The Jewish Floridian of North Broward

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Oct. 22, 1971)-v. 3, no. 6 (Mar. 22, 1974).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Dec. 17, 1971 called also v.1, no. 4, Sept. 21, 1973 called also v.2, no. 23, and Dec. 14, 1973 called also v.2, no. 28, repeating numbering of previous issues.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Vol. 2, no. 1 omitted in numbering of issues and was not published.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statement conflict: Sept. 7, 1973 called no. 22 in masthead and no. 23 in publisher's statement; Nov. 30, 1973 called no. 27 in masthead and no. 28 in publisher's statement.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44572526
lccn - sn 00229547
ocm44572526
System ID:
AA00014313:00007

Related Items

Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale


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Full Text
nJemsti Flloiridliai m
ie 1 Number 5
of NORTH BttOWARn
December 31, 1971
Price 20 c
e A.-
Chances For Peace Are
Slightly More Than Zero
USALEM (JTA)Israel's
g Chief of Staff, Gen.
Bar-Lev, served notice on
last week that any re-
of warfare would bring
and destructive retalia-
a gainst Egypt. Addressing
nday night conference of
rs in Tel Aviv, Gen. Bar-
said the chances for re-
^d hostilities are about 50-50
have been for some time.
[peaceful settlement is still
rtically possible, said the
il. bat the chances at the
it time are "only very
slightly more than zero."
Gen. Bar-Lev, who leaves the
Army next year for a Cabinet
post, spoke with confidence of
Israel's ability to hit back hard
and decisively against attacks
by Egypt or a combined Syrian-
Egyptian assault on the cease-
fire lines. "If the Egyptians at-
tempt to hit any civilian targets
in Israel we can retaliate in
kind with such force that they
would quickly drop whatever
plans they have," he said.
"We can do this despite all
their anti-aircraft defense in-
stallations," he added, "despite
their Russians and despite their
missiles."
Israel has its "answers" to
Egyptian long range air-to-
ground missiles, Gen. Bar-Lev
declared. He conceded that one
rocket might get through Is-
raeli defenses, but maintained
that massive missiles strikes on
any one target are not likely. If
Egypt should resume warfare on
a large scale, it would not be
surprising if Syria joined in, the
General said, but Israel is ready
for all eventualities, "and not
and not merely on paper.
India-Pakistan Conflict Proved
tbarrassing To The Arab World
RUSALEM (JTA) The
n-Pakistani war has seri-
embarrassed the Arab
1 and has brought out dif-
nces hitherto obscured by
united Arab front against
el, observers here noted.
e only Arab country sup-
ing India outright was Iraq,
reason for Baghdad's anti-
stan position, according to
keli circles, is Pakistan's
friendship with Iran, with
h Iraq is at bitter ends,
i Arabia, on the other
, has accused India of ag-
sion and is supported in its
ges by Morocco, Libya and
an, which identify them-
es with a brother Moslem
In try.
The irony of this is that East
kistan which was fighting for
ppendeoce with India's sup-
t, is also Moslem, the Israeli
pies noted.
Egypt found itself in an awk-
ti position. The Soviet
Ion, the military and political
jlnstay of Egypt, supports In-
Furthermore. there is a
long tradition of friendship be-
tween Cairo and New Delhi
stemming from the close rela-
tionship between the late Indian
Premier Jawaharlal Nehru and
the late President Gamal Abdel
Nasser of Egypt. But that is re-
garded in Egypt as a personal
relationship of tne past not in
force today.
Egypt and Yugoslavia voted
with the majority of the I'nited
Nations General Assembly for an
immediate cease-fire and with-
drawal of forces. And Egypt as-
sumed a position of fence-sitting
with almost comic sidelights
a Cairo radio commentator an-
alyzing the situation said Egypt
regretted the war and wished
both sides "success."
Israel explained its U.N. vote
for a cease-fire and withdrawal
by its position that the political
"status quo" should not be
changed by force. Israeli circles
point out that in 1967 Egypt
attempted to alter the status
quo by force and was defeated
by Lsrael, which was exercising
!,000 Soviet Emigres
Arrived This Month
EL AVIV (JTA)The irri-
gation of Jews from the
iet Union has increased to
I an extent that it is putting
tiain on Israel's hous-
lesources, Absorption Min-
circles reported.
Nil* Pincus, chairman of the
ish Agency, told a Labor
ty meeting last week
2.000 Soviet Jewish emigres
irrived so far this month.
timated that the total
psn immigration from the
^et I'nion this year would be
lit 12,000.
bsorption Ministry officials
that If the present rate of
lx continues, it may be nec-
ry to house two childless
Hies in a single three-room
That arrangement could be
['ted to continue, they said,
smaller flats are available
for couples without children.
About one-third of the emi-
gres have been coming from the
So\iet Georgian Republic, ac-
cording to Gen. Uzzi Narkiss.
director of the Jewish Agency's
immigration department, but
the focal [Miint of emigration
will soon shift further eastward.
It is believed that Jews from
Bokhara in Central Asia may be
the next group allowed to leave
Russia in large numbers.
Like the Georgian and other
Soviet Jews, the Bokharan Jews
are townsmen and are not used
to agricultural work, Gen. Nar-
kiss said, and to meet the in-
flux of these new immigrants,
10,000 homes should be built in
Beersheba, the Negev capital,
where there is no shortage of
jobs.
its rights of self-defense. The
status quo which has existed
since the 1967 Six-Day War can
be changed through negotiations
but not by force, they said.
Exchange Of
Personnel Is
Seen Possible
JERUSALEM (JTA)Victor
Louis, a Soviet journalist known
to be close to the Kremlin, hint-
ed in a report from Moscow
published nere recently that an
unofficial exchange or diplomatic
personnel between Israel and
the USSR may be made in the
near future.
The dispatch said the ex-
change will come about because
of the heavy administrative bur-
den involved in processing the
growing number of Jews leav-
ing Russia for Israel. The bur-
den now falls on the Dutch Em-
bassy in Moscow, which handles
Israeli affairs in the USSR, and
Finland's Embassy in Tel Aviv,
which handles Soviet affairs in
Israel in the absence of formal
diplomatic relations.
A number of Israeli diplomats
would be attached to the Dutch
Embassy, and a like number of
Russians would go to the Fin-
nish Embassy in Tel Aviv, Mr.
Louis rejiorted. "It is possible,"
he added, "that in a very short
time the voice replying to a
phone call to the Dutch Embas-
sy in Moscow will say 'Shalom'."
Mr. Louis made a visit to Is-
rael last spring, ostensibly for
medical reasons. He came on an
official Soviet passport, how-
ever, and met with Simcha Din-
itz, Premier Golda Meir's politi-
cal secretary, and his visit was
viewed in some quarters as a
move by Moscow toward renew-
ing contacts with Israel.
Foreign Ministry officials said
they had no information to cor-
roborate Mr. Louis' predictions,
but some details concerning the
number of immigrants depart-
ing and their points of origin in
his report were confirmed.
News Briefs
Four Infants Out Of Incubator
JERUSALEM (JTA) All of the four surviving babies of the
quintuplets born to Mrs. Hadassah Berman in October have been re-
moved from the incubators where they spent the first two months
of their lives. The largest of the infants, a boy, was taken out last
week. His three sisters were removed Sunday.
State Department Mildly Critical
WASHINGTON (JTA) The State Department responded
belatedly and with only mild criticism to a reported Soviet pledge
to support Egypt "in peace and in war" made in Cairo reentry
by Russian Ambassador Vladimir M. Vinogradov. Department
spokesman Charles Bray said that the Soviet envoy "made com-
ments in a private session with a small group of Egyptian jour-
nalists" which "obviously are not helpful to the whole process in
which the parties and others have been engaged over the past
month looking to an interim agreement or a full settlement."
