The Jewish Floridian of North Broward

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Oct. 22, 1971)-v. 3, no. 6 (Mar. 22, 1974).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Dec. 17, 1971 called also v.1, no. 4, Sept. 21, 1973 called also v.2, no. 23, and Dec. 14, 1973 called also v.2, no. 28, repeating numbering of previous issues.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Vol. 2, no. 1 omitted in numbering of issues and was not published.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statement conflict: Sept. 7, 1973 called no. 22 in masthead and no. 23 in publisher's statement; Nov. 30, 1973 called no. 27 in masthead and no. 28 in publisher's statement.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44572526
lccn - sn 00229547
ocm44572526
System ID:
AA00014313:00006

Related Items

Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
ftJemst? Florid fan
ie 1 Number 4
of XOttTlt HROWARO
December 17, 1971
Price 20 c
ALLOCATES $250,000 RAISED IN 1971
Federation Accepts $450,000 Goal For 72
Its last meeting of the year.
H, the board of directors of
Jewish Federation of North
anl allocated the $250,000
d during the 1971 United
|sh Campaign and Israel
gency Fund to a variety of
as. national and local bene-
y agencies, and accepted a
! of $450,000 for the 1972 cam-
ief beneficiary of the annual
trillion campaign was the
Jewish Appeal, which re-
$191,000 for its health,
ire, rehabilitation, immigra-
and absorption programs in
as well as for other life-
ng programs around the world
lucted by agencies funded by
UJA.
addition, the federation al-
lte $100 to the Jewish Telegraph-
Lgency which operates a world-
news-gathering agency. Both
considered overseas bene-
iry agencies.
)n the national level, a num-
of community relations agen-
received allocations this year,
luding American Jewish Com-
ttce ($200), American Jewish
ngress ($200), Anti-Defamation
Iguc of B'nai B'rith ($350),
the National Jewish Commu-
nity Relatons Advisory Council
i$285 in dues and allocation).
National "cultural" agencies re-
ceiving allocations were American
Association for Jewish Kducation
($100), American Jewish Histori-
cal Society ($100), B'nai B'rith
Youth Services Appeal ($250 des-
ignated for use by Hillel Founda-
tion for use on Florida college
campuses), Histadruth Ivrith of
America ($100), Torah Umesorah
($100), and YIVO Institute for
Jewish Research ($100).
Allocations of $200 each were
made to the Hebrew Union Col-
lege, Jewish Theological Semi-
nary, and Yeshiva Theological
Seminary.
National service agencies re-
ceiving allocations were the Coun-
cil of Jewish Federations and
Welfare Funds ($800 dues) and
the Synagogue Council of Ameri-
ca ($100).
The largest allocation made
to a local beneficiary agency
or service was a grant of $3,420
made to the Jewish Family and
Children's Service of Broward
County, which is jointly funded
by the local federation, the Jewish
Welfare Federation of Hollywood,
and the Broward County United
Fund.
A request for this amount was
made to the board by Mrs. Joel
Miller, Federation Women's Divi-
sion president, who is a board
member of the Family Service
unit. Mrs. Miller reported that
the case load from North Broward
increased by 40% over the same
period in 1970. The amount re-
quested represents 18% of the al-
location made by the Hollywood
Federation, she said.
Other specific allocations made
to local services were $600 to the
Broward Board of Rabbis for
conducting a chaplaincy program
at state mental hospital in Brow-
ard County; $200 to the River
Garden Home for the Aged in
Jacksonville, and $50 to the G. I.
Project conducted by "Pop" Sterl-
ing which ensures that servicemen
on active duty are remembered by
the local community.
An allocation to the Bureau of
Jewish Education in Miami will
be made from the budget of the
Federation's Jewish Education
Committee. Other functioning
committees of the Federation will
receive operating funds from the
basic budget of the Federation it-
self.
Allocations made this year
ascell Calls On President To
Intercede For Soviet Jewry
Reiterating his deep concern
|i>i the plight of Jews in the So-
net Union, Congressman Dante
ii this week coapontored a
rsohltton in the House of Rep-
resentatives urging the President
take immediate and ieter-
plned steps to:
Call upon the Soviet fOV-
bnnMnt to permit the free ex-
pression of ideas and the exer-
bise of religion by all its citi-
tena in accordance with the So-
viet Constitution.
Utilize formal and informal
contacts with Soviet officials in
an effort to secure an end to
discrimination against religious
minorities.
Demand of the Sov iet gov-
ernment that it permit its citi-
zens the right to emigrate from
the Soviet Union to the coun-
tries of their choice.
Raise in the General As-
sembly of the United Nations
the issue of the Soviet Union's
transgression of the Declaration
of Human Rights, particularly
against Soviet Jews and other
minorities.
Rep. Fasccll, a ranking mem-
ber of the House Foreign Af-
fairs Committee and a U.S.
Representative to the 24th Gen-
eral Assembly of the United
Nations, said, "We must con-
tinue to let the Soviets know-
that we are aware of what is
happening there and that we
are deeply distressed by the
violations of basic human rights
which are taking place."
'Scoop'And Golda Talk
' Y*
iward Ginsberg was elected
lirman at the Joint Distribu-
Committee at its 57th an-
I meeting in New York City
week. Mr. Ginsberg sue-
Louis Broido in the post
Senator Henry M. Jackson,
whose record on the State of Is-
rael has won him national acclaim
from almost every leading Jewish
organization in the United States
and an extremely close personal
relationship with key Israeli offici-
als, met with Prime Minister Golda
Meir during the second day of her
current visit to the United States,
and was personally thanked for
the Middle East in a way that in-
creases the likelihood of a re-
newal of conflict. The State De-
partment's approach has been to
wear thin the margin of Israel's
security in a foolish amJ short-
sighted effort to bring about in-
terim measures that would be un-
certain and unstable."
The Washington Democrat, who
will speak Monday night at a
Madison Square Garden rally in
New York in behalf of Soviet
Jewry, said "I am hopeful that the
decision to resume the sale of
Phantom aircraft which is lodged
in the White House will be taken
now, especially in view of the over-
whelming support the Senate has
given my amendment making
available the credits necessary to
do this."
When elected to Congress in
1938. at the age of 28. his district
contained only nire Jewish fami-
lies. When Israel was still a dream,
in 1944, he stated "If I can for-
ward the work of making a Jew-
ish homeland come true, you can
count on my earnest efforts in this
great humanitarian cause."
He and the late President John
F. Kennedy, then a fellow senator,
co-authored legislation to make itj
easier for refugees from Mid-East
nations to enter the United States.
point the way towards accept-
ance of the 1972 campaign goal.
Federation president Alvin Gross
declared.
"Many of the national and local
allocations are token contribu-
tions," he said, "and merely serve
to let the recipient agencies know
that we are aware of and appre-
ciate 'che work they are doing.
"We know that these small al-
locations will not materially en-
hance their budgetary require-
ments, but we hope that by rais-
ing substantially more money next
year and in the years to come, we
will be able to adequately help
support these and many other
deserving agencies," he continued.
"In addition, the need for addi-
tional funds for health and wel-
fare needs in Israel and through-
out the world has markedly in-
creased, and we want to contrib-
ute our share towards alleviating
needless suffering.
"We have already started our
fund-raising process for 1972 and,
if these early meetings are any in-
dication, we will meet and pos-
sibly surpass our goal of $450,-
000," Mr. Gross said.
