commit-
tee boliaVM that American his-
torians and universities should es-
tablish course* in Jewish history
and Integrate Jewish history Into
general history." Mr. Rosenman
said.
Four d in 1906, the An*
Jewish Committee is this coun-
try's pioneer human'relations or-
ganization.
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For fa/era%af!. Brochure* mad f*ervsi/M*
naff Cruise*. Tour* amdmtker Travel .Serlee*
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PHONE 525-3141
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Abie Nathan's 'Peace Plane' Destroyed by Young Vandals
NEW YORK (JTA) "A bloody
shame," said Israeli peace pilot
Abie Na'Jian when he learned that
the plane he piloted to Egypt on a
one-man peace mission shortly
after the Six-Day War was de-
stroyed by fire Friday night while
on display in P-ama? Gar oark.
Mr. Nathan spoke to the JTA
from his peace ship, "Peace" which
he hopes to sail to the Middle East
in June to beam peace broadcasts
to Israel and the Arab states. The
"Peace" is docked in West New
York, N.J. on the west short of
the Hudson River opposite Man-
hattan.
Israeli police took two 16-year-
old boys into custody for setting
fire to Nathan's plane the "Shalom
I." They indicated that fire was
an act of vandalism by a group
of youths who were having a "good
time" at the park and decided to
start a bonfire.
Nathan said the single engine.
two-seater Auster, a British plane
similar to a Piper Cub, had origi-
nally belonged to King Hussein
of Jordan who got it as a gift
from Queen Elizabeth II of Eng-
land. Hussein donated it to a fly-
ing club in Lebanon which sold it
to a flying club in England where
Nathan said he purchased it for
$5,000. He said the plane was
worth much more now because it
was an antique.
NO CEASE FIRE ON
HEALTH
Twice a week Chave Shamir travels
sixty miles to a clinic in one of
Israel's outlying development towns.
Chave is a nurse. Today, a pregnant
woman awaits her. She is an
immigrant. She is proud and happy
that her child will be born in Israel.
But she is only one of the many
awaiting medical care.
And Chave is worried. The facilities
of the clinic are not what they should
be. It can meet the demands of
childbirth, but can it cope with more
complicated cases? Not always, and
yet it is the only clinic in the area.
Chave knows that her people must
allocate 80% of their tax
revenue for defense, but she is also
aware of their many health needs.
Occupancy in hospitals is running
as high as 135% of capacity.
Wards and laboratories lack
important facilities.
There's not enough medical
personnel in rural areas and in
specialty fields.
Many immigrants need immediate
medical careand care in depth.
It's our responsibility to see that they
get it.
GIVE TO THE ISRAEL EMERGENCY FUND
OF THE UNITED JEWISH APPEAL
THROUGH THE 1972 CAMPAIGN
OF THE
JEWISH FEDERATION OF NORTH BROWARD


Pooe 4
+Jeist fUrktian
Friday. March 24. ijjj
'pJem'sfr Florid fan
OF NORTH EROWARD
T.I. l-li'.i I ***>*
rt-4#M
IOIFKICE an.l PLANT 1J0 N K th STHEET. MIAMI.
AltVHRTIglXtJ PRPARTMRXT ,
.MIAMI AIM>KKS: I.0 Box 31* 7 Miansi, Florida SUM
. FRED K 8HOCHKT WBU" M THOMPSON
Editor ..:i.l l'ul.li-1,,, A.--M-a,U to PhMMMI
K..r Hi.- .1. v lift K.iUi^lion of North Brbvmrri
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MATTER OF FACT
Volume 1
Friday. March 24. 1972
Number 11
N1SAN 5732
Significance Hard To Assess
The significance of all the rumors of various settle-
ment picposals coming out of the Middle East in recent
weeks is difficult to assess, except that their persistence
conveys a feeling that, despite denials, some real efforts
are being made in the direction of agreement on several
of the basic issues.
Egypt, it can safely be said, would like to see the
Suez Canal open so that Sadat can claim a victory at this
time leading to tote! withdrawal of Israel lrom Arab terri-
tory. It would keep the militants in his country and thos*
of his allies guiet for the time being, at least. And Israel
would not be averse to such a solution, provided its acguies'
cance assured a permanent cease-fire and the beginning
of meaningful talks about peace.
If nothing else, the proposals of Hussein recently
recognize the real problem the Palestinians pose for any
permanent peace in the area. And. again, while tho Is-
raelis officially rum up their noses at the Hussein package,
they too realize then the Palestinian question must be
dealt with and that there is now an opening in that
direction.
Whet's new in ell thi? is an air of possibility that has
not existed before.
Elderly Pose A Challenge
The question of Jewish poverty continues to disturb
national leaders, some of whom challenge figures first
developed by a sociologist for the American Jewish Com-
mittee in Chicago as being too high.
The executive director of the Chicago Federation, lely-
ii.g on early figures of the National Jewish Population
Study, says they indicate clearly the number is below
300,000 ard not even close to the estimated 750,900 figure
of the AJC study. The Leadership Conference of National
Jewish Women's Organizations has stated that 2504)00
Jews in New York City alone live below die poverty level.
while the executive director of Detroit's Jewish Family and
Children's Service says that the poor and "near poor' in
that city would go well above the AJC percentages.
Whatever the actual figures, it is obvious that the poor
- particularly the elderly who are over-represented in the
Greater Miami area pose a challenge to the Jews of
America, noted for their philanthropic concerns. It is time
that serious thought and action be given and that the facts
be known about Jewish poverty in America.
An Important Breakthrough
The American Jewish Congress has shown the v/ay
for others in selecting Mrs. Naomi Levine to succeed Will
Maslow cs its executive director, for she will be the first
woman to head a major national Jewish organization.
A staff member for 21 years, Mrs. Levine was not
chosen to succeed one of the leading figures in American
Jewish life because she is a woman, for she brings to the
post a record of accomplishment that was deserving of
recognition. Nevertheless, her appointment marks an impor-
tant breakthrough for those who believe in equality of the
sexes as well a* the races and it is only fitting that (Con-
gress, devoted to civil rights and civil liberties in al! its
aspects should be leading the way.
Action Under Suspicion
In view of its attitude on the issue of prayers in the
public schools, as shown by placing the question on the
Florida ballot, it is not surprising that the State Senate has
voted tc make the praying mantis the official state insect.
We have no doubt of the vote's constitutionality unlike
the school prayers, but questions have been raised about
its Americanism. An entomologist at the University of
Florida claims the praying mantis is really i.ative to China
- the mainland part we used to label "Red" and that
leaves the action under suspicion, we are certain, by some
of our loyal voters. Maybe another straw ballot?
...M r.|.. .-I "...............
WASHINGTON Thei ti
one situation that the New
Hampshire primary has not
changed by a* much as a
tide. The Democratic Party's
national chairman. Lawrence
O'Brien is -nv. the Casablanca
oi American politics, with neck
burning all around him.
There WUI a time "hen Chair-
man O'Brien could hope for the
arrival of the fire brigai
the Dew conventio
Miami Beach. His ambition,
which he baa been laboring
eeaselesslj to achieve, is t.>
itage an orderly. Bane, Impres-
sive ami therefore vote-getting
convention.
The hopeJ-for fire brigade
took the form of a Rood, BOHd
majority of convention delegates
pledget 1 to the front-runner. Sen
Edmund Muskie. If he has
enough spino to do so. any presi-
dential candidate with a major-
ity of the delegates in his poc-
k.'t can ensure safe ami -an.
convention just by using his
majority to lay down the law.
BIT THESE is little hope
for this kind of order imposed
from above in any convention
thai is split seven \va>s to Sun-
day, among a perfect smorgas-
bord of candidates jf every po-
litical flavor. And quite without
regard for the tiny band of New
Hampshire delegates, a widely
split convention now appear- to
lie ah.'a.! at Miami Beach.
For front-runner Muskie. Flor-
ida and Wisconsin are the two
hurdles immediately ahead All
the wiseacres say. apparently
with good reason, that Sen. Mus-
kie cannot hope for better than
a share of delegates from these
states. In Florida, the Muskie
share may also be sadly modest.
Under the new Democratic
rules. indeed, a share of the del-
egates is as much as Sen. Mus-
kie can hope for in almost ev-
ery state. There are just too
many Democratic presidential
aspirants. Most of them could
join in a debate with Muskie.
and the whole thing would sound
exactly like an echo chamber,
as did much of the New Hamp-
shire debate. But most of the
echo-chamber aspirants will^al-
so get their share.
THESE ASE also at least
two and maybe three non-echo-
chamber Democratic aspirants
who have to be considered. Rep-
Wilbur Mills will have the Ar-
kansas delegation and some
others from the South. Sen.
Heary M. Jackson will have the.
Washington delegation and lorna
others, too how many, one
must wait for Florida to see
Then there is Gov. George
C. Wallace. On the proportional
system the Democrats have
adopted. Wallace will hav< a
lot of Southern delegates. Very
likely, he will also have quite
a lot of Northern delegates for
h means to enter a lot of
Northern states' presidential
primaries. In more than one of
the Northern states, even in-
cluding Michigan of all places.
Wallace has a fair chance of
getting more votes than anyone
eke, including Ed Muskie.
So Wallace will have a really
large group of delegate*. It may-
be that a larger group will be-
long to Wallace than to anyone
els.- except Sen. Muskie. even
if Muskie retains his place as
the front-runner. Without any-
other sinister influences at work,
therefore, the spread of support
for various candidates :.t Miami
Beach should be quite enojgh
to ensure plenty of blood on the
floor.
BIT THAT is not where the
story ends, by any means The
National Women's Caucus has
already declared their Intention
tO challenge any convention
elation that is not on. -half fe-
male. One can already picture
K-lla Abzug charging into
the fray like u nightmare
'
between a bulldozer an.l an
Amazon.
That supposed leadi r of mod- j
ern thought, Jerry Rubin, has '
by JOSEPH ALSOP