Dr. Bernstein Named President
WALTHAM, Mass. (JTA) The trustees of Brandeis Univer-
sity have announced the appointment of Dr. Marver H. Bernstein, a
political scientist and Jewish communal leader, as the fourth presi-
dent of the 23-year-oM Jewish-sponsored university. Dr. Bern-
stein, who has been chairman of the national commission of the
B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundations since 1969 succeeds Charles Schott-
land, 65, who has been president on an interim basis since the
resignation of Morris Abram in March, 1970.
Trading Continues As Usual
JERUSALEM (JTA) Trading in U.S. dollars continued as
usual following the announcement of an 8.57rr dollar devaluation.
Trade in other foreign currencies was suspended pending clarifica-
tion of the monetary situation. Finance Minister Pinhas Sapir told
newsmen last week that there will be no further evaluation oi the
Israel pound which continues to be pegged to the dollar.
Germans Receive Awards, Citations
BONN (WNS) The Yad Vashem, the Israeli Memorial
Foundation for Nazi Victims, honored five Germans with awards
and citations here, for having saved Jewish lives during the Nazi
regime at great risk to themselves. Eight other Germans who were
to have received the awards, were too ill to attend. A similar
ceremony will be held for them at a later date.
Israel Offers To Exchange POWs
TEL AVIV (WNS) Eyal Achikar, a wounded Israeli pilot
who had spent nearly 17 months in an Egyptian prison hospital,
was exchanged for four Egyptian soldiers and six civilians. Defense
Minister Moshe Dayan, who visited Achikar at a military hospital,
told newsmen that Israel is willing to exchange all prisoners of
war with Egypt, even though Israel holds many more than Egypt
Argentine Jew To Receive Reward
TEL AVIV (WNS) Luther Herman of Buenos Aires, a b:ind
Argentine Jew, will be awarded $10,000 for supplying information
which led to the capture of Adolf Eichmann in Argentina in 1960.
Mr. Herman, who learned of Eichmann's whereabouts through his
daughter, who was dating Eichmann's son. notified Tuvia Freed-
man of Haifa, an Israeli tracking down wanted Nazi war criminals.
Eichmann was tried in 1961, and executed in 1962.
Medical Supplies Sent To India
TEL AVIV (WNSi Israel has sent 500 kilograms of medi-
cine and medical supplies to the Indian Red Cross for the relief of
the Bangla Desh refugees. A private group of Israelis recently
shipped 500 tons of soya flour to India for the use of refugees.
10,000 Jews Came To Israel In Nine Months
TEL AVIV (WNS) -- Officials here report the arrival of Jew-
ish immigrants from the Soviet Union has reached unprecedented''
proportions. In New York, Jewish Agency treasurer Leon Dulzin
said 10,000 Soviet Jews emigrated to Israel between March 1 and
Nov. 30, this year, and even more are expected in 1972.
NCJW Allocated $1 Million For Children
JERUSALEM (WNS) The National Council of Jewish
Women (NCJW) has allocated an additional $1 million over a 10-
year period to fund the Center for Research in Education of tin
Disadvantage^at the Hebrew University's School of Education. The
Tenter was originally funded by the NCJW in 1968 for a three-
year period.


Page 2
vjewistncridiaii
Friday. December 31, 1971
'Jewish Oriented' Movies
Reviewed By AJCommitlee
The first Jowish-orionled film bulletin, featuring reviews of cur-
rent commercial films in terms of their Jewish interest, has been
produced by the American Jewish Committee Brcr.cic&stihg'ana THm CoWhitfee'ofWWa'tlohW Jewish Community
Relations Advisory Council iNJCRAC) and will be featured by the
Jewish Floridian of North Broward on a monthly basis. (The AJC is
a beneficiary agency of the Jewish Federation of North Broward and
the Federation is a constituent member of the NJRAO
Three- lilms are being reviewed this month. They are:
FIDDLER ON THE ROOF
With C'iwiin Tupol, Norma
(Tan*. Molly Picon, Paul Maim.
Studio: Mirisoh Productions
Company. Distributor: United
Artists. Producer and director:
Norman Jmvlshon. Stage and
creen play by Joseph Stein,
liase Ali-iehe.ii. 180 minutes. Color.
Rated "O."
When "Fiddler" opened on
Broadway many years ago. its vir-
tues and venalities were heatedly
debated. Rather than reopen that
debate, I'll say right off that the
film is better than the play
that it is excellent entertainment
and will be an enormous financial
success. Topol is wonderful as
Tevye; the rest of the cast is
great; the music is as good as ever.
Which is not to say that the
film is what its makers imply it
is: a picture of shtetl life around
At first glance, "Sunday
Bloody Sunday" appears to be a
simple story of a slightly perverse
triangle: Daniel Hirsh (Peter
Finch), a London doctor, and Alex
Greville (Glenda Jackson), a
blight, fiercely honest woman, have
simultaneous affairs with Bob Elk-
in (Murray Head), a young art-
ist who is less sincere than he
thinks he is. The doctor and Alex
are aware, and tolerant, of each
other's roles.
Of the characters, all intriguing,
Dr. Hirsh will interest Jewish
viewers most. Asked if he feels
his Jewish identity, he says, "Not
especially, but I've always liked
chopped liver." The significance
of this reply becomes apparent
later, at his nephew's highly tra-
ditional (and accurately depicted)
Bar Mitzvah. Here we see a dif-
ferent Hirsh. He is a bit of a mis-
fit here, yet one feels that what
1900 as seen by Sholom Aletchem. maintains in a homo-
Ftddler" .s to the shtetl as the 1^,1 .nsccure ^ js due |n
lie" i P""1 t0 JudaUm and hLs lar* ,eW'
1 ish family. A flashback to his own
mythologized. hoked-up. sma
than-life picture. John Ford's
"Stagecoach" was a great film,
but it wasn't the West. Jewis-
Bar Mitzvah points up the irony
which the celebration of accept-
,, ance into the community holds for
on's -Fiddler" is a great show, but him }
it is not the shtetl; is isn't even -.._,,.
"Stacecoach." 'Sunday is well acted, extra-
Too often the film Is marred by ordinary in its character analysis.
pithy and far from simple.
DENISE BAKER
ROMANCE OF A HORSETHIEF
Studio and distributor: Allied
Artists. Producer: Gene Gutkow-
ski. Director: Abraham Polan-
sky. Based on a novella. Roman
fun a Ferd Gonef by Joseph
Opotashu. 101 minutes. Color.
Kated "GP."
errors and insensitive touches. For
example:
Sholom Aleichem wrote about
ftUanagdbn (traditionally Ortho-
dox Jews), hardly ever about Has-
sidim. The film arbitraily tosses
in Hassidic clothes and life styles
(and schmaltzy cliches about Has-
sidim) for "color."
The film has the Jews gather-
ing for vodka and hobnobbing with
the peasant! in the town tavern. This minor, humorous tale (shot
In the morning. Gokla grefts to Yugoslavia) is set in a Polish
Tevye'a hangover as if it were the' shtetl on ,hc ve of th<> Russo-
usual thine That may be America: j Japanese war of 1904. Occupying
the shtetl it isn't.
Tevye "s arbe kanfes (ritual
fringes) are called a "prayer
shawl" a hardly excusable, if
common, blooj>er.
When Chava married a non-Jew.
Sholem Aleichem'i Tevye held to
tradition, though his heart broke:
be <[ dared her dead. The movie
Tevye woven and in the end
gives his blessing. Easier for 1971
Cossacks commandeer all horses
in sight; but some of the Jews,
who want no part of the Czar's
war (they consider it retribution
for the Kishinev pogrom), orga-
nize for resistance, and escape
right under the breath of the Cos-
sack horsemen.