Golda Reassured
By U.S. Leaders
WASHINGTON (WNS) Is-
rael's Premier Golda Meir has
received assurance that the U.S.
would not permit the balance of
power to change to Israel's dis-
advantage in the Middle East
and that Israel would continue
to receive economic aid to main-
tain that balance.
The assurances came after
Mrs. Meir met for five hours in
separate meetings with Presi-
dent Nixon at the White House
and with Secretary of State
William P. Rogers in the State
Department. It was not known,
however, if the shipment of
Phantom jets tc Israel would be
resumed.
Government spokesmen re-
vealed that it hart been agreed
that the talks would be confi-
dential anil that no diplomatic
action on the Middle Best could
be "resumed or undertaken" un-
til after the end of the V.S.
General Assembly debate on the
Middle East which began on Dec.
S.
Mrs. Meir's two-hour discus-
sion with President Nixon was
described by White House
spokesman Ronald Ziegler. who
said, "A useful and satisfactory
discussion was held on Israel's
long-term needs for modernizing
and maintaining the capacity of
Israels defense forces in the
context of our ongoing policy of
maintaining the military bal-
ance."
The President stated, Mr.
Ziegler contlned, that Israel
must maintain a long-term de-
fense and the U.S. most assist
in that process. However, sim-
ply maintaining the military
balance in Itself would not bring
peace; negotiations are needed.
Asked if differences were nar-
rowed or resolved at the meet-
ing, a State Department source
said, "It is difficult to answer
that with either of these words
but the atmosphere was good."
Question** on the delivery of
Phantoms to Israel, the source
declared: "Both governments
are agreed that we should not,
as governments, be put in a posi-
tion of confronting one another
on this matter of aircraft. Any
statement, action or editorial
from any quarter that poses the
issue of relations between the
U.S. and Israel in the narrow-
context of these aircraft does an
injustice to the actual state of
our relations."
Diplomatic sources here said
Mrs. Meir's talks were "good in
spirit' but indicated that further
problems and discussions remain.
U.N. Security
Council Is
'Ineffective'
JERUSALEM JTA) Act-
ing Premier Yigal Allon said in
a radio interview last week that
the Indo-Pakistani war served
as a warning to small powers of
the ineffectiveness of the United
Nations Security Council in
averting or halting wars. Small
states everywhere, including the
Middle East could find them-
selves the victims of Big Power
interests and interference, ho
added, but he hopes "the lessons
of this tragedy are not lost on
Cairo."
Mr. Allon expressed sympa-
thy for the people of Bengla
Desh, East Pakistan, who find
themselves crushed between the
conflicting interests of the su-
per-powers and of the two me-
dium powers, India and Pakis-
tan and chided India for hav-
ing lectured Israel against the
right of active self-defense in
the June 1967 war. India did not
flinch from invading East Pakis-
tan which is part of the sove-
reign Pakistani state. he
observed.
The Security Council is cur-
rently debating the conflagra-
tion in the Asian sub-continent.


Page I
* Jewish Fhriidltori
Friday, December 17, 1971
Israel's Basic Position
Restated By Abba Eban
UNITED NATIONS 1JTA1 ,
. r-'oreign ill^Mi"-^1},
Er>; 11 i'.'i- I'M: >v iii-
, 1 'iit's reliance on the Jarring
[mission and negotiations as tlv
I > ,,.> 1 ,ward a Mi Idle Eas1
pea *< ttlement.
In -sinu the General As-
si -i i>' i- i' i- )ii'iM.i.-<; tlii' Mid-
east lebate Mr. Eban declared:
"Now thai Egypt has through
Ambassador Gunnar V. Jarr-
ing impressed Its willingness to
'enter into a peace agreement
vitli i-i;nl. now that both par-
Ik.- have presented their basic
[uKUions. they should now pur-
sue their negotiations in a de-
tiiilitl ;md concrete manner with-
out pri'ir eondtrions 50 as to
cii\it all the points listed in their
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respective documents with a
view^taxMcJuding a peace agree-
ment
it Mr. EUad will reply af-
rtrntattveJj to tins proposal then
negotiation on all matters, in-
iini iiiy boundaries am! with-
Mate,"
Mr. Eban was alluding t-> the
opening dt bale speech by Egyp-
tian Foreign Minister Mahrnoud
Riad, which was said to "con-
tain most of the fallacies and
illusions which have obscured
the Arab view 01 Israel far more
than two decades.''
i nitr.i Btataa Depssty Aasfcee-
Midur (-liri-.ti.ph.-i- II. Phillips,
in a eoinnu-ilt to the Jewish
'IVI.-graphir \gemy, i-aJI.-.l Mr.
Ebaa's speadl an "eloquent re-
llatllirnl of "basic" positions.
The Israeli foreign minister
assailed the Arab attitude to-
ward Israel by saying thai In
196" Egypl farced Israel "t
meel you on the field of battle.
You have since refused to meel
us at the conference table. For
lour long years you have de-
clined all negotiations
o-: condition that your own terms
!), acci pti'ii In advance. You
have rejected the idea ol a peace
structure to be built frees) By
Israeli and Arab hands. You
have pui your faith in solutions
Imposed and inspired by the ri-
valries o! outside powers." he
declared.
Sen, Gurnev Aids
Israel In Jei Vote
Senator Edward Gurnej of Flor-
ida played a key role In th
cessful fighl to secure overwhelm-
ing passage of the Jackson b
men) granting Israel credits for
the inruk d ate. purchase ol Phan-
tom Jets from tl"' Unit
The measure passe I. 82 1 14 vith
Sens. Gurnej an I a<
of Florida both castii g aft
tivc votes.
Senatoi Gurney mobilized maxi-
mum Republican support for the
measure, saying on the floor of
the Senate: "There are two fac-
tors to be considered when one
discusses the adequacy m Israel's
hardware. The first Is to consider
whether or not the hardware is
in fact adequate; in this case ade-
quate to ensure thai Israel would
be able to defend herself against
her enemies.
Tin- seoonsl to be considered,
and one that i perhaps more im-
portant in the situation under dis-
cussion, ls the perceived adequacy
of the military hardware. This Is
the more important question, how
strong Israel's posture appears
from the vantage point of her ene-
mies," the senior senator from
Flori a asserted.
"With adequate air defense, Is-
rael can sun i\i Witho it l shi
cannot," he noted. The United
States i- her only sow ci ol r I
fighters. That i~ whj ass tgi ol
\h\- amendment is so important.'
Group Discussion Set
"Generations in Crisis," will be
the topic ol a group discussion
(inducted by Rabbi Morris Shop,
Tuesday, Dee. 28, at 10:.'l0 a.m. in
the Temple Sholom Religious
School. The public is invited.
More than SI00,000 in Israel Bonds were purchased by the
Foil Lauderdale community In tribute to Ludwik and Paula
Brodzki at the recent Israel Dinner of State in the Ocean-
side Holiday Inn. where the honoreeg received the State oi
Israel Shalom Award. From left to right are Yehuda Levancm.
Israeli diplomat, who was the guest speaker; Mr. and Mrs.
Brodzki. and Dr Alvin K. Colin, dinner chairman.
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733-5451.

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Friday, December 17, 1971
fJm-ist) fhrSdHiciiri
Page 3
=8
Wtttt.YHM.mt
JOANNE HILLER
Chanukah ... Hanukkah... Hanuka ... Greetings!
