The Jewish Floridian of North Broward

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Oct. 22, 1971)-v. 3, no. 6 (Mar. 22, 1974).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Dec. 17, 1971 called also v.1, no. 4, Sept. 21, 1973 called also v.2, no. 23, and Dec. 14, 1973 called also v.2, no. 28, repeating numbering of previous issues.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Vol. 2, no. 1 omitted in numbering of issues and was not published.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statement conflict: Sept. 7, 1973 called no. 22 in masthead and no. 23 in publisher's statement; Nov. 30, 1973 called no. 27 in masthead and no. 28 in publisher's statement.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44572526
lccn - sn 00229547
ocm44572526
System ID:
AA00014313:00008

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Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale


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Full Text
pJemsti flaridlmn
ot XORTH MtOWAMU*
1--Number 6
January 14, 1972
Price 20 c
Major Functions Launch Federation Campaign
vish Federation of North
will kick off its 1972
Jewish Appeal-Israel
Fund campaign with
Br fund-raising meetings
February.
Mncn's Division will start
lign activities with an
fts "Champagne Lunch-
iuardo's" on Wednesday,
land the Men's advance
ision will sponsor the
event of the new Ir.vor-
kntry Club a dinner-
Iturday evening, Feb. 12.
ghlight the programs and
line overseas needs of
fs campaign will be two
ng national speakers.
incis Bloustein, a cabi-
er of the United Jewish
New York and a mem-
National UJA Women's
THt HON. JACOB MfMOM
Division board, will be the princi-
pal speaker at the Women's Divi-
sion $l-a-day minimum pledge
function; Jacob Barmore. Deputy
Ambassador to the United Na-
tions from Israel, will address the
$l,000-minimum pledge meeting at
Inverrary.
Two community leaders have
been appointed by campaign chair-
man Irwin Weiser and Women's
Division campaign chairman Mrs.
Donald Mitchell to serve as chair-
men for the respective meetings.
Mrs. Alvin Gross is leading a
committee of women working on
the initial gifts function; Martin
Yohalem is serving as chairman
for the advance gifts meeting.
Serving with Mrs. Gross on the
committee are Mrs. Samuel Gold-
farb and Mrs. Henry Legum, hon-
orary chairmen for the day, and
..,
. ........ i'! : i i : '" t.'ivi ,. ,i ;
IS. Won't Permit Arms
balance To Be Shifted
JGTON (JTA)
Nixon has reaffirmed
United States has
[commitment in princi-
to permit the military
the Middle East to
lie disadvantage of Is-
declined to specify
'or not that principle
| implemented,
icon appeared on a live
vision interview, "A
ion With President
conducted by Dan
hite House correspon-
B CBS News, which
wer a wide spectrum of
I and international af-
I whether it was true
I'.S. has agreed in prin-
^rll additional Phantom
Israel according to re-
culating this weekend,
replied:
^ve made a decision of
itini: a decision that I
announced: that we
|allnw the military bal-
he Middle East to be
ow, the Soviet Union
sending in very sig-
Prms shipments to the
view of these ship-
that continues to es-
have had to consider
ts of Israel for planes
> see that the balance
hift. We have made a
nt in principle. As far
tenting that principle,
however, this is not, of course,
the time to go into it."
Daring the hoar-long Inter-
view, Mr. Nixon also indicated
that In his meeting with Soviet
leaden in May, the Middle East
will be one of the topics for
dlscuMian.
(In Jerusalem, Foreign Minis-
try officials said Monday that
Nixon's views on the delivery
of Phantom Jets to Israel re-
flated the President's views "as
they had been known to Israel."
The officials declined to say
whether Nixon's views on the
subject became known during
Premier Golda Meir*s visit to
Washington in November or
were known here before her
visit.)
State Department spokesman
Charles Bray, asked by news-
men whether the United States
had indications that Israel is
prepared to make political or
territorial concessions ''now
that they have been assured of
continued Phantom deliveries,"
replied to the second part of
the question by referring re-
porters to Nixon's television re-
marks and offered a "no com-
ment" to the first part of the
question but warned against
speculation along those lines.
the Mesdamcs David Amdur, Al-
lan Baer, Ludwik Brodzki, Mau-
rice Fisher, Martin Fridovich, Al-
bert Garnitz. High Glickstein. Ed-
ward Hyman, Irving Karlin. Ben-
iamin Lehrman, Fred Lichtman,
Jacob Lutz, Joel Miller. Donald
Mitchell. Mollie Morrell, Berte
Newman, Abraham Schankerman,
Kona Simon, Samuel Soref. George
Scheer, Janice Starrels, Herbert
Stern. Albert Tarrson, Irwin
Weiser, and Alan Ziffer.
Mr. Yohalem, a former president
of Temple Emanu-EI has announc-
ed that Samuel Goldfarb and Mar-
tin Fridovich will serve as honor-
ary chairmen for the advance gifts
dinner.
Ambassador Barmore went to
Israel from Warsaw, Poland, 38
years ago. He studied at the He-
brew University in Jerusalem and
actively participated in the Haga-
nah prior to and during the War
of Independence in 1948.
In 1949 Ambassador Barmore
became the Secretary-General of
the Ministry of Food and Supply;
he was subsequently appointed to
the Ministry for Foreign Affairs.
His first overseas position, in the
Embassy of Israel in Warsaw, was
MM. NMNCIC 1. BlOUSTtIN
followed by assignments in Cyprus
and Argentina, and in 1963 he was
appointed Consul General of Israel
in Chicago to serve the Midwest
region. He served in that capacity
until 1969 when he was appointed
first minister to the permanent
United Nations Mission in New
York, where he serves under Am-
bassador Joseph Tekoah.
Gen. Elazar New
Chief Of Staff
TEL AVIV (JTA) The com-
mand of Israel's armed forces
changed hands Saturday when
Gen. David "Dado" Elazar. who
commanded Israel's successful
assault on the Golan Heights in
1967, became chief of staff, suc-
ceeding Gen. Haim Barlev, who
in
ROl
of Anti-Semitism In
|i Source Of Concern
(JTA) A recrudes-
FH anti-Semitic activities
^bs has become a source
fts concern to the Italian
(community and to the
ent.
Kb police are investigat-
Hries of anti-Semitic acts
(eats, and the pro-Nazi
H of a neo-Fascist group
to be Involved in the
K of the Milano Agricul-
|Jank three years ago
Jled 14 persons.
The Berman quints minus die brother
who didn't survive are shown the
day they graduated from the prema-
ture baby unit at the Hadassah-Hebrew
University Medical Center, where they
lived in incubators. The boy and three
girls were the lira* quints born in
Israel. Hadassah has special facilities
for "preemies" at the Medical Center
and, in addition, maintains a clinic for
all "high risk" infants bom in Jeru-
salem. This special clinic, for out pa-
tient follow-up care, is centrally lo-
cated in the city at its Straus Center.
has held that post for four years,
one year longer than normal.
The 46-year-old Yugoslavian-
born Elazar, Israel's ninth chief
of staff, paid a courtesy call on
President Zalnutn Shazar after
his appointment became official.
Gen. Elazar settled in Pales-
tine in 1940 under the Youth
Aliyah program and joined
Palmach. the elite brigade of
the Jewish defense force, Ha-
ganah. He rose to the rank of
colonel in Israel's Army in 1956
and became Bark'v's second in
command in 1967 as chief of the
General Headquarters Branch.
Gen. Barlev, 47, was also born
in Yugoslavia where he and Ela-
zar were members of the Ha-
shomer Ilatzair Zionist youth
movement. His retirement yes-
terday ended a SO-year military
career. After an extended leave
he will enter the Cabinet as
Minister of Commerce and In-
dustry, a portfolio presently
held by Finance .Minister Pinhas
Sapir.
