The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 3, no. 7 (Apr. 5, 1974)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 9, 1976 called v.4, no. 27 but constitutes v.5, no. 1; issue for July 7, 1989 called v.18, no. 11 but constitutes v.18, no. 13.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44570954
lccn - sn 00229545
ocm44570954
System ID:
AA00014312:00565

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Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward


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Full Text
fiewi5lti Meridian
OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE
low
10- Number 24
Fort Lauderdale, Florida Friday, October 16,1981
FndShocht!
Price 35 Cents
iving Is Less Taxing This Year
|"he Economic Recovery Tax
of 1981, passed by Congress
signed by President Ronald
i, represents a unique
irtunity for Jewish Fed-
s in the United States to
ease cash collections signifi-
in the remaining months
this year and give the 1982
[lpaign a very strong start.
said Herschel Blumberg,
in 1 chairman of the United
pish Appeal, during a meeting
UJA's National Campaign
licy Board.
nuin of the tax savings pro-
Mis expire Dec. 31, of this
He said: "The legislation,
significantly reducing the tax
rates in all brackets starting Jan.
1, 1982, including reducing the
maximum rate from 70 to 50 per-
cent, creates a considerable in-
centive for contributors to pay
past due pledges, make complete
payment of 1981 pledges, prepay
1982 pledges, and donate appre-
ciated properties and securities."
He noted that this is so be-
cause "the after-tax cost of dona-
tions may never be as low to the
donor as it is in 1981."
One of the key features of the
law, Blumberg cited, that is of
special signifcance to con-
tributors is the planned re-
ductions in individual tax rates
over the next several years. He
said this year the individual tax
rate will be reduced by 1.25 per-
cent; next year, 10 percent; in
1983, 19 percent, and in 1984, 23
percent. In 1982, the maximum
individual tax rate will decline to
50 percent from the present
maximum rate of 70 percent. The
graduated nature of the tax en-
hances the desirability of paying
all unpaid pledges in 1981 be-
cause of increases, he said, in tax
savings compared to later years.
He cited the following example
of paying a 1981 pledge in full
this year: A married taxpayer
whose $150,000 taxable income
(after all allowable deductions
and exemptions) requires him to
pay taxes of $72,600 would only
have to oav$66.280, if he paid his
$10,000 pledge this year a
saving of $6,320.
If that same taxpayer waits
until next year to pay his 1981
pledge, under the new tax sched-
ule he will save only $5,000 in
taxes, a loss of after tax dollars of
$1,310. And if he makes the same
pledge for 1982 and pays it this
year, he'll save an additional
$1,320 after tax dollars.
Leaders in the Jewish Fed-
eration of Greater Fort Lauder-
dale, including Gladys Daren,
Women's Division president, and
John Streng, treasurer, who are
co-chairing the Federation's cash
committee, are urging full pay-
ment of 1981 pledges before the
end of the year. Campaign lead-
ers are seeking 1982 pledges as
part of the preliminary plans of
the 1982 UJA campaign and
urging pre-payment on the
premise that "Uncle Sam helps
you pay your pledge this year."
Additional information on the
tax-saving aspects of the Econo-
mic Recovery Act of 1981 may be
secured by calling the Federation
office and talking with Campaign
Director Kenneth Bierman, 748-
{KL______________________
Jewish National Fund Installs Officers Oct. 27
Barrett Rothenberg, Coral
prings attorney, will be in-
alled as president of the Jewish
jtional Fund (JNF) of Greater
:n Lauderdale succeeding Dr.
Jvin Colin of Fort Lauderdale.
j The installation of officers will
kt- place at the annual meeting,
pen to the public, at 8 p.m.,
uesday, Oct. 27, in the Samuel
. Soref Hall, JewishCommunity
enter Perlman Campus, 6501
. Sunrise Blvd., Plantation.
The speaker will be Dade
inty's distinguished and
linen t theology scholar, Rabbi
. ing I.ehrman.
Dr. Colin, the retiring presi-
ent of JNF, said: "Over these
ast 10 years of JNF in our area,
Here has been steady progress
nd greater progress is ahead
ith our new president and with
jr executive director, Shirley
liller. JNF has 'come of age,' in
[laking the community realize
Shocked by Sadat's Death
Victor Gruman, president of the Jewish Fed-
eration of Greater Fort Lauderdale, speaking on be-
half of the Jewish community following the death of
Egypt's President Anwar Sadat, said ;
The Jewish community of Greater Fort Lau-
derdale was deeply shocked to learn of the assas-
sination of Anwar Sadat, president of Egypt. The
Jewish community deeply mourns the loss of a great
statesman. His peace initiative and courageous
diplomacy was instrumental in bringing about a
state of peace between Egypt and Israel and had
begun to lend an element of stability to the Middle
East. His loss will create a great void of leadership in
the Middle East and we hope that his efforts for
peace in that region will be fulfilled."
Atty. Rothenberg
the vast scope of the organiza-
tion's work throughout the State
of Israel."
Other to be installed, following
the nominations approved by the
nominating committee headed by
Jacob Brodzki, are Lou Colker,
Philip Halle, Libo Fineberg, vice
presidents; Lee Shainman, treas-
urer; Nat Baker, financial secre-
Rabbi Lehrman
tary; Bernard Oshinsky,
recording secretary.
Board members: Irwin Footer,
Paul Frieser, Victor Glazer, Vic-
tor Gruman, Hildreth Levin,
Leonard Levitt, Abe Meltzer,
Leon Messing, Josephine
Newman, Dorothy Oshinsky,
Sylvia Plafker, Larry Rothen-
berg. Abe Tuchman, Florence
Weissberg, Dr. Jack Zomlefer.
The Rabbinical Advisory Com-
mittee includes Rabbis Jeffrey
Ballon, Sheldon Harr, Phillip
Labowitz, Israel Zimmerman.
Helene Soref is chairman of the
annual meeting and installation
of officers during which special
presentations from JNF in New
York will be made. Hildreth
Levin has arranged for hosts and
hostesses with Peggy Brodzki in
charge of refreshments. Their
committee includes Mr. and Mrs.
Al Gross, Mr. and Mrs. Ludwik
Brodzki, Mr. and Mrs. Colker,
Mrs. Newman, Mr. and Mrs.
Shainrnan, Mrs. Plafker, Mr. and
Mrs. Philip Halle, Mr. and Mrs.
Oshinsky, Mr. and Mrs. Melt-
zer, Mr. and Mrs. -Nat Baker,
Seymour Gerson.
ne and Inseparable: Bible Study, Israel
r>fr ,
f

Wical talk by Prime Minister Begin. Seated at his left Dr. Halpern.
"ofo in Begin's home by Abe Gittelson.
By
ABRAHAM J. GITTELSON
Federation-CAJE
Education Director
Every Saturday night is an in-
tellectual and religious treat at
the residence of the Prime Minis-
ter of Israel Menachem Begin.
Those evenings, after Shabbat
ends, are devoted to the weekly
meetings of the central group of
the World Jewish Bible Society.
Leading Biblical scholars of
Israel, with Prime Minister Begin
as host, gather to probe in-depth
a different aspect of the Bible
each week. The Society, or-
ganized originally by Israel's
first Prime Minister, David Ben
Gurion, an avid student of the
Bible, met at his home, but at his
death, the group met in the
homes of the Presidents of the
State of Israel. With the election
of Begin, the site of the meetings
were returned to the Prime
Minister's residence.
This meeting near the end of
summer, to which this author and
his wife, Shulamith Gittelson,
were fortunate to attend, the
Saturday before Begin was soon
to leave for the U.S. and his first
meeting with President Ronald
Reagan, was somewhat special.
It directly preceded the Fifth
International Bible Contest for
Adults. Special guests of the
Prime Minister and the Bible So-
ciety were the winners of 30 na-
tional Bible contests throughout
the world. The outdoor patio of
the official residence was filled
from corner to corner with scho-
lars, newspaper writers, special
guests and government officials.
The first lecture was offered by
Dr. Sarah Halpern of the Hebrew
University in Jerusalem. The
main speaker, however, was the
Prime Minister himself. Viewing
Saul as a tragic hero, he traced
the relationship of the two prota-
gonists, substantiating his views
with copious quotes from the
Book of Samuel.
Some sharp questions followed
his presentation, inlcuding those
posed by Gideon Hauser, former
Attorney General of Israel and
prosecutor in the Eichmann trial.
Those present were astounded
by the scholarly approach to the
subject by Begin who was pre-
paring for his crucial meetings in
the White House, takingthe time,
because of his dedication and
Continued on Page 3
Women Plan Leadership Day Oct. 28
[Two nationally known leaders in
N National United Jewish Appeal
Fomen's Division are coming to Fort
fcuderdale this month to meet with
> leadership of the Women's
|ivision of the Jewish Federation of
pater Fort Lauderdale.
I Marsha Sherman, a member of the
ptional UJA Women's Division
bard, and Barbara Weiner, chairman
I the National UJA Young Leader-
?'!' will be the speakers at the ses-
?ns to be held Wednesday, Oct. 28,
> the Palm Aire Spa Hotel in Pom-
panoBeach.
Announcement that Sherman, now
of Tampa, and Wiener, of Milwaukee,
Wise., will be the speakers at the Oct.
28 Leadership Day sessions was made
by Lee DreUing and Roily Weinberg,
chairmen of the Leadership Day for
1982.
The local chairmen said that they
know that the speakers, frequent vis-
itors to Israel in recent years, will
bring a fresh new approach to
voluntary dedication needed for
leadership, in addition to accepting
the responsibility of serving for the
good of Jewish people everywhere.
Mrs. Sherman, former Florida
State and Regional chairman, was
elected president of the Women's
Division of the Jewish Federation of
South Broward, receiving the com-
munity's young Leadership Award in
1972 and the Woman of the Year
Award in 1975, before moving tdt
Tampa. Mrs. Wiener is also the wife
ner of a Young Leadership Award;
presented in 1972, by the Milwaukee
Jewish Federation.
Joining Mrs. Dreiling and Mrs.
Weinberg in noting the credentials of
the speakers and the messages they
will be bringing to the Division's
leadership were Gladys Daren,
Women's Division president; Jean
Shapiro, Women's Division executive
vice president for campaign, and
Felice Sincoff, Women's Division
Campaign '82 chairman. They antici-
pate this will be the finest Leadership
Day in the 14-year history of the
Women's Division campaigning for
UJA.