Yul Brynner is the lusty, Jew-
hating Cossack commander. Oliver
Tobias and Eli Wallach are a pair
Jews to accept, no doubt, but : of swashbuckling horse thieves
again, not the sht."tl. David Opotashu steals the show
If a man is a Jew, that's one as a gentle, pious horse trader who
thing; if he is merely Jewish, impersonates top brass, frighten- j
that's quite another. The screen | ing one and all. And Lainie Kazan I
T. v\" is merely Jewish, and that. is a Jewish madam whose hou-- i-
I believe, is the trouble with the a hideout for stolen horaea
film. Unfortunately, most non-
Jewa who see it will think it de-
picts our grandparent! and. God
forbid, so may some of us.
HARRY (iF.RSII
RI NDAY BLOODY SIVDAY
Studio and distributor: Cnited
Artists. Producer: Joseph Janni.
Director: John Sehlesinger.
Fireenplay by Penelope Gilliatt.
110 minutes. Color. Rated "R."
COUNSELORS:
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In adapting his father's story.
David Opotashu lost much of its
bittersweet flavor and substantial-
ly altered the cast of characters.
There are some chuckles, some
laughs and a slender reminder of
life in the oppressive air of the j
shtetl. And, yes, there is some
Jewish sex with Lainie Kazan and
Kli Wallach.
JlXnS SCHATZ'
Women's Division
President Guest
Speaker Tuesday
Mrs. Joel Miller, president of
the Jewish Federation of North
Browards Women's Division, will
discuss the role of the Federation
in the community Tuesday morn-
ing at the meeting-of the XgOeV
Emanu-El Sisterhood
Mrs. Miller will show the film.
"Images." which was produced by
the Women's Division of the
Greater Miami Federation, Mrs.
Kenneth Slatkoff, Sisterhood pres-
ident, said.
Allan Solomon, director of the
Union of American Hebrew Con-
gregations Camp Institute, will
also be on the program He will
discuss activities at Camp Cole-
man in Cleveland. Ga. The pro-
gram will start promptly at 11
a.m.
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lay, December 31, 1971
+Jewisti Her Mian
Page 3
iployment Office Charged With Bias
eci-otary of State Richard
Bo's office has asutd its first
charging a private em-
inent agency with engaging in
riminatory employment prac-
le charge, which is against
JacTcSonville Sltfer Service, a
jany supplying employees for
slescent care, cites them for
iting a recently issued regula-
from the Secretary of State's
prohibiting private employ-
agencies from discrimination
rnst persons on the basis of
t, religion, national origin, sex
knceatry.
Pc ret a ry Stone made the an-
ncement before a meeting last
of the executive committee
fche Florida Board of the Anti-
imation League of B'nai
i. In his statement, Mr. Stone
alimented ADI. for its assist-
to his office in providing in-
flation on the nature and ex-
of discriminatory practices
[the employment agency indus-
in Florida.
tie cabinet officer from Miami
;h declared that upon further
stigntion the Jacksonville
pany could face an admini-
tive healing on the discrimi-
nation charge. Penalties for such fe'-
| violations include revocation of
I an agency's operating license.
Reacting to the announcement,
William M. Alper, chairman of
the ADL Board, said, "We are
gratified to learn that the Secre-
tary of -State'Boffice>is mining
forthrightly against employment
discrimination by businesses li-
censed by his office. I feel that
his office is providing a measure
of leadership in opposing employ-
ment discrimination which could
well be taken as an example by
other state governments."
Amdur Men's Club Speaker
David M. Amdur, executive di-
rector of the Jewish Federation of
North Brovvard, will be the guest
s[ieaker at the breakfast meeting
of the Men's Club of Temple
Sholom Sunday, Jan. 9. at 9:30
a.m., Uen'i club president Mar-
tin Kurt/ has reported.
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FOR THE MOST
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Page 4
+JewlslincrMton
Friday, December 31,
1?
wJem'sfr Florididiri
OF NORTH BROWARD
OIFFICE and PIANT120 X E. 6th STIJKRT. MIAMI. Telephone 373-40S
MIAMI ADDRESS: P.O. Box 273. Miami, Florida S3101
FRED K. SHOCHET SEIJKA M. THOMPSON
Editor and Publisher Assistant to Publisher
For the Jewish Federation of North Rroward
AI.VIX OROSS DAVID M. AMDlli MRS. JOAN'VE HILLER
President Executive Director News Coordinator
Federation office: 3905 N. Andrew* Avenue. Ft. Lauderdale, Fla 33309
Telephone 5S5-4969
The Jewish Floridian Does Not Guarantee The Kashrvth
Of The Merchandise Advertised In Its Columns.
Published Bl-Weekly
Application to mail at second-class postage rate Is pending at Miami, Fla.
The Jewish Floridian has absorbed tne Jewish Unity and the Jewish Weekly.
Member of the Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Seven Arts Feature Syndicate,
Worldwide News Service, National Editorial Association, American Association
of English-Jewish Newspapers, and the Florida Press Association.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Area) One Year 82.00. Out of Town Upon
Request.
MATTER OF FACT
by Joseph Alsop
Volume 1
Friday, December 31, 1971
Number 5
13 TEVETH 5731
Devaluation Was Inevitable
Devaluation would seem to be the order of the day.
Not only the American dollar but United Nations resolu-
tions have suffered a shrinkage as the results of recent
events and, while there can be no gloating over this turn,
the devaluation in either case was inevitable.
At the same time the nations of the world were offer-
ing their resolution urging Israel withdrawal from Arab
territories before peace talks might begin, they were con-
fronted with India's naked aggression against Pakistan.
Whatever the circumstances and the underlying reasons,
it became evident that only after India had accomplished
its aims would it agree to a halt in the fighting.
No one is surprised with the role of the Soviet Union
in all of this, for its support of India maintains the hypo-
crisy of a position which speaks of peace but foments
aggression when it does not actually commit it No wonder,
then, as we listen and read the words of our "statesmen,"
eager to condemn little Israel but reluctant to stand against
the big powers, that devaluation of credibility is the theme
of our times.
'Principles' Serve Soviet Ambition
India's conguest of East Pakistan it can be called
little else adds strength to Israel's position against re-
turning some of the territory it occupies as a result of the
1967 war with Egypt, Syria and Jordan. It is true that the
inconsistency and hypocrisy of their position probably
causes the Indian and Soviet leaders little embarrassment
but in the present situation it is so at odds with past per-
formance as to border on the ridiculous.
Soviet propaganda has emphasized that the great
powers must work together for peace and that military
power must not be used to achieve political objectives.
Following that proposition, the Soviets take a line on Israel
in support of the Egyptian position: that the territory cap-
tured by military aggression must be given up even before
peace negotiations can begin.
The switch in "principles" when it came to supporting
the overwhelming majority of the Security Council and U.N.
General Assembly in demanding Indian withdrawal from
Pakistani territory proved again to the world that the So-
viet Union's only principles serve its own ambitions and
not the cause of world peace. As for India, it long ago
abandoned the principles of Mahatma Ghandi and now
the aura of his moral role has vanished as well.
Why So Many Arabs Are Loyal
The natural rate of increase among Israel's 450,000
Arabs is reckoned as the highest in the world by that
nation's Health Ministry. Trachoma, malaria and tuber-
culosis, diseases which afflict most seriously Arab nations,
have almost been completely eliminated in Israel and
there has been an impressive fall in the infant mortality
rate, as well as the development of mother and child
services. The statistics in this area, and in employment and
education, speak well for the concern Israel has for all its
citizens and why so many of its Arab residents are loyal
to the Jewish state.