HANUKAH IN MODERN ISRAKL ... a chapter in "So Young
lo Re a Rabbi The Education of an American Clergyman" by Dov
forctz Elkins i: well-worth reading, especially the part dealing with
"lie Feast of Dedication," more popularly known as "The Feast of
eights."
OFF BROADWAY but. luckily in Fort Laudeidalc! Rehear-
sals ha.e already begun tor what will undoubtedly be another success-
Bid miNiea! ur-ier the sponsorship of the B'NAI B'RITH WOMEN.
[Fort Lauderdale Chapter Mo. The chapter is fortunate in haxing the
brofeuional writing ability of ESTHER iMRS. jacki UEBMAN,
rounsdor. and the musical talent of BELLE iMRS. BERNARD
|BARASCH. Their laat year's outstanding musical, "Fiddler on the
G |at the District Five convention in Atlanta.
This year, their production like last yr-ar's award-winner
ill be directed by SHELLY MRS. ROBERT! RRITTON, a veteran of
Mage and screen. SHELLY has many successful directing credits and
fins also recently appeared in training films for bank tellers. She will
Men in a soon-to-be released ALLEN FUNT movie Appearing
In the m.isk-al are PAM (MRS. RICHARD) GREENE, MARSHA
f MRS, HARRY) GINSBURG. JUDY (MRS. JOSEPH) SAGON. BER-
JTHA YAYTON. PAl'LA .MRS. RICHARD. KONDIAN The men in
Ith.- cast are [RWIN FINE. JERRY I.AYTON. CANTOR JEROME
CLEMENT, DR. ALVIN COLIN, and RICHARD KONDIAN .
Ith.ro will a'so be a chorus of 20.
Stage s<-ts will be designed by LOIS (MRS. ALVIN) SUSSMAN.
I LI A and GILBERT MALLINGER Will be cochalring the annual dinner
know for the third time The production Is scheduled for Saturday
and Sun ay, Feb. 5 and 6. al Temple Emanu-El. I'm reserving one ol
|tb.' evenings, why don'l you?
TWO WOMEN' who met after many years were i xchanging details
rning theli lives. "Doyou have any children?" one woman asked.
"No." answered the other one. "Hut what do you do for aggravation?"
tiie first demanded,
THE SCROLL Temple Beth Israel's bulletin lor December
features a very fine composite picture of the groundbreaking cere-
mo j mi the front cover JOAN 'MRS. RONALD) MISIIKTN la
[tin- verj capable editor who deserves special recognition.
ARK SfOU COUGHING MORE AND ENJOYING IT LESS? .
IYou might he able to take a-d'ep breath of fresh air In Broward
County in the future because some people were concerned enough to
gel involved writing letters to public officials and attending the
' public hearing on Implementation Plans ol Air Quality St
lards al the Broward Countj Courthouse Two young people,
DEBRA and DAVID ABEL iSHIRLEE and BEN ABEL are their
parents i were among those who became involved, In fact, DAVIP spoke
before the pollution bos
NEXT DOOR NEIGHBORS in the international restaurant n
lion ol ill" recent Beaux Arts Promenade included Jewish. Polish
Greek and I. banese organisations The NATIONAL COUNCIL
i>K .11-.wish WOMEN very active!) and verj successfully participated ,
lor the second year. According t<> the capable and dedicated president,
CAROLYN i MRS ERNEST) GUTMAN, this year was even more
successful than last. Among those who helped were HELEN and.
STEVE GERO, PEGGY and VICTOR HERZOG, RUSS GRESS, MRS I
l.II.A SELBY. MARIA and FRED RICHELLE, LIZ and CALVIN
HAAG IKS CLAIRE WYI.ER, MISS ELEANOR SIMMERS. MRS.
IOANNE HILLER, MRS. KATYE GOLDMAN, EDNA (MRS. isi-
DOREl HARRIS. MRS. ROSE JACOBSON, MRS (ill.DA KOP1 L
SHIRLEY IMRS. JOED MILLER ROSE (MRS SAM) MAGED
MILDRED and HARRY STERN, MRS LYDIA MANDELL, RHEA
and HERMAN NATHAN and ERNEST GUTMAN Congratulations
to all foi a jo'i well done!
ANOI III i: CURTAIN Gl >IN< 1 UP .
Sunday, D c is I n 7 p.m. al T u-EI
\, ,ther talenl d I LUCILLE iMRS HUBERT) SHEN-
KIN '.':! I \K (MRS. DANIEL) GOODMAN have written the
MINNIE IS Al 1\ E AND Wl I not
vations Chi ck S IOBINS" 0
Di All pr i i ds v I
El youth
AS THE FESTIVEGLOW 01 THE CHANUKAH I X>N-
TINUES as the di ,;
the cl count the CHANUK VH
ancient for freedom and re-dedical Prt-
.: peopk
on mil C>!. T.or* and ether Tre>l !** r
advertised Ja this section ...
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Egypt's Air Force
Has 896 Planes
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
Egyptian Air Force numbers
8% combat and training
planes including the world's
fattest fighter and the
world's largest helicopter
supplied by the Soviet Union,
according to the Israel Arm)
magazine, Bamachane.
The magazine also publish-
ed details of Egypt's ground
and naval strength based on
figures published by Western
sources. The number of So-
viet>mae combat planes in
the Air Force Ls 407 which
includes 220 new MIG-21s.
120 Sukhoi-II bombers,
about 23 TU-lfi bombers and
some ;{;) Illushin-28 bombers
and 12 MIG-2.'$s. a fighter
plan.' said by Western
sources to out-run and out-
climb any other, including
the American F-4 Phantom
jets in the Israel Air Force.
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/


Page A
+Jelst>rhrl Friday. December 17, m
i
^Jemsti Flcridliari
OF NORTH BROWARO
Telephone 373-4805
OIFF1CE and PLANT12 N.E. 6th STREET, MIAMI.
MIAMI ADDRESS: P.O. Box 2973, Miami. Florida 3S101
FRED K. SHOCHET SELMA M. THOMPSON
Editor and Publiaher Assistant to Publisher
For the Jewish Federation of North Broward
ALVIN GROSS DAVID M. AMDUR MRS. JOANNE HILLER
President Executive Director News Coordinator
Federation office: 3905 N. Andrews Avenue. Ft. Lauderdale, Fla 33309
Telephone 565-4869
The Jewish Floridisn Does Not Guarantee The Kashrutn
Of The Merchandise Advertised In Its Columns.
Published Bi-Weekly
Application to tnall at second-class postage rate Is pending at Miami, Fla.
The Jewish Floridisn has absorbed ttie Jewish Unity and the Jewish Weekly.
Member of the Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Seven Arts Feature Syndicste,
Worldwide News Service, National Editorisl Association, American Association
of English-Jewish Newspspers, and the Florida Press Association.
SUBSCRIPTION
Request.
RATES: (Local Area) On Year $2.00. Out of Town Upon
MATTER OF FACT
by Joseph Alsop
Volume 1
Friday, December 17, 1971
Number 4
29 KISLEV 5732
We Celebrate the Victory of An Idea
Of all the festivals based on ancient historical events,
we know more about the date and the circumstances of
Chanukah than any other of our holidays. It was in 165
B.C.E. that the victory of Judah and his brother Maccabees
returned the Temple in Jerusalem to the worship of God
after beina defiled by the Syrians and their pagan worship.