Page 2
i'dfxirtiaier'tort LjuXcueramk
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday. October is,
Mobil Oil Offers Saudi Propaganda
"The widely circulated Mobil
Oil advertisement, 'The U.S.1
Stake in Middle East Peace: New
Opportunities' reads like a pro-
paganda statement published by
the government of Saudi
Arabia," wrote Robert Zweiman,
national commander of Jewish
War Veterans of the USA to W.
P. Tavoulareaf, president of
Mobil Oil. The new peace oppor-
tunity cited is Crown Prince
Fahd's "new eight point" Middle
East plan of August 7. Zweiman
noted, although the ad also con-
tains some of President Sadat's
comments during his August
U.S. trip, it mysteriously does
not mention Sadat's condemna-
tion of Fahd's plans as nothing
new.
The ad quotes the Saudi plan
as stating "that all states in the
region should be able to live in
peace," but does not mention
that Saudi Arabia has never rec-
ognized the State of Israel. "Hie
Community Calendar
FRIDAY, OCT. 16
Hadaaaah: L'Chayim Chapter:
General meeting, Deicke Audito-
rium, Boutique, Speaker Dr.
Bruce Clarin, Refreshments,
noon.
SATURDAY, OCT. 17
Jewish Community Center: Her
Story in History, Part I, Thea-
trical Performance, 8 p.m.
SUNDAY, OCT. 18
B'nai B nth: LauderhiU Lodge:
General meeting at Castle Gar-
dens Rec. Hall, 10 a.m.
Temple Beth Israel of Deerfield
Beach: Bagel and Lox Breakfast,
Documentary film, "Where We
Came From," 10 a.m.
Temple Beth Israel, Games, 7:30
p.m.
MONDAY, OCT. 19
Women's League for Israel:
Hatikvah Chapter, noon,
League's Homes in Israel film,
Broward Mall meeting room.
HADASSAH:
Aviva Oakland Estates Chap-
ter: Paid up membership lunch-
eon, Lauderdale Lakes City Hall,
noon.
Armon Castle Chapter: Board
meeting at Castle Rec. Hall,
noon.
Bat Ami-Tamarac Chapter:
Board meeting at Tamarac
Jewish Center, 9:30 a.m.
NATIONAL COUNCIL OF
JEWISH WOMEN:
Plantation Section: "Bon Ap-
petet" at Broward Mall.
Gold Coast Section: Board
meeting, 10 a.m.
EREV SHEMINI ATZERET
THURSDAY, OCT. 22
Temple Emanu-EI: Board
meeting, p.m.
Temple Beth Am of Margate:
Board meeting, 7 p.m.
Temple Beth Israel, Deerfiekl
Beach Sisterhood: General meet-
ing at Temple, 12:30 p.m.
HADASSAH:
.. Pompano Chai Chapter: Gen-
eral meeting at Pompano Rec.
Center, 1801 N.E. 6th St., 11 a.m.
to 3 p.m.
Oriole Scopus Chapter: Gener-
al meeting at Congregation Beth
Hillel, Margate Square, Margate,
noon.
ORT
| .. Wynmoor Chapter: Board
S meeting at Boca Raton Federal
5 Bank, State Rd. 7,1 p.m.
2 Lauderdale Ridge Chapter:
Regular meeting and Paid-Up
Membership Luncheon. Report of
ORT Conference in New York
and film, "Links in the Chain" at
-n Lauderdale Lakes City Hall,
I noon.
| B'NAI B'RITH:
m Plantation Lodge: Board
~* meeting, Southern Federal Bank,
Community Room, Sunrise Blvd.
and Sunset Strip 8 p.m.
Hope Chapter: General meet-
-n ing at Deicke Auditorium, noon
i Free Sons of Israel, Fort Louder
t dale Lodge: Speaker, Elaine
Z Allen, Whiting Recreation Hall,
-N.W. 64th Ave. and N.W. 24th
St., 7:30 p.m.
FRIDAY, OCT. 23
Workmen* Circle, Branch 1046:
7 General meeting at Lauderdale
i Lakes City Hall, 7:30 p.m.
C SATURDAY, OCT. 24 4
2 SUNDAY, OCT. 25
Jewish CISaaUj Center
"TsinderelU," Yiddish Play.
SUNDAY, OCT. 25
American Mogen David for Isra-
el: Special Show at Sunrise
Musical Theatre, 8 p.m.
new Saudi plan implies peace
without Israel; no wonder Yasar
Arafat was delighted with the
plan," said Zweiman. The PLO is
committed to Israel's total anni-
hilation; this is the reason why
Israel has refused to negotiate
with a terrorist group who wants
to destroy it.
Examples of Saudi Arabia's
peaceful efforts are shown by
their part in helping negotiate the
recent cease fire in Lebanon.
Zweiman claimed, "The Mobil
ad does not mention the Saudi's
financing the PLO to the tune of
400 million dollars a year. Saudi
money buys arms which the PLO
uses to attack Israeli civilians,
Lebanese Christians, and impor-
tant 'military targets' like a syn-
agogue in Vienna."
Teen Federation
Meets in Coral Springs 1
The Coral Springs Teen Feder- group two years ago a ^
ation held its first meeting of the again advisor to the 10th uS
uimu iiciu iw ~-------o------
new year on Wednesday, Oct. 14
at the home of Holly Gruber.
Beginning its third year, the
and 12 th graders.
!***l* **

all indications point to an ex
citing series of programs.
Selma Telles, who started the
tion program are invited to Zi
Mrs TeUes at 485-8983 or h3!
Gruber at 752-6507.
iNtt
fll
Women's Division of Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale offers
Beautiful Cards for Any Occasion
8 in a packet for $25.
Call 748-8200
HHIHIIIIIIIIIIIt
The most respected name
in Jewish funeral servic
In the world.
Not surprising, it's
Riverside, and there are many
reasons.
If you've ever worked with
any of our people on community
projects ranging from fund-
raising drives for Israel to
enhancing Jewish education,
you'd understand. If you've ever
experienced the compassion
and kindness of Riverside
counselors, you'd have an even
deeper appreciation of the
reasons for Riverside leader-
ship.
At Riverside, we have the
largest Jewish staff available
from any funeral director in
Florida. More important, they
are people who understand
Jewish tradition and honor it.
They carry on a tradition
that for over th ree generations
has been a priceless assurance
to Jewish families.
Our people. They make
Riverside the most respected
name in Jewish funeral service t,ame Gardner
in the world. Lena Rothfeld
SoniaGale
The Largest Jewish Staff
In The World.
CarlGrossberg, President
Andrew Fier, Vice President,
New York and Past President
of the Jewish Funeral
Directors of America.
Charles Salomon, Vice
President, New York.
In Florida:
Alfred Golden, Executive Vice
President.
Leo Hack, V.P., Religious
Advisor.
Sam Rosenthal
Kenneth Kay, V.P.
Keith Kronish,F.D.
Mark Ginsberg, F.D.
Harvey Pincus,F.D.
Douglas Lazarus, F.D.
Carmen Serrano, F.D.
Robert Burstein
Arthur Zweigenthal
Isaac Nahmias
Samuel Golland
Jules Fischbein
Alfred Stern
Syd Kronish
DickSorkin
Joseph Rubin
Henry Bof man
Joseph Bass
ADDRESSES:
MIAMI BEACH: 1920 Alton
Road (19th SU/531-1151
NORMANDY ISLE: 1250
Normandy Drive/531-1151
MIAMI: 1717S.W. 17th St.
(Douglas Rd.)/443-2221
NORTH MIAMI BEACH: 16480
N.E. 19th Ave./947-8691
HOLLYWOOD: 2230 Hollywood
Blvd./920-1010
FT. LAUDERDALE (Tamarac):
6701 West Commercial Blvd.
(E. of University Rd.)/
587-8400
WEST PALM BEACH: 4714
Okeechobee Blvd./683-8676
Five chapels serving the New
York Metropolitan area.
Bernard Eilen
Aaron Rosenthal
Sol Silver
Charlie Blumkin
Ida Rosenberg
Barney Sel by
Edward Dobin
Ralph Rubell
Guardian Plan Counselors:
Ira Goldberg, Manager
Steve Fischman
RIVERSIDE
Memorial Chap*), Inc./Funaral Oirectors
Tradition. It's what makes us Jews.
Sponsoring the Guardian Plan Pre-Arranged ifSAj
(.luirdW
pun.