Another Furor Erupts
"Women's Lib" is not popular among one segment of
the Israel population. A furor has erupted over the gov-
ernment's decision to assign civilian work in hospitals,
schools and welfare institutions to young women holding
religious exemptions from military service. From their point
of view, the place for every respectable woman is in the
home, under the supervision of her father, until she is
married.
WASHINGTON A plea for
a modest value-added tax is due
to be the most surprising, most
, interesting and .most generally
' gutsy of President Nixon's bomb-
shells for the election year.
The President's shrewdness
with bombshells and the Demo-
crats' invariable failure to be
ready for them are by now In-
coming almost proverbial. But
we have not yet had anything
quite like the one that is now in
preparation at the Treasury De-
partment under the astute su-
pervision of Secretary John
Connally.
Until the day for it comes,
the fact of the bombshell may
well be denied. The day may
not come, moreover, until the
scheduled report in early Feb-
uary of the presidential com-
mission now studying the school
problem under the chairman-
ship of former Secretary of De-
fense Nell McElray.
THIS WILL be a multipur-
pose bombshell, in truth, cal-
culated to bring down a per-
fect covey of birds in a single
thunderclap. But one must be-
gin at the beginning, with the
value-added tax itself. This is
sometimes called a "transac-
tions" tax; and it is loathed by
all the liberal faithful because
its impact resembles that of a
simple sales tax.
To be sure, the Scandinavian
countries, with their strongly
social-minded governments, live
quite comfortably with value-
added taxes at the rate of 15%.
At the West German level of
11%, with exceptions for such
things as food, an American
value-added tax would raise an
additional $50 billion of revenue
each year.
President Nixon's proposed
value-added tax will be far more
modest, in the neighborhood of
3*>. Very substantial remis-
sions and exceptions will be in-
cluded to make the tax less "re-
gressive." Yet the est imated rev-
enue will be somewhere be-
tween $10-12 billion a year.
BUT THAT will be no more
than the first part of the bomb-
shell package. The revenue
promised by the suggested new
tax is calculated to be equal to
the share of the national school
bill that is now paid by the
hated local property taxes. And
this, please understand, is by
design.
Thus the revenue from the
new Nixon tax will be shared
out to the states on a complex
pro rats, basis, roughly in pro-
portion to the number of chil-
dren in school in each state.
The states will then be re-
quired to prorate the tax to the
towns, cities, counties or other
tax-levying bodies that use prop-
erty taxes to pay school bills.
And these bodies, in turn, will
be required to forgive all prop-
erty taxes being paid on resi-
dential real estate, to the ex-
tent these taxes are now used
to support the schools.
Both home-renters and home-
owners will benefit since land-
lords also will be required to
pass on the forgiven taxes to
their tenants. It is hard to imag-
ine any measure that is more
likely to arouse Middle Ameri-
can enthusiasm than what will
amount to a very big cut in
home-owners' property taxes
and a considerable cut in rents
BY THE SAME token, more-
over, a crying inequity will also
be removed. At present, the rich
suburbs can levy much lower
property taxes and can also pay
for much better schools than
center cities and other areas
where the average personal in-
come level in far lower. But the
Nixon bombshell will put the
whole business on a basis of
share and share ahke. Rich
and poor school districts wiU get
Precisely the same sum per
child in school.
In addition, since the value-
added tax will be neatly tied to
s per capita subsidy for individ-
ual schookhiMren. h may be
possible to include the Cath-
olic school systems in the larger
share-out. These systems are
now tottering toward disaster.
Saving them will also save vast
sums for the general taxpayer.
IT CAN BE seen, then, that
bringing down coveys of birds
with a single thunderclap is
really a very' miki way of put-
ting it The true blue liberals,
of course, wUl die a thousand
deaths, turning as many colors
of rage as the legendary dold
in in agony. But i' vou th
about it. this Nixon 'w
is not measly boM ar,d cie
contrived.
It further promises
practical, equitable solution,,
a whole series of urgent nation
problems. And it will also bel
teresting to see the
Democrats running ar^iu
big cut in home-owners'
erty taxes.
/m.S e e
Max Lerner
Sees It
SAN FRANCISCO There they are, going at each other ir I
full-scale murderousness, finally using the weapons the great!
powers haw furnished to them over the years. Whatever excusal
they may employ they are the killers, caught up in a sensele*
wanton, tragic slaughter, mostly of the Innocents.
When I speak of the killers I mean the military and political
leaders of India and Pakistan, both of them. Yahya Khan aikl
his generals must have been dolts back in March tf they didn';
see that their cruel repression of the East Bengali movement for
autonomy would lead to a mass exodus of refugees and gw
India its chance to intervene. But even more, Indira Gandhi and
her advisers must bear the heavy burden of the decision to ua
Pakistan's blunder and its plight as the occasion for an aggre*
live thrust at the mastery of the subcontinent.
Thus neither side can approach whatever final judges then
may be. on whatever day of judgment, with clean hands. But
I don't exempt the great powers, who are also killers in armiaj
the two nations, seeking to use them in their alliance setup.
This goes for China, which is Pakistan's chief champion II
goes for America, which gave military and economic aid almos
equally to both without achieving any leverage power ova
either. But it goes especially for Russia, whose treaty of a'Jianct
lust August seems to have been the crucial event that gan
Indian leaders the go-ahead signal. It Is the Russians also wbo
blocked any timely United Nations action by the great powen.
and whose veto in the Security Council has again made a moei-
ery of that body as an instrument of peace.
BESIDES. INDIA AND PAKISTAN* have proved more or
less apt pupils, aping the ways that the great powers hie taugft
them. Who was it that swept down on Tibet? China Wht
was it that cracked down on Hungary and Czechoslovakia, it
repressions that became classic operations for military historj-
and must have been Yahya Khan's envy? Russia. Who was I
that sen' more than a half-million soldiers into Yi> -am, nd
clouds of planes? The United States. The arrogance o: power ii
not limited to the great powers. The infection of COTruptka Iw
spread from them to the lesser ones.
Along with the exercise of power there is the \-rose of
rhetoric. The Pakistani generals are not very good at it, but tin
Indians have shown themselves virtuosos of virtue. While Gen
Aurora, the Indian commander in East Bengal was racing ahead
to encircl- Pakistan's small army, Mrs. Gandhi spoke to all (J
India about the 'freedom fighters staking their all in defensed
the values for which we also have struggled."
Once again Americans must hear echoes of them*.Ves. Ms
Gandhi's sonorities bring back memories of Woodrow Wilsori
mixture of moralism and power as he threw American armis
into World War I with his graceful cadences, and of 1-1= earla
venture across the Mexican border. She also joins the questioo-l
able company of those who presided over America.- Men*
war in the 1840s, for the liberation of their compatriots ini
revenge for the Alamo.
NO. THE KILLINGS AND DYINGS, along with the Or**
ban double-think, are not the monopoly of any one side or any ou
nation. They appeal to whatever ruling group sees the hance
make use of them, perhaps to swell its territory. P'raps
wreak its frustrations, perhaps only to ease its problems a bit
It is enough to make anyone heartsick about what Mart
Twain used to call "the damned human race." No on.' can sort
out the blame, and I have not been sparing about America
which has sins aplenty in its past and present. This time.
ever. America tried to play it cool and neutral but was so *
snared in its own self-made traps that it failed to cry havoc.it
and out of the United Nations, at what it saw coming ami daW
act early enough to expose the hypocrisy of the iwvitt*
Russian veto.