The lighting of candles each of the eight nights of the
holiday the first this Sunday night is not clear in ori-
gin but for almost 2,000 years the nightly ceremony has
been a source of excitement and joy, particularly for the
children. Games and songs, special foods and gifts, are
all part of the celebration.
For the modern Jew, Chanukah's meaning has spe-
cial significance beyond the bright candles, the food and
gifts. It is the recognition that an individual's religion
must be his own choice, not the choice of the government
under which he lives. And while that battle for freedom of
religion was won through military victory, it should be
noted that the prophetic portion which is read concludes
with the verse: "Not by power, nor by my might, but my
spirit, said the Lord of Hosts."
It is traditional that we Jews do not celebrate the de-
feat of an enemy but the victory of an idea and in that
spirit we wish all a Happy Chanukah.
Sobering But Challenging Figures
The opening of the exits from the Soviet Union has
brought joy to the heart of every Jew. Authentic reports of
the new exodus indicate that, just in the past several
months, as many as 9,000 have arrived in Israel and that
more are literally pouring in every day.
That this is indeed a blessing goes without saying, but
it is one which brings greater responsibility to all Jews in
the free world. Only this past week, the Jewish Agency
released figures which shows that it costs $23,000 to inte-
grate a Russian family into Israeli life.
Nor can American, British, South African and French
Jews be unaware that, in addition to our Russian brethren,
some 40,000 immigrants from other parts of ihe world, most
of them arriving with little but the clothes on their backs,
have come to Israel to be settled during 1971 a sobering
figure but a challenging one as well.
There are times when Jews question the fund-raising
activities which have become a normal part of our lives.
The answer which we have accepted, and will continue to
do, is that we are our brothers' keepers and it is only
through our Combined Jewish Appeal that we can realize
with them that precious freedom we have struggled for
these thousands of years.
Protest Not Surprising '
Democratic self-government is hardly an ideal among
the Arab nations which continue to keep their masses in
bondage. It is no surprise, therefore, that Jordan is protest-
ing the Israeli plan to hold municipal elections in the occu-
pied area of the west bank. By permitting Arabs to vote in
the Jerusalem election, in admitting them to work from
such places as the Gaza Strip, and allowing Arabs from
all over the world to vacation with their relatives in Israel,
the Israelis are setting a bad example.
The Arab peoples are being shown that it it possible
to live in decency and dignity and, most of all, peace. This
is hardly what their rulers want them to know, and least
of all from Israel.
WASHINGTON As usual
in these cases the question is
whether enormously elaborate,
enormously expensive prepara-
tions reveal actual intentions.
In this particular case, do the
Soviet preparations to blind the
United States reveal an event-
ual intention to do exactly that?
The question is becoming
pretty urgent because the So-
viets have just successfully com-
pleted another round of tests of
their anti-satellite satellites. The
sole imaginable purpose of these
tests is to get ready to destroy
the reconnaissance satellites by
which the United States far
too seldom for reasons of econ-
omy surveys the progress of
Soviet military development.
IF THE American reconnais-
sance satellites are ever destroy-
ed in dire fact, this country will
be literally blinded. "Humintell,"
which is what "human intelli-
gence" or intelligence from
agents is now called in the busi-
ness, has dwindled to almost
nothing.
Our most vital data about de-
ployments and developments in-
side the Soviet Union therefore
come from the reconnaissance
satellites. These began to fly
in November, 196a The Soviets
conducted the first launch of a
component of their anti-satellite
system in 1963.
SINCE THEN there have been
repeated launches of components
of the system. More recently
there have been four complete
operations involving the destruc-
tion or attempted destruction of
a "drone" or target satellite.
Two were conducted this year,
one a good many months ago
and one quite recently.
If expenditure is any symp-
tom of intention, the numbers
of launches and operational tests
mean that the system is "more
for use than show." In the words
of the historian Gibbon. For the
United States to have carried
development and testing so far,
the needed investment would
have been well above $2 billion.
THE SIMPLE character of
this costly Soviet anti-satellite
system is also worth careful
thought. Shooting down a re-
connaissance satellite with an
ABM-like missile having a nu-
clear warhead is neither diffi-
cult nor costly.
But the Soviets do not share
the American belief that it is
safe to leave crucial weapons
systems without repeated ot>era-
tional tests. Satellite intercep-
tion with missiles having nu-
clear warheads would have been
a gross breach of Soviet treaty
Commitments. It might even have
waked up this flaccidly comno-
lent country.
HEXCE a very large part of
the huge expense of the Soviet
anti-satellite system results
from the simple fact that no
nuclear warhead is employed.
In a complete operational test,
a "drone" or target satellite is
first blasted off.
As the drone satellite comes
round, a command satellite is
then blasted into position close
to the drone, which the com-
mand satellite has means of
locking onto. Finally, a "chase"
or destroyer satellite is sent up.
It is ordered into correst posi-
tion by the instruments on the
command satellite. And it there-
upon explodes near enough to the
target satellite to put the latter
out of action.
WHEN THE first operation
of this kind was run by the So-
viets, it was interpreted in re-
verse by the more wishful mem-
bers of the intelligence com-
munity. It was said to be a sad
failure, because the destroyer
satellite had blown up while the
target satellite continued on its
course.
In fact, as is now known, the
target satellite was badly hit
by the pellets that the explo-
sion of the destroyer satellite is
designed to expel. As the tar-
get was a mere drone, this
made no visible difference. But
if the target had been a true
reconnaissance satellite, the
damage to complex and vulner-
able instrumentation would have
caused instantaneous blinding.
SO THEKE you have the evi-
dence, except for two Ltorns i.
the SALT talks, the Soy*'
themselves have proposed ,
treaty claus* that would see.
Continued On Pa*e g
e
As
Max Lerner
Sees It
NEW YORK The next three months, witnessing a hurri-
cane of summits for President Nixon, will be the most crucial o!
his Presidency. They will decide much for America, but nnfc
ably everything for Richard Nixon.
His flurry of summit meetings with the leaders of Israel
France. Portugal. Great Britain, Canada. Germany Japan
China and the Soviet Union might conceivably amount to
nothing except the fanfare of travel and protocol. I tajrg.M along
on the trip of Nixon's old chief. Dwight Eisenhower, through
Europe and Asia in 1960 which added up to very little, and
strikes me now as a chase that had no beast in view. But Nixon;
talks do have a target of prime importance in fact, a double
one.
*
THE IMMEDIATE TARGET, especially In the talk; with
President Pompidou and Prime Ministers Heath. Brandt and
Sato, is to find some stability for world currencies and trade.
The larger target, focusing on the Feb. 21 China summit and
also the Soviet one. is to get a new alignment of the jreat
powers. The two are linked, but are worth some ^parate
attention.
Nixon's man-in-charge for the first target is John (\>nnaliy.
and his man-in-charge for the second is Henry KlSSii Each
cf them has been making waves which doubtless dist trb the
other, but Connally's short-range waves through hi* a.owed
us. of the import surcharge and the investment tax ; | -
have caused anguish from Canada through France to Japan Im-
proving on Teddy Roosevelt's, his motto seems to be "Speak
toughly and carry a big stick."