Friday, October 16,1981
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 3
Trial of Accused Nazi Aide Ends
U.S. District Judge James
Paine is expected to make a deci-
sion concerning Bohdan Koziy,
Fort Lauderdale owner-operator
of two motels, accused of being a
Nazi collaborator.
The 14-day trial without jury
ended after Koziy denied that he
had been a Nazi collaborator, and
described himself as a dedicated
Ukrainian resistance fighter
during World War II.
c Judge Paine is expected to
*-v make his decision about the end
of this month or early in Decem-
ber whether to strip Koziy of his
citizenship because of the Justice
Dept. charges that Koziy ac-
tually was a Ukrainian policeman
who killed at least 10 Jews in the
Polish town of Lysiec during the
1942-44 years of the Nazi occupa-
tion of the land
The Justice Dept. charges that
Koziy lied about those war years
to gain admission to this country
and again when he applied for
citizenship
Judge Paine's decision will de-
termine whether Koziy retains
liis citizenship and thus goes free
or whether Koziy has his citizen-
ship evoked and thus face depor-
tation.
Bonds Office in Fort Lauderdale
The State of Israel Bonds
Organization is maintaining its
North Breward office at 2787 E.
Oakland Park Blvd. Suite 407,
according to Rubin Breger, the
newly appointed Executive Di-
rector.
Breger noted that office hours
are from 9-5 daily, Monday
through Friday. He said that
Bond holders may come into the
office to have questions answered
and to complete forms for re-
investment of matured Bonds.
The North Broward Israel
Bond campaign is now independ-
ent from the Miami campaign,
Breger noted, "because of the in-
crease in the Jewish population in
this area."
Nazi War CriminalsThe Search Goes On
On Wednesday, October 21, 8
p.m.. WPBTChannel 2 presents
The Hunter and the Hunted, a
one-hour intense documentary
Attended Special Project in Israel
8MB
Mr. and Mrs. Barry Wiemik of
Coral Springs (pictured), and
their 12-year-old son, were among
a group of 14 American families
who spent a month in Israel in a
special program established
jointly by the Young Leadership
Council and the Aliyah Dept. of
the World Zionist Organization,
Jewish National Fund, local Is-
raeli municipalities, and the Con-
i servative Movement in Israel.
Parents worked mornings in
such pioneering type projects in
Safed and Carmiel, located in the
Galilee, as pruning trees, clearing
fire roads in forests, and working
on barren land. They also had
time for visits, shopping, and at-
tending classes some afternoons
and evenings.
The children went to summer
day camp with local Israeli kids,
and received Hebrew lessons in
the afternoon.
Barry Wiernik, a hotel owner-
manager, on his first visit to
Israel, said: "We came here
strictly to find out about Israel
and to have a living experience.
I'm coming away with a very
good feeling about Israel, and a
special appreciation of life in the
Galilee." He also wanted his son
to have the Israel experience be-
fore his Bar Mitzvah.
This was the third year for the
family living experience program.
Next year the program will be ex-
panded to include similar groups
of Orthodox and Reform Jews
from abroad, according to WZO's
Aliyah Dept.
which reports on the continuing
worldwide search for Nazi war
criminals. The film is narrated by
Jose Ferrer.
During the Holocaust be-
tween 11 and 14 million people
including six million Jews, and
countless million Poles, Czechs,
Dutch, Russians, French,
Yugoslavs, and others lost
their lives. Today, almost four
decades later, the search for those
responsible for the systematic
murder of innocent people goes
on.
Interviewed in this docu-
mentary are Simon Wiesenthal,
the world's foremost hunter of
Nazi criminals; Beate Klarsfeld,
a German non-Jew who has
dedicated her life to bringing
these criminals to justice; former
SS officers Walter Rauff,
murderer of 250,000 people and
Klaus Barbie, alias Klaus Alt-
mann, "the Butcher of Lyon."
Both Rauff and Barbie head the
most wanted list, along with Dr.
Josef Mengele, "the Angel of
Death." Archival film footage is
also highlighted.
The Hunter and the Hunted
was conceived, written, and
reported by British-born 33 year
old Bill Bemister.
Farber Library Underway Leonard L. Farber of Fort Lauderdale, third from left, leads Brandeis
University officials in groundbreaking for new library which will bear his name. Farber, president of the
Leonard L. Farber Co. of Pompano Beach, is joined by, from left, Brandeis University President Marver
H. Bernstein, Board of Trustees Chairman Henry L. Foster and Chancellor Emeritus Abram L. Sachar.
The Fort Lauderdale philanthropist and civic leader provided a $2,250,000 gift toward a $6.5 million
.library complex on the Waltham, Mass. campus.
Shaw Says: Don't
Touch Social Security
In the course of his recent
address to the nation, televised
from the Oval Office, President
Reagan announced his intention
to forward to Congress a new
package of entitlement and wel-
fare reform measuresbut he
made the Doint that these mea-
sures would not include Social
Security.
The President has learned a
valuable lesson about Social
Security. His original proposals
were said to include a three-
month delay in cost-of-living ad-
justments next year, from July 1,
when they are customarily paid,
until October 1, when they would
coincide with the beginning of the
fiscal year.
But he received messages from
the Congressand from Con-
gressman Clay Shawthat such
a measure would not be ap-
proved.
Sahw said: "Many Members of
Congress agreed with me that
Social Security isn't an appropri-
ate place to cut in order to ba-
lance the budget. I personally let
the administration know that I
could not support cuts to the
Social Security system made as
part of a second round of budget
cuts to meet guidelines to balance
the budget by fiscal 1984.
"In my opinion, the Social Se-
curity system is so important to
so many Americans who depend
on it that no changes should be
made to the system for the sake
of balancing the federal budget. I
believe that changes must be
made to Social Securityif not,
the system will go broke but no
changes should be considered in
order to meet designated guide-
lines for reducing the deficit as a
means of balancing the budget.
"But it is a step in the right
direction when the President says
he wants to remove Social
Security from the political arena.
The President has asked House
Speaker "Tip" O'Neill and
Senate Leader Howard Baker to
each appoint five members to
meet with five persons appointed
by him as a bipartisan study
group to review all the options
available to the Social Security
system. Although those appoint-
ments will undoubtedly be won
by senior Members of Congress, I
have expressed to the leadership
my willingness to serve on the
study group."
One and Inseparable
Continued from Page 1
knowledge of the BiMe, to speak
at this gathering ot the world's
leading Biblical scholars.
After a welcome from Dr.
Haim Gvaryahu, chairman of the
World Bible Society (a frequent
visitor and lecturer in South
Florida during the past few
years), the 30 winners introduced
themselves, each in his own na-
tive language.
Swedish, Danish, Flemish,
Spanish, French and Italian min-
gled with Hebrew and English as
youthful voices, one contestant
still in his teens, alternated with
mature and even greying adults.
Some of the winners were Ortho-
dox Jews, others Christian
ministers, still others teachers,
male and female, and some lay
people.
The Bible contest for these 30
winners was still two days off and
the highlight of the evening was
the scholarly presentation of the
relationship of two of the most
fascinating Biblical heroes: the
last of the Judges, Samuel, and
the first of the Kings of Israel,
Saul.
A branch of the World Bible
Society has been meeting in
Miami for the past four years,
with outstanding local and Israeli
scholars lecturing on various
topics within the Bible.
Plans are underway to organize
a similar group in the North Bro-
ward area to explore the timeless
message of the Bible for contem-
porary life.
The Society issues a popular
quarterly magazine on the Bible,
Dor le Dor (From Generation to
Gemeration), which is directed
primarily to interested Jewish
laymen who wish to deepen their
understanding and appreciation
of their Jewish heritage through
study of the Bible. Subscriptions
which cost $10 for the year are
available through CAJE at the
Jewish Federation, 8360 W. Oak-
land Park Blvd., Fort Lauderdale
3321, telephone 748-8200. A
scholarly Hebrew quarterly. Bet
Hamikra. is alo published for a
similar fee.
CuNCOnQE //*TGBN*r/oNm. REftLTrcnnp.
INVESTOR OWNED CONDOS
FOR RENT
Call: 484-6900
At Somerset Lakes .T.r
Convenient Location 24 Hour Security Heated Pool*
Clubhouse Adult Community Spacious Rooms -^T
Eat-In Kitchen Walk-In Closets Much. Much More.
1 and 2 Bedroom Apartment* From $350
I and 2
Bedroom
~j Apartments
^ From 9450
At River Reach...
Tennis Pool Sauna Security
Dockage Available Complete Privacy
Country Living At Its Best.
Broker Participation Invited