I don't underestimate Mrs. Gandhi's and India'l bind *
being unable to digest 9 million refugees and yet unable to couj
or. anyone else doing something about the repression in Ea*
Bengal. Yet how ironic that her father's daughter, and bearW
the name of Mahatma, who again and again was ready to dk
order to keep Hindus and Moslems from murdering each otl*
should have been the one whom history chose to move to *
brink of this war and over, and to deal the United Nations I
aortal blow.
But humans, with the highest idealism, often help histrt
out in its absurdities. Americae* know well enough that*
leaders of its wars have tended to be high-minded liberals w
ouM it fare differently with India? And why shouktot *
todian people*lso discover what John Drydenseid to ha**'
En*1**. "Thyimn+nifrnMHat


friday, December 31, 1971
vJewisii fhrkttarj
Page
1
:HUitua,\ tsu mt
JOANNE HILLER
"IS FORT LAI'DERDALE THE FUTURE?" ALVIN TOF-
.ER poses that question in FUTURE SHOCK. In the chapter, "A
>iversity of Life Styles." he says, 'The successful 'sale' of the hippie
Bife-style model to young people all over the techno-societies is one of
Ithe classic merchandising stories of our time. Speaking of technologi-
cal backlash, he projects the thought that "protest against the rav-
fages of irresponsibly-used technology could crystalize in pathological
form as a future phobic fascism with scientists substituting for
Jews In the concentration camps. Sick societies need scapegoats." You
[may be shocked when you read "Future Shock," but read it!
WHEN YOU ASK STEVE COLLINS (son of CINDY and EPH-
[RAIM COLLINS) how old he is, he will tell you that he's 11 years okt
[right now. When is his birthday? Next November. There's magic at
[that age and especially for Steve who is a performing magician.
He's a student at Palm Cove School where he gave two magic
[shows. He recently left Cub Scout Pack 125 for membership in the
Temple Sholom Boy Scout Troop 463.
Continuing to practice his newest best trick, Steve's magical
ibility is sure to progress rapidly because he gets instruction from
it gem of magicians, Mr. Magic himself, PAUL DIAMOND. And
[younger brother Brian, at nine years old, is keeping his eyes on both
[of them. Special Note: Entertaining and Enterprising Steve
[Collins is available for birthday parties and other special occasions.
DO YOU KNOW WHO SAID IT? "In Israel, in order to be a
realist you must believe in miracles."
TALENT UNLIMITED applauding them alphabetically and
typographically DR. ALVIN COLIN, IRWIN FINE, PAM GREENE
(look for them in the forthcoming B'NAI B'RITH WOMEN'S Fort
Lauderdale Chapter 345 show) and JOSEPHINE NEWMAN (her
first time behind the footlights) .all singing stars in the ARLENE
GOODMAN and LUCILLE SHENKIN production. "Minnie is Alive
and Well" special applause for BERNIE ETISH. SID GORDON.
COL. JACK LEWIS. LOUISE and BILL NEIFELD, JERRY RADZI-
VILL, DR. ROBERT and DOLORES ROGOFF, SHAUN and DONALD
RODWIN. JONI ROSENTHAL. ESTHER ROSS. SHIRLEY SCHULTZ.
SY SCHWARTZ, and KEN TARNOVE. MIRIAM and HAROLD
KRAUSE successfully cochaired the double-evening event.
AGAIN TALENT UNLIMITED CARON MITCHELL (daugh-
ter of LOIS and DONALD MITCHELL) as a member of the Singing
Pines, a select group of teenagers from Pine Crest Preparatory School,
has been performing alone and singing with the group. Caron's voice
has a vibrant musical-comedy quality and following her June gradua-
tion, she very' wisely plans her college major in theatre arts and
very successfully, we hope.
ANSWER TO "WHO SAID IT?": DAVID BEN-GURION.
AS THE YEAR ENDS, memories begin for BEA and GILBERT
MALLINGER. Daughter, LINDA, and son ALAN, and his wife. FAYE,
flew in from California. Daughter, MARSHA, and her husband TERRY
REISMAN and their four-year-old ANDREW and two-year-old JILL
haw now returned to Miami, where Terry is in his second year resi-
I aency at Jackson Memorial Hospital ... a great family reunion.
HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS MARK SIEGEL (son of JULIE
! and ALVIN SIEGEL) studying dentistry at the University of Florida.
HENRY FRIEDER (son of ELIZABETH and SIDNEY FRIEDER).
studying medicine at Duke. Henry receives his high school diploma
at the end of his freshman year this June. As an honor student, it's
I possible to skip the 12th year in high school. Did you know that!
See you next year. Many New Year wishes for health and happi-
[ ness. SHALOM._____
Our Deadline
All organizational publicity release* and new* tem most
be in the Federation office no later than noon Tuesday
the week in advance of publication.
Copy must be typewritten and double-apaced on I Va"
x 11" paper. Names of persons, officers and organizations
should be given in full, and the person sending in each
news item should include his/her name and telepnone
number for reference.
*-e6tee'6 BAR1
\C COCKTAILS MILT SANDWICHES
takv-Ool. <
Sunrise Shopping Center
ARCADE SHOPS
$! PERMANENTS
ONLY $10
Palm Beauty Salon
Call For Appointment 5(4-717$
2396 E. Sunrise Blvd.
MM* |M to S>
tnm
Rabbi Meir Felman, spiritual
leader of Judea Center,
Brooklyn, N.Y., has been ap-
pointed chairman of the In-
ternational Conference of the
Rabbinical Council of Amer-
ica, scheduled for Jan. 5-8 at
Hechal Shlomo, Jerusalem,
with over 300 prominent Rab-
binic delegates from all parts
of the United States, Canada,
Great Britain and South
America participating.
LOST
Honey colored or light brown Chi-
huahua lott in vicinity of 1*00 block
N.W. nth Terrace. Answers to
Peppy. II found call Frank Stennls,
1 *is N.W. 11th Terrace, Ft. taud.
Phone 744-41M. Reward offered.
PICTURE
FRAMING
Reasonable Prices
ART CENTER
WORKSHOP
1401 No Federal Hwy.
Ft Lauderdale
Ptl 565S951
Our New Owner ...
MR. ABE PALSYN
invites you to visit
this fine Drug Store
PRESCRIPTIONS FILLED
LAWRENCE
DRUG
624 S.W. 2nd Street
Phone 524-4334
MAKE
YOUR OFFICE
PARTY
Sflbfl
FIESTA
Superb Don Ji:;in
Cuisine jnd ServkC
Call Miitie u' lor
information
B>. aWJfcW. 4i)t|vAVE.
> .Sut.Ho.d7.
Rabbi To Review Best Seller i p-^-Tuesday. Jan. n, at Tem-
ple Sholom in Pompano Beach.
"Future Shock," the best-selling
book by Alvin Toffler, will be re-
viewed by Rabbi Morris Skop at
The public is invited; refreshments
will be served.
Community Calendar
TUESDAY, iANUAKY 4
Temple Emonu-EI Sisterhood Luncheon Meeting 11:00 a.m.
SUNDAY, JANUARY 9
Men's Club of Temple Sholom Breakfast Meeting 9:30 a.m.
TUESDAY, JANUARY 11
Temple Sholom Book Review 8:00 p.m.
RKNYS
Member Sreiter Ft lauderdale Chamber if Cotmwrei.
mm kong moss
55.00
Jt.ee
8:8
p
.. PERMANENTLY IN FT. LAUDERDALE
BEFORE NOW
f^A^U^oHAiRsun::::::::::::::":jj:S
|HNACRLflHK'NWci.ULlTWORSTEb SUIT "i::."..: \ Bj
SILK WOOL TERrUENE SUIT ...........ti.OO
WOOL CASHMfRE SPORT JACKET ........ 71.00
DOUBLE KNIT SUI S.................... ONLY __
CUSTOM MA0F SHIRTS ...... ... ,*-00 J.N
Also on sale ladies knit wool tuiti, beaded
and embroidered sweaters and beaded bags.