also announced that he u
ami thousand followers rn,
iwrade Miami Beach stark
Continued from P9 (,
./no t
Max Lerner
Sees It
NEW YORK. N V The turnabout in birth figures in th..
United S1 tei ray loom evei larger In the histor) -ha.i
the turnabout In Chit The rtrtldng thing al -hat
most ot o w.i- tone before rather than after th
moved in with larger ppropriatiom for family p i
in the end. n i- onl) the people themselves, not
lies, who can do much to bring about population ihifl Govern-
ments can facilitate brib. m >- dhw either concept on
icption. and make t. hnologies available; church. ",ort.
ran. But the privacy oi wherever they bed down, it i- onl) the
man-woman pair-bond that deeidH what the Mgurn will be The
dramatic i xception i> the recent ease of Japan where a
government policy, broadly planned, skillfully executed, eai
followed bv a drastic drop in tin birthrate. But in. governm M -
plan was geared to a whole complex af Japan.-, tredttioi r.-ti-
lotions and character t:.nt- A Mrvilar drive would have much
harder going in India. BrufJl Eggnrt Bangladesh and indeed ia
the United Sta* -
THE Tl'KXABOl T (A ME IN AMERH A bfCaUM th
pie willed it, at every level, from Park Av.iuie and the Detroit
suburbs to the slums, fiom the rich girls on College campuses to
th. black poor. The birthrate has dropped steeply, th
age is higher, the expectation of family si/e ban dropped dra-
matically, the young an- no* nearly a* large a pen th.1
total population a- all the earlier ballyhoo had said th. > would
be. abortions are flooding New York and other eenti :s and
vaeectonuei on demand have bounded kharply upward.
Since we have been delug.V. wi'h BgUFCai I shall cite
stoat.
1 On children rvpretiitlosw: Among younger woman m
ItfS It was J3 children, in I9fi7 it was 29 an., in 1971 for 14
children We could call it the revolution of declining expect itiOBI
2 On birth among th* poor: The traditional gap between
the lower birthrates among the affluent, and the high birth itts
among the poor is narrowing rapidly. The rate dropped rwteJ a-
fast amon^ poor women iless than $5,000 income i. ami (aped-
ally the black poor. Evidently tlie latter don't believe that fam-
ily planning is a conspiracy of middle-cla** whit's.
3 On male vaeetrne: There were 200.000 in 1*59. 700-
000 in 1970 and the 1971 figures are stDl higher. It ha- Vconv-
(say* Dr. Harold Lear, in a medical journal u status symbol.
and there seems to be little thought about the pnycholofleal
splnoffs.
IT IS NOT THE FIRST TIME in population bistor) the
demographers have been cauht unwary. They have stud..^l and
dedad past figures rather than studying present ofr:
Hern was everyone worrying about mushrooming population in
America, and crying havoc, when behold, the new OHM
show the birthrate not mushrooming but down-zoomir^ If tbe>'
had watched the attitudes on the campuses and in the ghette*
and talked with working mothers and young feminist iiudeatt
they might not have been so surprised.
The causes" Not one but many, yet they can be |
three dusters: tedmology (the pill. loop, abortion, rterilizalioa
have all been made wkiely availablei. ecology (the i-onc-r about
th. crowding and i>ollution of the environment and th. \haa-
tion of resources under the pressure of numbers' and The chang-
ing attitudes, values and iBMtjdou,
fsKsjjeOLOOT, kcolouv AND the revolution of life
Itylat It is futile to say which pert ef the triad is dominant.
My own gnats is that the new attitudes about th. em***
ment an.', the new feelings of young women about making *
thing of their lives are the most widely shared changes that mar
the birth turnabout. There are passionate social movement '
hind both. They are part of the larger American revolution o.
the past 19 vears The fact is that while there has been a ***".
down in other aspecta of it, these particular aspeeta which
shape women's lives and the structure of the family are uJHm
on.
American society is strikingly flexible if it has producd to
major a change on its own. without government say-so and WW
out sanctions las in Chinai, but out of its own changing W*
al ut what comes first and what is secondary We have not b."
pan yet to measure its effects. With a 2.4 child exuviation ia
ruse apinoach to the Zero Population Growth figure of -' I' th^
nuclear family should be tightened, not dhsthrod WU1 fe*
children b" more cherish.^, or leaaf Does the new birthra"
Rama from greater indifference to children (which the ZPG ro*
1 aHM to be inciting) or from a greater valuation of should m.an better parents?
For the next installment of 1hi- exciting stor> he >'"''
wait for the mid-