The new number two man in
Israel's Army is Gen. Israel Tal,
who has succeeded Gen. Elazar
as head of the General Head-
quarters Branch. Gen. Tal, a
47-year-oki sabra. served in the
British Army during World War
II. He fought in the ranks of the
Jewish brigade in Italy, in Is-
rael's War of Independence, the
1956 Sinai campaign and during
the Six-Day War commanded the
northern arm of the Israeli pin-
cer drive that pierced Egyptian
defenses and reached the Suez
i Canal.


Page 2
+Jelstfk>rkfian
Friday. January 14, 1972
Abbie Ben Ari Speaker At
Plaza South UJA-IEF Event
Abbie Bon Ari, former director 1 Silman. Mr. and Mrs. Jesse Solo-
of the Israel Government Tourist mon, and Mrs. Sylvia Werner.
Office will speak to the residents j Prior to seorfjig with the Israel
fc '* hi- -m.' Government Tawriafa Offrr- Mr.
^^^^^^^^ Ben Ari was a spokesman for the
Israel Foreign Service and par-
ticipated in numerous other ac-
tivities, including missions abroad
as an advisor to young, developing
nations.
Born in Johannesburg, South
Africa. Mr. Ben Ari migrated to
Israel in 1952 and settled on a
kibbutz. In 1959 he moved to the
desert town of Kiryat Gat with
his wife and their two young sons
While there he served as a mem-
ber of the municipal council and
was a leader in the Kiryat Gat
Industrial Development Corpora-
tion.
Other government assignments
have taken him to the United
Nations. Europe and the United
States as a representative on vari-
ous international bodies; Mr. Ben
Ari has also lectured extensively
in America at universities an.i
other institutions on behalf of
the Israeli Foreign Service.
ABBIt BIN AM
of Plaza South condominium on
Wednesday evening on behalf of
the Jewish Federation of North
Broward's United Jewish Appeal-
Israel Emergency Fund campaign.
The program, sponsored by the
residents of Plaza South, is being
coordinated by Mr. and Mrs. David
Kramer and Mr. and Mrs. Joseph
Storch.
Serving as c<"'i>onsors for the
evening will be Mr. and Mrs. Jack
Abromowitz. Mr. and Mis. Al
Buzzell. Mr. and Mrs. Harry
Cohen, Mr. and Mrs. Melvin Fine,
Dr. and Mrs. Max Fraenkel. Mr.
and Mrs. Milton Frankle. Mr. and
Mrs Albert Gamitz. Mr. and Mrs.
Louis Glass, Mr. and Mrs. H. Gold-
farb, Mr. and Mrs. Lester Green-
gard, Mr. and Mrs. Nathan Karlin,
Mr. and Mrs. Mortimer Kassell.
Mrs. Silas Kassel and Mr. and
Mrs. Harry Klinghoffer.
Also Mr. and Mrs. Fred Licht-
man. Mr. and Mrs. Henry Lowen-
tt< in. Dr. and Mrs. Harold Luria,
Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Lurie. Mr.
and Mrs. Harry Miller, Mr. and
Mrs. Harold Mindlin. Mr. and
Mrs. Howard Perimutter, Mr. and
Mrs. M. Ray mon. Mr. and Mrs.
Herman Sandov, Mr. and Mrs.
George Siegler. Mr. and Mrs. Hy
Rabbi Shapero
Breakfast Speaker
Rabbi Sanford Shapero. the
newly appointed director of the
South Florida Federation of the
Union of American Hebrew Con-
gregations, will^be the guest
speaker at Temple Emanu-El .T
Men's Club breakfast meeting
Sunday, at 10 a.m. in the temples
auditorium. Bernard Etish. Men's
Club president, has announced.
Rabbi Shapero lectures at col-
lege and universities while repre-
senting the Jewish Chautauqua
Society, of which he is a life mem- [
ber. A founder and director of
teenage youth programs in Day-
ton and Columbus, Ohio, Rabbi
Shapero has also served as a chap-
lain in the U.S. Navy.
Further information about the
Society may be obtained from Al
Roth at the breakfast meeting.
Hadassoh Chapter Sponsor Of 'Stamp Book Luncheon'
. H 1 E S Stamp Book money as payment for this H,fc-
Luncheon." sponsor.!^ the Fort sah
Laudcrdale chapter of Hadassah,
will take place at noon Thursday.
Jan 20. in the all-purpose room of
Temple Emanu-El.
Members and juests may use
either trading stamp hooks or
Israel education set-vfe
luncheon, according to an an,
nouncemmt made by Mrs, Allan
Magill an 1 Mrs. Theodore Sobo
chapter co-presidents.. '
Mrs. Ludwik Brodzki ;] |f-
Edward Hyn.an are serving m *a
chairmen of the event
Learning Foundations J
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Lebanon Cracking
Down on Terrorists
JERUSALEM iJTA> Pre-
mier Saeb Salam of Lebanon
has announced a new crackdown
on terrorists by Lebanese au-
thorities He said his govern-
ment would no longer tolerate
challenges to the country's law
and sovereignty.
Salam spoke after two police-
men gunned down a terrorist
during a clash in a Beirut sub-
urb Friday night. The dead man
was identified as a member of
the Syrian-backed Al Saiqa. a
guerrilla organization loosely
linked to El Fatah.
According to some sources,
the shooting incident may
prompt Lebanon to follow the
example of Jordan and bar ter-
rorists from populated areas.
Ten terrorists were reportedly
arrested in a clash that devel-
oped when several of them at-
tacked a suburban police sta-
tion to free a comrade who had
been disarmed and detained ear-
lier for firing into the air to
mark the new year.
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A special new member induc-
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day, Jan. 21. at 8:15 p.m. Rabbi j
Morris A. Skop will deliver a ser-
mon entitled. 'Some Jewish Lea-
sons On Ecology";Cantor Ernest
Sehreiber will chant the Sabbath
prayers.
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Friday, January 14, 1972
*Jenisli fhoriddinr
Page 3
Moscow Feared Likely
To Stage Incidents'
LONDON (JTA) A dra-
matic demonstration of tho tin-
dei'box Mature of the Middle
East situation may be staged
by the Kremlin to induce Presi-
dent Nixon to exert more pres-
sure on Israel for concessions
when h*> visits ftfOKOW for a
summit conference next May.
Fears are growing In Lon-
don and Washington that with
Moscow's connivanc', Egypt will
stage shooting Incidents along
tle Suez Canal at about that
time to which th.' [sraelil arc
certain id respond in kind, ac-
cording: to OtBpman Ptncher,
writing in the Daily Express
Moiu'aj.
Mr. Ptncher said that British
nd I'.'*. int concern**! over the speed with
which the Russians are build-
ing a military airfield for
the sole use of their air force
LOOKING
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Peg's FeOufevs Finds, Inc., 4149
Nertb D(-t Highway is where you'll
find them. She hot eld and new
finds for Hie home you won't find
elsewhere. BtST Of ALL 10% Off
with this Ad. Tues thru Sat. 10-5.
563 8959 for after hours app't.
near the Aswan High Dam. They
are convinced thai it Ls scheduled
to be, ready for full operation by
the time .Mr. Nixon goes to Mos-
cow, and that it.s purpose is to
protect the dam from Israeli re-
taliatory strikes.
The Russians are taking rpe-
cial precautions to guard the
Aswan Dam in the event that
local shooting Incidents alone;
the Suez Canal escalate into
all-out lighting. Israeli Phan-
tom jets have the range to
reach the dam and Israeli sci-
entist are believed to have de-
veloped special weaoons to
breach it. That would cause dis-
astrous Hoods in Egypt.