Tor appointment tall B. KENNY Room 211
SCHRAFFT'S MOTOR INN
999 N. Atlantic Blvd.. Ft. liua'eri'ata 563-5961
Oren II AM I PM Includine Sun. Plui Duty A PCMBM
LARRY'S-KOSHER
BUTCHER SHOP
PLUS A WONDERFUL
KOSHER DELICATESSEN
6790 N.W. 57th Street, Fort Lauderdale
Telephone 972-1415
Phyllis' New Year
Specials
LATEST STYLES FROM
THE "BIG CITY"
IMPORTED
2 and 3 PIECE WOOL KNITS
VALUES TO __
'150 $KQ90
FROM WV
ELEGANT LONGS
$3990
VALUES TO
J250
FROM
BROCADE COSTUMES
va,l;|to $co9o
FROM
Jr., Misses, Half-Sizes

'Home of Famous Labels Elegance at a Price"
Phyllis' FASHIONS
2170 S117* St.
Across Iron Pier tS
Ipa Frill 117ta.lt)
I0TH STORES
9PB SW. 125
2831 E. OAKLAND PARK BLVD.
Between Biyview Drive ana' Iriejt
Turn iatt iiti FmMcial farkinf. Am


Page 6
*Jen 1stHer Mian
Friday, December 31, 1971


-
fJU WaLli SpeaL, tKcliciious >Z5cr\'
Mi HMMM
!,..! ..................M ........ UJ?
What's New In '72
tabbi Abramt
Fn rabbi artiii'r abrams
Temple Kinuiiu-El
AW look at the headline-; and
KM wonder whet, if anything, peo-
ple and nations have learned from
history. AH of
the mistakes of
the past are re-
repeated In a
neve r ending
cycle.
The United
Nations is going
the dismal way
of the League of
Nations a fu-
tile and impo>
tent debating
club, with about
as much peace
lb < ping influence as yesterday"s
newspaper.
The nations are as hungry for
power as ever. War's are still
i .tight to resolve problems.
Strength and might still overrule
lKjrtiom and reason in world
politics.
Hatred antf animosity still turn
people into barbarians. Two prime
examples air the Protestant-Cath-
qHc battle in Ireland and the ter-
rible atrocities of the Tndian-Pak- '
litani conflict. With a macabre1
vengeance, the Pakistanis slaughu:
end thousands of Bengals.
The most tragic incident was
the wholesale butchering of hun-
dretb of doctors, professors and
Other gifted people, reminiscent of
^'axi barbarism, and all this from
PiOUS Moslems!
Israel it still surrounded by ene- j
lilies and stands braced for yet
another round in the conflict with |
her neighbors. Egypt is bellowing
out her war cries again and the
sabres are unsheathed.
The Israelis are caught in a
death grip between East and West
Power struggles and finds herself
again a pawn in the hands of
Russia and the United States.
And locally, most disheartening
news comes out of Forest Hills.
NY., where a predominently Jew-
ish neighborhood demonstrates
against bringing in a low-cost
housing development out of fear
that blacks will move in and Jews
will move out.
Won't people ever learn? You
would think that a people who
were once oppressed would be
compassionate in their attitudes
towards others who are still vic-
tims of prejudice and hatred and
poverty.
Yes. in spite of it all, I still be-
lieve. I believe that every cloud
has its silver lining. Despair would
rob us of hope. Without hope, what
use is life?
Ecclesiastes said that there is
nothing new under the sun, but
that we should still live our lives
with hope and faith.
What do I hope for in 1972?
I hope that life will be more
sacred, that man will be more
human, that reason will overrule
passion, that communication will
build bridges of understanding,
that the spark of the Divine pres-
ence in man will not be extin-
guished, that each of us will carry
the Messlank spirit within us.
Oh, yes, and please God, keep
alive my ideals e\1>n if they
sound unrealistic. Please.
ICC 9
FORT IAUDERDAIE
BETH ISRAEL (^''p.^'bIvV
tive 547 E Oakland Prk "ivo.
Rabbi Akiva Brilliant. Cantor Mau-
rice Neo ____
EMANU-EL. 32\v. Oakland Park
Blvd. Reform. Rabbi Arthur J. Ab-
rami. Cantor Jerome Klement. ------a,------ .-
POMPANO BBACH
SHOLOM (Temple). 132 SE 11th Awe.
Conaervative. Rabbi Mem* A. Skop.
Cantor Ernest Schreiber. m
----- ----
MARGATE
MARGATE JEWISH CENTER. (Con-
servative) 6101 N.W. 9th St_________
by Beverly King Pollock
mAW I.
CANOLELIGHTING TIME
13 TEVETH 5:20
9
Question Box
B> RABBI OR. SAM I El. I. FOX
Why is it customary lor the
.room to come to the s\ naiiouiie
on the Sabbath naming before
his wedding-'
The way some gources analyze
it. it seems that the original time
for the groom's visit was on the
nh after the wedding. As a
n attei ol fact some I Midrash Tal- j gation of offering good wishes and
piyyot expect the {room to come congratulations to the couple in
.n the Sabbath befoie the wed-1 ,.,!,.,. lo aUm<,nt their happiness.
(I. 1S7l' .! wi*h TeleRrupliii- AsSBCJ)
who wished to offer their tributes
and compliments to the groom
would gather at this gate.
Having the groom come to the
synagogue either before or after
'he wadding on the Sabbath when
many people'are there, gives the
]*>ople of the community an op-
portunity to discharge their obli-
riing as well as on the 8 ibliath af-
ter the wedding.
Muskie Criticizes
Nixon For Refusal
To Sell Phantoms
Sen. Edmund Muskie (D-Mainei
has announced his strong support
for the Jackson amendment au-
thorizing Israel to purchase F-4
Phantom jets. The still unan-
nounced candidate for President
and former rice presidential nomi-
nee, said "I strongly support the
amendment to provide military
sales and credits to Israel because
I believe that additional assist-
ance to Israel is required to main-
tain the balance of power in the
Middle East."
He criticized the Nixon Admin-
istration for withholding from Is-
rael the shipments of Phantom
Jets. Sen, Muskie stressed the im-
portance of maintaining a secure
military balance in the Middle
Fast, and said that the Adminis-
tration's refusal to supply the
Phantom jets was tipping the
balance of power against Israel."
'There has been an atmosphere
of intensified rhetoric cembined
with growing discouragement over
the prospects for a peaceful settle-
ment, in such circumstances, con-
tinued stability depends more
than ever on a secure balance of
power between rival groups." he
said.
"Yet because of the Administra-
tion's strategy of attempting to
gain political leverage over Israel
by withholding s h i p me n t s of
Phantom jet aircraft, the military
balance has been shifting during
the last year against Israel," Sen.
Muskie added.
Muskie also noted that the
Soviets are continuing their ship-
ments ol major military weapons
to the Egyptians.
"* J
"" ..alaltalBaw
^VVVVVVVV^rVVVVVVtArV^rVWvvvvu. J
fP^j Oiwlli the Ma veil &
: ^fcaa^j^^^j^Bf _M at-' -* -
Thoughts For Cleaning Chickens By ...
Now that I have given my word to write a weekly column fa
The Jewish Floridian ot North Broward. my mother is a hap; won*
She announced to the world. "My daughter is writing for r*
newspaper.' tTranslation: "real" means Jewish." Maytx now j
believes I won't become assimilated.