Fiiday. March 24. 1972
fJenisti fk>ridliiain
Page 5
Henry Ford II Affirms Link With Israel
=^r
By PHILIP SLOMOVITZ
editor, Drtrtt 4*wi.sh New*
Vice ITwMeat, 4.T..V
Henry Ford XI Utilized an olRht-
day \-sit in Israel fbr multiplo
r>urnns*8: to solidify a 35-yrar in-
dustriaJ relationship with the Holy
I .and. to cement friens with
Israeli ami Jewish leaders, to ex-
tern! an Interest in an ancient his-
torical inspiration- and to social-
ize. Kvcry aspix't of the Israeli
visit by America's leading indus-
trialist was, from all indications,
a marked success. He met with
the jH'ople who represent the Kord
Motor Qd> and he has assigned a
rompiny v'c' president to study
the eondilions that may rail for
e\|vansk>n of itiito-assemblin in
the Jewish State. He met with
Israel'! leading government offi-
cials. He returned with a lascina-
tinn t"r the archaeological MpcctS.
Theft was the normal question
for an interviewer searching for
in explanation of so noted a
> hi istian's impression of the Jew-
ish State. Kord was puzzled. He
. \plained: He didn't go to Israel
his first visit to a Middle Kast
country with an ethnic, racial or
i IL-ious preconception, but as an
American, a human being, with
.m interest in a developing coun-
try, The spell of his seeing the
country- throbbing with activity
remains. He is fascinated: he was
introductd to antiquity, to a 5,000-
\ ear-old history which functions
ii so much nxxiernity. He was
ware of the archaeological reve-
lati ins, ami his admiration for the
imks created the antiquity
: ;''il with nnHlernitj over-
\> In Im.s him.
He turned to his i>ook shelf.
pulled out a copy of (Jen. Ylgael
n's lat) si book, Mai-Kokh-
a.' and expressed appreciation
an opportunity to become
note intimately informed about
Ings that prove historical
ithenticlty in an ancient land
now redeemed by modern build-
Fed's intimacy with his own
interests the Ford cars and then
' ill.Hum in Middle Eastern
nun tries was a subject for se-
ious concern in a rare Interview
h great industrial leader aixmt
the Middle Easl and the Jews
a iio have begun work of redemp-
tion Bui he gave an indication of
' vital interest in his meet-
a i tii Arabs, One Arab, ha said.
affirmed to him that his kin and
1 igloraata in Israel are 100
> ahead ol Arabs in other
ands. Then he spoke with anima-
tion about the reception given him
hi.I the man who accompanied
him on his visit, the eminent na-
tional Jewish leader Max M. Fish-
er, by notables in Nn/arelh. in-
line the city's Arab mayor ami
three Arab members of the Knes-
set.
He hesitated to say it, hut smil-
recalled that at that party
he was encouraged to play a big
In creating peace in the Mid-
dle Hast The Arab leaders told
hint how well they live now. what
good the Kord assembly plant in
Naaareth does for them creating
ohs and raising their economic
-' in lards and they prayed for an
1 uiy peace. Couldn't you be a
peace maker?" they asked Ford.
The automobtki magnate pro-
i a map of Israel. He drew
the lines that Indicated the areas
through which he and Fisher had
flown over the Sinai, and showed
' where they landed, at the Sue/
Canal, to be briefed on develop-
ments by Army experts. That's
where Ford heard Arabs and Is-
raelis shouting at each other
across the canal. He viewed them
as so near yet so far but with an
emphasis that peace is needed and
can be established through joint
effort.
Ford met, spoke with and re-
newed social contacts with Prem-
ier Golda Meir, Minister of Defen-
se Moshe Dayan. Foreign Ministei
Abba Fban ami Finance Minister
| Pinna* Sapir, in addition to many
I other Israeli officials and Army
leaders. He was esixvially elated
with his visit whh David Ben-
Gurion. They talked business -the
need for automobiles in Israel.
Ford's view is that Israel pri-
' marilv needs trucks and tractors
and because there is such a
great need he is convinced that
assembling them in Israel, with
parts Imported, would he more ad-
\ isahle. This raised the question
of manufacturing planes to fill
Israel's basic needs, and Ford was
emphatic in approving of the ex-
j tension of such efforts. He knew
; that 17,000 people were already
, employed in the airplane plant in
Israel, and that small planes have
' already been produced and larger
j ones are in the making, and he
was praiseful of these efforts.
He had assigned his vice pres-
ident for tractor operations, L.
1 Emory Dearborn, to go to Israel.
Immediately upon his own return
home, for a study of conditions
in Israel and the manner of co-
operation by the Ford Motor Co.
in extending the tractor and truck
distributions, Dearborn is now
preparing a report for the pres-
ident of the company. But Ford
j emphasized that there are no new-
plans (or extension of the auto-
mobile business in Israel, a major
reason i. Ing that the Israeli gov-
ernment has yet to reach major
Incisions on such developments.
"What Ii.ii i needs primarily,"
Ford said, is an assurance of
adequate supply of parts. The
country needs truck.-', it needs
tractors. But as yet there aie H0
specifics of what form our par-
ticipation in extended auto-
dlstrib ting In Israel will assume."
A truh fascinating story relates
to the Ford operations in Israel.
The operating Palestine Automo-
bile Corp. retains the Palestinian
nomenclature because the firm
was established in 1937 when
Great Britain was the mandatory
l>ower In the country. Dr. Shaul
Upschitz is the directing head of
the linn and the partnership is
shared with A. I. Loewenstein and
Mrs. Ilcne Marcus. In their plant
in Nazareth I hey assemble the
Ford ESCOrt as well as other cars.
The Escort, the smallest car
manufactured by Ford, is the most
popular car in Europe and its sales
are large in Israel. The 1,200 em-
ployes at the Nazareth plant
many of them Arabs assembly
18 Escorts dally. ..i addition to
trucks, tractor.", Dodges and
Chryslers and othei makes. Ford
; explained that in addition to as-
' sembling Ford cars and tractors.
this Nazareth plant also produces
numerous agricultural implements.
In the operations that supple-
ment automobile assembling, Ford
was additionally laseinated by the
mobile hospital cars, which carry
all necessary medieants and in-
struments to provide immediate
medical care for soldiers as well
as civilians, obviating the need to
take Injured to hospitals. Pursuing
his impressions of the Nazareth
auto assembling plant, he said the
1.200 employes were men from 24
different countries, and he was
impressed by the fact that three
new workers who had come to the
plant during his arrival in Israel
had come from Russia only two
weeks earlier. He surmised that
they must have come with a
knowledge of Hebrew, obviating
heir going through a thorough in-
tegration process.
It was not true. Ford said, that
the Font plant in Egypt had been
confiscated. He said the difficulty
there was that dealers were put
out of business because they were
.nable to get the viUi.y needed
supplies and parts. He said Ford
Motor Co. keeps sending trucks
and tractors to Jordan and has
good business relations with Iran,
and that the must effective op-
erations are In Israel, where tin-
Palestine AntoawMie Corp. has
dealership in Jerusalem, Tel Aviv
and Haifa, with a sub-dealership
conducted by an Arab in Nazareth.
Ford spoke wit a enthusiasm
about his visit to the Technion
campus in Haifa. He had estab-
lished a close fritydship with l-ord
Evelyn RothsdVld of London,
world chairman of the board of
Technion. and he went to the
Haifa technical university to l>c
witness to its progress. "It Is, in-
deed, the MIT of the Middle East,''
he said in summing up his im-
pressions. Lord Evelyn, Kurd ami
Kisher had become close friends
ami the former was the Ford'
house guest when he came here
laat year to address the Detroit
| Technion Society and to s|ieak for
Israel Bonds. Kord also s|>oke en-
thusiastically about his visit to
Caesaiia, and there, too, he was
impressed with the archaeological
activities. Kord and Kisher were
accompanied on their Israel visit
by their wives, Cristina Kord ami
Marjorie Kisher. In their way. the
ladies cemented American-Israel]
relations with the contacts they
made and with a perpetuation of
associations in behalf of Israel's
notable adventures.
(C), Lt72, Jewish Telegraphic Agenayi
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0