The Israelis arc not likely to
risk hitting the dam unless the
Egyptians strike at Israeli civil-
ian centers, such as an air raid
on Tel Aviv, according to Pin-
eher. The delicate nature of the
situation plays into the Krem-
lin's hands. They will be able
to convince Mr. Nixon of the
importance of a speedy settle-
ment in order to prevent a
serious new war and to secure
other Kast-West benefits.
Youth Aliyah Luncheon Set
The Chal Chapter of Hadastah
will hold it.s Youth Aliyah lunch-
eon in the Yankee Clipper Hotel
n Furl I.aiiderdale at noon Thurs-
day, Jan. 20, according to Mrs.
lack ftlelsner, chapter president.
Mrs. Edward Topaz will serve as
luncheon chairman.
'Family Affair' Sunday
YounK Judea will psesenl a
family affair" at 2 p.m. Sunday
at the Sunrise Golf Village Recrea-
tion Center, 17th Ct. and NW 60th
Ave. The program will include
Israeli songs and dances and "live"
magic entertainment.
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Jerusalem's Mayor Teddy Kollek greets stage and screen
star Edward G. Robinson, who was making his third
visit to Israel. For more than 20 years, Mr. Robinson
has been a supporter of the Israel Bond program, and
ha6 made many appearances in its behalf.
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Page A
-Jmistiner****
Friday, January 14. \^
wJewisti florid Ian
OF NORTH BROWARD
Telf*one J7i-e**
OIFFICE and PLANT1 X.R. 6th STREET. MIAMI.
MIAMI ADDRESS: P.O. Box TJ, Miami. Florid* JJ101
FRED K SHOCHET SEUMA M THOMPSON
Ed.tor and Publirfi*r Assistant to Publisher
For th Jewish Fwleratton of North Broward___^
AI.VIN GROSS DAVID M AMDl'R MRS JOANNE HIIXER
Prw.id.-nt Iwllll MiHIUl News Coordinator
Federation office: S*> N. Andrew* Avenue. Ft. Lauiderdale. Fla JSJv
Telephone 56.'. -1 ___
Th Jewish Floridian Doet Not Guarantee The Kaahrwth
Of The Merchandise Advertised In Its Columns.
PuMished Bi-Wt-ekly
Application to mail at second -class postage rate Is pending at Miami. Fta.
The Jewish Florid.an has absorbed the Jewish Unity and the Jewish Weekly.
Member of the Jewish Telegraph.c Agency. Seven Arts Feature Syndicate.
Worldwide News Service. National Editorial Association. American Association
of English-Jew.sh Newspapers, and the Florida Press Association.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Area) One Year $2.00. Out of Town Upon
Request.
Volume 1
Friday. January 14, 1972
Number 6
27 TEVETH 5732
Problems Which Cannot Be Ignored
At its final Cabinet meeting of the old year, the Israeli
government revised its estimates of 1972 immigration up-
ward by nearly 50 % to 70,000 persons. Only three weeks
before, economic and social planning was based on the
probable need to absorb about 45,000 immigrants.
Since fully half the 1972 newcomers are expected to
come from the Soviet Union this is welcome news. But, at
the same time, the estimate also brings with it tremendous
financial, social and psychological problems mat cannot
be ignored either by the affected Israelis or world Jewry.
According to the Jerusalem Post, housing training of
unskilled immigrants for jobs, schooling for children and
the integration of the newcomers into a new society coe
among the major questions government experts must at-
tack in preparation for the influx. Money, from additional
taxes on the already over-burdened Israelis and from world
Jewry, is another vital concern, for the new budget had
been based on the lower figure of immigrants anticipated.
The problem that this poses for Israel is not only that
of money. It presents a challange to the World Zionist
movement which Is soon to meet to find some other, if
possible, temporary solution to the great desire of Jews
in other parts of the world than Russia to emigrate to the
Jewish state at this time. The impact of 70,000 newcomers
on a society ringed by enemies and confronted with seri-
ous domestic problems can be ignored only at the expense
of Israel's security.
Choice May Be A Good One
Although there is natural disappointment in the rejec-
tion of Finland's Max Jakobson to replace U Thant as sec-
retary-general of the United Nations although a prac-
ticing Jew he would have won but for Russia's veto the
choice of Kurt Waldheim of Austria may be seen as a good
one from the Jewish point of view.
Ambassador Waldheim'i major credentials for the
poet is said to be his affinity for a middle course. How-
ever, during the Six-Day War in 1967 and as foreign min-
ister of Austria, he made it clear in public that he hoped
"the just cause of Israel" would triumph. He certainly will
be an improvement over U Thant whose position was
clearly on the side of the Arab states.
Problems Call For Unity
The issue of "jurisdiction" over certain areas of Jewish
life is an old one and is brought to mind again with the
proliferation of groups in support of Soviet Jewry and the
recent conference on Poverty in the Jewish Community
sponsored by the American Jewish Committee.
If ever there were two problems which call for unity
of the established Jewish community in Greater Miami's
case the Federation these represent classic examples.
As the Committee on Control and Authorixation of Cam-
paigns pointed out in a statement that could have been
even more forceful, the considerable funds which are
required to assist Soviet Jews can be mobilized only by
the United Jewish Appeal. Other efforts in this direction
may be viewed only as divisive and questionable as long
as UJA continues its magnificent effort in this direction.
Similarly, while American Jewish Committee is to be
commended for shedding light on the question of Jewish
poverty, a subject too-long hidden, the effort here must be
that of the total community and not by one of its agencies.
H. in tact, there are 750.000 poor Jews in America action is
called for by all and that cause can be served best by
Federation.
MATTER OF FACT
by Joseph Alsop
WASHINGTON On the eve
of the final cease-fire, the VS.
government had unchallengao.e
information of the Indian gov-
ernment's fletermination to
cau surviving half of Pakistan In-
dian forces, strongly superior
in arms, were already moving up
to engage the large part of the
West Pakistani army or. the
Kashmir front.
Dismemberment of V est Pak-
istan would have been the auto-
matic consequence of the de-
struction of the army, which
was the Indian aim While in
Washington, the sainted Ir.dira
Gandhi had rather openly hinted
at dismemberment in her ta.ks
with Present Nixon, for she
bitterlv complained that Pakis-
tan's northwest and northeast
frontier areas. Pushtunistan and
Beluchistan. had been unjustly
allotted to the wicked Pakis-
tanis.
WHILE the Indian forces
were moving up. moreover, lilt.
Gandhi's great protectors and
sponsors, the masters of the
Kremlin, were far from inac-
tive. Moslem states as far away
as Turkey got stern Soviet dip-
lomatic warnings not to react
in any way to the fate of their
fellow Moslems in Pakistan. The
government of Afghanistan was
under severe Soviet pressure to
move troops toward the frontier
as another threat to the Pakis-
tanis.
Besides satisfying Indian
ver.gefulness. there *M a prac-
tical object. The desired dis-
memberment of Pakistan wsl
to deprive the Pakistani rem-
nant state of any common fron-
tier with Tibet and thill
Communist China.
si'CH was the lituatioo
President Nixon I
ordered
Fleet to steam ton [whan
Ocean. And he furtlH r allowed
it to be hinted that be "
not be able to go to M
after all.
Concurrently, the
made the most P
risky, personal represi i
to the Soviet leaders. Thui "
Indian plan to con tin.:-
against" West Pakistan was
called off at the last moment
and by Soviet oomn
THESE ARE the plain Ul
stable facts as documented his-
tory will one day >!
The facts are worth relating at
this late date because they have
been concealed by liberal senti-
mentality and Democratic partis-
anship.