Cr CLEARLY. HE HAS BEEN Nixon's spokesman, no* nil m
and just as clearly Nixon will be able to mollify some of the ar-
gui>h in his talks with the West European. Japanese and Ca-
nadian leaders Nixon's bind is that while he need-; th good-
will of these allies he also needs terms on revaluati
currencies and on trade levels which will cut Am.>rl
favorable balances and bring some of the prosperity he hai
promised his countrymen.
But it is the great power talks with China. Russia and
Japan which will cast a longer shadow into the future. These
talks are evidently meant to end the era of confr<>:
tween something vaguely called "the West" and -.-thing
vaguely called "communism" in a bipolar world, and r
with a set of specific understandings between all I
powers, and with Europe, too. which lias not yet com!'; : as a
fifth great power.
fr ir tr
ONE WAY TO PIT THE larger aim is this: Not I) i -him
any "collective security," but to allay some of the 'curttj
which each of the powers has felt which may at a :>' dis-
tant day be a step toward genuine collective security though a
world policing unit which will enforce nuclear disarm
There is another way of putting it, In terms of the mooted
parallel with the diplomacy of Metternich, whom Ki&sbcjB
admires and regards as a model. There have been a
attacks from the conservatives recently (John Chamlx
the ablest) on the Nixon-Kissinger [wlicics. Their argunv- il that
Metternich tried to help post-Napoleon France against the
stronger great powers Prussia and Russia and thus it\ i
great power equilibrium, but that Nixon and Kissing *to
should (according to this model I be building up China
the Soviet Union, are actually strengthening Russia.
6 THEY DO IT THE argument goes by acceptBI
Brandt's Ostpolitik, by letting Russia cut its European
and shift them to Asia and by helping Russia to open the Suei
Canal and thus reach the Asian waters more easily.
As the old map makers used to say, there are dragor here
The former Nixon admirers who now regard him as soft >" "*
Russians will evidently not rest content unless there is a ik*
mentality throughout Western Europe as there is now in '*
Middle East. The question of a balance of deterrence in th H*
die East cannot be compromised, as Abba Eban is bound to arg*
forcibly at the United Nation* and Mrs. Meir in her White
House visit,
BIT NOTHING WILL BE gained by keeping the fla"-" <*
confrontation burning in Europe as well. Nor is the best Amer-
ican strategy one of helping either of the Communist ^a",s
aeainst the other, but rather one of minimizing confrontations
with each of them.
If each of the great powers can feel that no one po**
a one and no probable combination can dominate tl* j
others there wUl be a chance of lifting the siege mental*
throughout the world. It is a possible and achievable aim. a*
it will be worth all of Nixon's travels if he can com,- *[
somewhat close to it **
I


Friday. December 17. 1971
+Jewist>ncr*fian
Page
5
Battery Powered Heart Pacemaker
Rechargable From Outside Body
battery powered Cardiac Pace-1 vals of approximately 18 months,
for implantation in the
Jy, rechargable by radio waves,
the body, has been in-
The team effort was headed by
Dr. H. Fischler of Weizmann In-
ted for the treatment of heart- atHute's lectronics Department, of
ck by a team working in the
.oratories of Electroics Depart-
ent of the Weizmann Institute of
fcience in Rehovot, Israel. Re-
rging of the batteries takes
10 hours and can be done
a clinic, with only an overnight
for the patient.
I The Pacemaker is in the form of
isosceles triangle. The length of
sides is two inches with a
Lse of 1.8 inches. Its thickness is
lightly under seven eighths of an
)f the fixed-rate type, with a uni-
Dlar endocardial catheter elec-
de, the implantablc rechargeable
__emaker, which delivers diph-
fic impulses to the heart, consists
the charging network and the
acemaker itself. The batteries are
priodically recharged through the
.. from an external charger, at
interval of several months. Both
be Pacemaker and charger con-
Bin special safety arrangements to
.ovide for correct maintenance
nd charging of the batteries; and
check the battery voltage at any
nc. The pulse rate and Pace-
paker pulse width are adjustable.
.. have been set at values of 72
. its per minute and 1.8 millisec-
|nds in the tests made so far.
Tested on dogs, the Pacemaker
howed good results. No discom-
ort or harmful influences were
iksorvod. The new Pacemaker and
systems, it is believed offers
ope for new progress in Pace-
makers. Implanted Pacemakers
urrently in use require surgery for
pplacement of batteries at inter-
Our New Owner...
MR. ABE PAISYN
invites you to visit
this fine Drug Store
PRESCRIPTIONS FILLED
LAWRENCE
DRUG
624 S.W. 2nd Street
Phone 524-4334
which Dr. Ephraim Frei, a pioneer
in Magnetism and Medicine, is the
head, and included Doctors E.
Kaplinski and N. H. Neufeld of
the Tel Hashomer Hospital and
Heart Institute. Israel and Profes-
sor R. I. Bernstein, Professor of
Electrical Engineering at Columbia
University. Dr. Bernstein has just
returned from a year as a Fellow
in the Weizmann Institute's Elec-
tronics Laboratory.
The instrument developed is an
economic, low voltage, endocardial
Pacemaker, using nickel-cadmium
batteries. It includes a regulator
which keeps the charging current
constant within a broad range of
location of the transmitting coil,
which is necessary for a long bat-
tery life. A passive circuit is in-
corporated which allows checking
the voltage of the batteries extern-
ally by an electro-magnetic probe.
Th*. batteries are charged by a
small external transmitter placed
on the patient's chest and does not
interfere with his sleep. A moni-
toring meter shows whether the
power is received by the implanted
Pacemaker. When the charging is
properly completed the transmitter
is turned off automatically.
Experiments were conducted to
assure immunity against external
electrical lnteriercnces. such as
those that might be encountered
by a patient during his daily ac-
tivities. These included motor cars,
electric drills, fluorescent tubes, gas
hghters, electric shavers, high fre-
quency generators, Tesla coils, and
other electrical devices.
While further experiments are
continuing, the inventors declare.
It can be said tha* with reason-
able care there is no hazard to the
patient with this Pacemaker."
The Rechargeable Cardiac Pace-
maker is described in a paper writ-
ten by its inventors. H. Fischler.
R. I. Bernstein, E. H. Frei H. N.
Neufeld and E. Kaplinski. which
was presented Aug. 26 at the Inter-
national Conference on Medical
and Biological Engineering in Mel-
bourne, Australia.
Summarizing their views on tne
Pacemaker, the paper says: "The
practicality of the rechargeable
Pacemaker is demonstrated by its
small size, and in the effectiveness
of pacing during animal experi-
ments.
Laboratory tests showed high
operational stability of the Pace-
maker at varying temperature and
battery voltages, and immunity
against partial failing; of the bat-
tery. The design provides a mini-
mum three month time interval for
successive recharging of the bat-
tery; it can be performed at a
Pacemaker clinic, and lasts ten
hours (e.g. during the night) with-
out discomfort to the patient."
When the experiments have been
completed with animals wearing
implanted Pacemakers, the Pace-
maker will be sent to distinguished
U.S. cardiologists for clinical eval-
uation, through test use on hu-
man beings.
The Electro-Catheter Corpora-
tion of Rahway. N.J. has indicated
its interest in manufacturing and
marketing the Pacemaker. It has
obtained an option for a world-wide
licease from the Weizmann Insti-
tute of Science.
The story on the Pacemaker was
made public by the New York of-
fices of the Weizmann Institute of
Science.