Page 6
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, October 16,1981
JCC Prepares for Its First Arts and Crafts Festival
The Arts and Crafts Festival Committee
(pictured here) planned the physical layout
for the Jewish Community Centers first
Arts and Crafts Festival. Standing from
left are Archie Rozen, Joseph Milgrom,
Adolph Greenbaum, Co-Chairman Charles
Benjamin, Abe Tuchman ; seated Florence
Alter, Chairman Harold Goldstein,
Jeanette Greenbaum. JCC's Maintenance
Director Jerry Gumora.
The event, expected to become an annual
fixture on the JCC calendar, will take place
from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Sunday, Nov. 1,
with a social event to take place Saturday
night, Oct. 31.
On the eve of the public showing of the
arts and crafts, the Festival judges, Jill
Marcus for crafts, and Dr. David Pactor for
art, will announce the winning artists and
award ribbons.
Festival Chairman Goldstein said: "This
Festival should be fun, and it's been fun
working on it." Hi co-chairman. Green-
baum, and Jeanette Greenbaum are in
charge of the Collector's exhibition as part
of the Festival.
The social evening on Oct. 31, was
planned by Jean Hoffman's, reception com-
mittee. She said: "Our exhibitors will be
honored at that time. We plan on refresh-
ments, music and an opportunity for the
exhibitors to view one another's work."
Deadline for artists to submit entries is
Friday, Oct. 16. r
Plans are to make the Nov. 1 event a
family day with music and dance to help
create the appropriate festival atmosphere.
Food will be sold by JCC's Senior Adult
Club and JCC's Teens. Prizes will be
awarded for a Pick A Winner Project that
day.
Jackowitz Youth Lounge Hours
Monday-Friday: 3:30-5 p.m.
Sundays: 12-5 p.m.
The Youth Lounge Consists of pool
tables, a ping pong table. Bumper Pool,
Atari Video, games, television, darts and
a Juke Box.
Come on down and hang out, the Jewish
Community Center is the place to be.
SAT TUTORING
This is an excellent opportunity to pre-
pare yourself for the SAT's testings in
December. It is an educational service to
JCC members to help learn the skills
necessary to help achieve your highest
possible score on the SAT's. These are
used by most colleges in their admission
programs.
For more information, contact Scott
Snyder._______________________
I Holiday Topics at Hebrew Day School
m~ "
l
i
I
i
JOIN US FOR A PONY DAY
Family Pony Day
Sunday
October 25
1:30-4:30 p.m.
Pony Rides
Barbecue Dinner
Games For All The Family
Cartoons
Prizes
And Much, Much, More.
JCC The Year of the Family
SIGN LANGUAGE
Sign language classes
postponed due to the Holidays,
will resume Nov. 11, and continue
until Jan. 27.
FIRST PROGRAM-
FRIDAY, OCT. 16
The Center is planning full day programs
for all Broward County teacher work
days.
Watch for details!!!
TRIBUTE CARDS
Tribute cards for all occasions are now
available on an individual basis for $2.50
each. Contact Sandy at JCC 792-6700.
IIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUIt^
CRC CreatingMailgram 'Bank'
The Community Relations Committee is
establishing a mailgram bank to help world Jewry
in liice of crisis. Irving R. Friedman, CRC Chair-
man, announced that as there are many issues
facing the Jewish community, it was essential
that our legislators hear us in time of need.
Mailgrams will only be sent when an issue
requires immediate attention. Friedman said,
adding that CRC will send the mailgrams and
have them billed to the individual's home tele-
phone number.
The cost for mailgrams of 50 words or less is
13.90. Participants in the mailgram bank will re-
ceive a copy of the mailgram. and be billed direct-
ly by the phone company.
To participate in this effort, please return the
form below to Federation. For further informa-
don. contact Larry Schuval. CRC Director at
Federation. 718-8200.
MAILGRAM BANK
I Want To Help World Jewry In Time Of Crisis.
Debbie Wisk and Celso Pilnik
prepare the autumn holidays as
part of the area of Judaic enrich-
ment at the Hebrew Day School
which is continuing one of its
successful programs. The Day
School is acting as host to several
visiting Rabbis from the commu-
nity. Rosh Hashana became more
alive and meaningful to the staff
and children through the visit of
Rabbi Tennenhaus of Congrega-
j tion Levi Yitzchok of Hollywood.
' The Rabbi related appropriate
stories about the deep meaning of
the Holidays. He also blew the
Shofar with great expertise. The
children enjoyed his visit and are
looking forward to his return.
Rabbis in the community are in-
vited to speak with the children
at assembly programs. Call HDS
at 583-6100. By participating in
the Day School program, Rabbis
are re-emphasizing the commu-
nity aspect of the school. Chil-
dren are thusly exposed to the
various tenets of the different
denominations of Judaism.
HDS ACTIVITIES
The Hebrew Day School of
Fort Lauderdale has been ex-
panding its enrichment program
this year. The Day School, noted
for its fine Secular and Judaic
education has already had a per-
formance by PACE. The Per
forming Arts for Community and
Education Inc. The children were
thrilled to experience the sights
and sounds of the brass section of
an orchestra. The next perform-
ance, the second of four, will be
held at the Day School on
Monday, Oct. 12.
On Oct. 27, the entire School
will attend a performance of "The
Wizard of Oz". This will be held
at Parker Playhouse in Fort
Lauderdale. The performance is
put on by the Story Theatre Pro-
ductions, Inc. The staff and the
children are looking forward to
seeing a live play.
Another exciting live perform-
ance will be held at the D
School in the early part of
The Robin Hood Players. .
home base is Scottsdale, \ i
will once more be putting
play for the children. Theii
formances in the past wen
educational and entertaining, and
the school is looking forward to
another excellent experiemv
year.
New UJA Award
Planned for Women
NAME
PHONE
ADDRESS
.ZIP
I authorize the use of my name, and you may charge
.2____3____4____5____6____(Please Check One) Telegram(s)
i
p
a.
To My Telephone Number During A Jewish Crisis.
THE USUAL COST IS $3.90 PER MAILGRAM.
The Women's Division of the
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale has joined
numerous communities
throughout the nation in the
newly-established level of philan-
throphy in behalf of the human
and social service needs of Jews
around the world.
When women, beginning with
commitments made to the 1982
United Jewish Appeal campaign,
pledge, on their own, $5,000 or
more to the campaign they will be
awarded the Lion of Judah pin
Similar Lion of Judah pins will be **
awarded by all communties in the
nation, which participate in the
Lion of Judah division
Jean Shapiro, executive vice
president of campaign for the
Women's Division, and Cam-
paign '82 Chairman Felice Sincott
indicated that the Women's Divi-
sion has fully endorsed the na
tional program.
SIGNATURE
X>ATE
Creative Jewish Cooking
Mail to Community Relations Committee
Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale
8360 W. Oakland Park Blvd., Fort Lauderdale, Fl. 33321
f

Education is fun and the North
Broward Midrasha is proving it.
Helene Smith, culinary instruc-
tor, will teach a class in Creative
Jewish Cooking at Temple Beth
Israel, 7100 W. Oakland Park
Blvd., beginning Nov. 3 from
9:30tolla.m.
This will be a delicious gas-
tronomic treat where you can
have your kugel and eat it too.
The preparation of those foods
that some say preserved the Jew-
ish people Kugel, lotkis.
chicken soup, etc. The course will
include a perfect Passover, a tra
ditional Chanukah, holiday meals
and tables. All foods will be pre-
pared in kosher creative fashion.
For more information call "4-
8200, the Jewish Federation