The background facts are also
worth relating. In the early 60s.
to begin with, when President
Kennedy signed his treaty with
Pakistan, an approximate mili-
tary balance existed between
Pakistan and India. But that
balance was then progressively
upset by the combined action of
American liberal sentimentality
and hardheaded Soviet planning.
ALTHOUGH United States
military aid officially continued.
Pakistan was left with an army
and air force that grew more
and more obsolete with every
year that passed. The Soviets.
seeing their chance, then step-
ped in to provide India with
modern arms on the most la. ish
scale. Thus Pakistan was al-
ready hopelessly outgunned when
Sheik Mujibur Rah mar. -
aratist Awami Leagui a n the
Ea-t Pakistan election a
ago.
With her superior military
power Mrs. Gandhi roon saw
the chance that the East Pak-
istani election gav h simplest proof is the fact that
Indian divisions began to move
up to the East Pakistan fron-
tier last winter.
THIS WAS considerably be-
fore Sheik Mujibur Rahman
gave the signal for insurrection
last March. No one but a fool
can doubt that he gave that
signal with full asaurance of the
Indian aid that the East Pak-
istani rebels promptly receives.
The West Pakistani govern-
jnen, ,n be criticized for its
handling of Sheik Mujibur. be-
| d^ubt The U.S. govern-
ment can also be criticized for
v>nd with greater
promptitude and firmness to
,h0 it ion the Indians
arl .... s ieti had created.
FOR THE Sovfc .'.ease
was dedatve from
^intej
not htj
start to finish. The
Indira would not ha.
send a soldier ma
tani frontier if >he h>.
the crucial So.
against Pakistan's > eseCcT]
munist allies.
The resulting
ity that India i .^
come a vast new .... 5^
Continued on Pg 4,
/\S
Max Lerner
Sees It
NEW YORK Draft resisters. fugitives, exiles: Whal shaL
we do with them" How a nation ends a war is as import
how it starts one. Along with the winding down of actua
there must be a winding down of the internal hates and hosfflj.
ties the war generated. That is why the issue of amnesty for
draft resisters is critical now, and why a national debate on it fo
overdue
Sen. Robert Taft's bill to extend a hand of conditional we],
come to those who resisted or fled the war has caught nation!
attention, where the earlier bills of Rep. Ed Koch didn't. The ret,
son may lie in Taft's name, and in the fact that he is a r-spectrt
Ohio Republican, while Koch is a liberal New York Democrat
d -Cr
MAW WILL RESENT the idea of bringing ba
<-ty tho>e who refused to fight while others were dying Therei
ahvayi tM danger that those who fought and th-
11 be embittered by such an act
and that they may stir up social passions. But th- idea '. a>
already a social passion. Neither revenge
of heart a good emotion to have rampant in a na-
The: 00 still in American prisons .vh
:zh. There are 15.000 exiles in Cs
)thcr countries. Let them some boa
nyi Taft. and I agree. A continur
them from young men who
it a high It :"to a group of permar-:
lid tarn into enemies of America.
--
TAFT8 proposal SETS a condition, that
n of noncon.batant or civilian ser\i S
exil .navia have rejected the whil- :
the I was illegal and immoral :
and that the right to go b
that this will get a wide reap
America owe them actually" It owes them a secor. i c net TV
turn i< not an absolute right. They must
Icr't 1 > as a kind of r-demption but quite simply
which us I igain make them part of American life. ithouta>
t : antiwar conscience which made them go to]
. a ir: the first place.
The noncombatant or civilian service need not be f*
three years, as Taft's bill provides. If it la seen as symbolic
act on the part of the returning exiles, a year or la tnocfc
should do as well. The life of exiles is bleak and root!- The Jf
in prison is mutilating. Both groups have already pa.i a her-7
price for what they did. whatever their motivation The ad*
tional price should be only a symbolic one.
* ONE MIST TREAT the question of some 300 *
deserters and AWOLs as a separate one. While many ol tbeo
recoiled from the war. the element of antiwar saaaeienffJ
not there to start with. When the draft is done w:th aai
volunteer army takes its piece, and if the problem of the *&
lives can be settled, the deserter problem will become *
manageable. For the present, a general amnesty for them mir
crumble whatever discipline and deterrence the military sw
has.
In the case of the draft resisters this doesn't apply *"**
them there should be nothing to interfere with sMgMMJsw
There has been considerable talk of politics, not n
There are some who feel that President Nixon will welcome
whole issue of amnesty in the election campaign, abase hat #*
to I would give him a chance to reassure th< Sooth ass
the concervatives in his own party.
That may be so. yet here as in other cases t
polio- may prow to be the best politics, also If N:\
undercut the Democratic hold on the vote of the you: hisBW
be one way to do it.
* tt &
ON I ykry SCORE, magnanimity is the key Thb ha*
tiue after previous wars as well. The stakes of eodal ** I
cr-ativeness are high Such an act by Congress and the A*n"j
t-ation would set a good example for postwar social cohesi
tru teas of rDusands of lives, and give young men in the
hU a second chance to use their full potentials back
of their own country.
Finally, it would undo what could oe an unhealthv effect
the nation's future. There has been a eelective migrat
who showed a courage of the individual conscience
something that America or any other power system -
afford to lose.

I
:>rea*:
prim?0']
r. tbe
Th*',
asH


riday. January 14. 1972
+Jewisti finrMian
Page 5
h v JOANNE HILLER

IT'S OUR WORLD and January 72 is a great time to travel
tether.
TO I9RAEL where recently-transplanted SANDY and ALAN
)TTER and family are. There's an exchange of tapes and letters
[ween the Potters and CAROL and ALLAN PORTER. Can you
MS who sends the tapes and who writes the letters?
TEEN'S can plan now for a 27-day tour of Israel and London,
living June 21 from Miami and departing July 18 from London. All
lh school students (and those who will be in the 10th grade in
it ember) should begin communicating now with parents and vice
rsa. The toui schedule is exciting and even includes fruit picking.
Incidentally, Israel's major crop is oranges.These are waxed with
special coating developed by Israeli scientists to extend the time
sy may be stored without spoiling.
The price of the tour is very reasonable. Details may be obtained
ler from Rabbi Arthur Abrams of Temple Emanu-El or Rabbi
kiva Brilliant of Temple Beth Israel.
THE HORA is one of the most popular folk dances in Israel. It's
of the dances you could learn at Temple Emanu-El. There's an
raeli folk dancing group starting and you're invited to join .
$t contact the temple office.
ONE WAY (on a round-trip, of course) to meet out-of-state
?nds and Fort Lauderdale neigh1- rs is to embark on a cruise. Ask
til-traveled FRANCES and SIDNEY KATES who recently sailed
the Nieuw Amsterdam to St. Thomas, St. Maarten and San Juan.
the last port, the Kates unexpectedly met New York friends and at
jther they met their Fort Lauderdale neighbors. "It happens all the
ru\" Frances exclaimed!
HERE 'N THERE Just returning from a month's South Pacific
. which included Tahiti. New Zealand and Australia, HENRIETTA
LEONARD SOLOMON relate their experiences so vividly that it's
fce a "having a wonderful time" postcard handed to you personally.
Tahiti, known as "the Paradise of the Pacific" may have ro-
jntically projected that myth to the western world, but hasn't con-
iced the natives of that yet.
New Zealand, a country composed of several islands, has such
k-erse land features as beautiful fjords, majestic "Southern Alps."
[t springs and geysers. Famous for bold experiments in social wel-
re. New Zealand, in 1893, became the first country to give women
\e right to vote. It was also one of the first countries to provide old-
ie pensions and social security for all citizens. The percentage of
aple who can read and write is higher in New Zealand than in
lost anv other country.
No, the Solomons didn't spend their time gathering statistics.
iwever, because their hobby is square dancing, their people-to-
>ple meetings offered many unusual, non-tourist opportunities.