Page 6
+Jeist> ncrkMur
Friday, March 24, 197.
Test Useful In Prevention
Of Brain Damage In Babies
EIN KAREM. Jerusalem A
new test to detect the danger of
the development of brain damage
in newborn babies suffering from
nemorytic Jaundice we* recently
developed by Prof, Hil'-el Blond-
heim and his team in the Metabo-
lic Laboratories of the Hadassah-
Hebrew University Medical Cen-
ter in Jerusalem.
Hemolytic jaundice in newborn
babies is often caused by Rh in-
compatibility. It may also be
caused by an error in the enzyme
Ijif of the newborn baby. This
is a genetic error found mainly in
the Mediterranean area.
In Rh incompatibility, the red
blood cells of the ur.borr. infant or
the newborn baby are destroyed
When a mother is Rh negative and
her infant i- Rh I lerloOS
situation arises in which the new-
born infant suffers from congen-
ital anemia accompanied by jaun-
dice. If the infant becomes jaun-
d beyond the capacity of its
blood serum albumin to bind U*
IS bile pigment, knowr. H
biiirubin, this toxic substance may
enter the brain of the infant and
damage it.
When there is a congenital er-
ror In the enzyme system of the
infant, the biiirubin
the
albumin to bind it. s.vd brain dam-
,lt trors the excess 0/
Uirubin.
In order to n\ I !i brain
dams :'u b'ood o: I
nged wit!- a
transfusion of no ood Th-
transfusion itself is a
fonr. airf not with-
out danger. The decision to t:
the blood is usually made
only when the biiirubin in the in-
fant's blood has reached a certain
arbitrary level 20 miligrams
percent when there is almost
one molecule of biiirubin for every
molecule of albumin.
Te*t Involve* New Concept
The new test developed by the
Hadassah team determines when
the biiirubin binding capacity of
the infant's blood is exceeded or
when this is imminent. It involves
a new concept: until now physi-
cians only analyzed the amount of
biiirubin present in the blood;'in
the Hadassah test, two com-
pounds are analyzed in relation to
each other biiirubin and album-
in.
The test is performed simply
with a minimum of laboratory
equipment and requires less than
a drop of serum. The serum Is ap-
plied to a column of specially-
prepared synthetic resin, called
Sephadex. and is then washed
through with a buffer. When the
washtno are clear, the column Is
stained to detect traces of biiirubin
with a special reagent. If the col-
umn turns blue, it is a sign that
there is free biiirubin in the
child's blood beyond the capacity
of the serum albumin to bind it.
"THE PICTURE FRAME
YOU THOUGHT YOU
COULDN'T AFFORD-
Over 15,000 empty pxhws
Irwil ale at |ra-a-
way prkw. Mast tilts,
itylet mid finishes priced
at $1 and op. Sac folks
like non-flare or regular
flaw. We ho*e both at fivt-
o-way price*. Hangers in-
stalled tea etats. losah
thirty fit coats and up.
We install castom pictures
FftK.
e sore and bring yawr pic-
tures with yaa.
Custom framing donr on
th* premises with same day
deliery at low low prices.
House of 15,000
Picture Frames
Imported Picture Fromes
S.W. 13 ST.
(Just off S. Andrew*)
HONE: 523-1140
boon daily till 4 p.m.
I The Hadassah team responsible
for the new test consists of Prof.
I Hillel Blondheim. Dr. Nathan A.
I Kaufmann and Haim Kapitulnik.
At* The International Pediatric
Congress held in Vienna this year.
Dr. Blondheim presented a paper
on the test which attracted con-
siderable interest. When he re-
turned to his laboratory'. Dr. Blond-
heim found many letters request -
ire further details of the test and
where the kit itself could be ob-
tained. This kit is at present being
developed for possible production
and distribution by the firm of
An.es-Yissum in Jerusalem, a sci-
ence-based industry formed by
Mi.es Laboratories Inc.. of Elk-
hart. Ind.. and the Hebrew Unl-
-ty of Jerusalem. However, be-
fore the test can be put on the
market it requires further evalua-
tion by clinical scientists.
Apart from the research work
being done in Prof. Blondh. im 's
Metabolic Laboratory, further
evaluation of the test is going on
in a number of other laboratories.
The>e include the Pediatrics De-
partment of Hadassah, hea>d by-
Prof. Ales Russell, and of two
other hospitals in Israel, Bellii
and Tel Hashomer: the Ames-Yit
sum Product Develops Bt L ibora-
taalem; and tl
:, i ii. w lopment La ratorj
in Llkhart. Ind.
Special Project: Greek Babies
th- He

'
not allowed to becon -
rose of th- risk of
possible brain damage. They have
it with good results on
the sera of severely Jwund
Greek babies born on remote out-
lying Greek islands. This work
oral done in collaboration with Dr.
Timot Valaea, of the Agfata Sofia
Hospital in Athens.
When the babies on that* re-
mote islands develop jaundice,
they have to be flown to Athens
because of the lack of facilities
for exchange transfusions. Often
they arrive in a severely jaundiced
condition, some of them having
already suffered brain damage. In
addition, on the island of Lesbos,
jaundice is a particular problem
because of the special genetic
characteristics of the islanders
possibly due to inbreeding.
The frozen sera of the severely
jaundiced Greek babies were rush-
ed to Israel for testing at Hadas-
sah through the help of the Isra< I
Foreign Office.
However, the scientists need
further information as to whether
a positive test is in every case an
absolute indication for immediate
exchange transfusion. They also
vdah to know whether in those
cases where the test is negative,
it may be possible by a modifiea-
iton of the method to predict at
what degree of jaundice the child
will enter the danger zone and
require exchange transfusion to
prevent brain damage. For this
they need to work on fresh sera
of severely jaundiced newborn
babies.
A member of the Hadassah
team. Haim Kapitulnik. a bio-
chemist who is working on th.
project as part of his Ph.D. thesis
i- spending three months in Dr
i Valaea1 laboratory, which serves
throe hospitals in Athens. He i>
taking w ih him specially pre-
i S' i nadex columns ued in
the test according to the method
d m the Hadassah M tab-
one laboratory and will t"a. :
:. boratory how to d i
the that it may l> USad I i
the Greek babies.
While in Athi ns. Mr. Kapitulnik
ti -t the f:- m of se-
ll m iv born be
with a view to solving the remain-
ing problems eiore the test can
be released fo. uistribution.
Mr. IZapitulnik's visit has been
| arranged through the Internationa'
I Cooperation Division of the Israel
Foreign Ministry at the request
of the Greek Ministry of Social
Affairs.
Winners of the 1972 Frank L Weil Awards
oi the National Jewish Welfare Board ate
(torn the left) Rabbi Israel Miller, promi-
nent New York rabbi; Leon Kaplan. Miami
Jewish communal leader, and Jacques
Lipchitz, world-renowned Jewish sculptor.
The awards will be presented at the ban-
quet of JWB's National Biennial Conven-
tion Saturday April 15, in Atlanta, Ga.
Rabbi Miller, president of the Americcn
Zionist Federation and former chairman
of JWB's Commission on Jewish Chap-
laincy, will receive the award "for dis-
tinguished contribution to the welfare of
Jewish, personnel in the U.S. Amind
Forces." Mr. Kaplan, former president o(
the Greater Miami Jewish Federation ai.d
of the YM-YWHA of Greater Miami, wdl
receive the award "for distinguished coa-
tribution to the advancement of the Jew.
ish Community Center field." Mr. Lipch tz
will receive the award "for distinguished
contribution to the advancement of Jew-
ish culture." The three fields of work for
which the awards are given are JWBi
responsibility in behalf of the American
Jewish community. The late Frank L Weil,
for whom the awards are : imed, was
president of JWB from 19-40 o .
Seagram's V.O. Canadian.
For people who like
everything just right.
CtttDua misir-i suss or buctb
i nan am ns mm sucuh (hsihucs co. s-i.t


!97l|Bday, March 24, 1972
* JEW*** nrr*ftr>r
Vaan 7

>
GIVE AND ENJOY PASSOVER
CANDIES AND CAKES
Barton's Passover Continental chocolate and baked
specialties bring delicious and festive accents to
holiday entertaining and gift-giving.
JM's enticing selection includes:
Chocolate Matzo Balls, box of 24, 2.35
Passover Petit Fours, 40 piece Parve, 3.35
Seder Mints, 9 ounces Parve, 1.69
Jerusalem Assortment, 1 pound Parve, 3.25
Miniature Layer Cakes, 12 pieces, 2.75
Passover Cup Cakes, 1 V/i ounces Parve, 2.49
CANDY, at all jm stores except pompano