Friday, October 16,1981
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 7
IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMimilllllllllHHHM
iiiiiiiiiiiniiiir
niiiiimmmiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiimitttmiiHmHi^
319 Volunteers at Century Village Lauded for Raising $139,000
'*
a 22 vt2 ackbone of 25 United Jewish Appeal,"
declared Victor Gruman, president of the Jewish Federa-
Uun iftGreater K Lauderdale, speaking to the more
than 300 persons in attendance for the "Appreciation
Day meeUng for the volunteer UJA participants at
Century Village East in Deerfield Beach. parucipants at
In the big party room at Century Village's Clubhouse,
joining Gruman, who was the 1981 UJA Campaign Chair-
man, on the dais were (pictured from left) Henry Davila
club house director of Century Village who arranged for
the meeting room; Deerfield Beach City Councilman
Joseph Trachtenber, Evelyn Denner on Century Village's
UJA Executive Committee; Rabbi Leon Mirsky of CV's
Temple Beth Israel, CV-UJA General Chairman Samuel
K. Miller; Gruman; Leslie S. Gottlieb, Federation's
Kxecutive Director; Kenneth Bierman, Federation's UJA
Campaign Director, and Abe Rosenblatt, treasurer of CV's
UJA campaign.
Federation's leaders expressed their heartfelt thanks to
all the volunteers who made possible a more than 20 per-
cent increase in the 1981 campaign to a total of $139,000
Campaign Chairman Miller said that the increases were
the result of dedicated commitment on the part of the vol-
unteers who conducted a door-to-door campaign through-
out the sprawlmg complex of buildings.
Continuing in that vein, Gruman added that "you the
door-to-door volunteers, are just as important to the total
effort as are those of the bigger givers. Every one is needed
in our commitment to support our people in Israel our
people here in Broward, and our people throughout the
world because 'we are one one people indivisible I
thank you again from the bottom of my heart."
Pictured Are Some of The 319 Volunteers


Pageo
i ne o ewcsn r lUnuuirirWWy'tiier' tort iMilaxnuti*


The Jewish b'loridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, October 16,1981
Weizmann House at Weizmann
Institute of Science
By GEOFFREY WEILL
ITS NOT what you might expect in Israel.
A real, nonest-to-goodness "stately" home. But
there it stands, on a tranquil, verdant slope, in
Rehovot. The home of the late First President of
the State of Israel and his wife, Chaim and Vera
Weizmann, is located on the grounds of Israel's
spectacular Weizmann Institute of Science, and is
a treat for the visitor.
Chaim Weizmann was bom in 1874 in Motol,
a town in Russia's Jewish Pale of Settlement. As
a young man he became a Zionist, attending the
1898 Second Zionist Congress in Basel, Switzer-
land, chaired by Zionism's founder, Theodor
Herzl. In 1904, Weinzmann was appointed a
Reader in Chemistry at Britain's Manchester
University, after which his Zionist activities grew
from strength to strength. He married in 1906.
HE FIRST visited the land of Israel in 1907.
He was instrumental in working towards the Bal-
four Declaration, of 1917, Great Britain's
inoiiHMiious pledge to form a Jewish National
Home in Palestine. He led the Zionist Delegation
to the 1919 Versailles Peace conference, and in
1921 was elected President of the World Zionist
Organization. In 1934, he opened the Scientific
Research Institute at Rehovot, south of Tel Aviv,
named for British Zionist and philanthropist
Daniel Sieff. And it was thus in Rehovot, that in
1937 Chaim and Vera Weizmann made their
home.
In her diary, Vera Weizmann wrote, "At the
time of the opening of the Daniel Sieff Institute, I
happened to look out of the window of my
husband's small study there, and my eyes
alighted on a hill to the southeast." To design
their home on that hill, the Weizmanns chose Eric
Mendelsohn, architect of the original Hadassah
Hospital on Jerusalem's Mount Scopus.
Mendelson designed a lluuhau-styli-
structure, built squarely around a circular stair-
case, lit by glass bricks, a great favorite of the
post-depression designers. The two main
reception rooms flank the central courtyard
swimming pool, the elegant, long dining room
leading off the central hall.
IN A LETTER to a friend, Vera Weizmann
described how she planned the house: "the
library, big enough to hold all Dr. Weizmanns
books, must have an open fireplace where he
could arrange (or disarrange) the logs after the
manner of a man at home, and a loggia where he
could step out in the middle of a day's work."
The library desk remains as it was at the
time of Chaim Weinzmann's death in 1952. It is a
warmly-furnished room, on the east, intersected
with high porthole windows, and on the west
French doors open on to the swimming-pool ter-
race. Over the fireplace hangs an oil portrait of
Weizmann, by Birley.
The salon's art treasures are a tribute to the
Weizmanns' exquisite taste: magnificent
Persian silk carpet; priceless, fifteenth century
B.C. Chinese T'Ang Dynasty horse; and on the
walls, works by Impressionists Utrillo, Degas and
others.
Of the rest of the house, Vera Weizmann
wrote, "The guest bedrooms must not be too
few nor yet too many, and last but not least .
the garden which in the all-too-brief glory of the
Palestinian spring musl glow with masses of
color."
THE BEDROOMS are brightly furnished in
a style reminiscent of an English country house,
but what most impresses the visitor are the
personal touches: Weizmann's photographs,
ornaments, his prayer book open at his favorite
prayer, from the Yom Kippur Service, and most
of all the ledge specially built outside his circular
bedroom window, from which each morning, he
could feed the birds.
The house is lovingly cared for by the Weiz-
mann Institute. It is a moving visit. One feels the
Weizmann s presence, almost as if they have just
gone out for a few moments and will soon be back.
One is struck with the sumptuousness and
elegance, yet in no way is it ostentatious.
The grounds surrounding the house are, as
Vera Weizmann wanted, a riot of color. Perfect
lawns, flowering bushes, blossoming trees and
beds of fragrant flowers. Near the main entrance '
to the house is yet another charming memento of
Chaim Weinzman. Under a specially built
shelter, stands the 1951 Lincoln Continental, all
shiny black paint and gleaming chrome, with the
plaque that describes it as: "A gift from the Pres-
ident of the United States, Harry S. Truman to
Chaim Weizmann, First President of the State of
Israel." And not far from the house, at a site they
had chosen, are the graves of Chaim and Vert.
Weizmann.
THE WEIZMANN Institute cf Science at
Rehovot is twenty minutes south of Tel Aviv, and
forty minutes west of Jerusalem One of the
world's major institutions for scientific research
. T
Exterior view of the Weizmann House at Weizmann Institue of Science. Built in 1937, the
house is a typical example of the Bauhaus style of architecture. It was the home of Chaim
Weizmann, Israel's first President, until his death in 1952.

A corner of the salon of the Weizmann House at Rehovot. On the right a 15th century
Chinese Tang Dynasty horse; on wall, a portrait by French artist Barthe, of Vera Weizmann,
Israel's first "First Lady. "
- *
Library at the Weizmann House. Family photographs surround the room. On the fireplace wall
hangs the famous portrait of Chaim Weizmann by Birley. fireplace wall
and discovery, it is visited by thousands yearly
The Weizmann house itself is open Sunday
through Thursday from 10 a.m. until 3 p.m.
As one of Israel's founders, the whole
country, of course, is a tribute to this daring and
prophetic man. The Weizmann Institute is a
tribute to the man's scientific brilliance. And his
house, is a tribute to the man's sense of the
esthetic.
But perhaps no tribute to Chaim Weizmann
is more fitting than the telegram he received in
the United States two days after the State of Is-
r;iol s Declaration of Independence in 1948: "On
the occasion of the establishment of the Jewish
. we send our greetings to you. who have
done more than any other living man, towards its
creation." The telegram was signed, among
others, by David Ben Gurion and Golda Meir.
MHMiMriMMIMHl