WHEN VISITING Australia's capital city, Canberra, the
[ilomons were impressed by seeing an actual planned, model city
.lich included a government zone, municipal zone, civic center, uni-
sr.-itv site and residential suburbs. However, they said that if a
pme owner wants a rose garden or a fence of both, that home owner
st first request government approval!
After years of extensive traveling. Henrietta and Leonard en.thu-
istically claim that this National Council of Jewish Women tour was
best. RHEA (MRS. HERMAN) NATHAN, tour chairman for the
Forth Broward section of NCJW, will be pleased to hear that.
IT'S BEEN SAID that the best time to enjoy a trip is three
seks after you unpack.. Do you have a travel experience to share?
like to be "telling" if you'd like to be "sharing." ________
Temple Emanu-El
Art Auction Set
The third annual Art Show and
Auction, presented by Temple
Emanu-El and the William Haber
Galleries, will take place at 8:30
p.m. Saturday, Jan. 22, in the
temple's auditorium, 3245 W. Oak-
land Park Blvd.. Fort Lauderdale.
The art collection includes oils,
signed graphics and many original
works of art by such noted art-
ists as Marc Chagall. Sandu Liber-
man. Picasso. Dali and Miro.
A preview cocktail party will
precede the auction at 7:30 p.m.;
the public is invited to attend.
Ice Show And Dinner
For Mr. and Mrs. Club
The "Mr. and Mrs. Club," a
group of married Temple Emanu-
El members between the ages of
21 and 40, will attend a dinner and
ice show at the Sheraton Hotel,
Fort Lauderdale, Saturday at 9
p.m.
The "Ice Internationale" affair
is the second in a series of
monthly social events for the club.
Information regarding this event
may be obtained from Vic Spell-
berg, 8641 NW 20th Ct, Fort
Lauderdale, or by contacting the
temple office.

1
V
PHONE-565-7011
<9Jv/*> and (PouiUy
^Beauty &a&i*
NwOmM-Mr.MMqr
4242 D Ret* Mini W*w, Ft I**. Fk
IHMN.E Or St. M)

^
,
EAST COAST HEARING AIDS
Compl.lt Stltet.on of oil rpt. Lib.ro I Trod.-.n
otlo.onc.i. Boll.ri.i. Eormolds. R.po.ci lor oil
main. Fr.t TwM ""a Otmoniiioliom.
ipuAkie 421 E. Broward Blvd.
124-1152 Ft. Lm*w. Flo. 33W
THE COMPLETE DINNER RESTAURANT
COMPLETE DINNERS INCLUDING:
APPETIZER. SALAD, POTATO. DESSERT I IEVEM8E FROM 3.50
5400 H rtdwtl Mwyl Ft Uj* 771-WI
BEAT
INFLATION
at the
PIN HONEY SHOP
MEN'S WOMEN'S -
CHItOtEN'S CLOTHING
- mi sizes -
BRIC-A-BRAC
2302 NX 7th Avo
OPEN TUES. SAT. 9:30 to 5
Phono 564-1022
Refined Jewish widow, young
in spirit, good cook and drives
car, wishes to share lovely
two bedroom condominium,
pool, etc. Will exchange re-
ferences. Call 733-7482.
PICTURE
FRAMING
Reasonable Prices
ART CENTER
WORKSHOP
140) No. Federal Hwy.
Ft. Lauderdale
Ph 565-5951
Our New Owner ...
MR. ABEPALSYN
invites you to visit
this fine Drug Store
PRESCRIPTIONS FllLEO
LAWRENCE
DRUG
624 S.W. 2nd Street
Phone 524-4334
Phone
IU 34225
Rabbi Arthur Abrams, (left) and temple vice president
Michael Gora inspect one of the prints which will be offered
for sale at the Temple Emanu-El art auction Saturday, Jan. 22.
Temple Sholom Sisterhood Presenting Jazz Festival
A "jazz festival." featuring pro- The program, which will be
fessional musician Milton Miller,
will be presented by the Sister-
hood of Temple Sholom, Pompano
Beach, Tuesday at 8 p.m., Sister-
hood president Mrs. Jerome Soo-
wal has announced.
open to the public without charge,
will include contemporary music "
such as jazz, rock, country and
western and the bossa nova. Re-
freshments will also be served.
SeCl TiJlKCt BOAT MFG. CO.
"Safety Throuoh Strength"
250 S. Diiii Eat rompwo Beech Phone 7811621
1972 FIBERGLASS
V-28 SEAWIND CRUISER
%%%?. mm.mtmmmmM mmtm mm <-.
STANDARD EQUIPMENT:
Tinted safety plate ented windshield
Chrome on buss deck hardware with
8" cleats bow chocks
Step pads
Midship cleats
Twovent cab* windows
Two side cabin windows .
International runnini and anchor lifhts
Gas deck till with sale vent
100 piion ps tank with electric fuel
luate on dash
Mechanical steer"*.
Remote controls
12 writ battery ____
Rope and staaee locker forward
Will rf.ru hatch
Cjtn to fore deck
E.tra storage cempartmewts below
*"" to**6 DOUSItt SEJttIRD BRUS:
Pull carpeted headliner in cabin
Two 8' bunks m cabm
Two 8' storaee sheles in cabin
Cabin lifhts
Enclosed cabin bulkheads with solid
teak lowered door
Deluxe helmsman's seat with insulated
ice chest
Two foot rests
Deluxe captains swivel I slide chair
Instrument panel
Puiit m teak irjd neks
Non skid cockpit
floor fish box or beveraje cooler set
flush in deck
Fibei|lass motor box
Stern iish boxes with solid teak Ms
Approved ventilators fore A aft
Electric twin horns
Two aeto bilge pumps fore and aft
Bow i ail
Large compass
Glove boa
Bimmi top
Bunk cushions
To stern seats
Motor box cushion
Marine head
Electric windshield wiper
Interior ladder with hfhts
Outrmers ,M" lM to'd"*
225 HP 0MC
leboardOutboard
COMPLETE PRICE g950"
Cleaners of Fine Wearing Apparel
DO YOU KNOW
WE CLEAN DRAPES
We con also give you machine
precision-form drapery folds as
no hand pressing can do. It per-
mits length to be adjusted to
straight-line accuracy.
CLEANERS
2327 W. BROWARD BLVD., ft. LAUDfRDALE
Members Of The National Institute Of Dry Cleaning


Pcge6
+Jeistncridlian
Friday, January 14, jg*
i++fm+0+f+0+00+fwit+t++ti0imi&
Quoth the Maven
by Beverly King Pollock
vmwmvmwv^^^ammaammmaamm
Bock Home...
Twkr a \.ar I fly to Atlanta to see my parents and relatives land
to impress upon my children what a good daughter I am).
Unless you live far away from the scenes of your childhood, you
can never conjure up the anxiety and desperation that churns within
you in anticipation of a trip back home '
Kor hometown relatives east you in a certain mold and you are
obligated to live up to that image Like a game and you play
*>lT".etly by the rules.
Axiom No. I: Distance automatically leads to wealth. Of any man
you marry who lives more than 200 miles away, it is always said: "I
understand he comes from a very wealthy family. Five or six stores."
This image entails necessary expense. For a four-day trip, you buy
even new dresses. But buyer beware! For Tante Bloomeh may greet
you at the airport with. 'I always did like that coat you're wearing."
Axiom No. 2: On a person-to-person basis ione-to-one) the con-
versation con-ists entirely of rapid fire questions about you Such as:
"How are you?"
How are the children?"
'"Your husband is well":'"
"How is business?"
"Dirt you buy new bedroom furniture yet?"
Before you can answer one query in depth, you are interrupted by
th< negl question .