CftiGAl
i Ka^L


Page 8
9-JmisHUrk/lar
_ Friday-Ma^ h
By DR. JACOB K. MARCUS
Director
Aiwrkan JrwMi ArT*jiv*
llchn w I nion (oil.-**'
Jewish lustitut- of Religion
In the parly part of the 20th
o ntury the Yiddish n\vspa|*r. the
"Forward." ran a \ery irrtwrstins
column called A Bintel Brief' -
A P:\ck of Letters.
It was advice to the lovelorn.
( \ctuaPy it Ml more than that:
it was a clearing house for all
k>i-L* of communications to tho
editor asking for advice en any-
thing And everything touching OB
human ewpericnee). For Instance
a wife might write in pt.urins on
her h> ivt: she P' hand, die h is affection for him.
but he b SO Ugly a-id unattractive
thai she does not w-ant to live with
him. What ihall Or a man mighl write to the
Forward, signing himself "A De-
spond in Son-in-law. HU mother-
in-law is coming to live with him
and she is truly a snake in the
gftas and will turn his wife "ainst
him. (Please advise me Mr. Editor).
Researchers at the American
Jewish Archives on the Cincinnati
campus of the Hebrew Union Col-
lege have found that this was not
the first Jewish column of its
type. About 150 years earlier.
Mordecai Manuel Noah occasion-
lly wrote vitnettes or feuillo
ML beautiful succinct word!
. BBW Chapter Sponsor*
Bienvenida l h.ipter. B'nai H'rith
Women, epOMSrad an art exhibit
; featuring the works of Frank
| Kleinholz last weekend at Wood-
,|laml Country Club. Ft. Lauder-
sketclies on personal and intimate t of the most important Jews in tnei^^ Jhe art fhow. committee,
'' headed by Mrs. Lillian FeWman.
{included Priva Goldman. Ruth
Money And Matrimony
United States in the days before
the Civil War. Noah, who was
born in 1785. and died in 1851.
as a grandson of Jonas Phillips.
a fighter for civil li^Ttics at the
tihie the Constitution was being
written, who wanted to be sure
that in the new United States the
Jews would have the freedoms
which had been denied them in
the old American colonies. Noah's
.x*isin. Uriah Phillips Levy, rose
Too many girls in our day. he ,0 cojrunand the Mediterranean
t,.ti 'ji-h nvtrivacant anii SCill't' .* ._______ *-- L Tum
mattei-s. He did not wait to be
asked: he anticipated questions
I and supplied answers.
Included In a collection of the
[best of Noah's miniscule essays
(published in 1845 in a small vol-
i 'ime entitled "Gleanings from a
'Gathered Harvest" is a little gem
; called -Money and Matrimony,"
: which tackles the problems oi
1 courtship and marriage.
Kleinholz Art Kxl
|Teichler and Esther Ho
Mrs. Matild,. \\-m^
Went of Bienvenida cwj,
ortyapMlA-apeaking^a
ter in the countrj iC
which was formed a* thii|
'^^T- ha'a n'^b
about US.
m

lUSTOM TA'LOR
M)34 e LAS OCAI B1VO. Alteration Service S2>ttt]
c'ntivr "*o>it4

fleet in the years shortly before
the Civil War. despite the fact
that he was fought every inch of
wrote, are extravagant and scare
' off young men who want to many
' them. The young men are even ,
worse. They spend huge sums for ,h(1 W.(V beoau.se he was I Jew.
I ?k>thes, a horse and buggy, tickets
for the o|>era. full dress, and ex-1 Noah was a great American
(Ocnsive trinkets like rings, seals, j playwright and a widely read
nd chains. If young men and I new$pai>crman one of the batl
' women are extravagant it is the Known in Hew York City. Like
I fault of the parent! who indulge' many others, he waul into puli-
them. There Ls some excuse for
Indulging a girl, none for indulg-
ing a young man.
Should a man marry 'or lovo
ar money? There is no question
i that Ik snould get married. Mar-
; riage u the only true road to
; true happiness, but if a man mar-
! ries merely for money he will end
up with "pride and ugliness." And
in >|>ite of the wealth he secures
tics. He wa- head of Tamm;iny. a
good liberal organisation in oil
day. Surveyor of the Port of New
York, a judge, a consul in Tunis.
a social reformer, and a nroto-
Zionist. As far back at 1820 he
wanted to establish a colony for
Jews near Buffalo and. from his
earliest days, he hammered con-
he will enjoy "no happiness, no; slant ly on the them*1 that Pales-
content, no satisfaction.'"
tine must be restored to the Jews
WANTED
A volunteer, man or woman, who has had newspaps,.
experience to help write about community orgtnn
activities, and people. If you would be interested in
something for the community, call: David Amdur, ei
director, Jewish Federation of North Broward,
NOW1
It is best to marry a girl whojatld an independent state reestab-
l)rings no fortune. wK.se wealth | ,Ls,lod
consists of \irtue and economy. A
tjood girl Ls one who is amiable; Noah ^ a]sQ Sncriff 0f New
and indiLstnous. A proper young|^ ^ ^n ^^
.nan is one who is honest and capa-
ble. Should a man avoid a girl meeted saying It was too bad that
Whose father wants to endow tori i Jew haci the right lo hang a
No; .it all. If a father is rich and Christiin. be b reported to have
rford to give tor hnndaomc answ<.IV(i ,. it was B ,,itv thlt
fortune ho ought to do so making :
provision (or her and the children. [ Christians had to be hanged,
or a husband may lose all and; \jlKn 0f tno huge literature on
may not be eftfe "to place her be- faS(.jnating personality is in'
vond the vicissitudes of trade and
~...~~ manuscript torn. C opies an.- on
commerce. r
'Glcinings from a Gathered lb.- Archives-_____________
^est" went through two editions'
;n les< than three years. A copy,
formerly owned by Simon Wolf.
'h.' off'rial and unofficial Wash-'
ngton lobbyist to, Jews from the |
time of the Ci\il War till tho < arly
fears of the 20th century, is in
the Rare Book Room of the He-,
brew Union College Library.
Mordecni Manuel Noah was one'J
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M MIKKELSEN