Orange Bowl Parade Theme 'Wonderful World Of Music'
"Wonderful World of Music"
will be the theme of this year's
41-float New Year's Eve Orange
Bowl Parade, as it wends it way
over a three-mile route through
the heart of downtown Miami. Hy-
draulic-controlled platforms on the
floats are one of this year's inno-
vations. Each float will operate
independently, and music, cos-
tumes and models will be asso-
ciated directly with the song title
depicted by the colorful displays.
PICTURE
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Ph 565 5951
HOW IS YOUR TAX MONEY BEING SPENT?
In 10 years the population of Broward County hat doubled/
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The PUBLIC WATCHDOG is the TAXPAYERS LEAGUE.
Yo! need u, we need you. Your membership or contri-
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Golden Isles Convalescent Center is very special in that
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Page 6
+Jenistfkrtdr&n
Wday. Decer.-jw i
.. >
OL "KaUi Sp*L. "Jrom <7/.e frfpU
Where Does Our Money Go?
BY RABBI MORRIS A. SHOP
Tempi*' Sholom
Every year, thixwjjhout the
Jewish world,
millions of dol-
lars arc con-
tributed to var-
ious causes to
help feed, suc-
cor and aid oth-
01*. Many Jews
follow the
teaching of the
Bible a n d are
at least 'ten
p e r centers,"
Rabbi Skop gtvtag at lea-st
ten per cent of
their income to aid others. Others
are able and willing to give more
. some are "thirty per centers'"
. and many give less. Some do
not even give at all.
But when one realizes the noble
causes and worthy organizations
which help feed and educate and
save the lives of others, giving
becomes a pleasure. No wonder
the saying. "It la more blessed to
give, than to have to receive," is j
so meaningful.
In our own Jewish Federation I
rf North Broward we have a long
Hat of allocations each year which .
includes many worthy causes. The
largest allocation goes, of course
to the State of Israel as a grant
via the United Jewish Api>eal to
re-settle newcomers, help the
sick and aged, provide housing
and medical care to the uprooted
and suffering. The Jewish Biaille
Institute gets sonic help to aid
the Jewish blind. The local Pabbis
rotate in conducting religious
''WelicjioH* Service*
FORT IAUDERDAIE
BETH ISRAEL (Temple) Coneerva.
tive. 547 E. Oakland Par* Blvd.
Rabbi Akiva Brilliant. Cantor Mao^
rice Neu
42
If donors to our Federation
could only visit and see the grati-
tude expressed in speech ami ges-
ture of the recovered patients who
sing the Hebrew songs, enjoy the
Talmudic stories and join in the
prayers and hymns which bring
back happier memories of their
healthier days and their homes.
The local Jewish Family Serv-
ices get some of the monies to |
help in counselling, family prob- j
lema and emergency needs. Some ;
support is given to the Technion, i
Synagogue Council of America, I
Bureau of Jewish Education for!
guidance and youth education and |
projected Youth Pilgrimages to j
Israel.
Some funds are allocated to the
American Jewish Committee for j
its fine work in research and in- j
ter-faith relations; the River j
Garden Home for Aged in Jack- I
sonville gets some support; the j
Leo N. Levi Hospital for sick and j
indigent, the B'nai B'rth Anti-De-
famation Committee for its fine
work in protecting the Jewish
community f r o m anti Semites
) and crack-pots and tzoris.
I Many other groups and organi-
sations also receive some sui>i>ort
! including the three national or-
ganization representing the
Orthodox. Conservative and Re- J
j form denominations and their var-
ied programs.
Through the Jewish Federation,
separate apjx-als are avoided. Fol- '
lowing every year's campaign for
funds, a group of leaders in our
community, many who gave and
helped raise the funds, spend |
hours in evaluating the needs and \
EMANU-EL. 3245 W. Oakland Park
Blvd. Reform. Rabbi Arthur J. AD
ram. Cantor Jrome Klement.
48
Question
Box

POMFANO BEACH
SHOLOM (Temple). 132 SE 11th Ave.
Conaervative. Rabbi Morrie A. Skop.
Cantor Ernest Schreiber. ?
----------
MARGATE
MARGATE JEWISH CENTER. 6101
NW 9th St.______________
y^V^MWWWWAAAArWlAry^
9
CANDLELIGHTING TIME
29 KISLEV 5:13
9
VvWVVvVvV*/rVA*Ar\rWvV'
L
JOSEPH 1L50P
Continued from Page 4
to forbi^ what they have been
Investing do. The United States, mean-
while, long ago abondoned Its
anti-satellite program although
Soviet satellites could now '
brought down with Spartan mis-
siles using the nuclear warhead
thai was belatedly proved in the
famous Cannikin test
The evidence is hard to read.
Yet in such cases, it Is exactly
like playing Russian roulette to
base national policy on the |
thai preparations, especial])
verj expel sive preparations.
u ver reveal ultimate intern
services at the nearby Florida allocating the funds in a fair man-
State Hospital in Hollywood.
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while ii is generally agreed that
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ways been the official language
of Jewish prayer.
Afaimonidas, In his Laws of
Bv RABBI KAMrKLaf. FOX
>till hack of the lei
v v0 com^ej
takaa a great deal of rtilijenca
skill to porga this auction ajj
laava the hind quarter
Then an those who try t0(
eoaawna this par; i !lK-'amin
Tliero are, however, some,
munltlej which do have
Prajer, explaim tWl uature by an.1 thus consume th,s pan ,<

explaining that the Insistence of
praying in Hebrew has acted at
unifying agenl which synchronizes
the expressions of Jew* the world
ever.
Mainranldes explains that when
the rabbis observed that the Jews
were being dispersed and that many
forms oi expressions and many
different languages wen prevalent
they wen convinced of dte need
for a certain amount of coaalBtancy
and therefore composed the I
prayers of the Jewish people in a
dear lucid ityle.
Jewish prayer i* an experience'
in which the Jew feels at one with I
his people and with hh history be-
hind him and his future ahead of
Mm. One of the foremost vehicles
used in accomplishing this unity
in wcietj and in time i-. tha use
ol the Hebn w language
Why i it that JfWa art- lor-
liidili'ii to I'unsiiini' the im-at (nun
tin' hind part oi rattle?
The basic res pro libiting
the hind quarter is because ol thi
Biblical resti iction ag linsl eatl
the sinew ol the thigh-vein wl
is upon the hollow ol the thigh
the vein and the
which travels down the
animal after purging the a;
ate section.
'Pi*i
Why is the sinrw n| tbf tw
prohibitnd hy the Bihle*
Some commentai
ii is prohibited b ca .- the p,
arch Jacob w i i their-1
ing his struggle with the
Some amplify this reason bye
I injj thai Jacob ws i mrivi haJ
his people left hi ,nd
prohibiting this sect
ik to look OUt t"l I!
others.