Axiom No i: H moiv than one person Ls in the room with you.
you are talked to in the third person.
""She looks good, kain elfl horeh."
"A little fat. but as long as she's healthy."
A\iom No. 4: Everybodj talks at the same time. You must Inter-
rupt or you don't pet heard.
Back home, everyone is a maven. And the louder you talk the
your knowledge.
Axiom No. 5: Whenever a new person comes in the room, he must
be tilled in on all the conversations that have gone before. The room
acquires a sound reminiscent of dahvening.
Axiom No. 8: Yon as a visitor must subtly brag about your most
eeci nt accomplishments.
"Momma, how do you like the articles I'm writing for The J F'. Idian of North Broward?"
And your mother replies, "Very nice."
"But you still should have time to do a little something for the
Sisterhood. Nol necessarily be The President like your sister, but ."
Axiom No. 7: You musl In- Ix'iat.-d for some sin. usually of
omission.
Your mother says, "How long i< it since you were here?"
It's a rhetorical question, so she continues. "Everybody asked
you were coming. It was getting to be embarrassing for the
. hbors."
Axiom No. 8: You must act like doctor. You make 96 house
calxs and 473 phone tails to inquire about the health of each relative
(at leas) through third cousins).
Should you object to this torture, your mother says. You're here,
only 10 lavs a year You can act like n big shot. But I have to live here 1
you're gone! How can I look these people in the face?"
Axiom No. 9: There is a distinct prejudice against doctor- al-
though "very mother wanti her -on to be one.
Whenever someone says, "it'll cost a Tot of money" (in referring
to goiim on a trip, remodeling a house, eating dinner out, ate.) the
rebuttal is imnudialr.
Filter to spend it on that than on the doctor."
Axiom No. 10: When a hometown trip is unavoidable, relax and
j it You n :,\ even want to come hack for moiv.
rers'icc*
FOUT IAUDEP.DAIE
BETH ISRAEL (Tt-npl.) Con"rva"
tive, 547 E. Oakland P*rk |lv"
Rabbi Akiva Bnll.ant. Cantor Mao- ,
rice Neu
EMANU-EL 3245 W. Oakland Park
Blvd. Reform. Rabbi Arthur J Ab-
rami. Cantor Jerome Klement. e
--------
POMPANO BEACH
SHOLOM (Temple). 13!! SE lit* AVS.
Conservative. Rabbi Morne A. Skop-
Cantor Erneit Sciireiber. m
--------
MARGATE
MARGATE JEWISH CENTER. (Con-
aervative) 6101 NW 9th SI__________
New Yiddish Daily
Paper Is Launched
NEW YORK iJTA The
day after the closing of the Day-
Jewish Journal, leaving only the
Forward as the nation's major
daily Yiddish newspaper, a new-
Yiddish daily was launched her.'
under the name Yiddische Zei-
tung (The Yiddish Newspaper).
It* publisher is Sender Deutseh,
a 50-year-old native of Czechos-
lovakia who has published Dei
Yid for 19 years and Der Yid-
dtachar Kval "The Jewish Foun-
tain I for five years. Each bai B
circulation of about 7,000.
Mr, Deut^ch distributed 11.-
500 copies of Yiddtsch,- Settling
yesterday in four or five bor-
oughs, but said it was too early
to determine how many had been
sold. He edits and offsets all
three papers at Deutseh Print-
ing and Publishing Company a
Brooklyn firm of which he Is
president
Mr. Deutseh. a N>"\ Y
for 23 years, told the JTA he
expects the Yiddische Zeitung
to cos! him S2.">0.000 the first
year and hopefully less there-
after, He said the 15-cent four-
pager would seek to attract both
the older and younger genera-
tions of Orthodox New Yorkers
It will cover "all news." with
emphasis on Jewish news, and
will appear daily except for
Saturdays and Jewish holiday's
Der Yid was described a- a
"religion* political biweekly"
with a "strong" position on
Zionism, and Der Yid.lis iher
Kval as an "education and fam-
ily" journal.
mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm^mu.-
'Rubber Ruler Measuring]
personal ethics becomes an J
Problems are solved by a ptMj
pull, or a twist of the njj
Rabbi' Brilliant
B>: RABBI AKIVA BRILLIANT
Temple Beth Israel
With the beginning of the new
civil year of 1972 there will un-
doubtedly be those who will meas-
ure the events
of the year with
a rubber ruler.
It, of course,
could be a very
comforting ex-
perience Therei
are no vexing
- problems Every-
B^^^^^,- ( thin.- fits just
K Ww want it
ft [f the
Lm avuW. thin:; too
short, you com-
press the rubber
ruler If it i* too long, you stretch
it.
On the other hand, this could
prove to be a disastrous practice
If an architect were to use a rub-
ber ruler, he could saw time,
avoid ulcers, and Increase produc-
tion. However, his building would
collapse; his bridges would not
stand.
Those who live tneii lives ac-
cording to the rubber ruler may
find that life, at least at first,
will be much more Simple and
easier to cops with. They can
measure their ethics and religious
values by the yielding yardstick.
Whatever fits their fancy they
can accept; that which is onerous
they can reject; whatever corn-
compliments they can
that which offers < riti-
condemnation tiny can
forts an.;
embra i
dsra and
ud.
ruler of conscienc
In the field of religion, ^,
ber ruler pats us on the back
goes into all kinds ,,! contort
to give us "peace of mine" i
"tranquility of conscience"
pampers and spoils. It tells
are doing just fine. It savw
time and worry and the wi
self-improv.iu.-nt. It |i wn".
venient.
In the final analysh I
becomes clear that we need i
kind of religion and that kiMj
life that will do less for us i
more with us Indeed, if a but)
cannot stand when based or]
rubber ruler measuring, what
be said of life"
With best wish, for a h
and meaningful new year
f
Everything is relativistic; con-
venience decides what is good and
moral. Flexibility in business and
^/Flatter of J" JOSEPH ESI
Continued from Pat* 4
tegic base area ls what thou]
mainly matter to this country[
It is what fully justifies "V|
comparison of these events, at-l
tributed to Dr. Henry Kissir.ca.1
to Adolf HitU i reoocupslB||
of the Rhineland
Head what the virtuooj Eurtl
paan and An i Bfl
about the Rhinels
Kt's fii-st step forward on
road to war. Then the pr
American liberal blather
India will not surprise you
NATURAL
V'TAMINS
0HTITIC
FOCD
TELEPHONE
564 6459
KUBIES
Health Foods
an ounce of eaeveNTiow IS
WORTH A POUND Of CURE
Organic vegetables 3326 N E 33>0 ST
inSIaSOn QFFTHEGALT
Community Calendar
IRI9AY, JANUARY 14
Temple Emanu-EI Special Sabbath Service 1:15 p.m.
SATURDAY, JANUARY 15
Mr. 0*4 Mrs. Club Dinner-Ice Shew Sheraton Hotel 9 p.m.
SUNDAY, JANUARY 16
Men $ Club of Temple Emanu-EI Breakfast Meeting 10 a.m.
MONDAY, JANUARY 17
Temple Beth Israel Sisterhood General Meeting 8 p.m.
TUESDAY, JANUARY IB
Temple Shalom Sisterhood Jazi Festival I p.m.
THURSDAY, JANUARY 20
Hadassah Fort louderdale Chapter H.I.E.S. Luncheon
Temple Emanu-EI (All Purpose Room) 12 noon
Hadasioh Pompone Beach Chai Chapter Youth Aliyab
Luncheon 12:00 noon Yankee Clipper, Fort Louderdale
IKIMY, JANUARY 21
Temple Shalom Special Sabbath Service 1:15 p.m.
SATURDAY, JANilAKY 22
- Art Show tmd Auction l:3 p.m.