Lay. October 16, 1981
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Pagei-
rowsin' thru
roward
'ith max levine
Sidney Karlton, who headed
1981 UJA campaign among
residents of Plantation's
jlvnesian Gardens, this week
|d: "We raised $9,000 for 1961.
kw we've committed ourselves
fa goal of $15,000" That's
spirit of "One People
divisible" Sam Hoffman,
publicity purveyor for Sun-
Jewish Center, noting the
son of the year, says people
Duldn't "indulge in hate, greed
quest for power," if you do,
| adds, "you are wasting preci-
i time and that's a crime."
abbi Sheldon Harr, on Mon-
of this week as part of the
\Vat service, held special con-
ca t ion service for Temple Kol
Ji's Religious School's new
dents in its kindergarten and
grade classes the largest
Bring group in five years .
lith Indursky reported
jassah's liana Hawaiian
jens chapter had a paid-up
|mbership luncheon and
lion show at Lauderdale
kt-s City Hall .,. Bernard B.
Jkin noted the death of one of
Irish War Veterans Coral
^ings Post's most active mem-
s. Milton Schwartz.
lichael Satz, Broward
unty's State Attorney, was the
tured speaker at this week's
1st Broward breakfast
embly of the Fort Lauderdale-
Dward County Chamber of
imerce Also speaking to a
1st Broward group this week
Mike Siege! of WNWS-radio.
audience was the Brandeis
diversity National Women's
, m it tee chapter ... Soon
ailable at book stores: a
[initive book on Israel's strug-
for statehood and peace. The
Jthor of Israel's Defense Line
fr Friends and Foes in Wash-
Von is I. L. Kenen, editor-
eritus of the Near East Re-
n. published by the American
el Public Affairs Committee
IP AC) of which Kenen is
jrary chairman Arnold
in Praag is chairman of the
committee planning the Nov. 1
dedication of West Broward
Jewish Congregation'8 "shul."
Irwin Ames and Roz Hirach
have tickets for the concert by Sy
Sugar-conducted Senior "Pops"
Symphony Orchestra of Lauder-
hill to be presented Nov. 15 at the
Lauderhill Senior Center ... A
miniature Sukka, constructed
with loving care and suitable
notations for all its components
by Florence and Morris Posner,
members of Temple Beth Am, is
on display at the Catharine Young
Library in Margate through Oct.
21 {Simchat Torah).
Registration started this week
for members of Pompano's
Brandeis Women's Committee to
sign up for study groups .
Herb Slusher is the youth group
advisor for the 14-18 Senior
Youth Group at Plantation's
Temple Kol Ami where the group
had a pizza party following last
Saturday's Havdalah service.
Morris Posner, the one men-
tioned above, lives at 740 NW
73rd Ave., Margate 33063, is
publicity director for "Baysiders
(N.Y.) in Florida" which is plan-
ning a reunion Nov. 6-8 at Singer
Island. All Baysiders interested
should write to him Charlotte
Rosenzweig, vice president pro-
grams for Hadassah's Blyma
chapter, arranged to have the
Palm Springs III Choral Group
entertain this week at the chapter
meeting at Margate's Beth Hillel
. Iris Starr, former general
manager at Gallaeria's Saks
Fifth Avenue who was so helpful
in arranging a Women's Division
fund-raiser for UJA earlier this
year, is now general manager at
Bonwit Teller in Bal Harbour. .
And the Galleria and its
developer, Leonard L. Farbcr,
won the "Maxi" award presented
by the International Council of
Shopping Centers for the excel-
lence of its grand opening cam-
paign last year.
BUYING A NIW CAR?
Instead of a trade-in on an old car, consider
donating it to the Jewish Federation of Greater Fort
lLauderdale. Call Mark Silverman for details.
|Federation-UJA 748-8200.
A NOVEMBER 20 DECEMBER 20,1981
AN OPEN LETTER
To Jewish Families in North Broward County
who are not affiliated with a synagogue or temple:
needs. It is an invitation which your family
SHALOM:
The faith and values of Jews throughout
the centuries have been shaped and
strengthened by our synagogues. Our
synagogues have helped to pass our heritage
from generation to generation, from parents
to children to grandchildren.
In order to continue their vital services to
today's Jews in our changing world, the
synagogues must be kept vital and growing.
Synagogue membership and support are im-
portant obligations of every Jewish family,
not only for the synagogue's future, but for
their own.
The Jewish families of North Broward
County who are affiliated, the Jewish
Federation and the Synagogue Council
combine to extend an invitation to join a
synagogue which is responsive to your
ORTHODOX
Temple Ohel B'nai Raphael 735-9738
4351 W. Oakland Park Blvd.
Lauderdale Lakes 33313
Nathan Grossman, President
Young Israel of Deerfield Beach
1640 W. Hillsboro Blvd. 421-1367
Deefield Beach. 33441
Morris Septimus, President
The Traditional Synagogue of Inverrary
Dr. David Wolgin, President
Moshe Stern 742-9244
4231 NW 75th Ter., Lauderhill 33319
CONSERVATIVE
Temple Beth Israel 742-4040
7100 W. Oakland Park Blvd.
Sunrise 33313
Rabbi Phillip A. Labowitz
Al Lang, President
Temple Beth Am 974-8650
7205 Royal Palm Blvd.
Margate 33063
Rabbi Dr. Solomon Geld
Harry Hirsch, President
Sunrise Jewish Center 741-0295
8049 W. Oakland Park Blvd.
Sunrise 33321
Rabbi Albert N.Troy
Sam Wolberg, President
Congregation Beth Hillel 974-3090
7640 Margate Blvd.
Margate 33063
Rabbi Joseph Berglas
Harry Fine, President
Temple Sholom 942-6410
132 SE 11th Ave.
Pompano Beach 33060
Rabbi Samuel April
Dr. Milton Isaacson, President
Temple Beth Torah 721-7660
9101 NW 57th St.
Tamarac 33321
Rabbi Israel Zimmerman
Jack Weiner, President
Temple Beth Israel 421-7060
200 S. Century Blvd,
Deerfield Beach 33441
Rabbi Leon Mirsky
Joseph Lovy, President
should accept.
Listed below is brief information about
our local congregations. If you would like
more information or a personal contact,
complete and return the coupon below to the
Jewish Federation. It will be appropriately
referred. Requests for special membership
arrangements, if required, will be treated in
strictest confidence by all congregations.
There are no real barriers to affiliation.
We urge that your family become
congregation members and a link in the
chain that unites Jews from generation to
generation. It will strengthen your family
and your people.
Chaplaincy Commission Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale
and North Broward Board of Rabbis
Hebrew Congregation of Lauderhill
2048 NW 49th Ave. 733-9560
Maxwell Gilbert, President
Temple Israel of Gait Ocean Mile
Meets: North Beach Medical Center
Rabbi David Matzner
Ben S. Marcus, President
4280 Gait Ocean Dr. 566-0954
Fort Lauderdale 33308
Hebrew Congregation of No. Lauderdale
Meets: Western School
Murray Hendler, President
Kal Blumenreich 721-7162
REFORM/
Temple Emanu-El 731-2310
3245 W. Oakland Park Blvd.
Lauderdale Lakes 33311
Rabbi Jeffrey Ballon
Frances Smith, President
Temple Kol Ami 472-1988
8200 Peters Rd.
Plantation 33324
Rabbi Sheldon Harr
Phil Fagelson, President
i
Temple Beth Orr 753-3232
2151 Riverside Drive
Coral Springs 33065
Rabbi Donald R. Gerber
Barry Kantrowitz, President
RECONSTRUCnONIST
Ramat Shalom,
7473 NW 4th St. 583-7770
Dr. Richard Goldman, President
Rabbi Robert A. Jacobs
LIBERAL
Liberal Temple of Coconut Creek
Meets: Calvary Presbyterian Church
Arnie Nestel, Arthur Savitt,
Judge Harry Shooman, Presidium:
971-9729
P.O. Box 4384, Margate 33063
LIBERAL REFORM
West Broward Jewish Congregation
Don Workman, President 741-0121
P.O. Box 17440, Plantation 33318
COMMUNITY
Keter Tikvan Synagogue
Meets: Bank of Coral Springs
Rabbi Leonard S. Zoll 752-3771
P.O. Box 8125, Coral Springs 33065
Herbert Ray, President
_CLIP AND MAIL THIS COUPON.
FOR:
.MORE INFORMATION
.PERSONAL CALL
Synagogues) of Interest
Head of Family:
Address:-------------.-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Send To: JEWISH FEDERATION OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE
2999 N.W. 33rd Avenue, Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33311