Others comment ti
strict ion reminds us
ardy In winch aw
ways being i to ;
I'hciv .ire those whj '
that because tins area is i
subject to Injur,
the Inflammation
which ii's aloni
s quite prevalent .-
ahvaj i be some
nati in hi<
leeioM .mil inli l
S ime vent';: i .",a:^
tains ;:
is haul to digest. V
combination ol hist
as hj gienic 11 asoi -
bition.
i. i. 1971 .' Irf
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iber 17, 1971
*Jenis^ncridiar
Page 7
ISRAEI NEWSLETTER
By Carl Alpert
College Graduates For Israel's Army
i
l THE Af*E OF 18. the overwhelming majority
ol Israel youth Boys and girls go into thr
jy. it is a national service which i> accepted ai
here. The countrj i.- menaced bj
part of the responsibility <>f living
I enemies. All must join in the de-
However, tlio Israel defense
forces have made an interesting
land very efficient provision to
solve the problem of youth bound
(for university. This is called the
Academic Reserve (Atuda Akudr-
it>, and it operates as follows:
Secondary school graduates with very high
ps and a desire to study at university may, up-
entering the army, apply for acceptance into the
Jcmic Reserve. The authorities study the appli-
5, note the field of study, apply aptitude tests
other considerations, then make the decision,
number (the precise number is a military secret!
|the applications are approved.
The JSMIDB people selected undergo their prep*
Itory tMSk military training during summer va-
|ion. but spend the remainder of their time at-
Sding the university of their choice. Upon grad-
uation with a Bachelor's.-degree, they owe the
armed forces the full term of three yesM of com-
pulsory service. In other words, the academic de-
ferment is precisely what th words mean a
postponement, and can not be transformed later
into a waiver of service.
one of the imi>ortant considerations in the
decision is the field of study. Obviously, the arm)
is not particularly interested in encouraging some-
one to Study in a Held which may not be especially
useful when the young soldier takes his place in
uniform like medieval history, or Sanskrit lit-
erature, for example. But if he is to study elec-
tronics, or aeronautical engineering or chemistry,
among other subjects, the army certainly is inter-
ested.
The soldier-graduate who begins his deferred
service possesses a possession or an education which
the army can use. Furthermore, he is almost always
called upon to serve as an officer.
Some of the young people have mixed feelings
about the opportunity. Some grasp at it. for it en-
ables them to continue their education straight from
high school, without the distracting three-year inter-
lude. Furthermore, if they can not afford to a'tend
university, the army will provide them with .scholar-
ship-, in such instances, the recipient will owe the
"ariYiV ah c.\ii''i"y';ar"df'service beyond Ins required
three years, for every year for which he received a
scholarship. Fur students lacking the means, who
might otherwise never have dreamed of going to
university, this is a godsend.
Other young people take a different view. They
prefer to serve their three years, get it over with,
and then attend college. When they are older they
may BC married, and will be more career-oriented.
Besides, since most of their friends and buddies will
be getting into uniform, they prefer to stick with
their gang. For mast, it should be added, there Is
no choice.
Members of the Academic Reserve must main-
tain high grades, or the army yanks them out of
university and sends them into the ranks. Girls,
too, are accepted in the program, hut they must
thereafter serve their prescribed period of compul-
sory service even if they are married and have
children a state of affairs which otherwise
exempts a girl from service.
Israel is defended by a citizens army, and
there is need for educated officer material as well.
H.nce the authorities' Interest in selecting the verj
be-t of the young people for the Academic Reserves.
BOOK REVIEW By Seymour B. liebman
'Moscow And Jerusalem'
look .Moscow Ami Jerusalem bj Avigdor Dagan
kard-Schuman, |6.95) is the firs! to interpret a
ction of Soviet and Israeli diplomatic corre-
spondence and conversations affecting
relations between the two nations. The
author, who has been in Israel's foreign
service for 20 years, has served as am-
bassador to Poland, Yugoslavia and
Norway, and twice headed Israel's Fast
European department of foreign affairs.
He | roves the ambivalence of Soviet
diplomacy when it seeks to protect Us
clients, especially Fgypt. and when it
[its press and diplomatic corps to prove that it is
seeking nation.
May 19t>7. the Soviet propaganda machine made
charge of Israeli troop concentrations on the
jider. Pravda sut, d that its sources were Egyp-

line Jerusalem: By: AMOS BEN VEND

usteritv Measures
('opyitfhl ( i i!Ci .it-wi.h Telegraphic Agency)
new At stkuity measures approved Nov.
by the Cabinet concerning the reduction of
building, expense accounts, the non-replace-
of cars and furniture and additional items
been worked out for psychological as well as
mic reasons, Finance Ministry circles admit
he public sector in Israel plays an overriding
its eronomy. The deficit for the current year
saefs trade balance, including services, is $1.3
i. All this money is supplied from abroad.
of it from contributions to fund-raising cam-
and from other public sources such as loans
rants by foreign states.
OWOVer, due mainly to the skyrocketing de-
expandttures, Israel has to cut down on many
sci-vices. If the lower income families are
[that there is no money for better schooling
Sir children, for example, then the relatively
1 income families are much more envied.
ars are taxed in Israel 250',. so that a medium
American car costs $12,000. When the poor in
see government officials riding In such cars
ing in restaurants which specialize in French
g, the social unrest may become stronger.
b one of the reasons wh) the order has been
to cut down on items which the poor cannot
mother reason also borders on the psychology
ihen a top executive ol a government corpora-
told that he cannot renew his office furni-
nd is not allowed t-> spend more than S2.25
meal, he will be much more reluctant to ap-
i \\ nditun bj other officials
The problem facing the Ministry ol Finance of-
who will have to implement the new regula-
:n detail is how to crack down on the spei
labits ol tli< strong. As almost everywhere, II
be v pak wh i are unable to attain even the
I share ol what should be theirs by right
th lake more 'ban Is due them As
ker-riding pan of the economj depends on
c rhoni v the itrong arc these who ":
lor or deal with it.
tian, bul Egyptian officials attributed the story to Russia,
Dagan's questions about future Soviet-Israeli relations
go to fundamentals: Does Russia cherish logic? Does it
want peace? Will the United States show sufficient firm-
ness in its stand to force Russia to think of peace?
Boris Smolar. Russian rxjrn Jewish Telegraphic
Agency (JTA> editor emeritus, who is knowledgeable
about Muscovian chicanery, attempts to answer questions
ot why Soviet leaders look upon Jews as "supick>u.s ele-
ments." can Jewish culture survive in Russia, and other
pertinent queries in Soviet Jrjp Today and Tomorrow
(Macmillan Co.. $5.95. Since Smolar is not an -ins'ant
expert," his book deserves reading. He provides an au-
thorative picture of the social, economic, religious and
cultural lives of Soviet Jewry today. Prognostications may
be taken with a spot of salt, however, since Soviet lead-
ers are not aficionados of logic or the rules of the game.
My Testimony by Anatoly Marchcnko. translated by
Michael Scammel (A Delta Book, $2.951 is listed as
sociology-biography. It is! While not a masterpiece of
literary style, it is frightening in its simple, straight-
forward account of life in a Soviet labor (read "con-
Centratkm") camp. He served from l%0-66 as a politi-
cal prisoner in one of these camps, and classifies the
groups of political prisoners into intellectuals accused
Of anti-Soviet propaganda, religious believers, and nation-
alists those who advocate some degree of autonomy for
non-Russian parts of the U.S.S.R. (Marchcnko was re-
arrested in July 1968 for writing this book). The pattern
of life in these camps are very reminiscent of what we
hear about American jaiLs; homosexual rapes, corruption
of prison guards and their inhuman treatment of inmates,
ana the inadequacy of food.
As We Were Saying iy MBERT **&H
America's Third Force
FOR THOME A SIJtiHT space left-of-center. Common
Cause the modern brain child of Republican John
W. Gardner may prove in the 1970's as satisfying as
the old Fight For Freedom was in the
1940"s. Common Cause is a collection of
nearly 200,000 Americans paying $15
on a non-tax exempt basis with the
broad aim of trying to take the country
away from the professional politicians in
the hope that the people will pick up the
pieces and move on from there.