LAMBERTS
PIANO TUNING
SERVICE
and REPAIRING
FREE ESTIMATE
8405 NW. 59th Street
Tamsrac
Ft. LauderdaU
974-6364
HEAR
JACOB
SCHACHTER
ON WE AH
nAY yous
EAVOIITi
YIDDISH MUSK
BVttV S'JNDA r AT NOOK
RADIO STATION VVLTO
1200 I. Ytsjr Did
GRAND OPENING

,i
Tei. m-mucu
11 MnM IK n-rHt > i" a li* H'l I
i rum-II in a H MM II Ml W IIM'W*
l\ ill! MM I l|ll\ 11 Blim I u i M
i un\n> .ii i i. I w.ri I
II mi in i\i>- \ INI III II'
Opening Special 276 w\i
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r. January 14, 1972
+Jm/sti fkrkffain
Page 7
ISRAEL NEWSLETTER
By Corl Alpert
Comments Made After Truth Serum
,T DEAD OF NICJHT, when no erne was looking,
I crept stealthily into one of the secret labdra-
ries at the Technion, found the precious tube of
secret Truth Serum which had
been developed! there, and put
it in my pocket. In the weeks that
followed I found opportunity to
administer doses of the Serum to
a number of people, and recorded
the first words of truth they ut-
tered as the serum took effect.
Follow are some of the results:
Aloshr Dayan: Plastic surgeons
I could have my face fixed up so that the con-
scious black patch would not be nesessary. But
pn who would look at me a second time?
Yitzhak Rabin: I wish they'd let me come home
take a nice easy job, like being a member of
Israel Cabinet.
Pinhns Sapir: The next prime minister will be
me, or the person whom I designate.
El Al Hostess: Fasten your seat belts, eat your
per, tell the brat to shut up, keep your feet out
of the aisles, I don't care what you tell the man-
agement, and absolutely not, I have a boy friend.
INF President: We've outlived our usefulness
as an organization in Israel, but let's face it. We're
still good at raising money, so why wind up a good
thins?
(iolda Meir: I'm tired. How I'd love to get back
to my kitchen.
Israel Tourist Guide: This is a much better
store in which to buy your souvenirs. Besides, this
one pays me 10',i commission.
BeoMiurion: I know I've been a stubborn old
cuss and always insisted on having my way. But
it's true, isn't it, that have usually been right?
Abba Kban: I reject all malevolent and repre-
hensible asseversations that I am congenitally in-
capable of communicating my cerebrations in other
than lofty prose.
Gunnar Jarring: Both sides are stubborn and
unwilling to listen to reason. I think the United
Nations ought to withdraw from the issue and let
them shoot it out.
I) Thant: The Israelis are stubborn and unwill-
ing to listen to reason. Why do they always make
me look like a damn fool?
Zalman Shazar: If I can sax it in 30 minutes,
why limit myself to five?
Rabbi shlonio Goren: When I am elected chief
rabb* of Israel then you'll hear how I can really
blow the shofar!
American Tourist: The hotels are expensive, the
food mediocre, the people rude, the service bad and
the weather unbearable. But Israel is a wonderful
country and I can't wait to get back there again.
Yitzhak Ben Aharon: If our capitalist support-
ers in the United States ever find out what the
Histadrut is doing to private business in Israel, wo
sure would be in a fix!
.\:ihum GoMmann: As a citizen of Switzerland
I am in a much better position to have an objective
view of Israel's politics.
My daughter, Ruth: My father sure has a lot
of nerve, commenting and criticizing the way he
does every week, as if he is an expert on every-
thing!
As We Were Saying:
By ROBERT E. SEGAL
Book Review By SEYMOUR B. LIEBMAN
ountdown For Housing Issue Several Paperback8
kBKRS OF THE Queens Jewish Community Coun-
I! Inc. have a tremendous fright. They are Beared
kk that the city government agencies dealing with
housing, with the backing of the federal
department of Housing and Urban D^-
velopment, are actually going ahead
with plans for building three 24-story
buildings providing 840 apartments fol-
low Income families right in the middle
class section of Forest Hills. Queens.
All America itself has an even bigger
headache over housing needs, housing
decay, and housing failures. Whereas

' .

Film Folk
By HERBERT 0. LUFT
[ia To Play Aniko
"RRENTLY' IN* LONDON' to complete the
[screen comedy "The Public Eye" with Chaim
as her none-too-romantic co-star, Mia Far-
row flies next to Israel to portray
the title role of "Aniko'' in Men-
ahem Golan's forthcoming World
War II epic dealing with the leg-
endary Hanna Senesh who sacri-
fices herseli for the Allied cause
and for Israel. A native of Hun-
gary she had escaped to Palestine
to avoid persecution. Returning to
her homeland with the British
y. she parachuted into Budapest in an attempt
hbotage the shipment of Jews to the extermina-
Icenters, Caught by native collaborators, Hanna
executed by the Facial blackshirts.
Several plays have been written by Israeli and
lean authors to immortalize Hanna Seneafa
j is known as "Aniko" to the little people in her
Iti d country and worshipped as the Jewish Joan
ire. Hanna also is known as a poet and hel-
ps are read in the schools of Fret/ Israel
The current picture will be produced in conjunc-
vMi John Hyman of London, himself the son
[Jewish refugee who hails from Frankfurt and
we met last year in the British capital during
press screening of the Richard Harris starrer,
Bmfield." The contem, .ated film will be bud-
a, $2.5 million with the financing supplied by
nt US-UK group. Rod Steiger is sought for the
Df the unyielding Hungarian police chief who is
lined to crush the anti-Nazi underground.
This is the first attempt of Menahem Golan to
a truly international film in the English lan-
. tliough he received worldwide recognition
the Hebrew picture. "Sallah." which cata-
Topol to fame and fortune in 1965. Golan i-
itly completing, strictly for home consump-
| "Had and Carasso," a variation of "Abies
Rose" with Ashkenazi and Sephardic families
cing the protagonists of the original. Shmuel
nsky, who appeared on the stag* of Tel Aviv
lerntany as Tevye and repeated the role in
n-musical picture made by Arthur Brauner in
nction with Golan, plays one of the leads of
and Carasso," with Yossef Shiloah, Yuda
an and Gadi Yagil.
(Copyright 1972. Jewish Telegraphic Agency) f
I m u ,,w,M..'HI-IW:'>""'i:">l'W-' BMB* BBSS*......I
the National commission en Urban Problems, after care-
ful Study, says 11 million units are needed to house the
nation's poor and moderate-income families, only about
1.5 million such units have been built. Worse still, some
31 million new units of this nature are needed over
the next seven years. And adding woe to woe, the gov-
ernment itself- what with urban renewal, the construc-
tion of highways, demolitions on public housing sites, etc.
has actually been destroying more housing for the poor
than government at all levels has built for the poor.
One Queens resident quoted in late November by
the'New York Times, put the issue in a fascinating cap-
Mill "Those of us who are law-abiding, tax-paying, hard-
working citizens," she said, 'are having our rights taken
away from us because we do not loot stores, throw rocks,
or attack police." Less dramatically but not much more
accurately, Dr. Alvin M. Lashinsky. president of the
Queens Jewish Community Council, was quoted as assert-
ing that, "they (the government i haven't built any low
income housing in middle income areas that are not
Jewish."
The butt of much of the criticism in the Queens
dispute Mayor John Lindsay has said: In the final
analysis, this is a fundamental test and will be so viewed
nationally as to whether those who argue for integrated
communities have the courage of their convictions." So
tome of those who have been picketing along the edges of
the Queens low-income site are now out to impeach Mr.
Lindsay.