You'll never know the cross whoops, pardon th< itarN
had to bear. Then' vv.ie humble beginnings before I becamt I|J
Bombeck,
I've been writing for years. Stuff like grocery lists fa Ptao*a
excuses for the Uds on Rosfa Hashanah and Yom Kippur, letters ,
my parents > Atlanta, and SUUl tearing memos to my hii^ard sur
as "Dear husband please unstop the John so we don't haw to pay for,
plumber." My audience was rather limited.
But deep inside I vowed to affect eternity by writing sonvth:r
that really matters. And I figured a brush-up course in college cor,
position wouldn't hurt
My writing professor said the sort of thing I write is wry sjaj
Foi lining drawers So an eternity from now some grandchildren mis*
stumble over my poignant prose and tsk. "So that's how it ww in tV
olden days!"
Fortunately my children have been very helpful in provoking BJ
appetite for creativity and self-expression. Just the other day my*.-
cave me a real challange. He quoth, "Whyn't you express yon
creating something really different? Like a home-made eater
Whenever I tried to discuss my ringing aspirations with sj
mother she was singularly sympathetic "But Bev. dear, let s not tu|
about it now. Today I'm paying for the phone call."
Even my neighbor was kind. "Of course you should writ,
said. "Anything to keep your hand- out of the refrigerator
But my husband has been the most understanding of all ft
truly encouraged me Your writing will become immortal,' lie ai
Like that stuff you wrote for the PTA bulletin."
With such an electrifving show of confidence from th* prarir
who mean the most to me, I have entered the filigrevd field of Uftk
feature writers.
Sheila Graham and Helen Gurley Brown and Betty Fnerian ued
not worry. Because I promise not to infringe on their territories -ip, fashion, violence). Maybe.
Instead I vow to write in a new untapped vein One most editor;
have overlooked in their journals and exposes the story of the lua
the love-, the passions, the frustrations, yes -- the all CM
nushugais of the American Jewish housewife, mother and sen
Somersel Maugham said that people become writers because thrj
always think Of the right thing to May afterwards
As Somerset Mom" I shall strive to he a spokesman for tl
Smart Supermarket Set. that broad breed which is forced In HH
and act in terms of trivia, yet exacted lo influence the destiny of t*
world.
Who know-- Maybe someday the Jewish bousewife-mavenH
' in."
These sources contend that a
groom is likened unto a "king."
The King of ancient Israel was
required to have two scrolls of
the Toiah. Thus, the groom conies
before the Torah twice on the
Sabbath before his wedding and
on the Sabbath after his wedding.
First, a marriage was always
regarded ai a matter of general
community concern in olden
times land even in some Jewish
communities today i notice of in-
tent to marry had to be filed with
1he Rabbinate some time before
the marriage. To this end, the
presence of the groom in the syna-
gogue before the wedding was
tantamount to announcing to the
community that a wedding was
about to take place. The syna-
gogue, especially on Sabbath, was
the place where public informa-
tion was announced.
Secondly, a groom was consider-
ed an honored personage in the
community, especially the first
week after the marriage. In some
communities, a special reading
from the prophets was substituted
for one regularly assigned for that
particular Sabbath and the groom
read this portion.
Thirdly, many associate this
practice with the means by which
the wise King Solomon construct-
ed the Temple in Jerusalem. He
made s special gate referred to
as the "Gate of the Bridegrooms"
through which the groom would
ewer the sanctuary and people
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t


r, December 31. 1971
+Jewlst> norkflair)
Page 7
ISRAEL NEWSLETTER
By Corl Alpcrt
ories From Israel You May Never Have Read
[ONE OF THE MOST interesting news and events
in Israel never get into the headlines. For
ample:
Fanaticism. Bystanders were
shocked to see several Bnai Brak
Hassidim, replete with fur hats
and long black gowns, entering an
automobile on tho Sabbath and
driving away. They were on a life-
saving mission, to give blood of a
rare type for a 13-year-old girl in
the hospital.
What to 9ee in Israel. The Tcl-
iviv Municipality, to help heighten tourists" enjoy-
of Israel and the big city, has announced a
ies of evening programs, including: films on
he life of the primitive tribes in Australia and Now
Juinea.
Camouflage. The telephone number of the
VCA in East Jerusalem will not easily be found
anyone looking in the Hebrew phone book unless
Bjo looks under: YMCA for Girls.
Proems of Integration. What do new immi-
ants to Israel complain about? In the first year,
about the Jewish Agency which handles their immi-
gration; the second year, about the government;
third year, about taxes, and the fourth year
about new immigrants.
Impact of Strike*. On the very day when the
employees of the Israel Meteorological Services pro-
claimed a labor dispute and beginning of a strike, a
prolonged drought was suddenly and unexpectedly
broken with heavy showers.
Strikes and the Bible. During the week when
synagogues in Israel were reading the Torah por-
tion of the week, "BTia-alotcha et hanerot," the
eighth chapter of the Book of Numbers, which be-
gins: "When thou lightest the lamps .," em-
ployees of the Israel Electric Corporation went out
on strike, and Israelis by the thousands turned to
oil lamps and candles.
1'nlverslty Student Life. When a student at one
of Israel's universities was summoned to the plat-
form at public exercises to receive a prize for high
grades in his term paper, several of his buddies es-
corted him to the stage, claiming that they had a
share in his achievement. And another student told
such a sad sob story when filling in his application
for a scholarship, that the dean of students sent him
a bundle of old clothes and a food package as well.
We're Proud of our City. The resident of an
Arab section of Haifa complained that the munici-
pality had built no playgrounds in his neighborhood.
Was this discrimination? In reply, Haifa's mayor
invited the complaintant to come with him on a
tour of the city and see all the Jewish neighbor-
hoods where there were no playgrounds. The tour
will take all day, tho mayor added proudly.
A Matter of Confidence. Israel's Minister of
Tourism told an audience in Venezuela last spring
that Israel expected half a million tourists this year.
Newspaper report the next day quoted him as pre-
dicting a million tourists, and when the minister
hastened to correct the editor pacified him: Mr.
Kol. at the dynamic pace with which Israel grows,
you will reach the million. Have faith!
Housing Shortage. A young couple in vain
search for suitable living quarters in Jerusalem
iound irritating the news item that the local zoo
had produced a pair of orangutangs, and a special
home would be built for them in the zoo's monkey
quarters at a cost of IL 80.000.
THE AMERICAN SCENE
By: BEN GALLOB
JEWS IN SPORTS
By Haskell Cohen
Judaica Courses Bring Changes
li.\s>iVK CHANGES IN THE level of intelloctu-
"* ality of the American Jewish community, in the
status of the American rabbi and in the types of
American Jewish leadership are foreseen as de-
veloping from the impact on the hundreds of Jew-
ish collegian* of studying formal courses on Juda-
ism on a growing scale in universities, rather than
in Jewish schools.
The forecast was made by Dr. Jacob Neusner.
professor of Jewish studies at Brown University,
who noted that "every field of Judaic learning may
be found in some university." He added that "while
the professors remain primarily of Jewish origin,
they teach students of every ethnic and religious
background." He presented his views on the tre-
mendous growth in recent years in the number of
such courses under university auspices and the pos-
sible impacts of that development in a recent issue
of the Journal of the Central Conference of Amer-
ican Rabbis, the Reform rabbinical organization.
He reported such courses were being offered, on
an ever-growing scale, in the Hebrew language.
Hebrew scriptures, Talmud, Yiddish, post-biblical
Jewish history, literature, theology and the life of
the Jewish people in modern and contemporary
civ ilization.
One result of the university approach to the
study of Judaism, ho reported, was the develop-
ment of "a new kind of young Jewish intellectual,
one who treats Judaics in the same respect but
critical way as American history or English litera-
ture or any other aspect of the humanities." This
student "demands the same high standards of
knowledge, the same detached and sophisticated
approach to ideas. He is less sentimental, less slov-
enly in his approach to Jewish thought and history-"
Above all. Dr. Neusner asserted, he "is less likely
to be intimidated by the authority, the superior
knowledge of others, whether rabbis, teachers or
college professors."