"We are trying to bring the Individual
back to where he has access to his own
institutions." Gardner has said. "We wanl to open the
do irs and windows and let the people in W6 want to
;. ,i this country back on the path to greatness."
Soapj rhetoric? Don't b! too sure.
Coin.non Cause people have fought for the creation
nore public service jobs, for retention of the Offl i
omic Opportunity (the federal government's anti-
poverty agencyi, for voting rights for young people be-
tv i en 18 and 21, and foi an i I food stamp pro-
Sharpesl ..i all ha- been the fight for a wind-up of
1, o -China.
John Garner has attracted financial bacli
the IBM Watsons, John D. 1 III, John
Whitney, and Dreyfus I tf B 4 i| I -'
others, and ti ? pnafeastanato like- Lowell I
Common Cause i in ormer lobbylsl for
,i,,. v Ban Association,
Between You and Me By BORIS SMOLAR
Hebrew In The L.S.
AMERICAN GOVERNMENTAL sources are pro-
viding more than SI million a year for instruc-
tion of Hebrew language in public high schools.
This is a small sum compared
with the 90 million which Jews
spend annually on maintaining
Jewish schools of all types. It Is
also a small sum compared with
what municipalities spend on
teaching foreign languages in their
high schools.
The governmental expenditure
on Hebrew courses for high school
foreign language study included in the public school
curriculum. There are about 80 public high schools
In the nation where Hebrew is taught. Half of them
are in New York. The remainder are In Los An-
geles, San Francisco, Miami, Cleveland, Baltimore.
Philadelphia, Milwaukee and other cities with a
Substantial Jewish population. About 4.300 pupils
are attending the Hebrew classes in all these
schools.
The National Hebrew Culture Council has been
knstrum ntal in encouraging the teaching of He-
brew in public high schools. The Council has been
helpful to communities seeking to introduce He-
brew in suburban areas but meeting with various
problems in relation to public school boards and
educators. It is estimated that during the last 1>0
years, more than 150,000 young i>coplc Jews and
non-Jews have attended regular 5-period-a-week
classes in Hebrew and Hebrew cultur- in public
high schools throughout the United States. Since
Hebrew language study Is today recognized on a
par with other foreign languages in the curriculum
of American public high schooLs, it enables the
student to meet college entrance requirements.
The course of study for Hebrew classes in the
public schools aims at developing the ability of the
student to speak and write Hebrew. The curriculum
provides the student also with a bird's-eye view
of Jewish history and literature, an acquaintance
with Jewish folk-ways and customs and an orienta-
tion to the life and problems ot Israel. In the upper
grades, selections from ancient, neo-ctaseic an' eon-
temporar) writers are studied.
The study ol Hebrew In public high schools has
nothing to do with the Hebrew course- now being
n in about 200 colleges, universities and in the-
ological seminaries. In the collegi and universities
Hebr -w Is taught, while in the theolo
ninaries the Hebrew Is Biblical. The U.S. Office
f Educ tion estimates that about 6,000 students
arc attending Hebrew courses In American colleges
: unlversiti -
There are todaj aboul 800 olleges and univer-
sities in the Ui I which re the
Hebrew i as a ton ign langu i P*' ''
, (mission i students. 1 il no Hebrew course
is n ing ta i hi In aboul 800 of them. In g neral,
Hd uples the sixth pla i a nong foi
taught in Ame lean ichools of hi
the U.S lucatlon.
,,-,.,. I71 Jewish Telegraphl.


Page 8
*Je*lsbrk>rkHari
Friday, December 17
.
Week In History.,
Restoration of human rights to Soviet
Jews was the topic when delegates from
the Leadership Conference of National
Jewish Women's Organizations met with
U.N. Ambassador George Bush at the U.S.
Mission to the United Nations in New
York, part of activities the Conference
sponsored in 27 U.S. cities on Dec. 6.
Listening as Ambassador Bush accepts
petitions addressed to U Thant and
bearing more than 100,000 signatures
are left to right): Mrs. Howard Levine of
West Orange, N.J., chairman of the Con-
ference Soviet Jewry Committee and
president oi the American Jewish Con-
gress Women's Division; Mrs. Charles
Snitow of Scarsdale, N.Y., chairman of
the Leadership Conference; Mrs. Eugene
Gold of Brooklyn, a vice president of
Pioneer Women; Mrs. David Levitt of
Great Neck, N.Y., president of the Na-
tional Federation of Temple Sisterhoods;
Mrs. Gerrard Berman of Paterson, N.J.,
vice president of the National Women's
League of the United Synagogue, and
Mrs. Earl Marvin of Woodmere, NY., pres-
ident of the National Council of Jewish
Women.
40 Years Ago This Week: 1031
in- ahon registration "one
of the last gasps ol M0 parotid
\ erlcanism, a device of self- pro-
tective inferiority which is psychic
\ in its origins." Rabbi Stephen S.
Wise assailed Herltert Hoover's
endorsement of it as "lamentable
hypocrisy to which a President of
the United States .should scorn to
stoop."
A Jewish worker of Wilna was
sentenced to is months for alleg-
beating a soldier and a Christ-
ian woman neither of whom ap-
peare i in c wrt and neither of
whose names was disclosed
Joseph Paul Goebbels, Hitler's
lieutenant, denied a Communhrt
claim thai his wife was Jewish.
The Rumanian Embassy in
Washington denied its govern-
ment's endorsement of anti-Semi-
tic Parliament speech, saying:
"The government has not approv-
ed any policy save that which has
been officially declared, the re-
sults of which can be seen by its
results. The next day, Rumania
Closed thfl I'/ernowit/ Jewish High
School as an "economy'" measure.
Rabbi Isaac Aaron Verdznvitch
of Vladivostok. USSR, was re-
leased from prison after 10 months
when the authorities conceded he
had not helped Jews across the
Chinese frontier.
10 Years Ago This Week: 1M1
Attorney Robert Servatius. ap-
pealing Adolf Eichmann's death
"H w
sentence, admitted:
surprise to him. After .',l| I
self did not expect to re!
family again as a free man/'
i vatius gave 10-1 odds the m\
would never be carried out
The American Nazi pam.
"withering on the vine," the','
i Defamation League said
Mrs. Florence G. Heller of A
I ago gave Brandeis I niversitv"
; million for a Florence
luate School for Adv
| Studies in Social Welfare,
The Knesset voted
, former members of ti
i Leumi and the Lochamei L,
Yisrnel the same pension righu
:na veterans.
Franz Hoffman, former &
tion chief at Dachau got H
prisonment for th>
i Jews. Three ex-Nazi leaders
12, four and four years for
plicity in 1.000 Jewish deaths
Sen. Jacob K. Ja\its (R_J|
found "a determined govern
policy against allowing Sor
Jews who wish to do so from
rating to Israel." and urged
protest not only from indivi
nations like the US but also fi
the UN."
Moss Hart, president of
Dramatists' Guild, Pulitzer-*
ning co-author of "You
Take It With You" and di
of "My Fair Lady." died in
Springs at 57.
cdoAt I ImJv
SHALOM
PEACE
MAY IT FILL YOUR HEART
YOUR HOME
AND THE WORLD


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