Neither Mayoi Lindsay nor Dr. Lashinsky is going
to win the battle of Forest Hills. Jerry Birbach. president
of the Forest Hi.1- Residents Association, so vigorous in
Its opposition to the project, Isn'l going to win the fight
.11 her. And the same holds for James E. Robinson, the
head of the Corona-East Klmhurst. Queens branch of the
NAACP, who insists that those opposing construction of
the project "are looking for polarization."
For the real winners once again will be the political
inures who. both by prejudicial action and cowardly in-
action, have blunted the edge of city, state, and federal
laws designed to end the tragedy attending so many
efforts to provide adequate, sound, and sanitary housing
for that much-maligned one-third of our people who were
ill-housed in Franklin's day and remain so today.
Scores of sound proposals for providing suitable
housing for the poor, and for those in the lower middle-
income brackets, have been advanced over the yean since
military men returning from World War II found it so
difficult to obtain homes. But many who have the final
vliv in housing construction matters, i.e., the elected and
appointed officials, have lacked the moral clout to do the
knocking necessary to speej the desperate housing require-
ments of the impoverished in the wealthiest land dviliza-
tion lias evei\known. '
THE PAPERBACK Let My People Gc, edited and
compiled by Richard Cohen (Popular Library
$1.25) contains factual material on Soviet discrimi-
.nation against Jews, excerpts from
Jewish underground publications
and excerpts from eye-witness re-
ports on Jews imprisoned for
"V*P* \mt "anti-Soviet activities.'' The 'nook
deserved the sub-title: 'Today's
Documentary Story of Soviet
Jewry's Struggle to be Free."
Truth and Peace in the Middle
East by Arnold M. Soloway, Edwin
lass and Gerald Caplan (American Jewish Con-
gress and Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith
$1.25) is an excellent analysis of the Quaker Report
published under the misleading title, "Search for
Peace." The distortions of the truth of the "peace
loving sect" who acted as more than a devil's advo-
cate and the overwhelming evidence of anti-Israel
bias is revealed by the admission of Dr. Boiling, edi-
tor of the report, that the Quakers received U.S.
government suggestions that a "pro-Arab slant Is
required." Prof. Stone of the University of Sydney.
vho conferred with Boiling, confirms that Boding
'tended to agree" with those suggestions. It may be
well within the realm of possibility that the pro-
Arab staff of our State Department sought Quaker
support in favor of the til-conceived Rogers plan
and that the Quaker report was even subsidized
from secret funds such as those of the Central In-
telligence Agency.
Growing Up (lean iii America by Joseph S.
Lobenthal, Jr. iPocket Books $.95> is an attempt to
be a guide to tt". legal complexities of being a
young, protesting militant American. The language is
elementary and the thoughts simplistic. It should
ntitled, "The Young Rioters Handbook" because
inh'-rent throughout the book is the theme that con-
frontation with the law is inevitable and "good
guys" never meet the fuzz.
Up From the Depression by Dr. Leonard Cam-
mer (Pocket Books $.95) explains what mental
depression is, how to recognize the symptoms and
what to do when depression strikes a member of
the family. The author is a fellow of the American
Psychiatric Assn.
Yiddish Literature by Charles Madison iSchock-
en Books, $4.95 > is a masterful work. The author
has analyzed the scope of his field and examines the
major writers from Mendel.- Mokher Sforim to
Isaac B. Singer. It is a thick book and the author
has Chosen excellent illustrations from each writer
to illustrate his various points on humor, pathos and
philosophy. In the chapter on Sholem Asch. one can
find that traces of an antipathy to the God of the
.lews was hinted at decades before Arch became the
darling of the Christians.
:-


Page 8
+Jewts*n*rM**n
Friday, January ^
Brandeis Scientists Isolate
Substance To Lower Pressure
Scientists at Brandeis Univer-
sity have been able to isolate a
substance which is one of the most
potent agents known for lowering
blood pressure. The agent, a pep-
tide referred to as substance P,
was first discovered in the liCCs,
but, up to now, no one has been
ble to isolate and purify it.
The isolation and purification of
this agent has made it possible to
synthesize it and produce it more
economically than would other-
wise have been possible. Before it
became possible to synthesize sub-
stance P. it was necessary to ex-
tract it from the brains of cattle
by means of a lengthy process.
SynagogHe's Shift
Points Up Impact
Of Change In Area
ORLAitDO (JTA) The im-
pact of a changing neighborhood
on the status of a long-established
synagogue is vividly illustrated in
the reasons for the decision of
central Florida's first synagogue,
Congregation Ohcv Shalom, to
shift from downtown Orlando to
the eastern part of the city where
most Orlando Jews have moved.
Repairs to the 53-year-old syna-
gogue, which its rabbi has called
"too old, too small and too far
away from where the Jewish com-
munity now lives." had been cost-
ing up to $1,000 annually during
the past 10 years. The increased
distance between homes of He-
brew and Sunday school pupils and
the Conservative synagogue have
brought a drop of 10-15^ class
attendance each year for the past
three years. During that period
there has been no net gain in the
membership of 250 families, Rabbi
Rudolph J. Adler reported.
The synacoeue was purchased
in October by a Baptist church
and the synagogue's education
building wa put up for sale.
Plans are being made to construct
a new synagogue in the eastern
part of Orlando where two other
synagogues had earlier moved
their facilities.
While the new synagogue is be-
ing built, Ohev Shalom services
are being conducted in the audi-
torium of the Kinneret. a high-
rise Jewish-sponsored apartment
house. Rabbi Adler said prelimi-
nary plans call for a one-story
synagogue building with a chapel
seating from 250 to 750 persons.
Dr. Susan Leeman. research as-
sistant professor of biochemistry
at Brandeis, said, "We now have
available a far greater quantity
fnwn **>! <<)m*
Heyward Benson, executive di-
rector of the Broward County
Community Relations Commission
will be the guest speaker at Tem-
ple Emanu-El Friday at 8:15 p.nr
Rabbi Arthur J. Abrams' sermon
will be on "The Community and
You." Cantor Jerome Klement will
chant the Sabbath prayers.
of substance P than could ever
have been obtained by extraction.
This will greatly facilitate further
work on the physiology of sub-
stance P and possibly lead to a]
clinical ^valuation of this
material."
Dr. Leeman, who began her work
on Substance P about eight years
ago through a chance discovery,
said the agent is known to lower
blood pressure in mammals, stimu-
late salivary secretion and contract
intestinal smooth muscle.
She said her work on substance
P began while she was trying to
purify a certain type of hormone.
While working on that project,
she was injecting into laboratory
animals stimulated a salivary
secretion.
She immediately began to work
with the aid of a succession of
gradua> students, toward purify-
ing this material a peptide. One
of these students. Michael Chang,
eventually succeeded in obtaining
substance P in its pure form.
"While performing this work,
we realized that this peptide had
she noticed that the material which
all the biological activity attrib-
uted to a substance called sub-
stance P which was discovered in
the 1930s." Dr. Leeman said. "We
didn't realize it at first. However,
once we had reduced it to its pure
form, we tested it and found that
it fit the biological and chemical
attributes of substance P."
The Brandeis Biochemistry De-
partment was established in 1957
through a grant from Lewis S.
Rosenstiel of Miami Beach, foun-
der and now retired chairman of
Schenley Industries.
Mr. Rosenstiel also recently un-
derwrote the university's Rosen-
stiel Basic Medical Sciences Re-
search Center which is now under
construction on the Brandeis
campus. The new Center will be
headed by Dr. Hariyn O. Halvor-
son, one of the nation's leading
molecular biologists. Research at
the Center, which will have a
working relationship with clinical
centers in the Boston area, will be
concentrated initially on cell struc-
ture and function and on cell
genetics.
Our Deadline
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