As more and more such students take their
places in the adult community, "a much higher
level of intellectuality than characterizes the pres-
ent generation" of the American Jewish community
is likely. He predicted that the intelligent quotient
of American Jewish life was likely to rise consider-
ably." That development, in turn, he said, "will
pose problems for rabbis who are used to being the
only Jews in town who read Jewish books and
think Jewish thoughts." The rabbis correctly "take
for granted that their authority rests upon their
knowledge" but in the future, "their commitment
to learning is going to have to represent a more
central part of their professional lives than at pres-
ent,' he asserted. "An intellectual approach to
Judaism is not characteristic of the pulpit rabbinate
as a whole. That is going to change," Dr. Neusner
predicted.
(Copyright 1971, Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Die.)
By SEYMOUR B. UEBMAN Book Review
University Press Publications
A OEM OF LUCIDITY, brevity and scholarship is
**Dr. John A. Harrison's The Founding of the
RushUd Empire (University of Miami Press, $7.95).
The concise account is confined to
! the establishment of the Russian
Empire in Asia and America.
In terse but scholarly language,
the author presents sketches of
people and the land. Until the 9th
Century, the present Slav states of
Poles and Czechs hadn't formed
and the main state of the Rus-
__Isians was only a loose federation
of trading communities. The expansion over the
I Urals and the Carpathians didn't begin until a half
millenia later. This eastward movement was slow
J but inexorable and Harrison employs maps to
trace the course.
While there is a brief account of the meetings
between the Russians and Chinese in the early 18th
Century and the Treaty of Kiakhta, there is no
mention of the fears of the Spanish, and later the
Americans, after the Russians began a southward
movement from the Aleutian Islands. It is the
author's prerogative to stop his account where he
will, but we hope that he will add a few more pages
to subsequent editions which the book deserves.
Crusader Flgural Sculptures in the Holy Land
by Moshe Barash (Rutgers University Press. $15)
is an exquisitely beautiful contribution to the his-
tory of art. The author is associate professor of art
history at the Hebrew University.
Many figural sculptures ranging from baptis-
mal fonts to door frames and capitals were exca-
vated within the past few decades in Acre and' Naza-
reth. The volume casts new light on Crusader art
as well as the history of religion.
Went German Reparations to Israel by Nicholas
Balabkins (Rutgers University Press, $12.50) is a
narrative of contemporary social and economic his-
tory. The first six chapters give a background per-
spective to Germany's road into industrial genocide.
the social order of the Third Reich and a survey of
the forces that conceived, financed and carried out
tho actual genocide Of European Jewry. This is fol-
lowed by the economic problems of Germany and
Israel and the moral problems confronting Israel
and Jewry to claim or not to claim?
The rest of the book discusses the Luxemburg
Treaty of 1952 and subsequent developments for
both nations. Balabkins in on the economic faculty
at Lehigh University ^nd his'bopk is a veritable
tour de force.
A Tough Game
CHORTIA AFTER THE Six-Day War, when the
State of Israel was still trying to retain a ves-
tige of rapport with the U.S.S.R.. the American
Amateur Athletic Union appealed to Milton Kut-
sher, Catskill Mountain hotel owner, to assemble a
basketball team and play the invading Russian
basketeers on his court. Kutsher reluctantly com-
plied.
At that time, this writer had just returned
from Israel, and during his visit there learned from
Israeli basketball heads that the Russians were
coached by Leon Gomolsky, a Jew. Furthermore, on
the visit to Israel by the Russian hoopsters two
years before the war. Coach Gomelsky had mixed
clandestinely with the Israelis. Under constant sur-
veillance by the commissar who accompanies all
Soviet athletic units on snorts junkets, Gomelsky
managed to confer with Israeli sports writers while
riding up and down in his hotel elevators. On the
surface Gomelsky only spoke and understood Rus-
sian. Actually, he is fluent in Yiddish and had no
trouble exchanging news and background on the
folks in his home city of Leningrad.
The Russian hoopsters knocked off every Amer-
ican opponent on its U.S. invasion that spring and
arrived at KutShers undefeated for its final game in
the states. The team, a giant group, hustled off
their bus and mobbed tho check-in desk at the re-
sort. Tho young lady in charge had me paged and
I hurried over to the lobby and watched the rowdy
antics of players for a moment, finally shouting for
silence.
"Don't those guys have any manners at all?"
I asked of no one in particular.
"Don't pay any attention to them." a dark
haired, handsome man volunteered, "they're nothing
but a bunch of animals."
It developed that the English speaking stranger
accompanying the team was a n force from Finland
assigned to travel with the team on its American
tour. Subsequently we became very good friends
and he turned out to bo an excellent referee and a
swell guy. He had been assigned several times be-
fore to Russian basketball tours and knew their
personnel well. My interest, of course, was in meet-
ing tho Soviet coach, a tiny man, who was standing
in a rather forlorn fashion in tho rear of the crowd
watching his players' boorish antics.
At dinner, I introduced myself to the officials,
(the doctor,, commissar. Interpreter, and tho coach.)
Tlv; interpreter and commissar did a double take
when they hoard my name was Cohen, the doctor
smiled and the coach gave me a quick hearty hand-
shake. I invited the group to be my guests at the
night club that evening.
The next day at practice on the Kutsher out-
door court, the coach grabbed a ball and began
shooting long set shots at one of the baskets. I
immediately walked over to serve as his retriever,
figuring we could converse in Yiddish. It wasn't to
D8, however. Tho commissar, sensing that the
coach and I were too friendly, moved over and en-
gaged me in conversation as I returned the ball
to Gomelsky after each missed shot.
The Russians won the game and claimed our
pick-up team, which included Ed Mast, now of the
NY. Knicks, John Warren of the Cleveland Cava-
liers, and Connon of the Momj>his Pros, gave them
the toughest game of their ten-game tour.


wm^mm
Page 8
+Jewistncrk#ati
Friday. December 31
Pacesetter chairman Mrs. Allan Baer, (left) had the atten-
tion of general chairman Mrs. Donald Mitchell initial gifts
chairman Mrs. Alvin Gross, and Mrs. Roger Odwak. general
luncheon chairman at a recent meeting at the Jewish Federa-
tion of North Broward Women's Division 1972 United Jewish
Campaign-Israel Emergency Fund campaign leadership.
The ladies are planning a series of fund-raising programs,
starting in February, to meet the needs of the local, national
and overseas beneficiary agencies of the Federation._______
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A 'Mini Album"
A concentrated program to pro-
vide the residents of Greater Mi-
ami with attractive 1971 Com-
: memorative Stamp Folders began
last week, according to Postmas-
ter E. M. Dunlap.
The Mini Albums, containing
VS. commemorative stamps is-
.sued in 1971. are on sale at all
'classified post offices in Greater
Miami. Post Offices from Pom-
pano Beach to Key West are also
selling the kits.
This folder is an easy way for j
a vounsster or anyone to start
a stamp coJ Postmaster
Dunlap said. The folders, 10'xlO"
in size, will contain a description |
of each stamp together with the |
packet of 24 attractive commemo-
rative star.; I bWUBd I :nng the
- which can
be used to affix the stamps to the
folder. The hinges are a plassine
strip which collectors use for
mounting stamps without harm-
ing either folder or stamps.
Postmaster Dunlap suggests
this album as an excellent holiday
gift and ureeri residents desiring
them to obtain them as toon as j
i possible as the supply is limited.
The price of the complete album ;
is $250.
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