Page 10
^^^^h^ujrut^nO^^ti^r^^^ial^nnT
?.Tr-
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, October 16,1981
Shemini Atzeret-Simchat Torah Combined at Liberal Temple
The Liberal Jewish Temple of
Coconut Creek will celebrate the
concluding days of Sukkot (Fes-
tival of Tabernacles) with a
combined Shemini Atzeret-
Simchat Torah service at 8 p.m.,
Monday, Oct. 19, in the Sanc-
tuary of the Calvary Presbyter-
ian Church, Coconut Creek Park-
way, opposite Wynmoor Village.
The service will mark the
eighth day of the festival and the
rejoicing for the presentation of
The Law. There will be a proces-
sional with the Torah serous, ac-
companied by the liturgical
hymns, followed by the conclud-
ing verses of the Book of Deuter-
onomy and the beginning of a
new cycle of reading the Five
Books of Moses with the opening
verses of the Book of Genesis.
Rabbi Bob Ilson, founding
rabbi of the congregation, will
conduct the worship service. He
will discuss "The Never Ending
Cycle: Symbol of Life and the
Eternal People." Following the
service, there will be a collation
and an hour of fellowship.
TEMPLE BETH ORR
Temple Beth Orr's Senior
Youth Group (CSFTY) will assist
the Coral Springs Temple's
Rabbi Donald R. Gerber at the 8
p.m., Friday, Oct. 16, service at
the synagogue, 2151 Riverside
Dr. An Open Forum will follow.
The Temple will host an Oneg
Shabbat.
The Reform congregation is
holding its Simchat Torah service
at 7:30 p.m., Monday, Oct. 19.
The Yizkor service will be held
the following day at 10:30 am.
TEMPLE BETH AM
Friday night services at Tem-
ple Beth Am will be held on Oct.
16 at 8 p.m. President Harry
Hirsch will direct the services,
assisted by first vice-president
Alfred Cohen for the English.
Max Mode 11 will conclude his
two-part series of talks on the
topic "Who Is A Jew." On Oct.
23, Rabbi Geld will answer ques-
tions on this subject submitted to
him in advance. On Oct. 30 Rabbi
Geld will summarize the
thoughts expressed during the
four-week symposium and add
his own ideas. The Temple will
host the Oneg Shabbat.
The Sukkot holidays will end
with the Simchat Torah services
on Oct. 21 at a a.m. Yizkor serv-
ices will be held on Tuesday, Oct.
20 at about 11 a.m.
At the end of each of the
Sukkot services a Kiddush will be
held in the Succah erected by
Jerry Rubinstein and his assis-
tants. The interior decorations
and display of the season's fruits
and vegetables were set up by the
Sisterhood, aided by the school
children and their teachers.
RAMAT SHALOM
Ramat Shalom, 7473 NW 4th
St., Plantation, will have a Suk-
kot service Friday night, Oct. 16,
conducted by Rabbi Robert A.
Jacobs. Members of the congre-
tgation will share the service with
Rabbi Jacobs as the Ritual Com-
mittee has prepared a special
Sukkot service, which in keeping
with the innovative and family
concept approach of Reconstruc-
tionism, features the involvement
of the entire membership.
On Tuesday night, Oct. 20, a
Simchat Torah service will be
held starting at 7 p.m. During
this joyous evening Gillian
Greenstein, guitarist and
vocalist, will be on hand for the
Israeli folk dancing which will
round out the night. Information
on the synagogue and its various
activities, membership and func-
tions can be had by calling 583-
7770 weekdays from 9 to noon.
WEST BROWARD JC
West Broward Jewish Congre-
gation, the newest congregation
in the north of Broward county,
will be holding services in its
newly established sanctuary at
7420 NW 5th St., Plantation.
Services will be at 8 p.m. on Fri-
days.
A dedication ceremony is
planned for 1 p.m., Sunday, Nov.
1.
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Religious Directory
v
LAUDERDALE LAKES
OHEL BNAI RAPHAEL TEMPLE. 4351 West Oakland Park
Boulevard. Modern Orthodox Congregation. Saul Herman. Rabbi
Emeritus.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL. 3245 W. Oakland Park Blvd. Reform Rabbi
Jeffrey Ballon. Cantor Jerome Klement.
SUNRISE
BETH ISRAEL TEMPLE. 7100 W. Oakland Park Blvd. Conservative.
Rabbi Phillip A. Labowitz. Cantor Maurice Neu.
SUNRISE JEWISH CENTER. INC. 8049 W. Oakland Park Blvd.
Conservative. Rabbi Albert N. Troy. Cantor Jack Merchant.
LAUDERHILL
HEBREW CONGREGATION OF LAUDERHILL. 2048 NW 49th
Ave. Lauderhill. Conservative. Maxwell Gilbert, president.
NORTH LAUDERDALE
HEBREW CONGREGATION OF NORTH LAUDERDALE 6:30
Friday; 9 a.m.. Saturday, in Western School. 8200 SW 17th St. Murray
Hendler. president.
FORT LAUDERDALE
TEMPLE ISRAEL OF GALT OCEAN MILE. Conservative. Rabbi
David Matzner. ,
Ocean Blvd.
TAMARAC
TEMPLE BETH TORAH-TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER. 9101
NW 57th St. Conservative. Rabbi Israel Zimmerman. Cantor Henry
Be la sco.
PLANTATION
TEMPLE KOL AMI. Plantation Jewish Congregation. 8200 Peters
Rd. Liberal Reform. Rabbi Sheldon J. Han-
RAM AT SHALOM. 7473 NW 4th St. Rabbi Robert A. Jacobs.
Weat Broward Jewish Congregation.74^0 NW 5th Street.
POMPANO BEACH
TEMPLE SHOLOM.132 SE 11th Ave.. Conservative. Rabbi Samuel
April. Cantor Jacob Renzer.
MARGATE
BETH HILLEL CONGREGATION. 7640 Margate Blvd. Conser-
vative. Rabbi Joseph Bergias.
TEMPLE BETH AM-MARGATE JEWISH CENTER. 7205 Royal
Palm Blvd. Conservative. Rabbi Dr. Solomon Geld. Cantor Mario
Botoshansky.
LIBERAL TEMPLE of Coconut Creek. Friday evening services
Calvary Presbyterian Church. Coconut Creek Blvd.
CORAL SPRINGS
TEMPLE BETH ORR. 2151 Riverside Drive. Reform. Rabbi Donald S.
Gerber. Cantor Harold Dworkin.
KETER TIKVAH SYNAGOGUE. 8 p.m. Friday; 10:30 a.m. Saturday
in Auditorium, Bank of Coral Springs. 3300 University Dr. Rabbi
Leonard Zoll.
DEERFIELD BEACH
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL at Century Village East. Conservative.
Rabbi Leon Mirsky. Cantor Joseph Schroeder. -;
YOUNG ISRAEL of Deertield Beacn. i*>4U W. Hilisboro Blvd. Or-
thodox.
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HEBREW CONGREGATION
North Lauderdale Hebrew
Congregation will hold Sukkot
services at the home of Seymour
and Dorothy Wildman, 2300 SW
81st Terr., North Lauderdale
The Congregation meets for
Friday evening service at 7 and
at 9 a.m. Saturday in the
Western School, Room 3, 8200
SW 17th St.
BNAI MITZVAH
TEMPLE SHOLOM
Beth Gaynor, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Louis Gaynor, will be-
come a Bat Mitzvah Friday eve-
ning, Oct. 16, at the service at
Temple Sholom. Pompano Beach.
Rene* WaaaermaD, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Gary Wasserman,
will become a Bat Mitzvah at
Temple Sholom's Friday evening
service, Oct. 23.
The following day at 6 p.m.
service, Andrew Levy, son of
Mrs. Madeline Levy, will become
a Bar Mitzvah.
BETH TORAH
Bar Mitzvah honors will be ac-
corded Jeffrey Pittle, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Marshall Pittle, and
David Baratz, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Michael Baratz, at the Sat-
urday morning' earvicea, iQct. ?*
of Temple Beth Torah in Tama-
rac.
SUNRISE
JEWISH CENTER
Allan Soloway, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Benjamin Soloway, will be-
come a Bar Mitzvah at the 9 am.,
Saturday, Oct. 16, service at
Sunrise Jewish Center.
BETH ISRAEL
Last Saturday morning, Nich-
olas Ferber, son of Melanie and
Cyril Ferber of Coral Gables, be-
came a Bar Mitzvah at the serv-
ice at Beth Israel, 7100 W. Oak-
land Park Blvd.
pw/^%
Candlelighting Time
Friday, Oct. 166:32
Monday, Oct. 19: Erev Shemini Atzeret6:29
Tuesday, Oct. 20: Erev Simchat Torah7:29
One hour after Sundown
Friday, Oct. 23-:26
,rnhnja rasftp iftj
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Ba-ruch A-tah Ado-nye, Elo-haynu Melech Ha-olam.
Asher kid'shanu B*mitz-vo-tav. V'tzee-va-nu
L'had-leek Nayr shel Shabbat.
Blessed art Thou, 0 Lord our God King of the Universe,
Who has sanctified us with Thy commandments
And commanded us to kindling Yom Kippur lights.
once
11th
hool
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let*
all
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I
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V