;rch 24. 1972
^Jewish fkridur
Page 9-
Question Box
By KABlti l)K. KAMI El. .1. I(>X
j, it thul on the first two
ot Pii-wover, thr ktdtliiKh
|rl ,. muliis. as well as on
lolidays, the kMduah was
l\ recited tor the sake of
ir travelers who would
! iv i have been able t<>
Mved in the kiridusli bs>
1 icked a home or wine.
k-.>\ >i eve. the law Stated
irett "I men have to
. menta for, or have
,j with wine since the
is part Of the Passover
i. and thus everyom
iking kiddush at the
Interesting to note that-in
ii Babylonia and in
in was customary tor the
I mitj to have the Be-
| in the synagogue be-
st ot the community waa
{ I pad and COIMtUCt the
m'i\ as.
is it that the ll.ill.l
nil n ll II'' (ll.I lit III ill
kinriiiiii: mill on holiday*.
Jso chanted In the evrnhii;
Paaaevar ssevfea la th-
tgue on thr first wto
it r:isHO\i-r liy soiin- roll-
lions'?
that this is done be-
< ime synagogues the com-
ha I a joint seder. Rabbi
[sraelia stated that this
(not be done any more be-
iwiwne has the seiier at
However, a different
ia given by an eailin
I ir- tor requiring the
ot the Mallei psalms in
| I Igue. This reason
many congregations to
its recital in the ijiaa
pier the Mallei [isalms are
in the synagogues or not
i two nights of the
Pi. they are definitely re-
All Type* Reefing
* An Expert Do Itf .
f Repairs Re-Jteofing
A. A. ROOFING
H260S.W. 22ndCt.
Phone 527-93 1
AU PLANTS AT
SALE PRICES!
t Sunday Only
IS GARDEN
NURSERY
S.W. 106 Ave., Davie
l wast on Griffin Rd.
Ave.)-Call 5f 1-4935
dted in the seder ritual at home.
rhere la, hy\i.t,i.'i-..1.>uc difference
jUL'w6*" th'' curreiil reaK>*ali>f the
"Sflvl psNhns at rnaValder home
ritual and their usual recital dur-
ing the holidays In the synagogue.
In the synagogue the recital is
introduced with a benediction
since there is a community service.
At home there is no benediction.
Therefore, the rabbis introduced
the cha n ting of these Mallei
psalms in the synagogue service
during the first two nights of the
Pa sso ve r so that the i roper
benediction can lie recited before
the psalms in the synagogue which
would also apply to the psalms
later at home. The reason for re-
quiring that the Mallei psalms be
recited .it the evening home serv-
ice i^ that the miraculous deliver
.el.-, in,iii slavery on the original
Passover took place at night Thus,
the Jews were asked to observe
the night of Paaaover with these
psalms oi praise and thanksgiv-
ing for the exodus from Egypt.
Why ere the prayers for dew
recited on the first day ol I'uhm-
eterf
The Midi ash (Pfarke, of Rabbi
Klie/er. .;_'i tells us that it was
on the Passover that Isaac called
his son to receive the blessing,
telling him that the chambers of
heaven had opened and they con-
tained dew. When Jacob finally
came forth with the blessing the
same Midrush oalms that a fresh
dew of heaven came upon him,
strengthening him.
The apiiearance of the dew is
thus a redeeming force as nature.
v\ hich has lieen enslaved during
the winter. U freed to bloom in
the spring, just like the Israelites
who were enslaved in Kgypt were
released by the Almighty so they
could bloom spiritually and receive
the revelation.
|C>, ItTI, JeWlall Telegraphic Agency)
Police Award Goes
To Sgt. Slepecky
Sgt. Michael J. Slepecky of the
Fort Lauderdale Police Depart-
ment received the 12th annual Po-
lice Award sponsored by B'nai
B'rith Lodge No. 1438 this week
at a special awards ceremony held
in the school lounge at Temple
Emanu-KI. 3245 W. Oakland Park
Blvd.
Sgt. Slepecky was selected by
his fellow policemen for out stand- !
j Ing police work and service
I throughout his career.
Attorney Sidney Kates, second
vice president of the congregation.
served as master of ceremonies:
the principal speaker was Fort
lauderdale Police Chief Robert j
\V. Johnston. Following the pro-
gram, the new officers and board I
of directors was installed.
Soviet Jews Arrive
At Kennedy Airport
NEW YORK A Joyous family
reunion made possible |,V tri0 *er-
rise of the attornfv general's Da,
role authority under the immigra-
tion lew took place at Kennedy
International Airport here vthen
Dora BerkovitCh and her ki" ar-
rived on a Pan American Jetlinei
from the Soviet Union to .join hei
sister, Mrs. Isidor Wasserman,
"*o resides in the Bronx New
York.
in addition to Mrs Berkovitch.
the arriving group consisted ot hei
husband, Josif, their married
aughterand son-in-law, Etllla and
Leova Ok-si-ns/t. in and the vounc
couple's two children, Rronislawa.
a gni of 8, ..nd Roman, 4 yeai
of age.
United Hias Service, the world-
wide Jewish migration agency that
handled all the details, pointed
out that the two families were no:
eligible for admission under the
regular immigration law becau*
Mrs. Wasserman. who had hersell
migrated to this country in 1969
with her husband to Join the hit-
ter's family, was not a United
States citi/en.
JOSEPH ALSOP
Continued from Pace 4
naked. They may well challenge
the Democratic candidates to
join them in nakedness and a
joint of not.
Then there are the issues.
There is amnesty for the draft
dogers. a sure vote-getter. There
is the great Prof. John Kenneth
Gelhraith's pet scheme for wide-
spread nationalization of indus-
try, another sure vote-better.
TIIK.RK ARK instant troop
withdrawals from Euroi*'. Viet-
nam and everywhere else i a
matter on which Sen. Muskie
has already largely sold the
pass. Then- is the strong left-
wing thrust to leave this coun-
try without any national defense
at all. Here, Muskie has nearly
sold the pass.
Every one of these proposals,
including even the most idiotic
and the most suicidal, will have
loud advocates at Miami Beach.
So say a prayer for Casabianea
O'Brien, with the deck burning
all around him.
Issues, Not Age,
Cause The Gap
M
RENT
WE RENT
It Everything
ludmg Hertz Trucks
131 HE. 45th St.
PHONE
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WASHINGTON, DC. "Our
odety is facing more of an issues '
gap than a generation gap,'' said
Dr. Max K. Haer. national direc-
tor of the B'nai B'rith Youth Or-
ganization, at the opening session '
ol the B'nai B'rith Youth Commis-
sion.
"Young people are the shock
troops of the reform movements
of our day," declared Dr. Baer,
who has been in youth work for
almost 'our ileeailes, "They (the
youth I tend to be more idealistic I
than adults who are entrapped by
vc sled interests. They are not
shackled to obsolete traditions,"
he added, recalling that at last
year's White House Conference on
Youth there were only two Issues
out of the hundreds that were de-
bated on which youth and adults '
tailed to agree.
"There is conflict and confronta-
tion between the generations,' Dr.
Baer said. "But the generations
are not headed toward clash and I
collision. The differences are more
pronounced In lifestyles than In
values, and in intensity rather
than in the nature of beliefs.
"The revolt of youth is directed
against the failure of society to
establish the peace and social jus-,
tice which we have verbalized in
our prayers for many centuries.
Nor have the young rejected the
American dream. What has alien-
ated them has been our failure tt i
..hi. wii id '' -' /!"
carry out in full the spirit of the
Declaration of Independence and
the Bill of Rights," he said.
Though the picture of Judaism
in America has been called bleak,
ii can be overdrawn, he cautioned.
"And we may be Overly pessimistic
al out the breakdown of Jewish
family life."
Dr. Baer quoted from a survey
ol entering college freshmen by
the American Council on Educa-
tion in which 42' i of the Jewish
freshmen males stated that during
the preceding year they had dis-
cussed their future frequently with
their parents, while the corres-
ponding proportion for men of
other religions was \\2.or'<. Of the
Jewish girls. 51.53 had discussed
their future frequently with pa-
rents, while 48.2'i of girls of other
religious groups had done so.
Dr. Baer aisn mentioned a study
of over 200 presidents of B'nai
B'rith Youth Organization regions
and councils in which about 56%,
Said their parents had a more po-
iitive influence on their Jewish
identification than any other per-
son. Only 10'- felt that their pa-
rents had no influence on their
Jewish identification.
Dr. Baer is chairman of the
White House C'oiilerence Follow-
up Committee of the Council of
National Organizations on Chil-
dren and Youth.
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FOR THE OTHER GUY -



Pcge 10
+Jewisl>ncrld**n
Friday. Morch 2.
OL l&lLi SmmL cjrom Ob V"'p
Festival Of Freedom
By RABBI ARTHIR J. ABRAMS
Temple Kmanu-Kl
Of all the many Jewish holidays,
Passover is most universally ob-
the need to improve society.
The Seder begins with the story
of the oppression in Egypt and
concludes with the Messianic hope
that mankind can progress to-
served by Jewish people. The Se- wards a j^,,,,,. mme enlightened
der is a beauti-1 era -r^ Haggadah and Seder
f u 1 experience | represent the essence of Judaism
ami should be with moods of thoughtful reflec-
<-on meaningful, j^^ celebration.
It is a festival that encompasses
the pathos, hopes, and destiny of
the Jewish people and of all man-
kind.
US. Postal Service Wins Appeal, Hikes ThW Class Rates
The VS. Postal Serice this week
railed some third-class temporaiy
mail rates, according to Postmas-
ter E. M. Dunlap.
The major change will be a 5
cent minimum per piece charge
applying principally to advertising
circulars. The present reduced
rates for non-profit organization*
will not be affected.
Regular bulk rate for circulars
will jump from 23 cents per pound
to 28 cents per pound with a mini-
mum per piece eharce of 5 cents
whichever is higher. The regular
bulk rate for books and catalogs
till go from 17 to 21 cents per
pound with a mlnimun charge o*
, cents per piece.
Single oiece third class mail to
Canada and Mexico also will cost
more to send.
The hikes followed a successful
aDpeal by the Postal Service,
which had planned to implement
the increases Jan. 24 but was
blocked by the District Court.
The appeal decision was handed
down by the Dist
Circuit Court of Appeal,
nctofCblm
* to mentis
w*|0 patronizing
ow odvertiserj
Wi really imporfnf
ffoiki Akr.mi
Haggadah i n -
eludes a wide
variety of rich
Jewish litera-
ture, folk cus-
toms, and reli-
gious values.
There are
many beautiful
versions of the Haggadah. For in-
stance, the Kibbutz movement in
Israel has its own variation which
might emphasize pride in Israeli
nationalism, freedom for the Jew-
in his homeland and the c'.ose rela- j
tionship of man to the earth.
Another interesting haggadah '
is the archaeological version '
which contains references to the I
historical and archaeological dis- '
coveries related to Passover, it ,
h. many beautiful color pictures
the land and historic ritual ob- '
|ei -
Thp Reform and Remnstr
Haggadot are modern attemoti to
the tradition and ujidate
the holiday with references to
111 day concerns. Many |ieople
add poems, read mgi
I with Soviet Jews,
racial Injustice, and
fKeli&ioiis *^
crvices
FOtT LAUOEtDALf
ETH ISRAEL (Temple) CanMrvi-
tivo. M7 E. Oakland Park Blvd
Rabbi Akiva rilliant. Cantor Maw
rice Nn 42
EMANU-EL. 3246 W. Oakland Park
Blvd. Reform Rabbi Arthur J. Ab-
rama. Cantor Jerome Klement. 4S
----------
POMFANO BCACH
SHOLOM (Temple). 1S2 SE 11th Avo.
Conservative Rabbi Morris A. Skop.
Cantor Ernest Sehroiber. 49
----------
MAIGATt
MARGATE JEWISH CENTER. (Con-
trvative) 4101 NW 9th St.
9
CANDLrllGHTING TIME )
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FORT LAUDERDALE 566 3616
NO CEASE FIRE ON
EDUCATION
The Israelis have shown more than
their share of courage and sacrifice.
But courage and sacrifice alone do
not assure survival.
Minister of Defense Moshe Dayan
said it to a graduating class:
"Courage is no longer enough, you
need knowledge." Israel is the land
of the People of the Book. But in
Israel ten per cent of the population
is illiterate. The People of the Book
provide only nine years of
compulsory free education to Israeli
children.
Half of Israel's immigrants come
from culturally deprived countries,
but the children of these immigrants
provide only one-third the high
school graduates, only one-eighth
the university students.
It is our responsibility to see that all
immigrant children receive a proper
education. This is Our promise.
To keep the promise we must:
provide pre-kindergarten schooling
for 38,000 children from
educationally disadvantaged
homes to assure them a headstart
in education;
provide scholarships to assure
high school education, vocational
and academic, for 100,000 students
so that they will have the
opportunities denied their parents
in lands of oppression;
give massive support to the
institutions of higher learning so
that no Israeli youth will be
deprived of the opportunity to
achieve his maximum potential.
GIVE TO THE ISRAEL EMERGENCY FUND
OF THE UNITED JEWISH APPEAL
THROUGH THE 1972 CAMPAIGN
OF THE
JEWISH FEDERATION OF NORTH BROWARD


March 24. 1972
+JmistincridKan
Page II
KRAfl NtWSUTTER By Corl Alpcrl
Arab-Jewish Relations
it: \l>i SOMETIMES so absorbed in our con-
iii with relations between Israel and*"the
i .stales on Hi- and international le
n'i't'L.-1^1' #*) RiMe 4nfiffieWit M
tent Ion to relations between '
and Arabs In Isra< 1 on the ii livid
ual, laan-to-ri an b
n is u fart that th apprad-
nat.ly 401.000 Arabs Hvin| within
the Slate of Israel reside, for Lie
(most part, in their own towns ami
villages. Evan where there are
.wealth- numbers of Arabs within
t>. as ii. Haifa, they cluster together in areas
lich become known as the Arab quarter. The Iwsis
this is sociological, and is not too different from
causes which impel Jews In the United States
elsewhere to live in a Jewish neighborhood:
dmtty to fricn's; availability of religious and
Stlonal facilities, etc.
AiWinc to the separation of the two elements
^hr population is the further socio'economic fact
88*1 of Israel's Jews live in urban areas.
treat only 4.T- of Israel's Arabs are urban
filers, Th> obvious result is that the two do not
ne into Erecjoem personal contact.
Ri, ill studios conducted by Dr. Yochanan
r- ,,; Tei Avi\ University reveal some Interesting
pudes on the par! of Arab and Jewish young
ipie toward each oilier.
Would you be willing to marry an Arab Dr.
asked sampling <>t Jewish youth. Not will-
repUed 87' of the Scphardi Jewish youth.
Iv 2' were willing, and the remainder presum-
Is uncommitted. Ashkenazi youth showed a somo-
)i different result: "Not willing," 5tf';.
Are you icaay io accept Arabs as close, per-
:riends *' "Absolutely not," replied 3X'i of
iiv Sephardi young people. The Ashkenaxl opposi-
tion was 21", but the major percentages in each*
could not give a firm answer.
Dr. Pare>%s*bf thvNtfoin]tih tlifc*Tl Ifardl
i action la their way of rejecting their own orient i
or x Mid-Eastern background, and expresses their
desire to become Mm the dominanl group the
Ashkenazls.
What do the Arab youth think of the Jews"
Willing to Ik- friends with Jews j8r; ; willing to
live in Jewish neighlwrhoods 42'; ; willing to
live in the same house with Jews 30'.'.
Once again it would appear that this is a re-
sult of the desire to become like the majority a
short step toward long-range assimilation. There
are fr-quvnt instances of Arab youth who change
their names and seek to "pass" as Jews.
The attitude toward Jews among Arabs of the
W'est Bank, who have not had the tradition of close
relations with Jews over the last 23 years, is quite
different. Among the West Bankers: Willing to live
with Jews -12';. (not willing 69%); willing to
have Jew ish friends 19r;; maybe 42*/< ; abso-
lutely not --38'r.
In pondering the meaning of these figures it
should be borne in mind that Israel's Arabs and
Jews live under the cloud of threats from across
the border uttered by Arab leaders who constantly
proclaim war and a desire to annihilate Israel.
Relations are further exacerbated by the occa-
sional activities of saboteurs who throw liomlis in
buses, markets or other public places. Kach such
act is calculated to receive a hostility which may-
have been abating. Indeed, that may be the delib-
erate purpose of many of the wanton acts of terror-
ism which take their toll among Jews and Arabs
alike.
DATELINE JERUSALEM
By Amis Ben-Vwed
Post Office Is Snarled
is NOT A St Ct'EM.S STORY. It is a story of
. fastest growing government department, whi-'ii
ime time has become a symbol of inefficiency The
ol Communications il'ostsi employs 20'; oi Is*
iiveintnent workers. It runs mail services, tele-
telegrams and telex operation! of the country.
lently, a letter arrived in Jerusalem from Tel
Ker its days, according to the postmark. In the
rek an airmail postcard fiom Ixmdon took 11 days
h the letter box. a lilt, r from Jerusalem four
letter Hum a Jerusalem suburb five days, and an
>-. tn a wedding in Jerusalem itself nine days
I .hi of a telephone may take up to two
Even U technically everything is In order, i' lakes
ii t Ilk four months Three departments deal with
f them is responsible for the line only, which
,1-ciiher apartment or office After the
i- Installed a third department is called Into
responsible for making the connections
i i i and testing the line The three depart-
ate with one another by mail. .. in
use* bj telex I found out that even offldala do
not know where the other offices are located.
Getting a phone, or line repaired, is a task beyond
the powers of the average Israeli. Dialing the Faults
Department may take hours; the number is usually busy,
And if a team is sent to locate the fault, the subscriber
had better be at home a return visit may take three
weeks or longer to arrange. If one wants action, one has
to plead pedal circumstances with the clerk accepting
the complaint- that there ii a sick person at home, or
thai the owner is a doctor or a police officer.
The Communications Ministry still functions on the
ii. arilzatlonal lines established during the British Man-
ra than 30 years ago. Young Israelis have since
M over the top jobs, some of them former army
officers. Bui they, too, have succumbed to the system,
'ih low quality of the manpower employed Justifies low
ries: the latter In turn make- work morale low. Every
20 employees seem to haw their own union, and barely
a month passes without at least one of them striking,
thus compounding the confusion
(Copyright lilt/Jewish Telegraphic Agency)
BOOK REVIEW By Seymour B. Liebman
Three Good Books
In roi..\\vr ;i:ii'i>i\(. drawings In Tit
Book oi Alfred Ksntot I McGraw-Hill Book Co.,
[ ,i unique apd moving book, live startling
,rii\ to the ho The C"hjj
:<,-, provefeb, "0 i-
h more than 10.'- is
aptlj applied hart than In
most instances.
Thierenstadt, Auschwitz and
s, hu.H/hnde The I >"*-
ir, las book are either sketches h
preset ved while an inmate or du-
fcites that he made alter his release. The brie
is almost in the spirit of Elle Wiesel's writing
iherc is no patent attempt to depi i horroi
j minis of brutality and sadism. The
i i of the pictures ii 111 the still-
fedilile storj ol lean's inhumanity lo mar.
Israel: \ Survej ami Blbliograph)
. i bj M i in .i : Martin's Press $1."
I. It will satisfy th
ire than i
.n'l el th u '""k
: the ans
wl litional Ii I l''1'
cle has an app i I : i '''>'
Thi book opens with a briel historj and a sec-
lion on Zionism and then proceeds t i government;
and co-operative settlements; the econ-
omy; ;i hi J and medicine: education and th
- with ii sub-sections; Christian, Moslem and
Druse communities, and the Dead Sea Scrolls, Each
section and sub-section i- written by a competenl
author; for the most pan a ide nicians and officials.
The writing Is in terse and i ige and
editorlalhtlng Is at a minimum. The book reveal!
Israel and the facets of Its life hi a most comrnerid-
manner.
Heroes of Israel by Morria Rosenblum i Fleet
Press Corp., |B> 's ;,i,1' '"" ,,'IS(' Ih au,n"1' "
synthesised the biographies of 10 men and two
women who are 30th century notables Henri,
Weizman, Ben-Gurion, Trumpeldor, Eliezer Ken
Veh,ii. Hannah" 9ene*h "Mickey" Marcus, Yi ael
Alkm; Ifeshe Da; la Meii and
, \ non.
One ea inol Fault the book for what it
tor what is omltt. I We read ol th
,i team Itttk? of ih. Ir pet s
: children Th
. adde | thing new about the i.
-

As We Were Saying: By ROBERT E. SEGAL
The Education
*'M>f \4 WASP* '*
N*PHE MOBE I I.KAKNKI), the less I felt 1 could
do lo change what 1 saw." Lois Mark Stalvcy
wrote in '"Hie Education Of A WASP,'' one wom-
an's honest and honorable account
of her education in prejudice and
its bitter by-products.
First published in May. 1970,
"The Education Of A WASP' is
now available in paperback. Fathaa
Theodore M. Hesburgh, president
of Not iv Dame, whose own heroic
efforts to advance equality of op-
portunity in his role as vtaerous
chairman of the U.S. Commission On Civil Rights
are well known, has expressed the hope that many
will read the book. "Rather than instill guilt in
White America, 1 hope this book will inspire read-
ers to reach the American dream in which I^is
Stalvev once believed,' he add-.
Is that dream no longer credible the dream
of making this nation one in which liberty and
justice are actually for all? Not just for the black
Nebraska tackle who gtops the fleet Alabama full-
back cold behind the line of scrimmage, not just
for the winsome slllgcr of rock on the David Fitf*
show, not just for Shirley Chisholm running for
president, but for the millions of less than talented,
often frustrated, frequently unchampioned plain
folks constantly obliged lo beer the handicap of de-
valued origin or minority creed or despised race?
Near the end of her chronicle, all of the events
in which are undoubtedly true, Mrs. Stalvcy tells
us what happened when she deliberately criss-
crossed letters she nad received from two people
she knew, making sure that each beheld the penned
hatred of the 'Mher. One letter was from a militant
black who wrote: "I approve of anything that will
relieve US of Jews, those human parasites who nrey
on black misery, suffering and misfortune.'' The
second was from a Jew who wrote: "You're wasting
your time trying lo help Negroes. They won't even
help them* Ives. They wont train to compete; they
Cant take aliu.se. They have no pride, no eharacler."
Mrs. Stalvcy patiently traces her odyssey as
naive quarrel-settler, exponent of Integration, timid
fighter fpl an FEPC ordinance. Catalyst in 1'TA
and tireless listener to stories of Indignity and heart-
break rooted In racial prejudice. She had headed <\
small advertising agency before she married the
man who :> so resolvi d to stand behind her In her
acts of enlightenment and decencj thai eventually
he took the clout of forced transfer to Philadelphia
and final loss of Job and income for the sake of
loyalty to immovable convictions about racial
justici.
From the first modern stirrings of racial up-
heaval in Ann rira refusal i" ride at the back of
,,, bus In 1953 on up through sit-ins. boycotts,
st man i bii arson, and rock-throw-
in. one Wasp, advanced from "I literal"
to an unawarded but wall ted !uate de-
li he art of human understanding "It was
yean before i learn d th. difference between el...
qu ,;,... speakers who unfurl brotherhood
speeches Ilk. i : the quiet, stubborn men who
tly doing what can be done." sh
observ ed.
Tenj Sanford, who w ... fame and the nation's
,titudc as an exemplarj young governor ol North
Carolina a few short years ago, has reminded ua that
those Americans "who should be pacemakers in
tack i "I and p......tj p oblemi seem con-
,,.,,, ,.; the Ewture happen, largel| without agree-
design 0 I unwillingly.
Mrs. Stalv. j "' kiml "' Peemaker; -lie
has scicnce' ha
n.can help end drift and generate construe-
.hi.
i
i


They're the oldest lines in the business. And believe it or not,
some of the car dealers in this town still use them. If they ever
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