r, October 16,1981
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 11
\amir Tells UN Gathering Palestinians
Already Have Homeland in Jordan
UTED NATIONS -
(S) Israeli Foreign Minis-
fttzhak Shamir declared in a
ch to the UN General Aa-
tly that the Camp David ac-
i "have been and remain the
feasibly path to peace," in
lideast.
to other viable solution ap-
on the horizon," he said,
said that the resumed
jny negotiations for the
Btinian Arabs living in
ea, Samaria and the Gaza
ict will be concluded suc-
jlly in the near future,
reiterated Israel's position
the Palestinian Arabs "do
a state on a major part of
territory of Palestine,
oely Jordan, which is already
jlestinian state "by virtue of
agraphy, demography, his
'stated, "there is no need to speak
further of self-determination for
the Palestinian Arabs, their
homeland is already in exis-
tence."
AS FOR the Lebanese situa-
tion, Shamir said that "some
120,000 Lebanese civilians have
been the victims of Syrian and
PLO atrocities" in recent years.
He said Israel hopes "that an in-
dependent and free Lebanon will
soon reemerge and maintain good
relations with all its neighbors,
including Israel."
But, Shamir warned, "this will
be very difficult to achieve as
long as the PLO is allowed to
nest in Lebanon," and plan its
terrorist acts from there and as
long as the Syrian occupation
of Lebanon continues. "The
banon, within its international
boundaries, free of Syrian occu-
pation and PLO terror, "Shamir
said.
Referring to the situation of
Soviet Jewry, Shamir accused
the Soviet Union of preventing
"many thousands" of Jews from
emigrating to Israel. "Over the
past year, we have been watching
with growing anxiety the steady
decrease in the number of Jews
leaving the Soviet Union, to the
lowest number for the last ten
years," he said.
HE CHARGED that "over the
pastsix months, the number of
'Prisoners of Zion' detained un-
der false pretexts and sentenced
by Soviet courts to long prison
terms had doubled." He men-
tioned in that connection the
names of imprisoned Jewish acti-
vists Ida Nudel, Viktor Brailov-
sky and Anatoly Sharansky.
The Israeli minister appealed
to the Soviet Union "to reopen its
gates for Jews who wish to return
to their homeland, and to cease
the persecution of Jews in the
Soviet Union." Shamir also ex-
pressed concern over the harrass-
ment of Syrian Jewry, calling
upon the Syrian government "to
respect the basic human rights of
its Jewish community which it
holds hostage and which it pre-
vents from leaving."
Organizations
government of Israel will at all
culture, religion and Ian- times support the reestablish-
Therefore. Shamir 'ment of a truly independent Le-
irael Condemns Atomic Energy Agency
9tani efforts to produce nuclear
weapons. This proved that the
agency acted in an "arbitrary and
discriminatory" manner against
Israel, the Foreign Ministry said.
THE STATEMENT noted
that Israel has taken several
initiatives to establish a nuclear-
free zone in the Middle East, in-
cluding one at the United Na-
tions General Assembly last
year. "The action in Vienna does
nothing to help achieve such an
objective," it said.
The Foreign Ministry defended
Israel's raid on the Iraqi installa-
tion, saying it was ordered only
after clear information was ob-
tained that Iraq was at the point
of producing nuclear weapons,
the prime target of which was
Israel.
By DAVID LANDAU
And HUGH ORGEL
IRUSALEM (JTA)
The Cabinet has con-
Ined the International
lie Energy Agency
CA) decision to suspend
knical aid to Israel as
>itrary and immoral."
IAEA, meeting in
ma, voted 51-8 with 27
tentions to condemn
kel's air raid on Iraq's
lear reactor last June
to withhold all techni-
ind economic assistance
llsrael on nuclear mat-
lie resolution, sponsored by
tria, Saudi Arabia and
ral Persian Gulf states, and
juced by Yugoslavia, called
ext year's regular session of
|IAEA to expel Israel from
organization unless it agrees
place its nuclear program
tr international supervision.
United States and several
Latin American countries voted
against the resolution.
THE CABINET's statement,
drafted by Premier Menachem
Begin, said: "Enemies of Israel
Iraq, Saudi Arabia and others
of their allies attempted to
expel Israel from the IAEA.
They failed in their design, due
mainly to the attitude and ac-
tivity of the United States. How-
ever ... a sufficient majority was
mustered to condemn Israel for
its operation of national self-
defense (the raid on the Iraqi
reactor) for its act of rescue of
tens of thousands of civilians, in-
cluding children the govern-
ment of Israel condemns this
arbitrary and immoral resolution.
An earlier statement by the
Foreign Ministry said the Israeli
raid on the Iraqi reactor was no
excuse for the IAEA action inas-
much as the agency took no
measures against Iran after it
bombed the Iraqi facility some
months before the Israeli raid.
Nor did the IAEA take action
when India operated nuclear in-
stallations or in response to Paki-
PIONEER WOMEN
The eight clubs in the Broward
Council of Pioneer Women which
cooperates with Na'amat, its sis-
ter organization in Israel, will
participate in a "teach-in" at 9
a-m., Thursday, Oct. 29, at Holi-
day Inn, Coral Springs.
The gathering of the leadership
will have Harriet Green national
vice president, as keynote
speaker, discussing Zionism in
relation to the organization and
its support of educational, voca-
tional and child care services.
Workshops will follow the open-
ing session.
SUNRISE MEN'S CLUB
Three acts of song, comedy and
magic will be presented at 8 p.m.,
Saturday, Oct. 31, by the Men's
Club of the Sunrise Jewish Cen-
ter in the Center at 8049 W. Oak-
land Park Blvd. The performers
will be Magician Jackie Field,
song stylist Constance Melody,
and Mickey Sharp, a creative
comedian. Accompanying them
will be Jerry Carotta at the piano.
Reserved seating for a dona-
tion of $3 is available. Tickets
may be secured at the Center
from 10 a.m. to noon daily except
Saturday.
KOL AMI
The Sisterhood and Brother-
hood of Plantation's Temple Kol
Ami are sponsoring a champagne
art auction Saturday, Oct. 17,
with preview at 7:30 p.m., and
auction at 8:30. Works of famous
artists will be on exhibition.
Three door prizes will be
awarded. Admission is free at the
Temple, 8200 Peters Rd.
DEERFIELD'S
BROTHERHOOD
The Brotherhood of Temple
Beth Israel in Deerfield Beach is
presenting a film, "The Mame-
Loshen." at 8 p.m., Sunday and
Monday, Oct. 25 and 26, in the
Temple's social hail.
This film features comedian
David Steinberg, actor Herschel
Bernardi, author Leo Rosten,
editor of the Daily Forward
Simon Weber, Dr. Joshua Fish-
man of New York, Yeshivo
University and Yiddish scholar
Dr. Saul Goodman. In addition a
Yiddish folk song and poem in
animated fashion called "Afn
Veg Shteyt a Boym" by Itzik
Manger and sung by Josh Walet-
sky. Tickets for these films are
available at the Temple Office at
II.
Mameloshen
Sunny Landsman, leader of the
Broward Circle of Yiddish Clubs,
will teach Yiddish at Temple
Beth Am in Margate, beginning
Monday, Nov. 2, from 10 to 11
a.m.
As part of the North Broward
Midrasha this course will add joy
to the life of the participants. It is
for those who want to learn and
improve their knowledge of
"mameloshen." Join the fun of
entering the joyful world of Yid-
dish. For further information call
748-8200, the Jewish Federation.
Rommel's Son Arrives in Israel
Warm Welcome at Youth Center
L AVIV (JTA) Rom-
has arrived in Israel to a
welcome. But Sunday's
r was not Gen. Erwin Rom-
the "desert fox" who led
er's army to the gates of
Jt in World War II, but his
Dr. Manfred Rommel,
ar of the West German town
(uttgart.
Rommel came at the invi-
In of the Union of Local Au-
Ities in Israel, in recognition
i-s position as head of the
talent organization in West
aany to attend the corner-
i-laying ceremony for a
center for German and Is-
youngsters at the Labor
f's College of Beth Berl near
)MME1. SAID he thought
most Germans today agreed that
it was better for Germany to have
lost the war under Hitler than to
have won it and continued the
Nazi political system.
Manfred Rommel said he was
certain his father, who brought
his army as far as El Alamein
near Alexandria, would have
thought the same had he been
alive today.
It was the West German Local
Authorities Alliance which
donated the funds for construc-
tion of the youth center at Beth
Berl, and Labor Party Chairman
Shimon Peres said at the cere-
mony: "39 years ago the name
Rommel cast fear in all hearts.
But a generation later, his son
comes to us on another mission,
of peace and friendship."
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REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EAHALQUZX_0DCZOO INGEST_TIME 2013-07-12T21:51:12Z PACKAGE AA00014312_00565
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES