The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 3, no. 7 (Apr. 5, 1974)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 9, 1976 called v.4, no. 27 but constitutes v.5, no. 1; issue for July 7, 1989 called v.18, no. 11 but constitutes v.18, no. 13.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44570954
lccn - sn 00229545
ocm44570954
System ID:
AA00014312:00551

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Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward


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Full Text
' lewisti itllarndlnaiin
, 10 Number 22
OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE
Fort Lauderdale, Florida Friday, October 2,1981
FndShochtl
Price 35 Cents.
ntral Issue Is U.S.-Saudi Problem
In its Sept. 16 issue, The Wall Street Journal had
iis review and analysis of "The Saudi Problem"
The great AWACS debate now starting on Capitol
Jill is being cast as a popularity contest, democratic
nd Jewish Israel versus oil-rich and Arab Saudi Ara-
This is profoundly unfortunate, for it obscures
that seems to us the central issue in the sale, which is
Dt the Israeli problem but the Saudi problem.
Suppose for a moment that Israel didn't exist. Sup-
dsc Lord Balfour had declared that the Jewish home-
land would be in Arizona or Wales. Then consider anew
the facts of the AWACS sale: Here is an airplane so ad-
vanced and sophisticated we have never sold it outright
to any other nation, using it in NATO only with joint
command relationships. This plane is now being flown
over Saudi Arabia by the U.S. Air Force, the American
presence having been invited by the Saudis at the out-
set of the Iraq-Iran war. The Saudis come to us saying,
in the interest of defending the oil fields, we would like
to buy the airplanes so that we can send the American
crews home, or at least keep the American technicians
on the ground.
With or without Israel, it seems to ue there is a small
question or two: How does this better protect the oil
fields? And how does this advance American in-
terests? What do we get out of it?
The administration and other proponents of the sale
generally fail to address these questions, understand-
ably preferring to tilt with Menachem Begin over
whether U.S. policy ought to hinge on the Arab threat
to Israel. But to the extent there is an answer, it is that
\ Continued on Page 4
he Joy of the New Year Brought to 'Shut-ins'
Samuel April Heft) begins service at Center for ^' l'lanla His aides included Sol Cohen and Joel Cohen. Sl '""'" Na
the loud, piercing sound that re-
sulted startled some of his listen-
ers.
It was the prelude to his expla-
nation of the synagogue worship
services during the penitential
fcpping in front of three-score
no re persons, mostly elderly
e, some in wheelchairs some
Used walkers. Rabbi Samuel
on Friday afternoon. Sept.
laced a shofar to his lips, and
on Nursing Home, pictured are
than Elias, Rabbi Rudolph Weiss,
Days of Awe tromRoshHashana
through Yom Kippur for the resi-
dents of Center for Living Nur-
sing Home at 2000 E. Commer-
cial Blvd., Fort Lauderdale.
Rabbi April of Temple Sholom
Horowitz, Irene Weiss.
Lillian
Ruth
of Pompano Beach, other rabbis,
and lay volunteers from that day
of Sept. 18 through the morning
of Sept. 28 were bringing mini-
High Holy Days services into the
nursing homes in the north of
Broward county, and to Jewish
persons confined in Broward
county prisons.
The program, with the gene-
rous cooperation of all of those
participating, was arranged by
Continued on Page 5-
to President's Mission to Israel, Romanoff Briefed on Israel Needs
|h;ird Romanoff, general chairman of
D*2 United Jewish Appeal Campaign
Jewish Federation of Greater Fort
krdale, last week joined campaign
Islup from 62 communities nationwide
he largest UJA President's Mission to
and the others were guests of Israel
lent Yitzhak Navon for four days of
morning to late at night meetings
llo|i level Israeli officials and on-site rc-
nl humanitarian programs and serv-
fundud by Federation-UJA campaigns.
binunoff, who has accepted the chal-
ol si-eking community support to
the I ederation-UJA 1982 goal of
UO.IHHJ, was told that "the remarkable
on.se u> this year's President's Mission,
largest ever, clearly demonstrates the
pgth of the American Jewish com-
iel Waldman Leads 'New Gifts' Effort
fl Waldman
Snificant changes in the Jewish
klation nationwide, and particu-
in the Sunbelt states, such as
da, pose tremendous new
enges to leadership in Jewish
^rations and their United Jewish
1 campaigns.
The future existence of a cohesive
national Jewish network rests with
th development and implementation
of a long range plan to attract to-
day's non-committed Jews into the
mainstream of the Jewish com-
munity, through Federation and
synagogue.
These were among the highlights of
discussions by national leadership
from Federations around the country
last month at a "New Gifts Campaign
Seminar" hosted by the Denver
(Colo.) Jewish Federation.
Ethel Waldman, general co-chair of
the 1982 UJA campaign of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort Lauder-
dale, and Mark Silverman, Federa-
tion staff associate, attended the se-
minar chaired by Neil Cooper,
National UJA New Gifts chairman.
Federation President Victor
Gruman and General UJA Campaign
munity's ongoing commitment to our peo-
ple in Israel."
The speaker was UJA National Vice
Chairman Neil J. Norry, chairman of the
Mission, who said: "This expression of
unity and concern underscores the continu-
ing partnership that gives deeper meaning
to our campaign theme for 1982One
People Indivisible." Romanoff's participa-
tion in this Mission marked the advance
briefing for the Federation's local cam-
paign-
Romanoff visited Project Renewal sites,
met with residents and community leaders
for discussions of the program's progress in
upgrading the social, economic and cultural
quality of life in' Israel's distressed neigh-
borhoods.Visits were also made to review
programs carried out by the Jewish Agency
in Israel, the major beneficiary of the
United Jewish Appeal funds through the
Chairman Richard Romanoff reported
that Mrs. Waldman, who headed the
1981 Women's Division campaign,
will spearhead the innovative and ex-
citing effort to seek new commitments
throughout the Jewish community in
North Broward.
United Israel Appeal, and the American
Jewish Joint Distribution Committee
(,I DC). These include programs, primarily,
for the young, the elderly, and new immi-
grants throughout the nation.
The group was welcomed to Jerusalem by
Mayor Teddy Kollek and toured the Jewish
quarter of the Old City before gathering for
individual meditation at the Western Wall.
Highlights of the Mission included a torch-
light ceremony atop the ancient fortress of
Masada with the Israel Defense Forces
Armored Corps a first for a President's
Mission and a ceremony of remembrance
at Yad Vashem. the memorial to victims of
the Holocaust
The Mission closed with a state dinner
hosted by Israeli Prime Minister Menachem
Begin in the Knesset, the Israeli parlia-
ment.
Mrs. Waldman and Silverman
learned that there are an estimated
one million Jewish households who
have never, made a commitment to
Federation-UJA campaigns through-
out the nation, even during Israel's
1973 Yom Kippur War and the 1967
Six Day War with hostile nations
seeking to destroy the Jewish home-
land.
The New Gifts campaign, they said,
will reach out to those Jewish families
which have not yet participated in the
Federation-UJA campaigns, hoping
to enroll more of the Jews in the 30 to
45-year-old age bracket, who can be-
come the future leaders of the com-
munity.
found free Site Por kosheR nutRition pROQRam See page 2


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"PHaSy ."October i!
19
t
He Found Free Site for Kosher Nutrition Program
Sol S. Brenner, a Jewish acti-
vist from his days of many yean
Xin Brooklyn, continued his
its on behalf of Jewish com-
munal activities ever since his re-
tirement in 1968 from a varied
business career.
Now he is being hailed as a
"money-saving hero" for the
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale and, more par-
ticularly, by those elderly who
participate in the kosher nutri-
tion program which had been
housed in Federation's previous
location in Lauderdale Lakes.
When the Federation was
forced to move because of an ex-
cessive increase in rent, the re-
located offices at 8360 W. Oak-
land Park Blvd. had no facilities
for a nutrition site.
Almost month-long efforts by
Federation staffers and those
associated with the Service
Agency for Senior Citizens of the
Broward County Area Agency
for Aging which supervises the
Federation-supported kosher nu-
trition program failed to find a
new location.
Fearful that they would be un-
able to travel to the Federation's
other kosher nutrition site at the
Jewish Community Center cam-
pus, 6501 W. Sunrise Blvd., in
Plantation, one or two of the
elderly told Sol Brenner of their
plight.
No youngster himself, having
been bom 76 years ago in Poland,
Sol Brenner, known as "a man
who knows his way around
town," and as president of JCC's
Senior Adult Club since its origi
nation in the Federation's old of
fices, went to work to help hi?
friends.
He sought out L. L. Green
Sol S. Brenner
wald, a former Lauderdale Lakes
city councilman, who is friendly
with the developer-owner of the
Shoppes of Oriole in the 4300-
block of North State Road 7, and
Community Calendar
MONDAY, OCT. 5
Workmen's Circle-Branch 1046:
Executive Committee meeting,
Suite 121. Loft Mall, 5460 N. St.
Rd. 7, 7:30 p.m.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL:
Couples Club: meeting, p.m.
Games, 7:15 p.m.
ORT:
Woodlands No. Chapter:
Board meeting.
Hillsboro Chapter: General
meeting, Community Room
Broward Federal Savings &
Loan, Century Plaza 2, noon.
HAD ASS AH:
Armon Castle Chapter: Gener-
al meeting. Castle Recreation
Hall, noon.
Sunrise Shalom Chapter:
Board meeting, Broward Federal
Bank, University Dr., 10 a.m.
Masada Margate Chapter:
Board meeting, Boca Raton
Bank, Basics Plaza. St. Rd. 7 and
Coconut Creek Pkwy.
Bat Ami-Tamarac Chapter:
General meeting, American
Legion Hall, 8551 W. McNab
Rd.. Tamarac, noon.
B'NAI B'RITH: Lauderdale
Lakes Lodge: Board meeting,
Hawaiian Gardens, 10 a.m.
Landerhill Lodge: Board meet-
ing. Men's Card Room. Castle
Gardens Recreation Hall. 10 a.m.
Deerfield Beach Chapter 1552:
Board meeting.
Temple Kol Ami Sisterhood:
Board meeting. 8 p.m.
TUESDAY, OCT. 6
Temple Emanu-El Sisterhood:
Board meeting. 11 a.m.
Hadassah-Rayus Tamarac Chap-
ter: Board meeting. Tamarac
Jewish Center, noon.
B'nai B'rith-Ocean Chapter:
Board meeting.
Pioneer Women-Hatikvah Chap-
ter: General meeting. Whiting
Hall, Sunrise Lakes, 11:30 a.m-
2:30 p.m.
Temple Sholom Sisterhood-Pom
pano: Board meeting. Temple Li-
brary, 10 a.m.
Temple Beth Torah Sisterhood:
Games, 12:15 p.m.
WEDNESDAY. OCT. 7
HAD ASS AH:
Inverrarv Gilah Chanter:
Board' meeting, Colonnades
Clubhouse, 10 a.m.
GoMa Meir Chapter: Board
meeting at members' homes, 10
a.m.
EREV YOM KIPPUR
KOL NIDRE
THURSDAY, OCT. 8
YOM KIPPUR
FRIDAY, OCT. 9
B'NAI B'RITH:
Hope Chapter: Board meeting,
Deicke Auditorium. 10 a.m.
Women's League lor Israel:
Executive Board Meeting, Wyn-
moor.
SATURDAY, OCT. 10
Temple Emanu-El: Las Vegas
Nite.
SUNDAY.OCT.il
Temple Beth Am Margate: Gen-
eral meeting.
Temple Beth Israel: 7100 W.
Oakland Park Blvd., Games, 7:30
p.m.
#%
Candlelight ing Time
Friday, Oct. 2 Sabbat Shuvah-6:47
Wednesday. Oct. 7-Erev Yom Kippur-6.40
Friday, Oct. 9-6:39
t I : : it ;
Ba-ruch A-tah Ado-nye. Elohaynu Melech Ha-olam,
Asher kid'shanu B'mitz-vo-tav, V"tzee-va-nu
L'had-leek Nayr shel Shabbat.
Blessed art Thou, 0 Lord our God King of the Universe.
Who has sanctified us with Thy commandments
And commanded us to kindling Yom Kippur lights.
who introduced Brenner to Rev.
Daniel Vornell. Rev. Cornell of
Churches of Oriole has a 300-seat
first floor hall in the Oriole
shopping center.
Rev. Cornell graciously and
generously told Brenner the ko-
sher nutrition program's 125-plus
elderly persons could use his hall
every weekday for the morning
programs and noon-time hot
kosher mealsfree!, no charge
for electricity, air conditioning,
storagejust make sure the
Federation has liability in-
surance, which the Federation
has.
Sol Brenner rushed back to the
Federation office just two or
three days before the Federation
was scheduled to move. He took
Federation President Victor Gru-
man, others from the Federation,
and Nutrition Site Manager Sam
Perlis and wife, Sara, who volun-
tarily arranges the morning pro-
grams, to meet Rev. Cornell and
view the site All were delighted.
So with handshakes all around,
the "deal" was accomplished,
and letters of thanks went out to
Rev. Cornell and former Council-
man L. L. Greenwald. m
And the day the movers came
to move the Federation offices,
first things loaded, and first
things unloaded were the Kosher
Nutrition's refrigerator, tables.
J
On kindling *naj dv- lights, say:
f^p wrf-% Pin* flpgp
jcw*9q or
On fcndlmg the Tom Kippur light*, say:
Blessed art Thou, O Lord our God, King
of the universe, who hast sanctified us by
Thy commandments, and commanded us to
kindle the light of the Day of Atonement.
Boruch atto adonoi eloheinu melech ho'olom,
asher fadafapnu r/mitzvoeov, v'trivonu l'had-
hk naur hel yom hakip-
punm.
jjd f? iflrwi wpi ygw
BroA atto adorn* eloheinu melech ho'olom, riifci
cacyoau Wmm v'higiyonu human hazeh. 9
Blessed art Thou, O Lord our God, King
of the universe, who hast kept us in life, and
hast preserved us and enabled us to reach this
season.
F-10-M1
chairs, piano, equipment, SUD.
plies, and the American and
State of Israel flags. And on
Aug. 31, the same day that the
Feseration was in its new quar-
ters, the kosher nutrition pro-
gram provided more than 100 hoi
meals to the eligible elderly parti-
cipants in attendance that day h
their new facilities at 4322 N
Sate Rd. 7 next door, inciden
tally, to JCC's Le Browse thrift
shop of "new and gently used
merchandise."
As Federation President Gru-
man expressed what Sol Brenner
did, he called him "our hero"
adding: "He saved the Federa-
tion hundreds of dollars that
would have had to be spent in
rent for any other location."
Brenner is modest about his
accomplishment. He said: "i
live in Lauderdale Lakes, and I
know most of the people that,
to this nutrition site would have
found it difficult to go to Plant*.
tion or anywhere else out of this
particular area."
So. it's a great big "thank
you to Sol Brenner. Besides his
activity as president of JCC's
Senior Adult Club, and his wife,
Lillian, conduct social dancing
classes at JCC, and together thev
strive to help people, and to make
more people aware of the pro-
grams and services at the Center
which receives funding from the
annual Federation-United Jewish
Appeal campaigns.

Happy New Year
Alfred Golden
Mark Ginsberg
Robert Burstem
Riverside Memorial Chapels
Fro-2-ii
F10M1
Religious Directory
LAUDERDALE LAKES
OHEL B'NAI RAPHAEL TEMPLE. 4351 West Oakland Park
Boulevard. Modern Orthodox Congregation. Saul Herman. Rabbi
Emeritus.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL. 3245 W, Oakland Park Blvd. Reform Rabbi
Jeffrey Ballon. Cantor Jerome Klement.
SUNRISE
BETH ISRAEL TEMPLE. 7100 W. Oakland Park Blvd. Conservative.
Rabbi Phillip A. Labowitz Cantor Maurice Neu.
SUNRISE JEWISH CENTER. INC. 8049 W Oakland Park Blvd.
Conservative. Rabbi Albert N Troy. Cantor Jack Merchant
LAUDERHILL
HEBREW CONGREGATION OF LAUDERHILL. 204^ Ntt 49th
Ave Lauderhill. Conservative. Maxwell Gilbert, president.
NORTH LAUDERDALE
HEBREW CONGREGATION OF NORTH LAUDERDAI.K 7 p.m.,
Friday; 9 a.m.. Saturday, in Western School. 8200 SW 17th St Murray
Hendler. president.
FORTLAUDERDALE
TEMPLE ISRAEL OF GALT OCEAN MILE. Conservative Rabbi
David Matzner
Ocean Blvd.
TAMARAC
TEMPLE BETH TORAH-TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER. 9101
NW 57th St. Conservative. Rabbi Israel Zimmerman. Cantor Henry
Be la sco.
PLANTATION
TEMPLE KOL AMI. Plantation Jewish Congregation. 8200 Peters
Rd. Liberal Reform. Rabbi Sheldon J. Harr.
RAM AT SHALOM. 7473 NW 4th St. Rabbi Robert A. Jacobs.
_- POMPANO BEACH
TEMPLE SHOLOM.132 SE 11th Ave.. Conservative. Rabbi Samuel
ApnL Cantor Jacob Renzer.
_, MARGATE
BETH HILLEL CONGREGATION. 7640 Margate Blvd. Cower
vative. Rabbi Joseph Berglas.
TEMPLE BETH AM-MARGATE JEWISH CENTER. 7205 Royal
Palm Blvd. Conservative. Rabbi Dr. Solomon Geld. Cantor Mario
Botoahanaky.
LIBERAL TEMPLE of Coconut Creek. Friday evening services.
Calvary Presbyterian Church. Coconut Creek Blvd.
ivwn. ~ .*- CORAL SPRINGS
TEMPLE BETH ORR. 2151 Riverside Drive. Reform. Rabbi Donald S.
Berber. Cantor Harold Dworkin
KETER TIKVAH SYNAGOGUE. 8 p.m. Friday; 10:30 a.m. Saturday
LLtmBrdZoU' B,nk Co1 Spring9' 330 Vaivmity Dr IUbbi
ssbseuxSS^S'Eot con9ervauve.
YOUNG ISRAEL^ Efiittt^W. Hillaboro Blvd. Or- \
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Friday, October 2,1981
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 3
8rowsin' thru
roward
with max levine
L
Ethel and Josef Reichkind of
Plantation are right proud of
their daughter, Linda, now at-
tending Hebrew University in
, Jerusalem on the Year Abroad
Program to complete her major in
Judaic Studies. Joan, who was
the 1979 Florida Region B'nai
B'rith Girls ffsiah, earned a
place on the Dean's List of Honor
Students 1981 spring semester at
Washington University in St.
Louis, Mo. Her dean, Linda
B. Salamon, sent Joan Reichkind
a letter saying "sorry you can't
be with us" for the Fall Honors
Assembly which was held on
"Sept. 9. Bella Davidovich is
the soloist next week when Fort
Lauderdale Symphony begins its
33 rd season.
Broward County's supervisor
of elections, Jane Carrol, opened
a branch office for voter registra-
tion at 3455 N. State Rd. 7 in
Lauderdale Lakes Mall ... At
last month's third Moscow Inter-
national Book Fair, Abba Eban's
History of the Jews and the 1981
American Jewish Year Book were
among the books and records of
Hebrew and Yiddish songs seized
by the Soviets and unable to be
shown at the Fair.
Jack Salz, Florida State Chair-
man of Adult Jewish Education
for B'nai B'rith. was busy just
before the holidays, making three
xpeeches in five days at the Tem-
ple Sholom Sisterhood in Pom-
pano, Lauderdale's Kol Haverim
and Lauderhill's B'nai B'rith
lodges Deerfield's Temple
Beth Israel Brotherhood is
honoring the congregation's first
vice president. Sam Cohen, and
his wife. Fran, at the Brother-
hood Oneg Shabbat Friday. Oct.
16 Claire Mitchel of Broward
county's Human Relations
Division reported that a health
seminar for women, by women,
about women, My Body, My
Life, will be held Oct. 10, at
Broward Community College.
Gene Ozols, who opened "The
Connoisseur" convenience store
at 5538 W. Oakland Park Blvd. in
the Inverness Plaza about a year
ago, has added to his list of out-
of-town newspapers which in-
cludes The Forward and All
Gemeiner Journal, Israeli news-
papers, magazines and paper-
backs Rep. E. Clay Shaw said
the federal Mass Transportation
System is giving Broward
county's mass transit system a
grant of $15,910 to put into oper-
ation a computer system. Will
that improve bus service?
Susan Sandberg, president of
B'nai B'rith Youth, was the
scheduled speaker Oct. 1 at the
Sunrise B'nai B'rith Women
chapter's meeting at Nob Hill. .
Temple Sholom's Rabbi Samuel
April believes in things getting
better. His sermon topics on Kol
Nidre and Yom Kippur will be "A
Better New Jew." and "A Better
New Memory." as follow ups to
"A Better New World," and "A
Better New You" during Rosh
llashana services Susan
Lynn Benjamin of Lauderhill has
been appointed a designer for
Kobison Associates. Coral Gables
architectural planning interiors
firm Entries can be sub-
mitted Oct. 5-8. Betty Leverentz
of Nova University announced,
for the art exhibition co-
sponsored by Nova and Coral
Springs Artist Guild Oct. 24-
Nov. 4 at Nova's Coral Springs
Art Gallery. Prizes totalling
SI.800 will be awarded.
Starting
October 17,
you 11 cruise
for less.
And fly for free
*^
Fly free round-trip to
San Juan and cruita the
Caribbean aboard Costa s
M/S VWortd Renaissance
tor 7 day* departing any
Saturday from October 17
through December 12,1981
You'll save hundreds of
oomts on one of Ihs iiKMt
tantasbc vacation -a
veiuea In the Caribbean
SaM from Sen
Juan to the most
exotic ports in the
heart ol the
Caribbean-St. Lucia,
Barbados, Guadeloupe
Antigua and
SL Thomas. That's
twice as many
ports as on most
cruises starting
in Florida
You get unbeatable value on
a World Renaissance cruise Vk
tuety everything is Included in
the price ot your cruise ticket...
spectacular dining...constant
courteous service provided by a
crew member tor every two pas-
sengers., all activities., nightly
on-board entertainment. And
throughout H aN. a ship that has
the elegance and Intimacy ot a
private yacht.
Priced from only $660 to
# $1210,'you'd be hard-
pressed to find a better
vacation value on land
So take advan-
tage ot our By free
offer and caH your
travel agent today
World Benaissa nee of
Greek registry.
The largest cruise fleet In the world
One Biscayne Tbwer. Mum. Fla 33131 (305) 358 7330
$1.6 Million Building Plans Voted by Beth Orr
in
Members of Temple Beth On-
Coral Springs approved the
building plans for a new sanc-
tuary and social hall at a special
congregational meeting in Sep-
tember. Past President Buddy
Himber, leading the Temple's
Capital Fund Raising drive which
has been in progress since April,
said $1,600,000 was needed "to
build the kind of edifice this con-
gregation deserves."
The Capital Funding program
has exceeded its primary goal set
six months ago. It has reached
past $350,000 in pledges and
cash from 60 percent of the mem-
bership the funding program
will ultimate in a final appeal
during the High Holy Days when
it is hoped that non-member
guests of the congregation and
members who haven't made their
pledges so far. will raise the total
to $400,000.
Stan Bernstein, chairman of
the New Building Committee for
the past year, reviewed the land
acquisition of two additional
acres, the site plans and showed
artist's renditions of the new
building. "What we are about to
build, is Phase I of our over all
long range plan," he said. Abo on
the drawing board is the ar-
chitect's suggested plan for a
school, youth lounge, office wing
and chapel surrounding a grassy
quadrangle.
The new building will provide
an additional 15,000 square feet
to the present 5,000 square foot
Temple Beth Orr building. The
architect selected for the project
is Barry Sugerman who has been
involved in all the preliminary
planning for the building which
will have permanent seating for
about 500 and additional seating
for 700 or more. The present
membership at Temple Beth Orr
is over 450 families, with 400
children in the Religious School
and close to 200 children in the
nursery school. The completion of
the building is expected to take
12 to 18 months.
Happy 17th for Cantor Klement
Cantor Jerome Klement this
week began his 17th consecutive
service of chanting High Holy
Days liturgy for the congregation
of Temple Emanu-El which is,
once again, holding these services
at Parker Playhouse in Fort Lau-
derdale.
With the congregation now
using the new Union of American
Hebrew Congregations new
prayer book, "Gates of Repent-
ance." Cantor Klement says the
new prayer book leans markedly
towards the Conservative
"Machzor." He said this trend in
the Reform movement has been
going on for some time. He found
it necessary to adjust his musical
liturgy to accommodate the new
text. but. for him. it was no great
problem since he came to Temple
Emanu-El from a conservative
background.
Shirley Moscovitz is assisting
in the musical portions of the
services, conducted by Rabbi
Jeffrey L. Ballon.
During services this week, and
next Wednesday night and
Thursday, the lobby of Parker
Playhouse will have a photo dis-
play of the remodeling of the
sanctuarv at Temple Emanu-El,
3245 W. Oakland Park Blvd., and
the construction of a reflecting
pool and garden just outside the
sanctuary. The plans for the con-
struction were created by Temple
member Don Singer, Fort Lau-
derdale architect.
The Sunsweet
Self-Improvement
The Sunsweet Self-Improvement plan includes
exercise and a healthy, well-balanced diet.
And that includes Sunsweet Prune Juice, with
no preservatives or added sugar. Sunsweet is
100% pure natural fruit juice, with lots of iron,
potassium and vitamin B2. And best of all. it
tastes good. So drink a toast to yourself.
With Sunsweet.
jjtfjfe
SUNSWEET
Tbyour health:
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rnernnmarrrTnTtaainui muuuii j ii.^aua
77u? Jeii/isA Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
ermuv
fWy. October 2,198J
Jewish Floridian
of Greater Fort Lsuderdsle
FRED K SMOCMET SUZANNE SHOCHET
Editor end Publisher Executive Editor
Published Weekly Mid-September through Mid-May. Bi-Weekly balance ot year.
Second Class Postage Paid at Hallandale, Fla. USPS 898420
Postmaster Send Form 3678 returns to Jewish Floridian. P.O. Bos 01-2873, Miami, Fl. 33101
Advertising Supervisor Abraham B Halpern
Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood Advertising Office Am Savings 2500 Bldg
2500 E. Hallandale Beach Blvd.. Suite 707 G. Hallandale. Fla. 33009 Phone 454-0466
Plant: 120 NE 6th St.. Miami. Fla. 33132 Phone t -373-4605
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Jewish Floridian Does Not Guarantee Kashruth ot Merchandise Advertised
Greeter Fort Lauderdale News Office: 8360 W. Oakland Park Blvd.. Fort Lauderdale.
Fla. 33321 Phone 748-8200
Max Levlne, News Editor
SUBSCRIPTION RATES 2 Year Minimum $7.50 (Local Area 83.95 Annual) or by membership
Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale. Victor Gruman. President.
Leslie S. Gottlieb. Executive Director 8360 W Oeklsnd Park Blvd Fort Lauderdale. Fla 33321
Friday, October 2,1981
Volume 10
Yom Kippur
The chant of Kol Nidrei will be heard in synagogues
throughout the world on (October 7) Wednesday evening, usher-
ing in Yom Kippur, the last of the High Holy Days.
From the most humble congregation to our gloriously-built
temples, from gatherings in lands where Jews must whisper for
fear of their survival to pioneer outposts in Israel, the chant will
call us to a spiritual stock-taking.
The universal, compelling force of Yom Kippur has as
much meaning for us today as it did in our ages-old past. Per-
haps more than any other Jewish holiday, the Day of Atonement
evokes a spirit of awe in the heart of every Jew.
In the chanting of "Uv-chen Tayn Pachdecha," we implore:
And i put Thine awe on all Thy creatures, that they may all form
one force to do Thy will." Here, the meaning of Judaism aspires
toward total identification with its highest belief.
And, in this aspiration, all Jews recognize the essential uni-
ty of their faith. In direct contrast, there can be no greater trib-
ute to the dignity of the individual Jew.
Yom Kippur, according to tradition is the day on which
man's fate is sealed for the year to come. On Kosh Hashana, it is
merely recorded and. during the Ten days of Penitence, we make
one final effort to assure our favor in the eyes of God. But it is a
further tribute to the Jew that his faith transcends the irrevoc-
able nature of fate.
Through the Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauder-
JAale's sponsorship of the annual United Jewish Appeal cam-
paigns, North Broward's Jewish community have contributed to
those achievements in the land of Israel. And those committed
Jews strengthened Jewish life as well in isolated, threatened and
distressed communities on the world's continents aiding
the elderly, the afflicted, the handicapped, giving new direction
to the lives of hundreds of thousands of youngsters throughout
the world.
And as the sun is setting, and Neilah service is ending, once
again, we utter the credo of our faith through the Shema:Hw, O
Israel, the Lord is our God. The Lord is One. And we are one
the Jews of America and the people of Israel "One People In-
divisible."
QReetmqs foom Women's division
Gladys Daren
In preparation for the season's
first Board meeting of the
Women's Division of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort Lau-
derdale, set for Oct. 12, President
Gladys Daren, extended greet-
ings to the Jewish community of
North Broward. She said:
"On behalf of the officers and
directors of the Women's Divi-
sion, it gives me the greatest
pleasure as we worship during
these High Holy days, marking
the start of the New Year 5742, to
wish for each and every one of
you a happy and sweet year, and
the hope that you will be in-
scribed for a good life."
GMARCHTIMATOVA
BILL MARKHAM
CANDIDATE FOR U.S. SENATE
To All My Friends
May You Be Inscribed and Sealed for
A Year of Health, Happiness and Shalom,
. Peacel For Israel and the Entire World.
5742 1981,1982
Paid By Bill Markham For U.S. Senate Campaign Committee.
newyeaR
tndm Ce&epation
. verse, who hast kept us in life,
4TISHRI5742
Number 22
Before the staff of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale went their separate
ways to attend High Holy Days
services in their own congrega-
tions, Rabbi Albert B. Schwartz,
director of the Federations
Chaplaincy Commission, and
Abraham J. Gittelson, Federa-
tion's Central Agency for Jewish
Education director, conducted an
abbreviated Rosh Hashana-Yom
Kippur service attended by the
entire staff in its new offices at
8360 W. Oakland Park Blvd.
Included in the concluding
shehecheyanu (Blessed art Thou,
O Lord our God, King of the uni-
verse, who hast kept us in life,
and hast preserved us and ena-
bled us to reach this season) was
a special blessing and prayer for
the good health and a year of
peace for all people.
Participating in the service
with Rabbi Schwartz and Abe
Gittelson were these other staff
members: Leslie S. Gottleib, exe-
cutive director; Knneth B. Bier-
man, campaign director; Joel
Telles, assistant executive direc-
tor; Jan Salit, Women's Division
director; campaign associates
Kenneth Kent, Paul Levine, Alan
Margolies, Mark Silverman;
Lawrence M. Schuval, Com-
to an
Staff
munity Relations Committee;
Max Levine, public relations and
The Jewish Floridian.
Nettie Berman, Leila Butnick
Martha Dorn, Joan Fein, Lor-
raine Hochman, Helen Lee Sue
Marilynn Levine, Phyllis Rich!
man, Gene Scaramell, Florence
Siegel, Helen Steigman, Iris
Steinberg, Judy Weber, Judy
Wolfson, Regina Wermeil.
The ataff extends its best
wishes for a Happy New Year to
the entire Jewish Community of
North Broward.
CarlAlpert
Ten New Personalities
HAIFA There were many
names in the news this past year,
but between one Rosh Hashana
and the next new personalities
emerged on the scene. In accord-
ance with our annual custom we
present herewith, in alphabetical
order, the new names which made
headlines in Israel this year.
Aharon Abuhatzeira. Minister
of Religion in the former Govern-
ment, was narrowly cleared by
the courts on charges of bribery,
seceded from the National
Religious Party and formed his
own party, Tami, frankly based
on sectarian appeal to the Se-
phardim. He was named a Cabi-
net member of the new Govern-
ment but now faces a new trial on
charges of graft and corruption
allegedly committed when he was
Mayor of Ramla.
Yoram Aridor, Begins contro-
versial Minister of Finance, who
appears to have arrested the in-
flationary spiral in Israel by in-
troduction of highly unorthodox
economic policies. The situation
seems to be improving, but many
economists warn that the
reaction, when it comes, may be
worse.
Mr. Chibotero, a fictional un-
seen character promoted in a
series of television commercials
designed to encourage saving of
electricity. The public took an
immediate liking to the program,
as projected through the image of
the heimeshe, previously
unknown actress, Miriam Foux.
Energy consumption did decline,
it was said.
Gen. Rafael Eitan (Rafu) took
his post several years ago as mil-
itary Chief of Staff with a reputa-
tion for extreme taciturnity. This
year he opened up and was the
center of several controversies
because of his frank expression of
opinions on defense matters
which, critics said, had best be
left to the political leadership.
Justice Moshe Etzioni was
chairman of the national Election
Commission but his name really
made headlines in connection
with the Etzioni Committee on
teachers' problems, which he
headed. The committee report
recommended broad concessions
to the teachers, and led to a long
and bitter te*rhw c^;l-
Shlomo Glickstein, Israel's No.
One tennis star, brought glory to
his country by his achievements
on foreign courts, but more than
anything else he symbolized the
explosive emergence of tennis as
a highly popular sport now
sweeping Israel.
Philip Habib, President Reag-
an's special emissary to the Mid-
dle East, "pulled a Kissinger"
with his shuttling between Israel
and the Arab states. He achieved
no miracles and no break-
throughs, but his presence helped
avert what might well have be-
come a much more serious situa-
tion.
Yosef Mendelevich arrived in
Israel after 10 years in a Sovi
jad. He was this years symooVof
the many other Prisoners of Zion
who art' still held and punished in
the Soviet Union because they
want to get out and rejoin their
Herzl Shafir. Inspector-
General of the Police Depart-
ment, was fired only a year after
being appointed to that job. The
Minister of the Interior charged
that Shafir was high-handed and
refused to accept ministerial
control: critics claimed he was
Backed because he was pressing
criminal investigations into
matters close to the Minister's
Party.
Avraham Shapiro, prominent
industrialist (head of Carmel
Carpets) entered politics as head
of the Agudat Israel list and
drove a hard bargain with Begin
to swing his four Knesset seats to
support of the Likud coalition:
without them Begin would have
been unable to set up a Govern-
ment.
Those are the '0 new names of
the past year. Test your own
memory: Who can recall why the
following were the 10 top head-
liners of last year: Dr. Yosef
Burg, Pesach Grupper, Zvi (iur.
Yigael Hurvitz, Yitzhak Modai.
Lt. Daniel Pinto, Bassam Shak'a,
Yitzhak Shamir, Avraham
(Buma) Shavit and Oron Yarden.
Central Issue Is
U.S.-Saudi Problem
Continued from Page 1
the sale is a special favor intended to shore up the
leader of the "Arab moderates."
Precisely what makes the Saudis so moderate, how-
ever, is never quite clear. To a lot of people it has to do
with oil prices. The Saudis are selling us oil at only 15
times the price of a decade ago, but they have kept their
quotes below the rest of OPEC. This is widely regarded,
especially by the Aramco partners who have profited
from the arrangement, as a political favor to the West.
But the dominant member of a cartel always undersells
the other members. As the oil glut spreads and the
OPEC price comes under pressure, it becomes more evi-
dent than ever that the Saudi price has little to do with
politics and everything to do with profit maximizing.
They set the price of their oil in their own interest, and
will continue to do so with or without AW ACS.
In politics, the Saudis are Arab moderates because,
unlike Libya or Iraq, they don't invade their Islamic
neighbors. And, of course, because they talk an anti-
Soviet line. But like the Soviets they supply money and
rhetorical support to the terrorist Palestine Liberation
Organization. At the time of Camp David, they cast
their lot against Egypt's President Sadat, an Arab
leader who acts as well as talks pro-Western. In doing
this they also undermined U.S. policy. For that matter,
in 1973 they singled out the U.S. as the object of an oil
embargo. Better, surely, to have a Saudi Arabia led by
the I louse of Saud than by a fundamentalist mullah or
a Marxist colonel. But this is not a special friend to
whom the U.S. owes great favors.
Nothing here is to say that the U.S. ought to write off
Saudi Arabia. To the contrary, we should seek a closer
relationship, built on our mutual interest in defending
the oil fields. But this the Saudis have resisted, not
allowing access rights to their bases, let alone following
the Egyptian example of conducting joint exercises
with our rapid deployment force. If, perish the
thought, the AWACS detected a Soviet airborne thrust
at the oil fields, on what forces would they call. ? The
Saudis have always wanted the U.S. to defend them,
but to remain 6,000 miles away. The great sorrow of
the AWACS sale is that we missed an opportunity to
make them face geographical reality.
The whole episode, in fact, was mishandled from the
first. In retrospect, the Saudis should have been offered
their choice of two options: a joint command relation-
ship for the AWACS or the outright purchase of the E-
2C, a similar but less capable plane we have sold to oth-
er nations, including Israel. Instead, they were more or
tess promised the plane by the Joint Chiefs in the lame-
duck days of the Carter Administration, and this de-
cision was ratified by the Reagan Administration
before it had even filled its staff. In short, the home-
work was never done.
By now the security issues involved have been
overtaken by questions of saving face-for the Saudis,
or Mr. Reagan, for Mr. Begin. Amid the tumult there
is a very real problem of how to defend the Persian
i /i. u n ne seems to notice- No the Saudis, and
not the Reagan Administration.


Friday, October 2,1961
I ho.launch WnnWi/ii, n(Ci*<>n+nr 1?nr+ TZwAmmiUU
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 5
. The Joy of the New Year Brought to 'Shut-Ins'
I fir
/'up left: At Plantation Nursing Home. Lillian Schoen
"lunches licht" to begin service which had the volun-
teer assistance (top right) of Dolly Klein. Castle Co-
Chairman Helen Cooper, Sylvia Mulhauser, Edith
Continued from Page 1
Rabbi Albert B. Schwartz, direc-
tor of the Chaplaincy Commis-
sion of the Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale, was
provided by Federation-Jewish
Community Center-sponsored
'7ECARE (With Energy, Com-
passion And Responsible Effort)
nursing home volunteers, chaired
by Ruth Horowitz. Also assis-
ting at many of the services as
cantor was Sol Gruber of Lauder-
hill.
At Center for Lving, Rabbi
April was assisted by a volunteer
group from the Lauderhill B'nai
H'rith lodge and Lauderhill B'nai
B'rith Women. This B'nai B'rith
group has been providing Yid-
dishkeit comfort at this home for
Svhlanger and Organist Ann Smuckler. Bottom left:
liabbi Samuel April brings New Year greetings at Cen-
ter for Living, some of his volunteer assistants before,
ill,ring and after the service when an "oneg" was held
included (bottom right): Ruth Horowitz, Lou Gold,
Sunny Friedman. Pianist Dora Cohen, Murray Rubin-
stein.
several years. Sol Cohen, Joel
Cohen, Lou Gold, Murray
Rubenstein, Sunny Friedman,
Fritzi Rosanasky, Charney Gold-
farb, and Dora Cohen, the
group's piano player, are among
the "regulars" who have been
visiting at the Center at various
times during the year.
Opening the service at the
Plantation Nursing Home at
about the same time that services
were being held at the Center for
Living, Lillian Schoen, chairper-
son of a group of Castle volun-
teers, benched licht and offered
the shehechayanu blessing.
Rabbi Rudolph Weiss conducted
the service with Nathan Elias of
Lauderhill blowing the shofar at
the appropriate times. Mrs.
Schoen was assisted by the
rebbitzen, Irene Weiss, the
Rabbi's wife; also her co-chair-
person, Helen Cooper, and Dolly
Klein, Sylvia Mulhauser, Edith
Schlanger and Ann Smuckler at
the Plantation Home's organ.
Fven unto those who are
"shut-in" in prison institutions,
the Chaplaincy Commission pro-
vided services that called on
those confined to "examine their
lives, recount the times gone by,
and to seek forgiveness for acts of
commission which led them
astray."
Rabbi Israel Zimmerman of
Ter"?le Beth Torah, Tamarac, on
Sept. 22 conducted the abbre-
Varied Activities AvailableAt JCC
* From programs and activities
for people of all ages, ranging
from the nursery stage to the age
when some people don't care to
reveal their age, the Jewish Com-
munity Center at the Perbnan
Campus, 6501 W. Sunrise Blvd.,
Plantation, has something for
everyone. Here is a brief descrip-
tion of some of the events and
services (for more details, and for
information about other activi-
ties, call the Center 792-6700).
Yom Kippur for the Deaf
JCC Assn. for The Deaf is
sponsoring special Yom Kippur
service for the Deaf with Kol
Nidre at 7 p.m., Wednesday, Oct.
7, and resuming at 11 a.m.,
Wednesday, Oct. 8 in the all-
purpose room of Temple Emanu-
El, 3246 W. Oakland Park Blvd.
Director EUi Levy and Lay
Reader William Conn will con-
duct the service, the second High
Holy Days services sponsored by
JCCAD which expressed its
tpanks to Temple Emanu-El for
making available its facilities.
Milk and Honey Auditions
Singers, dancers, actors, ac-
tresses and production personnel
are needed for the scheduled pro-
duction of Milk and Honey next
January. Auditions will be held
from 2 to 5 p.m., Sunday, Oct. 11
and Sunday, O *"d *pin
at 7:30 p.m., Thursday, Oti '2 in
JCC's Soref Hall.
Book Review Series
Rabbi Albert B. Schwartz, di-
-ector of the Chaplaincy Com-
mission of the Jewish Federation
of Greater Fort Lauderdale, will
be the first of the reviewers for
the JCC's Greater Jewish Book
Review Series which opens at 8
p.m., Wednesday, Oct. 29. Rabbi
Schwartz, a scholar who "salts
and peppers" his talks and re-
views with bits of humor, will
talk about The Book of Esther.
Museum Club
Thursday, Oct. 15, at noon,
and every third Thursday
thereafter the Museum Club
meets. The club makes guided
tour of art exhibitions.
Visiting Historic Sites
Though the Wanderlust Club
has cancelled its October
meeting, usually on the fourth
Wednesday of the month, it has
announced a busy series of trips
during this month.
Thursday, Oct. 15, another trip
to Jewish points of interest in
Miami Beach, an extension of,
and different from, a Miami
Beach trip the club took a year
ago. The cost for members is $12,
non-members $17.
From Monday, Oct. 26 to
Monday, Nov. 2, Wanderlust is
sponsoring a trip to the Smokies.
Cost for members is $475 double
occupancy, $550 single; for non-
members $500 and $575 respec-
tively.
A one-day trip, Tuesday, Oct.
27, is planned to take the group
to the Flagler Museum, Norton
Galleries, and partake of a buffet
lunch at the Breakers in Palm
Beach. For members $23, non-
members $27.
Calligraphy
Edie Mac Donald will be the in-
structor for classes on the art of
distinctive writing, calligraphy.
The eight sessions begin Mon-
day, Oct. 26. Fee, including
materials for beginners in the
class, is $35, while those with in-
termediate skills in calligraphy
will be charged $25 with
materials additional.
Analyze Handwriting
And while others are working
to create the art of distinctive
writing, others may join a class
to analyze handwriting. Ellen
and Lowell Schoenfeld will be the
instructors for the Handwriting
Analysis classes beginning at 10
a.m., Thursday, Oct. 29. For the
five sessions, the fee is $10.
viated High Holy Days services,
encompassing portions of the
Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur
liturgy, at the county's Stockade
at 5400 NW 9th Ave. A similar
service was conducted by Rabbi
David Gordon of Sunrise in the
county's detention facilities on
the seventh floor of the Broward
County Courthouse.
Continuing the series of serv-
ices for those who reside in
nursing homes and retirement
centers, Rabbi Sheldon Harr of
Temple Kol Ami, Plantation,
officiated at Covenant Care in
Plantation, and Rabbi Dr. Solo-
mon Geld of Temple Beth Am,
Margate, with a group of his con-
gregants went to Colonial Palm
West Nursing Home in Pompano
Beach to provide the service.
Rabbi Jeffrey Ballon of Temple
Emanu-El went diagonally across
the street from his synagogue at
A 'Showcase Star'
3245 W. Oakland Park Blvd. to
bring the comfort of the service
and New Year greetings to the
Jewish guests at St. John's
Nursing Home and Rehabilita-
tion Center.
During the course of the 10
days, Ilabbi Schwartz, with the
aid of WECARE's Mrs.
Horowitz, and Sol Gruber acting
as cantor, conducted similar
services at Fort Lauderdale's
Alden House, Manor Oaks,
Manor Pines, Harbor Beach
homes; Yesterday's Retirement,
Oakland Park, Broward Con-
valescent Home, and Lauderhill's
Shalom Manor.
Closing out the series last
Monday, Erev Rosh Hashan
morning, Cantor Joel Muhldof
and Aaron Grodsky conducted
the service at the Tamarac
Nursing Home.
L anguage
Classes At
Library
When the Jewish Community
Center's production of Showcase
of Stars began its season last
weekend, one of the star per-
former was Linda Newman. She
has had experiences as a dancer,
actress, and singer in summer
stock and university productions,
including experimental dramas
and musicals.
For the season's opening
production she interpreted Ann
Sexton's poetry. She and others
will be performing in other shows
during the next few. months at
the Center.
Sidney Possner and Edward
Greene will be teaching Hebrew,
free of charge, during October at
the Lauderdale Lakes Branch of
the Broward County Library
System. Possner will be teaching
beginners Tuesdays from 7 to
8:30 p.m., and in a class for those
with intermediate knowledge
from 9:30 to noon on Thursdays
at the library, 3521 NW 43rd
Ave., Lauderdale Lakes. Greene
teaches advanced class from 7 to
8:30 p.m. on Mondays.
Classes are available on a
weekly basis for those interested
in learning-or improving their
I fluency in Spanish and French.
At the North Lauderdale
branch, 6601 Blvd. of Cham-
pions, Sylvia Gordon is teaching
needlepoint on Tuesdays from 1
to 3 p.m.; and on Fridays, from 1
to 3 p.m., Joan Friedman teaches
crocheting.


gtfftrr
*r-*-

-.I ,:.:... l.-.A-.l.'JM!-.' '.-
Page 6
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale_______
Friday, October 2, 1981
Pioneer Women Charter 2 Clubs
KIAMESHA LAKE. N.Y. -
Thirty-six clubs established
during the past two years were
awarded their charters in Pioneer
Women, the Women's Labor
Zionist Organization of America
last month at the organization's
27th biennial national conven-
tion.
Among the newly-chartered
clubs are the Simcha Club of
Broward County, whose presi-
dent is Jeannette Lieberman of
9221 Sunrise Lakes Blvd., Sun-
rise; the Tamara Club of Fort
Lauderdale, whose president is
beatrice Zamost of 6005 Del Lago
Circle, Sunrise.
Conducting the charter presen-
tation ceremony attended by
more than 700 members was
Phyllis Sutker of Chicago, a na-
tional vice president. Pioneer
Women, founded in 1925, has
50,000 members in 500 clubs
throughout the country.
In cooperation with Na'amat.
its sister organization in Israel.
Pioneer Women supports educa-
tional, vocational and child care
services that improve the quality
of life for Israelis through a net-
work of 1,500 installations. In the
United Stastes. the organization
supports programs for the ad-
vancement of human rights and
is an authorized agency for Youth
Aliyah.
Witnesses Identify
Koziy as a Killer
Tamarac Proclaims Hadassah Month
Four Hadassah chapters in
Tamarac will celebrate October
as "Hadassah Month" with
Tamarac Mayor Walter Falck
issuing a proclamation to that
effect at 9:30 a.m., Wednesday,
Oct. 14.
At the same time. Florence
Krantz. president of Bat Ami-
Tamarac chapter, representing
the four chapters, will present a
medallion to the Mayor. This
medallion was issued 'n com-
memorate the 120th birthday of
Hadassah's founder, Henrietta
Szold.
During October, the chapters,
part of the largest women's
Zionist organization in the
Western hemisphere, is putting
on a membership drive. The
membership vice president who
have full information on their
chapters in Tamarac are Dorothy
Pittman for Bat-Ami which
meets the first Monday of the
month; Sadie Witt for Herzl-
Bermuda Club, open to residents
of Bermuda Club only, meeting
second Wednesday of the month;
Estelle Zwerin for Rayus-
Tamarac, meets fourth Tuesday
of the month, and Anne Fried-
man for Shoshana-Tamarac.
which meets fourth Thursday of
the month.
JEWISH WAR VETERANS
Pompano Beach
Jewish War Veterans Pom-
pano Beach Post and its Auxil-
iary have made arrangements for
a dinner dance to be held Satur-
day, Nov. 14, at Williamson's in
Fort Lauderdale. Tickets are
priced at $12.50 each.
The Post meets the third
Thursday monthly in the Pom-
pano Beach Recreation Bldg.,
1801 NE 6th St.
Members of the Post will join
other JWV members at the
Broward-Palm Beach Council's
quarterly meeting Oct. 16-18 at
the West Palm Beach hotel. The
tab for the two nights, three
days, is $100 per couple.
The Post is seeking volunteers
to help arrange a picnic for veter-
ans at the VA Hospital in Miami
to be held on the hospital
grounds. Adjutant Max Krasner
and Auxiliary members have
more information about the
event.
DEERFIELD
SISTERHOOD
Sisterhood of Temple Beth Is-
rael, Deerfield Beach, has been
successful in obtaining additional
Thanksgiving weekend reserva-
tions at the Barcelona Hotel,
Miami Beach. The package for
four days and three nights, Nov.
26 through Nov. 29 is $130 per
person double occupancy, includ-
ing kosher meals, bus transpor-
tation to the hotel and back to
Century Village, Contact Etta
Feltauate, Yetta Rothberg, Shir-
ley Vengel for reservations.
NATIONAL COUNCIL
OF JEWISH WOMEN
The Gold Coast Section of the
National Council of Jewish
Women will hold its first of the
season social functions at 11:30
a.m., Monday, Oct. 28, at the
Palm Aire Country Club. A
luncheon and card party is being
arranged by Marion Deck and
Lucille Keener, chairperson for
the day.
Lillian Bimberg is section
president. She and the following
members may be called for
tickets:
May Malbin, Martha Kauf-
man. Betty Bachman. Lillian
Glanz. Lillian Hodin, Ruth
Israel, Sasha Kerr, Helen
Levinson. Ethel Magner, Evelyn
Paskin.
Plans are being made to honor
Life Members of the section
which has a varied program here
and in Israel to improve the
quality of life and equality of op-
portunity for people.
The U.S. government's effort
to deprive Bohdan Koziy, an ac-
cused Ukrainian police officer
during the Nazi occupation of
Poland, of his citizenship is ex-
pected to end this week. Koziy, a
Fort Lauderdale motel owner-
operator, is being tried without
jury before Federal District
Court Judge James C. Paine in
West Palm Beach.
During the first two weeks of
the trial Koziy, has been identi-
fied as the policeman serving the
Nazis and shooting Jews, inclu-
ding a four-year-old daughter of a
Jewish doctor in Lysiec, Poland,
in the fall of 1943.
The U.S. Justice Dept. charges
that Koziy lied on his immigra-
tion papers to enter this country
and again when he applied for cit-
izenship.
Paine accents the tes-
those who have iden-
Conference on Aging at BBC in November
U.S. Rep. Clay Shaw (R
Broward County), as a local pre-
liminary to the White House
Conference on Aging, will chair a
two-day Broward County Confer-
ence on Aging Monday and
Tuesday. Nov. 9-10 at Broward
Community College.
He said the aim of the local
conference is to develop policy re-
commendations for Broward
county's delegates to the White
ARMDI's 3rd Annual Show Oct. 25
Max Bezozo. president of the
Sunrise chapter of American Red
Magen David for Israel (AR-
MDI), could very well be imita-
ting the barker at the circus:
"Hurry, hurry, get your tickets
now, it's almost showtime!"
In this instance Max Bezozo
reports brisk ticket sale for the
third annual musical revue, head-
lined by Broward county's very
popular Sunrise Symphony Pops
Orchestra, Sunday evening. Oct.
25. at Sunrise Musical Theatre.
The show, which will also fea-
ture Singer-Composer Richard
Ryan, baritone soloist, "the
Clown in a Gown" Dory Sinclair,
and operatic soprano Phyllis
Arick, is co-sponsored by the
Good News Fellowship Church.
Bezozo was one of those in the
audience of more than 4.200 peo-
ple who crowded Sunrise Musical
Theatre last month for Good
News Fellowship's production of
"For Israel, with Love." He's
hoping that SMT will be packed
again on Oct. 25, noting that the
$4, $5. and S6 tickets are being
sold rapidly with a slower re-
sponse for the $10 tickets.
The church, which sponsored a
"Run for Israel" mini-marathon
for ARMDI's support of Magm
David Adorn (Red Shield of
David), Israel's equivalent of the
American Red Cross, has been a
co-sponsor of ARMDI's two pre-
vious musical productions at the
Sunrise theatre, in each instance
selling about 1,000 tickets each
time.
So. to repeat the barker's ad-
monition: "Hurry, hurry, call
Max Bezozo in Sunrise, or Betty
Schulberg, ARMDI's admini-
strator, also in Sunrise, for ticket
information."
House Conference in December.
Delegates to the Washington
conference in the White House
include Tillie Greenstein of Sun-
rise, Ralph Marrison of Manor
Pines Convalescent Center,
Emanuel Borenstein.
They are among the members
of the advisory committee named
for Shaw's conference which is
aponsored by BCC Foundation.
Included in the long list of ad-
visory committee members who
will name the 700 participants
scheduled to be invited to the
November conference are Leslie
S. Gottlieb, executive director of
the Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale; Lawrence M.
Schuval, Federation's Com-
munity Relations Committee
director: Sidney Nerzig. Condo
Co-Op Executive Council: Aaron
Heller, Silver Haired Legislator;
Rabbi Herb Tobin of the Jewish
Federation of South Broward.
If Juds
timony o
tified pictures of Koziy, all video-
taped as they were questioned in
Poland by government investiga-
tors, as a Nazi collaborator, he
can revoke the Ukrainian's cit-
izenship and the government
can then begin deportation pro-
ceedings against him.
The witnesses testified that
Koziy killed at least two Jews
and was involved in the deaths of
eight others sometime between
1942 and 1944.
Yom Kippur Service
Lillian Glanz of Liberal Jewish
Temple of Coconut Creek re-
ported that Rabbi Bruce Warshal
will conduct the Yom Kippur
services for the congregation in
the Sanctuary of the Presbyter-
ian Church on Coconut Creek
Parkway, across from Wynmoor.
She also announced that Rabbi
Bob Ilson. rabbi emeritus of
Temple Sinai in Pittsburgh, a
founder in March 1980, with a
Wynmoor Village group, of the
Liberal Jewish Temple, will
officiate at the Shemeni Atzeret-
Yiskor service that the congrega-
tion will observe Monday eve-
ning, Oct. 19.
Oct. Birthdays
Ramat Shalom's Rabbi Robert
A. Jacobs, observing his 32nd
birthday this month, will be
joined by others in the congrega-
tion observing birthdays in Octo-
ber for special blessings at the
Sunset Seder and worship serv-
ice, starting at 6:45 p.m., Friday.
Oct. 2. at the synagogue. 7473
NW 4th St.. Plantation Jillian
Greenstein, guitarist and
vocalist, will provide the musical
accompaniment for the Shabbat
songs and for the Israeli folk
dancing after the service.
SECRETARY WANTED
Shorthand, typing ability needed for Gait Ocean
Mile Office. Call Jewish Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale 748-8200.
_____________________________________itf*^tf53*;:i38*^::38s|^:3S**S
BUYING A NEW CAR?
Instead of a trade-in on an old car, consider
donating it to the Jewish Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale. Call Mark Silverman for details.
Federation-UJA 748-8200.
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HWMM nm
ine Jewish bWcliZndfGnate^o^
Page 7
Barry College Plans Judaic Studies Course
College in Miami Shores
nning, provide there is
,jnt interest, the develop-
|of a Master of Arts degree
lewish Studies, beginning
teptember.
College has become,
ify Barry University, by
| action last week.
John P- Sause, associate
or of Rehgious Studies
philosophy in the college's
ous Studies Dept., said the
id program will cover five
i areas in Judaism: Bible,
nporary Jewish Life. Jew-
ish History, Modem Hebrew
Literature, Rabbinic Literature.
The faculty will be composed of
distinguished scholars and
learned rabbis from all branches
of Judaism.
Dr. Sause, who earned his Ph.
D. in religion and culture at
Florida State University, stud-
ied with Richard L. Rubenstein,
a leading theologian on the Holo-
caust. He also was graduated
from San Diego (Calif.) State
University, studying with
Maurice Friedman, an authority
Man's Opinion
on the writings and teachings of
Martin Buber.
Information regarding ad mis
sion as a student, interested per
sons who would like to donat
books on Judaica for the college':,
library, and those who might like
to support development of an
endowed chair for coordinator of
Jewish Studies should get in
touch with Dr. Sause, a member
of Barry College's faculty for
seven years. The college is lo-
cated at 11300 NE 2nd Ave.,
Miami Shores, 33161. He can be
reached at the college 758-3392,
extension 209.
As The New Year Dawns
ROBERT E. SEGAL
need to lift up our eyes to
s far above our daily petty
s as wc contemplate the
ch of Rosh Hashanah and
ippur. And this year we
well occupy our thoughts
ie advocacy of certain peo-
ond the limits of the Jew-
munity.
ider, for example, a recent
ing in Cleveland. In that
,e United Ukrainian Or-
ion and the Jewish
nity Federation, in the
I of bitter quarreling over
1 of Ukrainian-born John
ijuk, closed ranks and
a model public statement
ing for warm cooperation
rts to awaken sentiment
ing the violation of hu-
nts in the Soviet Union.
ELAND Ukrainians had
Demjanjuk's con-
that he was an innocent
of Soviet-inspired oppre-
ut evidence had been
forward that he had
in atrocities against Jews
serving as a guard in
ka and Sobibor death
Eventually, Federal
Frank Battisti revoked
juk's American citizen-
use he had lied about his
tivities when applying for
tion in 1958.
incor hanging over the
^ge Cleveland groups
and Ukrainian
in new insights and
[understanding. Jewish
jcame to realize that the
lated only to one culprit,
ctions of the entire
iar Rental
irtments
Tyler Street
llywood, Fl.
'ard 966-7600
6244777
MfeftML No Pets
Ukrainian national were not at all
consonant with Demjanjuk's
deeds.
"We recall that Metropolitan
Andrew Szeptycky, the Arch-
bishop of Lviv, and other brave
Ukrainians risked their lives to
bring Jews to freedom during
World War II," the joint state-
ment pointed out. Now, they con-
tinue, let us close ranks and get
on with join efforts to bring more
Jews out of a nation violating
solemn human rights agreements
and let us work together to
achieve the independence of
Ukraine.
IN THE same season, Ukrain-
ians all over the United States,
along with many born in, or
tracing their ancestry back to
Latvia, Estonia, and Lithuania,
were marking Captive Nations
Week. Here again was reason for
AMerican Jews to take courage
in their own continuing effort to
arouse the world to Moscow's
harsh treatment of co-religionists
seeking but denied permission to
leave Russia. Many American
Jews of Lithuanian origin watch
now with heightened interest the
agony of Lithuania. For Poland,
in its hour of unrest, it is a
Lithuanian neighbor facing
domination by the same Russian
forces that swallowed up Lithua-
nia in 1940.
So it is that in these historic
and sacred days of awe, the days
of judgment, the days of repent-
ance, the days of renewal, we
share generously with people of
menaced nations our prayers for
deliverance into freedom for all,
our prayers for universal peace.
In this solemn season espe-
cially our concern is intensified
for Jewish refusenicks on trial, or
soon to be tried, in Moscow. Rus-
sian officials hold in their hands
the fate of Viktor Brailovsky,
Stanislav Zubko, Osip Loskshin,
Boris Chernobilsky, Evgenh
Lain, and other threatened Jews
in a land where the ancient seeds
of anti-Semitism flourish in new,
vicious forms.
IN THIS season also we take
renewed inspiration from one of
the noblest victims of Russian
oppression, the exiled Andrei
Sakharov who has recently defied
those who keep him confined in
Gorky by sending to the world an
eloquent message. "I turn to the
U.S.A. and, in particular, to the
USSR," he says, for "a decisive
renunciation of all forms of sub-
versive activity, including the
use of an influenced press the
renunciation of support for in-
ternational terrorism."
Seven Arts Feature
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Memorial Gardens, Cemetery
Mausoleum & Funeral Chapel
ANNUAL HIGH HOLY DAY MEMORIAL SERVICE
OFFICIATING: Rabbi Israel Zimmerman
Temple Beth Torah Tamarac Jewish Center
DATE: Sunday, October 4, 1981
TIME: 11:00 A.M. Promptly
PLACE: STAR OF DAVID MEMORIAL GARDENS
7701 Bailey Road, Tamarac, Florida
(305) 721-4112
We are proud lo serve tne Jewish Community on this occasion, and wish you peace, toy. great
happiness and a healthy and happy new year
It would give us a great deal of pleasure to have you share this Memorial Service with us
A further commitment to the
community
The new Levitt-Weinstein Memorial Chapel in North
Miami Beach is more than mortar and brick. This new
facility represents an extension of our 80-year commit-
ment to serve our community, and reflect the individual
situation of each family.
Whether you call our new chapel in North Miami
Beach, or any of our other chapels, your traditions,
values, and limitations are respected.
In the tradition of our fathers... and their fathers before them.
Myron WeWittin Trt *fejiMtoM Cantor MMy MmM Sanny Imttt Marvin Rantt Jotl Wm. Wtinsttin Norman Cutlet Henry Klein William Grashow Jack Sinatra Phil Kolb
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ragee
*'- *~rzstf^gitf.amjwj^^
Jewish Books
in He view
(A service of the JWB Jewish Book Council, 15 E. 26th St., New
York 10010. Reprinted with permission.)
Hebrew Day School
Between Right and Right: Israel: Problem or Solution? By A.B.
Yehoshua. Translated from the Hebrew by Arnold Schwartz. Double-
day & Co., Garden City, NY. 1981. 177pages. $11.95.
Reviewed by Raphael Patai, author of The Jewish Mind, 1978
National Jewish Book Award for Jewish Thought.
Community in its excellent Pre
Kindergarten program. ine
school, funded in part by the
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale-sponsored UJA
Campaign, meets in its school
located on the Jewish Communi-
ty Center Perlman campus. 61
for
tio enables each -
ceive the attention andennch
ment so important at this age
This especially holds true ft
those children who>**
missed going into kindergarten
because of the new school dead-
line about age
A generation ago a Haifaite of
renown, Yehezkel Kaufmann,
wrote a monumental study, en-
titled Golah veNekhar (4 vols.),
which to this day remains the
most incisive analysis of the
significance of the Golah, the
Exile, in the history of the Jewish
people. In the present slim vo-
lume, another Haifaite, the well-
known Hebrew writer, A.B.
Yehoshua, acclaimed for his short
stories, some of which are sur-
realistic, others realistic, or con-
taining a strong mythological
unercurrent, returns to the sub-
ject from the point of view of the
young Israeli generatoin which
knows the pre-State era and the
meaning of the Golah only from
reading or from its elders' word of
mouth.
The five essays comprised in
Yehoshua's book focus on the ur-
gent ideological, psychological,
and social issues of an embattled
Israel which was born form the
ashes of the Holocaust, and lives
in a situation of double tension:
that between Israel and the Arab
world which surrounds and
threatens it, and that between
Israel and the Golah,the Di-
aspora, which, in the fourth de-
cade after the establishment of
Israel is still the home of the
great majority of the Jewish
people.
Although Yehoshua disclaims
being either a Jewish philosopher
or historian, his trenchant obser-
vations on the vital problems of
the relationship between the
young state and the old Diaspora
will be read with profit by both
philosophers and historians, as
well as the general public. As for
the Holocaust, Yehoshua consi-
ders it "the final decisive proof"
of the failure of Diaspora ex-
istence, but he feels it was too
high a price to pay for the crea-
tion of Israel: "If we are con-
fronted with the choice: no Holo-
caust and therefore no State of
Israel. I doubt that any of would
dare to say: Let there be a Holo-
caust so that the State of Israel
can be established."
I personally found most in-
teresting and novel Yehoshua*s
interpretation of the Golah as the
result of a Jewish neurotic ten-
dency to live in the Diaspora.
The Jewish people, created in the
Golah, has chosen to live in Exile,
has remained scattered in the
Diaspora of its own free will.
Yehoshua develops this theme at
length, and demonstrates that
the Golah had "a pathological at-
traction" for the Jews, although,
paradoxically, they never ceased
to impugn it. While one feels
that this argument presents a
typical young Israeli point-of-
view, one cannot deny that it has
a certain convincing force.
On the Arab-Israeli problem
Yehoshua is, if not dovish, hesi-
tant and circumspect. He argues
that the Jewish claims to Eretz
Israel can be countered by Arab
claims which have equal objec-
tive validity. Neither the religi-
ous, the historic, or the sur-
vivalistic arguments put forward
by the Jews are in themselves a
sufficient basis for the claim. In
the final analysis, the Jews have
only a moral right to the country:
The Jewish people have "the
moral right to seize, even by
force, part of any other country in
order to establish a soveriegn
state of its own. These few sam-
ples should suffice to show that
this is indeed a thought-provo-
king and challenging book.
Finally, a word must be said a-
bout the translation. A difficult
BETWEEN
RIGHT
&RK.HT
tSRAELlPROBLEMOR
SOLUTION?
ARYEHOSHUA

Hww T)av School's Program for Pre-Kindergartners
Hebrew uay a"luwy'Sunril!eSivd.,ptaMation Mm**** p0(^
Sapperstem, the physical *W
tion teacher, works with the f
year-olds twice a week at the w[l
equipped gymnasium on the irr
Campus. The children also
music under the direction 2
Arlene Solomon, along with t
rest of the student body.
The Pre-Kmdergartenchilditt t!
are also exposed to many cultuTi
activities, such as the P.A C E
Concert Series.
A special part of the fte-K
program is the extensive Judaic
curriculum that the children ate
exposed to The quality 0f can
and experience in the early year,
of life are crucial in determining
the direction the total develop!
ment of the child will take. Be-
cause the environment makes a
great impact in the years before
age five on the shaping of beliefs
Kabbalat Shabbatim Important
but fine Hebrew stylist of Yeho-
shua's stature deserves a good
English translation. I regret to
have to point out that the present
translatoin is heavey, clumsy,
and occasionally faulty. A better
translation would have enhanced
the attractiveness of this book for
the English-reading public.
An important aspect of the
programming at the Hebrew Day
School is that of Kabbalat
Shabbat. The "welcoming in" of
the Sabbath has special signifi-
cance to these children. The early
childhood department holds its
Kabbalat Shabbat services on
Friday mornings. The children
conduct the majority of the serv-
ice in their own inimitable
manner.
The first through fifth grades
have an individual class Shabbat
throughout the month under the
able direction of the Hebrew
Department. Their format in-
cludes special guest speakers,
film strips, skits, etc. On the first
Friday of the month, the entire
upper grades hold Kabbalat
Shabbat in Soref Hall. Here
Cantor Jack Stateman conducts
their service with total student
participation.
During September special
attention was devoted to the
Selichot services as well as the
High Holy Days services. Cantor
Stateman instructed the children
about the meaning of Selichot.
The specialPivvuf requesting for-
giveness was explained with rele-
vancy to the children. One Fri-
day was spent reciting and un-
derstanding a sampling of these
Piyyut (Psalms).
Solemnity was a keynote for
September's Kabbalat Shabbats, attitudes, and values, the School
IlL iL. .J..nnl e\t Quiz lr nt in I ?______?_____ ." ..
but with the advent of Sukkot in
October the mood and the genre
of the programs will reflect it.
Welcoming the Sabbath in this
traditional menner makes the
Day School children sensitive to
their traditions and commitment
to Judaism. _______
Dr. Jack Solomon
2502 E. Oakland Park Blvd.
Happy Holidays
The
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Colonial Insurance
Counsellors, Inc.
351 N. State Road 7
Plantation 33318
587-6690
Bruce Taylor
JohlK.Hotman
AlRotman
believes in integrating Judaic ex-
periences into the young child's
life.
The program is designed to
prepare each child for his or at
upcoming Kindergarten experi-
ence.
Henri's Place
3332 E. Atlantic Blvd. 941-7859
New Year Greetings
Happy New Year To All
Green Cay Corp.
700 NW 12th. Terrace
Pompano Beach, Fla. 33061 943-1692

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ALAN G.
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Full Text
fiewi5lti Meridian
OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE
low
10- Number 24
Fort Lauderdale, Florida Friday, October 16,1981
FndShocht!
Price 35 Cents
iving Is Less Taxing This Year
|"he Economic Recovery Tax
of 1981, passed by Congress
signed by President Ronald
i, represents a unique
irtunity for Jewish Fed-
s in the United States to
ease cash collections signifi-
in the remaining months
this year and give the 1982
[lpaign a very strong start.
said Herschel Blumberg,
in 1 chairman of the United
pish Appeal, during a meeting
UJA's National Campaign
licy Board.
nuin of the tax savings pro-
Mis expire Dec. 31, of this
He said: "The legislation,
significantly reducing the tax
rates in all brackets starting Jan.
1, 1982, including reducing the
maximum rate from 70 to 50 per-
cent, creates a considerable in-
centive for contributors to pay
past due pledges, make complete
payment of 1981 pledges, prepay
1982 pledges, and donate appre-
ciated properties and securities."
He noted that this is so be-
cause "the after-tax cost of dona-
tions may never be as low to the
donor as it is in 1981."
One of the key features of the
law, Blumberg cited, that is of
special signifcance to con-
tributors is the planned re-
ductions in individual tax rates
over the next several years. He
said this year the individual tax
rate will be reduced by 1.25 per-
cent; next year, 10 percent; in
1983, 19 percent, and in 1984, 23
percent. In 1982, the maximum
individual tax rate will decline to
50 percent from the present
maximum rate of 70 percent. The
graduated nature of the tax en-
hances the desirability of paying
all unpaid pledges in 1981 be-
cause of increases, he said, in tax
savings compared to later years.
He cited the following example
of paying a 1981 pledge in full
this year: A married taxpayer
whose $150,000 taxable income
(after all allowable deductions
and exemptions) requires him to
pay taxes of $72,600 would only
have to oav$66.280, if he paid his
$10,000 pledge this year a
saving of $6,320.
If that same taxpayer waits
until next year to pay his 1981
pledge, under the new tax sched-
ule he will save only $5,000 in
taxes, a loss of after tax dollars of
$1,310. And if he makes the same
pledge for 1982 and pays it this
year, he'll save an additional
$1,320 after tax dollars.
Leaders in the Jewish Fed-
eration of Greater Fort Lauder-
dale, including Gladys Daren,
Women's Division president, and
John Streng, treasurer, who are
co-chairing the Federation's cash
committee, are urging full pay-
ment of 1981 pledges before the
end of the year. Campaign lead-
ers are seeking 1982 pledges as
part of the preliminary plans of
the 1982 UJA campaign and
urging pre-payment on the
premise that "Uncle Sam helps
you pay your pledge this year."
Additional information on the
tax-saving aspects of the Econo-
mic Recovery Act of 1981 may be
secured by calling the Federation
office and talking with Campaign
Director Kenneth Bierman, 748-
{KL______________________
Jewish National Fund Installs Officers Oct. 27
Barrett Rothenberg, Coral
prings attorney, will be in-
alled as president of the Jewish
jtional Fund (JNF) of Greater
:n Lauderdale succeeding Dr.
Jvin Colin of Fort Lauderdale.
j The installation of officers will
kt- place at the annual meeting,
pen to the public, at 8 p.m.,
uesday, Oct. 27, in the Samuel
. Soref Hall, JewishCommunity
enter Perlman Campus, 6501
. Sunrise Blvd., Plantation.
The speaker will be Dade
inty's distinguished and
linen t theology scholar, Rabbi
. ing I.ehrman.
Dr. Colin, the retiring presi-
ent of JNF, said: "Over these
ast 10 years of JNF in our area,
Here has been steady progress
nd greater progress is ahead
ith our new president and with
jr executive director, Shirley
liller. JNF has 'come of age,' in
[laking the community realize
Shocked by Sadat's Death
Victor Gruman, president of the Jewish Fed-
eration of Greater Fort Lauderdale, speaking on be-
half of the Jewish community following the death of
Egypt's President Anwar Sadat, said ;
The Jewish community of Greater Fort Lau-
derdale was deeply shocked to learn of the assas-
sination of Anwar Sadat, president of Egypt. The
Jewish community deeply mourns the loss of a great
statesman. His peace initiative and courageous
diplomacy was instrumental in bringing about a
state of peace between Egypt and Israel and had
begun to lend an element of stability to the Middle
East. His loss will create a great void of leadership in
the Middle East and we hope that his efforts for
peace in that region will be fulfilled."
Atty. Rothenberg
the vast scope of the organiza-
tion's work throughout the State
of Israel."
Other to be installed, following
the nominations approved by the
nominating committee headed by
Jacob Brodzki, are Lou Colker,
Philip Halle, Libo Fineberg, vice
presidents; Lee Shainman, treas-
urer; Nat Baker, financial secre-
Rabbi Lehrman
tary; Bernard Oshinsky,
recording secretary.
Board members: Irwin Footer,
Paul Frieser, Victor Glazer, Vic-
tor Gruman, Hildreth Levin,
Leonard Levitt, Abe Meltzer,
Leon Messing, Josephine
Newman, Dorothy Oshinsky,
Sylvia Plafker, Larry Rothen-
berg. Abe Tuchman, Florence
Weissberg, Dr. Jack Zomlefer.
The Rabbinical Advisory Com-
mittee includes Rabbis Jeffrey
Ballon, Sheldon Harr, Phillip
Labowitz, Israel Zimmerman.
Helene Soref is chairman of the
annual meeting and installation
of officers during which special
presentations from JNF in New
York will be made. Hildreth
Levin has arranged for hosts and
hostesses with Peggy Brodzki in
charge of refreshments. Their
committee includes Mr. and Mrs.
Al Gross, Mr. and Mrs. Ludwik
Brodzki, Mr. and Mrs. Colker,
Mrs. Newman, Mr. and Mrs.
Shainrnan, Mrs. Plafker, Mr. and
Mrs. Philip Halle, Mr. and Mrs.
Oshinsky, Mr. and Mrs. Melt-
zer, Mr. and Mrs. -Nat Baker,
Seymour Gerson.
ne and Inseparable: Bible Study, Israel
r>fr ,
f

Wical talk by Prime Minister Begin. Seated at his left Dr. Halpern.
"ofo in Begin's home by Abe Gittelson.
By
ABRAHAM J. GITTELSON
Federation-CAJE
Education Director
Every Saturday night is an in-
tellectual and religious treat at
the residence of the Prime Minis-
ter of Israel Menachem Begin.
Those evenings, after Shabbat
ends, are devoted to the weekly
meetings of the central group of
the World Jewish Bible Society.
Leading Biblical scholars of
Israel, with Prime Minister Begin
as host, gather to probe in-depth
a different aspect of the Bible
each week. The Society, or-
ganized originally by Israel's
first Prime Minister, David Ben
Gurion, an avid student of the
Bible, met at his home, but at his
death, the group met in the
homes of the Presidents of the
State of Israel. With the election
of Begin, the site of the meetings
were returned to the Prime
Minister's residence.
This meeting near the end of
summer, to which this author and
his wife, Shulamith Gittelson,
were fortunate to attend, the
Saturday before Begin was soon
to leave for the U.S. and his first
meeting with President Ronald
Reagan, was somewhat special.
It directly preceded the Fifth
International Bible Contest for
Adults. Special guests of the
Prime Minister and the Bible So-
ciety were the winners of 30 na-
tional Bible contests throughout
the world. The outdoor patio of
the official residence was filled
from corner to corner with scho-
lars, newspaper writers, special
guests and government officials.
The first lecture was offered by
Dr. Sarah Halpern of the Hebrew
University in Jerusalem. The
main speaker, however, was the
Prime Minister himself. Viewing
Saul as a tragic hero, he traced
the relationship of the two prota-
gonists, substantiating his views
with copious quotes from the
Book of Samuel.
Some sharp questions followed
his presentation, inlcuding those
posed by Gideon Hauser, former
Attorney General of Israel and
prosecutor in the Eichmann trial.
Those present were astounded
by the scholarly approach to the
subject by Begin who was pre-
paring for his crucial meetings in
the White House, takingthe time,
because of his dedication and
Continued on Page 3
Women Plan Leadership Day Oct. 28
[Two nationally known leaders in
N National United Jewish Appeal
Fomen's Division are coming to Fort
fcuderdale this month to meet with
> leadership of the Women's
|ivision of the Jewish Federation of
pater Fort Lauderdale.
I Marsha Sherman, a member of the
ptional UJA Women's Division
bard, and Barbara Weiner, chairman
I the National UJA Young Leader-
?'!' will be the speakers at the ses-
?ns to be held Wednesday, Oct. 28,
> the Palm Aire Spa Hotel in Pom-
panoBeach.
Announcement that Sherman, now
of Tampa, and Wiener, of Milwaukee,
Wise., will be the speakers at the Oct.
28 Leadership Day sessions was made
by Lee DreUing and Roily Weinberg,
chairmen of the Leadership Day for
1982.
The local chairmen said that they
know that the speakers, frequent vis-
itors to Israel in recent years, will
bring a fresh new approach to
voluntary dedication needed for
leadership, in addition to accepting
the responsibility of serving for the
good of Jewish people everywhere.
Mrs. Sherman, former Florida
State and Regional chairman, was
elected president of the Women's
Division of the Jewish Federation of
South Broward, receiving the com-
munity's young Leadership Award in
1972 and the Woman of the Year
Award in 1975, before moving tdt
Tampa. Mrs. Wiener is also the wife
ner of a Young Leadership Award;
presented in 1972, by the Milwaukee
Jewish Federation.
Joining Mrs. Dreiling and Mrs.
Weinberg in noting the credentials of
the speakers and the messages they
will be bringing to the Division's
leadership were Gladys Daren,
Women's Division president; Jean
Shapiro, Women's Division executive
vice president for campaign, and
Felice Sincoff, Women's Division
Campaign '82 chairman. They antici-
pate this will be the finest Leadership
Day in the 14-year history of the
Women's Division campaigning for
UJA.



Page 2
i'dfxirtiaier'tort LjuXcueramk
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday. October is,
Mobil Oil Offers Saudi Propaganda
"The widely circulated Mobil
Oil advertisement, 'The U.S.1
Stake in Middle East Peace: New
Opportunities' reads like a pro-
paganda statement published by
the government of Saudi
Arabia," wrote Robert Zweiman,
national commander of Jewish
War Veterans of the USA to W.
P. Tavoulareaf, president of
Mobil Oil. The new peace oppor-
tunity cited is Crown Prince
Fahd's "new eight point" Middle
East plan of August 7. Zweiman
noted, although the ad also con-
tains some of President Sadat's
comments during his August
U.S. trip, it mysteriously does
not mention Sadat's condemna-
tion of Fahd's plans as nothing
new.
The ad quotes the Saudi plan
as stating "that all states in the
region should be able to live in
peace," but does not mention
that Saudi Arabia has never rec-
ognized the State of Israel. "Hie
Community Calendar
FRIDAY, OCT. 16
Hadaaaah: L'Chayim Chapter:
General meeting, Deicke Audito-
rium, Boutique, Speaker Dr.
Bruce Clarin, Refreshments,
noon.
SATURDAY, OCT. 17
Jewish Community Center: Her
Story in History, Part I, Thea-
trical Performance, 8 p.m.
SUNDAY, OCT. 18
B'nai B nth: LauderhiU Lodge:
General meeting at Castle Gar-
dens Rec. Hall, 10 a.m.
Temple Beth Israel of Deerfield
Beach: Bagel and Lox Breakfast,
Documentary film, "Where We
Came From," 10 a.m.
Temple Beth Israel, Games, 7:30
p.m.
MONDAY, OCT. 19
Women's League for Israel:
Hatikvah Chapter, noon,
League's Homes in Israel film,
Broward Mall meeting room.
HADASSAH:
Aviva Oakland Estates Chap-
ter: Paid up membership lunch-
eon, Lauderdale Lakes City Hall,
noon.
Armon Castle Chapter: Board
meeting at Castle Rec. Hall,
noon.
Bat Ami-Tamarac Chapter:
Board meeting at Tamarac
Jewish Center, 9:30 a.m.
NATIONAL COUNCIL OF
JEWISH WOMEN:
Plantation Section: "Bon Ap-
petet" at Broward Mall.
Gold Coast Section: Board
meeting, 10 a.m.
EREV SHEMINI ATZERET
THURSDAY, OCT. 22
Temple Emanu-EI: Board
meeting, p.m.
Temple Beth Am of Margate:
Board meeting, 7 p.m.
Temple Beth Israel, Deerfiekl
Beach Sisterhood: General meet-
ing at Temple, 12:30 p.m.
HADASSAH:
.. Pompano Chai Chapter: Gen-
eral meeting at Pompano Rec.
Center, 1801 N.E. 6th St., 11 a.m.
to 3 p.m.
Oriole Scopus Chapter: Gener-
al meeting at Congregation Beth
Hillel, Margate Square, Margate,
noon.
ORT
| .. Wynmoor Chapter: Board
S meeting at Boca Raton Federal
5 Bank, State Rd. 7,1 p.m.
2 Lauderdale Ridge Chapter:
Regular meeting and Paid-Up
Membership Luncheon. Report of
ORT Conference in New York
and film, "Links in the Chain" at
-n Lauderdale Lakes City Hall,
I noon.
| B'NAI B'RITH:
m Plantation Lodge: Board
~* meeting, Southern Federal Bank,
Community Room, Sunrise Blvd.
and Sunset Strip 8 p.m.
Hope Chapter: General meet-
-n ing at Deicke Auditorium, noon
i Free Sons of Israel, Fort Louder
t dale Lodge: Speaker, Elaine
Z Allen, Whiting Recreation Hall,
-N.W. 64th Ave. and N.W. 24th
St., 7:30 p.m.
FRIDAY, OCT. 23
Workmen* Circle, Branch 1046:
7 General meeting at Lauderdale
i Lakes City Hall, 7:30 p.m.
C SATURDAY, OCT. 24 4
2 SUNDAY, OCT. 25
Jewish CISaaUj Center
"TsinderelU," Yiddish Play.
SUNDAY, OCT. 25
American Mogen David for Isra-
el: Special Show at Sunrise
Musical Theatre, 8 p.m.
new Saudi plan implies peace
without Israel; no wonder Yasar
Arafat was delighted with the
plan," said Zweiman. The PLO is
committed to Israel's total anni-
hilation; this is the reason why
Israel has refused to negotiate
with a terrorist group who wants
to destroy it.
Examples of Saudi Arabia's
peaceful efforts are shown by
their part in helping negotiate the
recent cease fire in Lebanon.
Zweiman claimed, "The Mobil
ad does not mention the Saudi's
financing the PLO to the tune of
400 million dollars a year. Saudi
money buys arms which the PLO
uses to attack Israeli civilians,
Lebanese Christians, and impor-
tant 'military targets' like a syn-
agogue in Vienna."
Teen Federation
Meets in Coral Springs 1
The Coral Springs Teen Feder- group two years ago a ^
ation held its first meeting of the again advisor to the 10th uS
uimu iiciu iw ~-------o------
new year on Wednesday, Oct. 14
at the home of Holly Gruber.
Beginning its third year, the
and 12 th graders.
!***l* **

all indications point to an ex
citing series of programs.
Selma Telles, who started the
tion program are invited to Zi
Mrs TeUes at 485-8983 or h3!
Gruber at 752-6507.
iNtt
fll
Women's Division of Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale offers
Beautiful Cards for Any Occasion
8 in a packet for $25.
Call 748-8200
HHIHIIIIIIIIIIIt
The most respected name
in Jewish funeral servic
In the world.
Not surprising, it's
Riverside, and there are many
reasons.
If you've ever worked with
any of our people on community
projects ranging from fund-
raising drives for Israel to
enhancing Jewish education,
you'd understand. If you've ever
experienced the compassion
and kindness of Riverside
counselors, you'd have an even
deeper appreciation of the
reasons for Riverside leader-
ship.
At Riverside, we have the
largest Jewish staff available
from any funeral director in
Florida. More important, they
are people who understand
Jewish tradition and honor it.
They carry on a tradition
that for over th ree generations
has been a priceless assurance
to Jewish families.
Our people. They make
Riverside the most respected
name in Jewish funeral service t,ame Gardner
in the world. Lena Rothfeld
SoniaGale
The Largest Jewish Staff
In The World.
CarlGrossberg, President
Andrew Fier, Vice President,
New York and Past President
of the Jewish Funeral
Directors of America.
Charles Salomon, Vice
President, New York.
In Florida:
Alfred Golden, Executive Vice
President.
Leo Hack, V.P., Religious
Advisor.
Sam Rosenthal
Kenneth Kay, V.P.
Keith Kronish,F.D.
Mark Ginsberg, F.D.
Harvey Pincus,F.D.
Douglas Lazarus, F.D.
Carmen Serrano, F.D.
Robert Burstein
Arthur Zweigenthal
Isaac Nahmias
Samuel Golland
Jules Fischbein
Alfred Stern
Syd Kronish
DickSorkin
Joseph Rubin
Henry Bof man
Joseph Bass
ADDRESSES:
MIAMI BEACH: 1920 Alton
Road (19th SU/531-1151
NORMANDY ISLE: 1250
Normandy Drive/531-1151
MIAMI: 1717S.W. 17th St.
(Douglas Rd.)/443-2221
NORTH MIAMI BEACH: 16480
N.E. 19th Ave./947-8691
HOLLYWOOD: 2230 Hollywood
Blvd./920-1010
FT. LAUDERDALE (Tamarac):
6701 West Commercial Blvd.
(E. of University Rd.)/
587-8400
WEST PALM BEACH: 4714
Okeechobee Blvd./683-8676
Five chapels serving the New
York Metropolitan area.
Bernard Eilen
Aaron Rosenthal
Sol Silver
Charlie Blumkin
Ida Rosenberg
Barney Sel by
Edward Dobin
Ralph Rubell
Guardian Plan Counselors:
Ira Goldberg, Manager
Steve Fischman
RIVERSIDE
Memorial Chap*), Inc./Funaral Oirectors
Tradition. It's what makes us Jews.
Sponsoring the Guardian Plan Pre-Arranged ifSAj
(.luirdW
pun.


.1 .!
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-----
"" .- !
Pi
****
. VWV-V...-.
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdaie
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While Visiting Here, They'll Talk About Kibbutz Life
Friday, October^
Laura and Matthew Sperber of
Kibbutz Yahel in the Negev
desert of Israel and their daugh-
ter, Shira, born on the Kibbutz,
will be visiting with Matthew's
parents, Ruth and Milton Sper-
ber of Fort Lauderdaie this
month.
The young couple and their in-
fant daughter (pictured) are
featured on the cover of a bro-
chure produced by AZRAthe
Assn. of Reform Zionists of
America, an affiliate of the Union
of American Hebrew Congrega-
tions. The brochure is being
distributed throughout the U.S.
And the reason for that
distinction is part of a story that
PLO Rockets
Destroyed
Israeli
Forests
Jewish National Fund (JNF)
officials, after surveying the
damage done by PLO rockets
launched from Southern Lebanon
before the "cessation of hostil-
ities" worked out -by Special
Envoy Philip Habib of the U.S.,
report the fires gutted more than
150 acres of forest land in the
Galilee around the town of Kiryat
Shemona It was, they said, the
largest forest fires since the 1948
founding of Israel.
Many of the trees that were de-
stroyed, they said, were planted
during the past 30 years in
memory of Jewish victims of the
Holocaust.
The JNF was founded in 1901
by the World Zionist Organiza-
tion to acquire and develop land
for forestation in pre-
independence Palestine. The
ultimate goal was to return the
barren hills of Israel, left bare by
2.000 years of occupying forces,
to their Biblically wooded state.
"The firemen and JNF forest-
ers did their utmost in trying to
save the trees, but the damage
was enormous," said JNF For-
estry Head Ben Porat. "It was
very difficult to get the forest
fires under control with the shells
falling repeatedly and rekindling
the fire."
JWB Provides
Continued from Page 1
American Jewish community.
At the same time, JWB is the
national headquarters of Jewish
Community Centers, YM &
YWHAs and Camps in the U.S.
and Canada, seeking to
strengthen and perpetuate the j
quality of Jewish life through the
Jewish Media Service, the JWB
Lecture Bureau, the JWB Book
Council, the JWB Music Council,
Hebrew language programming
and Israel-related projects.
JWB is- supported by Fed-
erations, the United Jewish Ap-
peal of Greater New York-Fed-
eration of Jewish Philanthropies
Campaign, and the JCCs and YM
& YWHAs and Camps it serves.
:
Music Lovers!
"Nefesh is a very pleasant and en-
joyable recording that can be heard
again and again, nice to own and nkx
to give.
. Tba IWm ia Aahkenujc and the mpmi u
darply Jrwiah. with raapact lor Orthodox
tradition Though modem in approach, it of
tan haa an Oriental haling and ahowi a pop or
jaii influence Netaeh-eaey to Uatan to."
Aa n-viemd in HAOASSAH MAGAZINE
harardkeveUenleb, nail from NWaaa.
BaaftUSoWeetEadAw.
New Yerk. Ne York IMJH
eS <0 eoeare poetafe aad keanfan] .ktaay back
ewaewaue U ax aauefled.
goes back to their childhood acti-
vities and interest in their respec-
tive Temple youth groups in
Roslyn and Great Neck. N. Y.
At age 15, Temple scholarships
took them to Israel. Four years
later they elected to spend a col-
lege year at the Hebrew Univer-
sity in Jerusalem. After com-
pleting collegiate education,
came marriage in 1977 in New
York with many young Israelis in
attendance, and then back to
Israel the young couple went
with a side trip of three weeks to
Russia, on behalf of the Jewish
Agency in Israel, to visit re-
fusniks as "good will ambassa-
dors."
In Israel, the young Sperbers
were part of the original group of
National Federation of Temple
Youth of the World Union for
Progressive Judaism that _
ceived the plans for the fili-
form KibbuU m A rava S
Eikt.r-rr.sdyaAe/.togiv^'
Now Laura Sperber has ^
elected general secreUrTlfT
Kibbutz and she hea^Se0^
"" Study Center, L
with dormitories and clawrnT
built on the Kibbuub^a
Congregation Sisterhoods.
In their capacity as leador.
Kibbutz Yahel, Our. ft
take part m the SumiaymoS
<8:30). Oct. 18 -ftTS
Voice Program on TV Charae
7, and will also speak Friday eve.
rung, Oct. 16 service at Temple*
Kol Ami, Peters Road, PlaX
tion.
All the Sperbers are active in
ARZA, Reform Judaism's !fa
in the World Zionist Organic
tion, and its supreme governing
council, the Zionist Congress
The most respected name
in Jewish funeral service.
Intheworld.

Not surprising, it's
Riverside, and there are many
reasons.
If you've ever worked with
any of our people on community
projects ranging from fund-
raising drives for Israel Jo
enhancing Jewish education
you'd understand. If you've ever
experienced thecompassion
and kindness of Riverside
counselors you'd have an even
deeper appreciation of the
reasons for Riverside leader-
ship.
At Riverside, we have the
largest Jewish staff available
from any funeral director in
Florida. More important, they
are people who understand
Jewish tradition and honor it.
They carry on a tradition
that for over three generations
has been a priceless assurance .
to Jewish families.
Our people. They make
Riverside the most respected
name in Jewish funeral service
intheworld.
The Largest Jewish Staff
In The World.
Carl Grossberg, President
Andrew Fier, Vice President,
New York and Past President
of the Jewish Funeral
Directors of America.
Charles Solomon, Vice
President, New York.
In Florida :
Alfred Golden, Executive Vice
President.
Leo Hack, V.P., Religious
Advisor.
Sam Rosenthal
Kenneth Kay, V.P.
Keith Kronish, F.D.
Mark Ginsberg, F.D.
Harvey Pincus, F.D.
Douglas Lazarus, F.D.
Carmen Serrano, F.D.
Robert Burstein
Arthur Zwigenthal
Isaac Nahmias
Samuel Gotland
Jules Fischbein
.Elaine Gardner
Lena Rothfeld
SoniaGale
Bernard Eilen
Aaron Rosenthal
Sol Silver
Charlie Blumkin
Ida Rosenberg
Barney Sel by
Edward Dobin
Ralph Rubell
Guardian Plan Counselors:
Ira Goldberg, Manager
Steve Fischman
Alfred Stern
Syd Kronish
DickSorkin
Joseph Rubin
Henry Bofman
Joseph Bass
ADDRESSES:
MIAMI BEACH: 1920 Alton
Road(19thSt.)/53M151
NORMANDY ISLE: 1250
Normandy Drive/531-1151
MIAMI: 1717 S.W. 17th St.
(Douglas Rd.)/443-2221
NORTH MIAMI BEACH: 16480
N.E.19thAve./947-8691
HOLLYWOOD: 2230 Hollywood
Blvd./920-1010
FT.LAUDERDALE(Tamarac):
6701 West Commercial Blvd.
(E.of University Rd.)/
587-8400
WEST PALM BEACH: 4714
Okeechobee Blvd./ 683-8676
Five chapels serving the New
York Metropolitan area.
RIVERSIDE
Memorial Chapel, Inc./funeral Directors
Tradition. It's what makes us Jews.
Sponsoring the Guardian Plan Pre-Arraneej 2fi61f
Fune'J! Plan.


Friday, October 16,1981
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 7
IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMimilllllllllHHHM
iiiiiiiiiiiniiiir
niiiiimmmiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiimitttmiiHmHi^
319 Volunteers at Century Village Lauded for Raising $139,000
'*
a 22 vt2 ackbone of 25 United Jewish Appeal,"
declared Victor Gruman, president of the Jewish Federa-
Uun iftGreater K Lauderdale, speaking to the more
than 300 persons in attendance for the "Appreciation
Day meeUng for the volunteer UJA participants at
Century Village East in Deerfield Beach. parucipants at
In the big party room at Century Village's Clubhouse,
joining Gruman, who was the 1981 UJA Campaign Chair-
man, on the dais were (pictured from left) Henry Davila
club house director of Century Village who arranged for
the meeting room; Deerfield Beach City Councilman
Joseph Trachtenber, Evelyn Denner on Century Village's
UJA Executive Committee; Rabbi Leon Mirsky of CV's
Temple Beth Israel, CV-UJA General Chairman Samuel
K. Miller; Gruman; Leslie S. Gottlieb, Federation's
Kxecutive Director; Kenneth Bierman, Federation's UJA
Campaign Director, and Abe Rosenblatt, treasurer of CV's
UJA campaign.
Federation's leaders expressed their heartfelt thanks to
all the volunteers who made possible a more than 20 per-
cent increase in the 1981 campaign to a total of $139,000
Campaign Chairman Miller said that the increases were
the result of dedicated commitment on the part of the vol-
unteers who conducted a door-to-door campaign through-
out the sprawlmg complex of buildings.
Continuing in that vein, Gruman added that "you the
door-to-door volunteers, are just as important to the total
effort as are those of the bigger givers. Every one is needed
in our commitment to support our people in Israel our
people here in Broward, and our people throughout the
world because 'we are one one people indivisible I
thank you again from the bottom of my heart."
Pictured Are Some of The 319 Volunteers


sy, October 9. 1981
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 11
kted are treated more bru-
than non-Jews changed in
y? After all, the views,
an and contentions of one
jn can neither create nor ne-
[ reality.
ONE believes that the
ity in Argentina is different
| that descibed by Timerman,
are other sources to check:
lothers of the disappeared
who gather weekly at the
de Mayo in Buenos Aires
: to learn the whereabouts
eir loved ones; Amnesty
ational; the Council on
sheric Affairs; the Anti-
at ion League of B'nai
and the Inter-American
lission on Human Rights,
ency of the Organization of
rican States.
[these sources are also su-
per haps another source
be considered more objec-
nd reliable James Neilson,
litor of the English-Ian-
Buenos Aires Herald.
Ig in the August-Septem-
lue of Hadassah Magazine,
bs:
is, it was generally be-
. received far harsher
treatment from the military than
Christians or atheists did if cap-
tured by the security forces.
Such reports as have leaked out
from the military's half-hidden
prison system make it plain that,
as far as the army is concerned,
being Jewish is tantamount to an
admission of political guilt.
Some people who were held for a
time and then released have
testified that they saw portraits
of Hitler on the walls of the tor-
ture chambers and that one of the
first questions they had to an-
swer was, 'are you a Jew'?"
According to the neo-Judenrat,
the security forces carry extra-
legal activities which are not
authorized by the government.
But if this is so, why aren't any of
them arrested? Why don't.the
legal authorities end this reign of
terror? But forces do not operate
in a vacuum. They operate with-
in the framework of a political
system.
WHAT MOTIVATES the neo-
Judenrat to deny the existence of
anti-Semitism in Argentina?
What motivates them to deny
manifestations of neo-Nazism in
that country? How do they
iukkot Program Set For
Kosher Nutrition Sites
Festive Holiday of Suk-
khich begins at sundown
ly, Oct. 12) will be the
of programs arranged for
articipants of the Kosher
lion program at both sites
supported in part by the
Federation of Greater
Lauderdale.
3i David Gordon of Sun-
rho has been active volun-
in the Federation's
Paincy Commission program
Dviding religious services at
Itals and at the county's de-
n facilities, will he the
Her at il a.m.. Thursday,
5. to the elderly who will be
iing the site at the Jet
W
!> Blvd.. Plantation
Jr those gathering for
uzing ar.
re .
A. : I Sh >J
l bop] :
: "Liker
i ... turn
lham J.
k'v for Jewu tiop
- ;r (.f sducal grams
deration
attending eithei one of
I Kosher Nutrition pr 'grama
on Oct. 15, the first day of Choi
Hamoed Sukkot, are in for a real
treat, because both of the spea-
kers are knowledgeable, witty,
and add anecdotes to spice their
talks.
Rabbi Gordon, in addition to
serving the Chaplaincy Commis-
sion, is also an instructor in the
Judaica High School, teaching
classes there on the Book of Exo-
dus, and also teaching at Bro-
ward Community College.
At the JCC site prior to the
start it the New Year. Cantor
Paul Deitell of Hawaiian Gardens,
provided an overview f the High
Holy Days.
Gittelson, who is coordinating
with Susans iiothstein
in charge I Seni Adult pro
gramn
ment
for tl .ding
thi S ill tion
\ ices to enh
the quality >1 Jewish lift for all
vish com
Diunity in North Broward "
THANKSGIVING AT
MIAMI BEACH'S FINEST
GWTT KOSHER HOTEL
fAYS-3 NIGHTS
(Nov. 26-29)
ONLY
4 PER PERSON
DBL OCC
PLUS TAX
5 DAYS-4 NIGHTS 'EVERY LUXURY
(Nov. 25-29) OCEANfRONT
$99
INCLUDES? DELICIOUS
KOSHER MEALS DAILY
WALDMAN HOTEL ON THE OCt AN AT 43 ST
PHONE 538 5731EOR RESERVATIONS
FACILITY
POOL 'PRIVATE
BEACH
RELIGIOUS SERVICES
DAILY
ENTERTAINMENT
rationalize their orchestrated at-
tacks on Timerman? In addition
to the fact that they accept the
Reagan Administration's percep-
tion of Argentina as merely an
"authoritarian" regime which is
an invaluable ally in the fight
against "totalitarian" regimes,
there is a more fundamental rea-
son.
The root of the matter is this:
there is an attempt to deny the
Jewish nature of the plight of
those Jews who are victimized by
the Argentine regime by denying
that Xhey are Jews or victimized
as Jews. The neo-Judenrat
identifies these victims in terms
used by the regime: leftists,
radicals, revolutionaries, dissi-
dents and malcontents. They do
not define who is a Jew in
The
I KOSHER
H
V\K
>
<)
ouanfron;
MOTEL 40ih w
Ht Strtt%
GLAT7
N<,t&SUCCOTH HOLIDAYS
MM
LJL

Tennis facilities Sauna Hand Ball Volleyball
Olympic Swimminq Poo! Entertainment
full Block ol Private Beach TV m Rooms
Daily Synagogue Services
four Hosts Michael left owitz t Alex Smo*
Phone: 1-538-9045
Argentina according to halacha
but according to the govern-
ment's charges.
This is truly a tragedy of great
magnitude: Jews being denied
their Jewish indentity by other
Jews only because the govern-
ment has accused them, without
dur process of law, of being
political opponents even though
many of them have never even
been politically involved.
THE VICTIMIZED Argentine
Jews suffer a double indignity
they have been read out of the
community as Jews at the same
time that their tormentors insist
on recognizing them as Jews and
considering them guilty because
they are Jews. Their identity as
Jews and their suffering as Jews
is erased by the neo-Judenrat
and thus there is no Jewish pro-
blem in Argentina.
The tragedy in that country
as in other South American
'countries is that aside from
those who are known to have
been jailed or who have disap-
peared there may be many more
Jews who are in prisons, being
tortured or killed without any one
abroad knowing about it until it
is too late to try to save them.
And all this because the neo-
Judenrat denies the reality of
anti-Semitism and manifest-
ations of Nazism in Argentina.
A JTA Feature
Dormant* has a /k. Naturally.
Dorman's siiced natural Swiss, sliced natural Muenster and natural
Baby Muenster have something different Kosher certification. Naturally.
Enjoy these great-tasting packages of natural goodness Produced
under strict Orthodox Rabbinicai supervision.
N. Dorrnan & Company Inc.. S/osse '
The cheese with the paver
between the slices
My >on,
THe Knight!
Jewish mother* (and fathers) h ive traditionally boasted, and justifi-
ably so, about their children's professional achievements. But in how many
pares of the world can a |ewi>h parent proudly proclaim: "Meet my son, I HE
KNIGHT'"
Certainty Scotland must stand in 'lie forefront. In recent
yearsJScotland produced three Jewish Knights, two lewjsh Mem-
bers r)f Parliament, a I ord Provi i I, and the only [e>* ish
pip in the entire world!
Ol coul
hefin-
themfo
result is why we sa\ that J&.B whispers
Incidentally, you don't haw to wail uni >m -
a Knight or your daughter a Dame in 01 Vny
'simcha* will do! 1c"T> T 1
J&J-s Ifu
o> Ble-ded Scotch Whisky. C1990 "**? I
xvraroers




Page 6
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, October 16,1981
JCC Prepares for Its First Arts and Crafts Festival
The Arts and Crafts Festival Committee
(pictured here) planned the physical layout
for the Jewish Community Centers first
Arts and Crafts Festival. Standing from
left are Archie Rozen, Joseph Milgrom,
Adolph Greenbaum, Co-Chairman Charles
Benjamin, Abe Tuchman ; seated Florence
Alter, Chairman Harold Goldstein,
Jeanette Greenbaum. JCC's Maintenance
Director Jerry Gumora.
The event, expected to become an annual
fixture on the JCC calendar, will take place
from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Sunday, Nov. 1,
with a social event to take place Saturday
night, Oct. 31.
On the eve of the public showing of the
arts and crafts, the Festival judges, Jill
Marcus for crafts, and Dr. David Pactor for
art, will announce the winning artists and
award ribbons.
Festival Chairman Goldstein said: "This
Festival should be fun, and it's been fun
working on it." Hi co-chairman. Green-
baum, and Jeanette Greenbaum are in
charge of the Collector's exhibition as part
of the Festival.
The social evening on Oct. 31, was
planned by Jean Hoffman's, reception com-
mittee. She said: "Our exhibitors will be
honored at that time. We plan on refresh-
ments, music and an opportunity for the
exhibitors to view one another's work."
Deadline for artists to submit entries is
Friday, Oct. 16. r
Plans are to make the Nov. 1 event a
family day with music and dance to help
create the appropriate festival atmosphere.
Food will be sold by JCC's Senior Adult
Club and JCC's Teens. Prizes will be
awarded for a Pick A Winner Project that
day.
Jackowitz Youth Lounge Hours
Monday-Friday: 3:30-5 p.m.
Sundays: 12-5 p.m.
The Youth Lounge Consists of pool
tables, a ping pong table. Bumper Pool,
Atari Video, games, television, darts and
a Juke Box.
Come on down and hang out, the Jewish
Community Center is the place to be.
SAT TUTORING
This is an excellent opportunity to pre-
pare yourself for the SAT's testings in
December. It is an educational service to
JCC members to help learn the skills
necessary to help achieve your highest
possible score on the SAT's. These are
used by most colleges in their admission
programs.
For more information, contact Scott
Snyder._______________________
I Holiday Topics at Hebrew Day School
m~ "
l
i
I
i
JOIN US FOR A PONY DAY
Family Pony Day
Sunday
October 25
1:30-4:30 p.m.
Pony Rides
Barbecue Dinner
Games For All The Family
Cartoons
Prizes
And Much, Much, More.
JCC The Year of the Family
SIGN LANGUAGE
Sign language classes
postponed due to the Holidays,
will resume Nov. 11, and continue
until Jan. 27.
FIRST PROGRAM-
FRIDAY, OCT. 16
The Center is planning full day programs
for all Broward County teacher work
days.
Watch for details!!!
TRIBUTE CARDS
Tribute cards for all occasions are now
available on an individual basis for $2.50
each. Contact Sandy at JCC 792-6700.
IIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUIt^
CRC CreatingMailgram 'Bank'
The Community Relations Committee is
establishing a mailgram bank to help world Jewry
in liice of crisis. Irving R. Friedman, CRC Chair-
man, announced that as there are many issues
facing the Jewish community, it was essential
that our legislators hear us in time of need.
Mailgrams will only be sent when an issue
requires immediate attention. Friedman said,
adding that CRC will send the mailgrams and
have them billed to the individual's home tele-
phone number.
The cost for mailgrams of 50 words or less is
13.90. Participants in the mailgram bank will re-
ceive a copy of the mailgram. and be billed direct-
ly by the phone company.
To participate in this effort, please return the
form below to Federation. For further informa-
don. contact Larry Schuval. CRC Director at
Federation. 718-8200.
MAILGRAM BANK
I Want To Help World Jewry In Time Of Crisis.
Debbie Wisk and Celso Pilnik
prepare the autumn holidays as
part of the area of Judaic enrich-
ment at the Hebrew Day School
which is continuing one of its
successful programs. The Day
School is acting as host to several
visiting Rabbis from the commu-
nity. Rosh Hashana became more
alive and meaningful to the staff
and children through the visit of
Rabbi Tennenhaus of Congrega-
j tion Levi Yitzchok of Hollywood.
' The Rabbi related appropriate
stories about the deep meaning of
the Holidays. He also blew the
Shofar with great expertise. The
children enjoyed his visit and are
looking forward to his return.
Rabbis in the community are in-
vited to speak with the children
at assembly programs. Call HDS
at 583-6100. By participating in
the Day School program, Rabbis
are re-emphasizing the commu-
nity aspect of the school. Chil-
dren are thusly exposed to the
various tenets of the different
denominations of Judaism.
HDS ACTIVITIES
The Hebrew Day School of
Fort Lauderdale has been ex-
panding its enrichment program
this year. The Day School, noted
for its fine Secular and Judaic
education has already had a per-
formance by PACE. The Per
forming Arts for Community and
Education Inc. The children were
thrilled to experience the sights
and sounds of the brass section of
an orchestra. The next perform-
ance, the second of four, will be
held at the Day School on
Monday, Oct. 12.
On Oct. 27, the entire School
will attend a performance of "The
Wizard of Oz". This will be held
at Parker Playhouse in Fort
Lauderdale. The performance is
put on by the Story Theatre Pro-
ductions, Inc. The staff and the
children are looking forward to
seeing a live play.
Another exciting live perform-
ance will be held at the D
School in the early part of
The Robin Hood Players. .
home base is Scottsdale, \ i
will once more be putting
play for the children. Theii
formances in the past wen
educational and entertaining, and
the school is looking forward to
another excellent experiemv
year.
New UJA Award
Planned for Women
NAME
PHONE
ADDRESS
.ZIP
I authorize the use of my name, and you may charge
.2____3____4____5____6____(Please Check One) Telegram(s)
i
p
a.
To My Telephone Number During A Jewish Crisis.
THE USUAL COST IS $3.90 PER MAILGRAM.
The Women's Division of the
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale has joined
numerous communities
throughout the nation in the
newly-established level of philan-
throphy in behalf of the human
and social service needs of Jews
around the world.
When women, beginning with
commitments made to the 1982
United Jewish Appeal campaign,
pledge, on their own, $5,000 or
more to the campaign they will be
awarded the Lion of Judah pin
Similar Lion of Judah pins will be **
awarded by all communties in the
nation, which participate in the
Lion of Judah division
Jean Shapiro, executive vice
president of campaign for the
Women's Division, and Cam-
paign '82 Chairman Felice Sincott
indicated that the Women's Divi-
sion has fully endorsed the na
tional program.
SIGNATURE
X>ATE
Creative Jewish Cooking
Mail to Community Relations Committee
Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale
8360 W. Oakland Park Blvd., Fort Lauderdale, Fl. 33321
f

Education is fun and the North
Broward Midrasha is proving it.
Helene Smith, culinary instruc-
tor, will teach a class in Creative
Jewish Cooking at Temple Beth
Israel, 7100 W. Oakland Park
Blvd., beginning Nov. 3 from
9:30tolla.m.
This will be a delicious gas-
tronomic treat where you can
have your kugel and eat it too.
The preparation of those foods
that some say preserved the Jew-
ish people Kugel, lotkis.
chicken soup, etc. The course will
include a perfect Passover, a tra
ditional Chanukah, holiday meals
and tables. All foods will be pre-
pared in kosher creative fashion.
For more information call "4-
8200, the Jewish Federation


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The Jewish Floridian af Greater Fort Lauderdtde

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Page 12

The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, October 9. 1961
Autonomy Talks Resumed
By DAVID LANDAU
CAIRO (JTA) Af-
ter an 18-month sus-
pension, Israel, Egypt and
the United States resumed
negotiations late last week
on Palestinian autonomy
on the West Bank and the
Gaza Strip. The three dele-
gations, meeting at the
Mena House Hotel near
Cairo, delivered brief open-
ing statements in which
they pledged good will and
redoubled efforts to move
the talks towards
agreement.
The months of spasmodic
negotiations in the aftermath of
the Egyptian-Israel peace treaty,
signed in early 1979, failed to
achieve significant progress. But
the head of the Egyptian dele-
gation. Foreign Minister Kamal
Hassan AH, said in his opening
remarks that "a new hope" had
now arisen for the success of the
talks "with the new American
Administration and the recent
elections in Israel."
THE KEY FIGURE on the Is-
raeli team is the new Defense
Minister, Ariel Sharon. His
evolving new policies on the West
Bank have aroused the interest of
both the Egyptian and American
delegations, which apparently
share Sharon's intentions.
In recent weeks there has been
a wave of reports in the Israeli
media, inspired by Defense Min-
istry circles, to the effect that
Sharon proposes to introduce
major liberalizing measures on
the West Bank with the avowed
aim of wooing moderate local
leaders into the peace process.
. Israel radio and television
elaborated on Sharon's plan to
separate between purely military
security affairs on the West
Bank, which will remain in the
hands of the army, and civilian
control with as many as possible
Palestinian civilians in high ad-
ministrative positions.
EGYPT'S Minister of State,
Butros Ghali, a key presence
throughout the peace process
with Israel, publicly welcomed
Sharon's moves. In a statement
here, Ghali called on Israel to
provide "confidence-building
measures" that would "give
hope" to the Palestinian and
thereby improve the negotiating
atmosphere.
Asked if sich measures should
include the return of the two ex-
iled West Bank mayors, Mo-
hammed Milhem of Halhoul and
Fahd Kawasme of Hebron, to
their homes, the Egyptian diplo-
mat said this was "certainly" the
kind of thing we have in mind.
Speaking for the U.S. at the
formal session. Alfred Atherton,
the U.S. Ambassador to Ejrvpt.
Shamir, Carrington
Trade Heated Words
By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK (JTA) -
'' Sharp exchanges'' took
place here in conversations
between Israeli Foreigr
Minister Yitzhak Shamir
and British Foreign Sec-
retary Lord Carrington,
sources here say.
The two men met at a Man-
hattan hotel, and while their talk
was described as "polite,"
Shamir was reported to have ex-
pressed Israel's displeasure over
Carrington's anti-Israel state-
ments, his talks with leaders of
the Palestinian Liberation Or-
ganization and his support, in a
most extreme manner, of what is
known as the European initiative
to bring the PLO into the ne-
gotiations for a Middle East
settlement.
SHAMIR, reportedly, ex-
pressed particular dissatis-
faction with recent statements by
Carrington calling on the U.S. to
apply pressure on Israel. Shamir
asked the British diplomat how,
he would feel had Israel called on
the U.S. to pressure Britain on
the Irish question. During the
conversation, Carrington re-,
portedly expressed the wish to
visit Israel and while Shamir said;
he would be welcome, he did not1
extend an official invitation.
Carrington has emerged as the
moat outspoken supporter of the
PI 9 in the European Economic
:j> nity ; EEC) and has called
repeatedly for negotiations with
the PLO as part of the Mideast
peace process.
He was said to have repeated
that call in his talk with Shamir,
and to have said that although he
supports the Camp David pro-
cess, as it stands it is not enough
to reach a final settlement in the
Middle East.
/ IN HIS ADDRESS to the UN
General Assembly, Carrington
stated that in the view of his
government, "A comprehensive
settlement can only be negotiated
if all parties concerned, including
the Palestinian people and the
PLO which will have to be asso-
ciated with negotiations, accept
the principles which we set out ini
the Venice declaration and play
their full part.'' The Venice decla-
ration in June, 1980, was the
EEC's statement of principles on
the Middle East.
Carrington also told the Gen-
eral Assembly that "the starting
point" toward a just peace in the
Middle East "must be the in-
dependence and security of all
states in the area, including Is-
rael, and the legitimate rights of
the Palestinian people, including
the right to self-determination."
Carrington was one of three
European Foreign Ministers with
whom Shamir met. The others
were West Germany's Foreign
Minister Hans-Dietrich Genscher
and the newly-appointed foreign
Minister of Holland M. van der
Stoat
ACCORDING TO sources
here, Shamir's talks with the
German and Dutch Ministers
were held in a much more cordial
atmosphere than his encounter
with Britain's Foreign Secretary.
Genscher was invited to visit Is-
rael and is scheduled to go there
next spring.
The crux of the Shamir-
Genscher talk was the interna-
tional situation and the role of
Saudi Arabia in the Middle East.
The Saudi image in the West is
one of moderation. But Israel's
view, as expressed by Shamir, is
that the Saudis play a negative
role, at least as far as the Arab-
Israeh conflict is concerned. -
A' friendly atmosphere also
prevailed at Shamir's meeting
with Van der Stoel who took
office only ten days ago. The
Dutch diplomat noted with satis-
faction the improved relations
between Israel and the United
Nations Interim Force in Leba-
non (UNIFIL) which includes
Dutch troops.
reemphasized "the commitment
of the Reagan Administration to
remain ... a full partner" in the
peace process. "We are here to
play a full role," he said, "to do
all we can to help the process
move forward."
HIS REMARKS apparently
sought to allay concerns voiced in
Israel over the fact that Sec-
retary of State Alexander Haig
neglected to refer to the Camp
David process in his address to
the United Nations General
Assembly earlier this week.
Atherton also sought to allay
concerns felt both in Israel and
Egypt that the U.S. had
weakened its interest in the auto-
nomy talks by not designating a
special envoy to head its del*
gations. as was the case under
the Carter Administration. He
said that he and the Ambassador
to Israel, Samuel Lewis, were co-
chairmen of the U.S. team and
this showed that "we are re-
doubling our efforts we're
here with two of delegation
N
0
R
T
H
B
R
0
W
A
R
D
North Broward Midrasha
Institute of Jewish Studies
A community program of adult education
Classes begin the week ol November 2nd for 7 weeks.
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
7100 W. Oakland Park Blvd.
TUESDAY
Creative Jewish Cooking
9:30-11:00 a.m.
10:00-11:00 a.m.
Exodus & Leviticus
Synagogue Skills
11:00-12:00 a.m. Jewish Values
8:00-9:00 p.m. Ethical Issues.
Basic Hebrew
TEMPLE BETH TORAH
9101 NW 57 St.
MONDAYS
7:30-8:30 p.m. Hebrew I
Hebrew II
The Jewish Family
Jewish Music
Ethics ot the Fathers
Cantillation
Cycle ot Jewish Year
6501 Sunrise Blvd.
TUESDAY & THURSDAY
9:30-11:30 a.m. ULPAN Hebrew
MONDAY a WEDNESDAY
7:30-9:30 p.m. ULPAN Hebrew -
SUNDAY
7:30-9:00 p.m. Israeli Dancing
THURSDAY
7:00-8:00 p.m. Heritage ol Jewish Music
7:00-9:00 p.m. Israel & Survival
1 00-3:00 p.m. Crafts/Jewish Home
SUNRISE JEWISH CENTER
8049 W. Oakland Park Blvd.
THURSDAY
10:00-11:00 a.m. Ethics of the Fathers
TEMPLE BETH AM
7205 Royal Palm Blvd.
MONDAY
Yiddish
8:30-9:30 p.m.
9:30-11:00 a.m.
11:00-12:00 a.m.
TEMPLESHOLOM
132SE11 Ave.
WEDNESDAY
7:15-8:15 p.m Basic Hebrew Reading
Cantillation
8:15-9:30 p.m Cycle ol Jewish Lite
RAMAT SHALOM SYNAGOGUE
7473 NW 4 St.
MONDAY
8:00-9:00 p.m. Questions Jews Ask
PEES: MEMBER PARTICIPATING INSTITUTIONS:S5 pr course (MAX. SM
NON-MEMBER S29 FIRST COURSE: 110 ADDITIONAL COURSE (MAX. **
CHECKS PAYABLE: CENTRAL AGENCY FOR JEWISH EDUCATION
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CALL PARTICIPATING INSTITUTION
OR "48-8200
10:00 11:00 a.m.
WEDNESDAY
8:00-9 00 pm.
THURSDAY
1 00-2.00 p.m.
2:00-3.00 p.m.
WEDNESDAY
7 00-9:00 p.m.
Contemporary Issues Forum
Great Ideas From Bible
Elementary Hebrew
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October 9,1981
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Pace46
Kol Ami Starts High School
ale Kol Ami high school in Islam, and
Lion is providing a new
|um this year. One of the
. offered is a TV movie
utilizing the recent docu-
"Masada" in studying the
[the Jewish people during
Diical period, and in dis-
the moral implications of
oices given the leaders of
Bple at that time.
will also be a course on
itive Religions. A study
estantism, Catholicism,
some Far Eastern
sects, as they compare and
contrast to Judaism.
A youth group program for
teenagers at Temple Kol Ami and
young resident in the Plantation
area is being planned. They will
have a wide range of social activi-
ties, Jewish folk singing, dancing
and cultural Droerams Call Tem-
ple Kol Ami (472-1988) for de-
tails.
RAM AT SHALOM
The service and study period at
Candlelighting Time
Friday, Oct. 9-6:39
Monday, Oct. 12Erev Sukkot 6:36
Friday, Oct. 16-6:33
jSlyn ?ho *r hn
r t r t I iv
.natf hv -u d*binh
nns
T ~
HSftp
it ;l
-izte

la-ruch A-tah Ado-nye. Elo-haynu Melech Ha-olam,
Isher kid'shanu B'mitz-vo-tav, V'tzee-va-nu
L'had-leek Nayr shel Shabbat.
flessed art Thou, O Lord our God, King of the Universe,
X'ho has sanctified us with Thy commandments
id commanded us to kindling Yom Kippur lights
Religious Directory
LAUDERDALE LAKES
IEL B'NAI RAPHAEL TEMPLE. 4351 West Oakland Park
ulevard. Modern Orthodox Congregation. Saul Herman. Rabbi
neritus.
EMPLE EMANU-EL. 3245 W. Oakland Park Blvd. Reform Rabbi
ffrey Ballon. Cantor Jerome Klement
SUNRISE
ETH ISRAEL TEMPLE. 7100 W. Oakland Park Blvd. Conservative,
hbbi Phillip A. Labowitz. Cantor Maurice Neu.
JNRISE JEWISH CENTER, INC. 8049 W. Oakland Park Blvd.
^nservative. Rabbi Albert N. Troy. Cantor Jack Marchant.
LAUDERHILL
SBREW CONGREGATION OF LAUDERHILL. 2048 NW 49th
! Lauderhill. Conservative. Maxwell Gilbert, president.
NORTH LAUDERDALE
SBREW CONGREGATION OF* NORTH LAUDERDALE. 7 p.m..
May: 9 a.m.. Saturday, in Western School. 8200 SW 17th St. Murray
Rndler. president.
FORT LAUDERDALE
IMPLE ISRAEL OF GALT OCEAN MILE. Conservative. Rabbi
vid Matzner.
pan Rlvd
TAMARAC
tMPLE BETH TORAH-TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER. 9101
57th St. Conservative. Rabbi Israel Zimmerman. Cantor Henry
lueo.
PLANTATION
tMPLE KOL AMI. Plantation Jewish Congregation. 8200 Peters
\ Liberal Reform. Rabbi Sheldon J. Harr
iMAT SHALOM. 7473 NW 4th St. Rabbi Robert A. Jacobs
POMPANO BEACH
1PLE SHOLOM.132 SE 11th Ave.. Conservative. Kabbi Samuel
ril. Cantor Jacob Renzer.
MARGATE
ETH HILLEL CONGREGATION 7640 Margate Blvd. Conser-
tive. Rabbi Joseph Berglas.
CMPLE BETH AM-MARGATE JEWISH CENTER. 7205 Royal
dm Blvd. Conservative. Rabbi Dr. Solomon Geld. Cantor Mario
ktoshanskv
[BERAL TEMPLE of Coconut Creek. Friday evening services/
klvary Presbyterian Church. Coconut Creek Blvd.
CORAL SPRINGS
SMPLE BETH ORR. 2151 Riverside Drive. Reform. Rabbi Donald S.
^rber. Cantor Harold Dworkin.
STER TIKVAH SYNAGOGUE. 8 p.m. Friday: 10:30 a.m. Saturday
Auditorium. Bank of Coral Springs. 3300 University Dr. Rabbi
anard Zoll.
DEERFIELD BEACH
SMPLE BETH ISRAEL at Century Village East. Conservative.
bbi Leon Mirsky. Cantor Joseph Schroeder.
)UNG ISRAEL of Deertield Beacn. 1M0 W. HUlsboro Blvd. Or-
Ramat Shalom, 7473 NW 4th St.,
Plantation, at 8:15 p.m., Friday,
Oct. 9 will be conducted by Rabbi
Robert A. Jacobs. Gillian Green-
stein, guitarist and vocalist, will
provide the musical accompani-
ment for the Sabbath songs.
Rabbi Jacobs and Greenstein
recently taped a program for Sel-
kirk Cable TV Systems.
The synagogue is looking for-
ward to the Sukkot and Simchat
Torah holidays. During the Sim-
chat Torah celebration Rabbi Ja-
cobs will lead the congregation in
Israeli folk dancing. Unaffiliated
area families are invited to attend
services and participate in prayer
and study period discussions.
Information on Synagogue
activities can be had by calling
583-7770 from 9 a.m. to noon
I Monday through Friday."
EMANU-EL
Temple Emanu-El's Men's
Club will have its traditional lox
and bagel breakfast Sunday,
Nov. 1, 10 a.m. Guest speaker
will be Major Nick Navarro, head
of the Broward County Sheriff's
"Organized Crime Unit." Major
Navarro will speak on "Trouble
in Paradise," a topic related to
smuggling in Florida. Breakfast
is free to paid-up members;
guests $2.
Wednesday, Nov. 4, at 6 p.m.,
the Men's Club is sponsoring a
chicken dinner followed by a card
party.. Contribution is $3.50 per
person. For further information
and reservations call: Ben Ellen
or Ernest Strauss.
B'NAI MITZVAH
TEMPLE SHOLOM
Beth Gaynor, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Louis Gaynor, will be-
come a Bat Mitzvah at the Fri-
day evening, Oct. 16, service at
Temple Sholom in Pompano
Beach.
On Oct. 23 at Temple Sholom s
Friday evening services. Renee
Wassennan, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Gary Wasserman. will be-
come a Bat Mitzvah.
The following evening at 6
o'clock, Andrew Levy, son of
Mrs. Madeline Levy, will become
a Bar Mitzvah.
BETH AM
Hebrew School Sabbath was
noted last Friday night at Tem-
ple Beth Am, Margate, with
fourth graders participating in
the service. Joy Kahn-Evron,
School director, coordinated
Yom Kippur services for stu-
dents, aged seven through 13,
Thursday morning from 9:30 to
10:30 with the 14-18-age group
holding a service from 10:45 to
noon.
The Temple's United Syna-
gogue Youth (USY) provided
babysitters for toddlers through
first grade to enable parents to
attend services.
At last Sunday's Men's Club
breakfast meeting the speaker
was Samuel Pomerantz, vice
president of Drexel, Burnham
Lambert, discussing "Financial
Planning for the Retiree.
RAMAT SHALOM
QUESTIONS JEWS ASK
A non-judmental overview of
the contemporary Jewish experi-
ence will be explored by Rabbi
Robert A. Jacobs of Ramat
Shalom with those persons en-
rolled in the "Questions Jews
Ask" course of the North Brow-
ard Midrasha for Adult Educa-
tion.
The participants will be Mon-
day evenings from 8 to 9 p.m.,
beginning Nov. 2, at Ramat
Shalom synagogue, Plantation.
Students will discuss with
Rabbi Jacobs tradition and
change in the modern world, how
to create a meaningful Jewish
family life, and get an answer to
"who are we" in the Jewish com-
munity.
Information on Midrasha
courses and events at Ramat
Shalom and other participating
synagogues and the Jewish Com-
munity Center is available by
calling the Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale, 748-
8200.
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& Jewish FieriJ 1(3m
Volume 10 Number 23
OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE
Fort Lauderdale, Florida Friday, Ortober9,1961
FndShocht
Price 35 Cents.
Sen. Lawton Chiles Opposes AWACS Sale
Sen. Lawton Chiles of Florida
Ls joined in sponsoring a reso-
Vtion disapproving the Reagan
Administration's proposed
AWACS-F-15 enhancement sale
> Saudi Arabia.
In a floor speech announcing
Lis co-sponsorship, Chiles said,
Fl believe the Senate has a clear
ind pressing responsibility to re-
ect this ill-advised arms sale. It
: not in the best interests of the
Jnited States, the continued
ecunty of Israel or the cause of
eace in the Middle East."
The AWACS should not be
sold to any nation, the senator
said. "It would be a devastating
blow to our defense posture if the
AWACS technology were to fall
into unfriendly hands."
He insisted AWACS was not
essential to Saudi Arabia's air
defense: "If anything, Saudi oil
fields are much more vulnerable
to ground attack or sabotage."
Chiles called the proposed sale
"an equally wrongheaded policy
from the perspective of our long-
standing commitment to the
security of Israel. Israeli defense
problems will be compounded by
the sale of AWACS aircraft and
aerial tankers and AIM-9L
Sidewinder missiles for the Saudi
F-15's.
"It must be remembered that
while Saudi Arabia has entered
into a cooperative relationship
with the United States, it is no
friend of Israel and remains com-
mitted to the destruction of the
State of Israel."
Regarding the F-15 enhance-
ment proposal, Sen. Chiles
stated: "In 1978 the administra-
tion proposed the sale of 62 F-15
planes to Saudi Arabia ... to be
equipped with the AIM-7 Spar-
row missile and the AIM-9P3
Sidewinder missile, all alleged to
be defensive weapons.
"I opposed the F-15 sale in
1978. I was doubtful they would
remain defensive weapons. How-
ever, I never expected that it
would be the United States pro-
posing to^ive the Saudi F-15s an
offensive capability. I feel this
represents the breaking of a
solemn promise, not only to the
U.S. Senate but also to the
government and people of Israel.
Our friends deserve better
treatment."
Chiles called on the Senate to
adopt the resolution of disap-
proval, an action required in the
House of Representatives as well
to turn down the sale.
Nursing Home Residents, Others Wished a 'Sweet Year'
s
'JP


Men and women of Temple Beth Am I left) joined their
Irabbi, Dr. Solomon Geld and Cantor Mario Botoshan-
Apple slices dipped in honey
vere served to residents of
nursing homes as they were
vished a healthier, happier New
icar at the conclusion of Rosh
lashana-Yom Kippur services
brought to them by rabbis of the
community and by dozens of oth-
volunteers.
The series of services in the
nursing homes and also in Brow-
rd County's detention facilities
vas arranged by Rabbi Albert B.
chwartz, director of the Chap
aincy Commission of the Jewish
federation of Greater Fort Lau-
derdale, with the help of Ruth
Horowitz, chairman of nursing
borne volunteers of the Federa-
tion-Jewish Community Center-
sponsored WECARE.
Scenes at several of these serv-
ices for "shut-ins" are pictured
on this page and elsewhere in this
issue.
Although there were only two
or three Jewish men confined to
Bro ward's pre-trial detention
facilities, and two or three in the
stockade at Powerline Rd., prison
officials from the Broward
County Sheriffs Dept. had
others join in attending the serv-
ice. They felt that the rabbis
should have a "bigger congre-
gation" for taking the time lo
bring the New Year service to
their prisoners.
s*y for the service at Colonial Palms Nursing home.
Center: Nathan Hershberg sounds the shofar at jail
service. In nhoto at riaht. Rabbi Sheldon Harr (extreme
Rabbi Israel Zimmerman of cake at the conclusion to ell those
-:w^ ^ 3- a..
right) officiates at Covenant Care. (Other pictures Page
9)
Temple Beth Torah Tamarac,
officiated at the stockade, and
sounded the shofar during the
service.
At the detention facilities in
the Broward County Courthouse
the library was filled with
detainees and guards plus two re-
porters and a photographer from
The Miami Herald's Neighbors
edition. Rabbi David Gordon of
Sunrise, assisted by two other
Sunrise residents, Cantor Robert
Hansel and Nathan Hershberg
who sounded the shofar con-
ducted the service with Mrs.
Horowitz serving apples, honey.
in attendance.
AT Colonial Palms Nursing
Home in Pompano Beach, men
and women of the Temple Beth
Am congregation of Margate
joined their rabbi, Dr. Solomon
Geld, and their cantor, Mario
Botoshansky, at the service with
Nathan Bodner sounding the
shofar.
Among those in attendance,
and helping to serve punch and
the honey-dipped apples were
Beth Am's President Harry
Hirsch, first vice president Al
Cohen, second vice president
Jack Magzen, Sam Glkkman, Ir-
ving Resnikoff. Henrv Pier. Leon
Marokus, Phil Eisenman, David
Klempner, Adolph Sokol. Al
Kaplan, Sisterhood President
Celia Glkkman, Sarah Simono-
witz. Flora Weller, Goldie
Katroaar, Edith Nagel.
Rabbi Sheldon Harr of Temple
Kol Ami, Plantation, was assist-
ed by a group from Lauder hill's
B'nai B'rith lodge and from He-
brew Congregation of Lauderhill
in conducting the service at
Covenant Care Nursing home in
Plantation. Among those assist-
ing were Sol Cohen, Nathan
Elias. Murray Rubinstein and
Sunny Friedman, with Mrs.
Horowitz.
JWB Provides Services for Jews In Military
NEW YORK Jews in the
U.S. armed forces, their families
ln>und the world, and patients in
Veterans Administration hos-
pitals mark the High Holy Days
kith help from Jewish chaplains
ftnd JWB's Commission on Jew-
sh Chaplaincy, according to
labbi Herschel Schacter.
Rabbi Schacter, chairman of
the JWB Commission on Jewish
Chaplaincy, noted, "Since there
ire only 44 full-time Jewish mili-
ary chaplains on active duty
with American forces and 11
nore at Veterans Administration
hospitals, the commission
mobilized 246 civilian and reserve
rabbis as well as 172 lay religious
leaders to conduct Rosh
lashanah and Yom Kippur serv-
ices at every base where Jews
serve."
"Services," Rabbi Schacter
said, "will take place in Europe at
bases in such countries as Spain,
Germany, Greece and Turkey. In
the Far East, there will be serv-
ices in Korea, Japan, the Philip-
pines and Okinawa."
In accordance with the tra-
dition of full support to the field,
the JWB Commission on Jewish
Chaplaincy provided JWB
calendars 1981-82, inspirational
literature, Selihot (penitential
prayers) cassettes, and, as
needed, ram's horns (shofarim),
prayer shawls (taliot) and skull
caps (kipot), according to Rabbi
Joseph B. Messing, director of
JWB's Armed Forces and
Veterans Services and the Com-
mission on Jewish Chaplaincy.
Traditionally, the first of the
services took place on the island
of Guam in the South Pacific,
just east of the International
Date Line, and since services
follow the sun. Pearl Harbor in
Hawaii will be the last base to
sound the shofar blast trum-
peting the end of the High Holy
Days.
The full-time and part-time
Jewish chaplains covering the
VA hospitals have made plans to
provide religious services for all
hospitalized veterans. Am-
bulatory patients will be pro-
vided the opportunity to attend
services in the hospital chapels
and bed-ridden patients will re-
ceive SDecial coverage by the
chaplains.
"Break-the-Fast" suppers for
military personnel and VA
patients arranged by the chap-
lains will mark the conclusion of
the Yom Kippur.
All of the U.S. services en-,
courage and foster liberal leave
and pass policies for Jewish per-
sonnel, and in many instances,
service men and women who can-
not get home for the holidays are
invited to share the warm "home
hospitality" of Jewish families in
the locale where they are
stationed. Frequently, single men
and women are guests of Jewish
military families on their bases.
Local Jewish communal or-
ganizations cooperate fully in
holiday planning for service per-
sonnel with the Jewish chaplains,
the JWB Chaplaincy Commis-
sion and JWB's Women's
Organizations' Services, accord-
ing to Rabbi Messing.
The JWB is the U.S. govern-
ment-accredited agency that pro-
vides religious, morale and wel-
fare services to Jews in the armed
forces, their families and hos-
pitalized veterans on behalf of the
Continued on Page 2
omen's Division Board Meets Oct. 12
Jacob Brodzki, a past president of
Ihe Jewish Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale and a past president of
the Jewish Community Center of
Greater Fort Lauderdale, will be talk-
ing about global concerns rather than
local issues when he speaks to the
board members of the Federation's
Women's Division at noon, Monday,
)ct. 12, in Federation's re-located of-
fice at 8360 W. Oakland Park Blvd.
Brodzki, a member of the national
executive committee which planned
last June's World Gathering of Jew-
ish Holocaust Survivors, in Jerusa-
lem, will speak about those poignant
days he and his brother, Ludwik, who
was chairman of the North Broward
committee for the World Gathering,
took part in what became a "celebra-
tion of life" for the survivors.
Gladys Daren, president of the
Women's Division, will preside at the
meeting. Plans will be completed that
day for the Leadership seminar that
will take place Oct. 28 at the Palm
Aire Spa Convention Center. Women
from the National United Jewish Ap-
peal's Women Division will join the
leadership group for an up-date of
campaigning for Women's Division
role in the 1982 UJA campaiagn


Pageo
i ne o ewcsn r lUnuuirirWWy'tiier' tort iMilaxnuti*


The Jewish b'loridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, October 16,1981
Weizmann House at Weizmann
Institute of Science
By GEOFFREY WEILL
ITS NOT what you might expect in Israel.
A real, nonest-to-goodness "stately" home. But
there it stands, on a tranquil, verdant slope, in
Rehovot. The home of the late First President of
the State of Israel and his wife, Chaim and Vera
Weizmann, is located on the grounds of Israel's
spectacular Weizmann Institute of Science, and is
a treat for the visitor.
Chaim Weizmann was bom in 1874 in Motol,
a town in Russia's Jewish Pale of Settlement. As
a young man he became a Zionist, attending the
1898 Second Zionist Congress in Basel, Switzer-
land, chaired by Zionism's founder, Theodor
Herzl. In 1904, Weinzmann was appointed a
Reader in Chemistry at Britain's Manchester
University, after which his Zionist activities grew
from strength to strength. He married in 1906.
HE FIRST visited the land of Israel in 1907.
He was instrumental in working towards the Bal-
four Declaration, of 1917, Great Britain's
inoiiHMiious pledge to form a Jewish National
Home in Palestine. He led the Zionist Delegation
to the 1919 Versailles Peace conference, and in
1921 was elected President of the World Zionist
Organization. In 1934, he opened the Scientific
Research Institute at Rehovot, south of Tel Aviv,
named for British Zionist and philanthropist
Daniel Sieff. And it was thus in Rehovot, that in
1937 Chaim and Vera Weizmann made their
home.
In her diary, Vera Weizmann wrote, "At the
time of the opening of the Daniel Sieff Institute, I
happened to look out of the window of my
husband's small study there, and my eyes
alighted on a hill to the southeast." To design
their home on that hill, the Weizmanns chose Eric
Mendelsohn, architect of the original Hadassah
Hospital on Jerusalem's Mount Scopus.
Mendelson designed a lluuhau-styli-
structure, built squarely around a circular stair-
case, lit by glass bricks, a great favorite of the
post-depression designers. The two main
reception rooms flank the central courtyard
swimming pool, the elegant, long dining room
leading off the central hall.
IN A LETTER to a friend, Vera Weizmann
described how she planned the house: "the
library, big enough to hold all Dr. Weizmanns
books, must have an open fireplace where he
could arrange (or disarrange) the logs after the
manner of a man at home, and a loggia where he
could step out in the middle of a day's work."
The library desk remains as it was at the
time of Chaim Weinzmann's death in 1952. It is a
warmly-furnished room, on the east, intersected
with high porthole windows, and on the west
French doors open on to the swimming-pool ter-
race. Over the fireplace hangs an oil portrait of
Weizmann, by Birley.
The salon's art treasures are a tribute to the
Weizmanns' exquisite taste: magnificent
Persian silk carpet; priceless, fifteenth century
B.C. Chinese T'Ang Dynasty horse; and on the
walls, works by Impressionists Utrillo, Degas and
others.
Of the rest of the house, Vera Weizmann
wrote, "The guest bedrooms must not be too
few nor yet too many, and last but not least .
the garden which in the all-too-brief glory of the
Palestinian spring musl glow with masses of
color."
THE BEDROOMS are brightly furnished in
a style reminiscent of an English country house,
but what most impresses the visitor are the
personal touches: Weizmann's photographs,
ornaments, his prayer book open at his favorite
prayer, from the Yom Kippur Service, and most
of all the ledge specially built outside his circular
bedroom window, from which each morning, he
could feed the birds.
The house is lovingly cared for by the Weiz-
mann Institute. It is a moving visit. One feels the
Weizmann s presence, almost as if they have just
gone out for a few moments and will soon be back.
One is struck with the sumptuousness and
elegance, yet in no way is it ostentatious.
The grounds surrounding the house are, as
Vera Weizmann wanted, a riot of color. Perfect
lawns, flowering bushes, blossoming trees and
beds of fragrant flowers. Near the main entrance '
to the house is yet another charming memento of
Chaim Weinzman. Under a specially built
shelter, stands the 1951 Lincoln Continental, all
shiny black paint and gleaming chrome, with the
plaque that describes it as: "A gift from the Pres-
ident of the United States, Harry S. Truman to
Chaim Weizmann, First President of the State of
Israel." And not far from the house, at a site they
had chosen, are the graves of Chaim and Vert.
Weizmann.
THE WEIZMANN Institute cf Science at
Rehovot is twenty minutes south of Tel Aviv, and
forty minutes west of Jerusalem One of the
world's major institutions for scientific research
. T
Exterior view of the Weizmann House at Weizmann Institue of Science. Built in 1937, the
house is a typical example of the Bauhaus style of architecture. It was the home of Chaim
Weizmann, Israel's first President, until his death in 1952.

A corner of the salon of the Weizmann House at Rehovot. On the right a 15th century
Chinese Tang Dynasty horse; on wall, a portrait by French artist Barthe, of Vera Weizmann,
Israel's first "First Lady. "
- *
Library at the Weizmann House. Family photographs surround the room. On the fireplace wall
hangs the famous portrait of Chaim Weizmann by Birley. fireplace wall
and discovery, it is visited by thousands yearly
The Weizmann house itself is open Sunday
through Thursday from 10 a.m. until 3 p.m.
As one of Israel's founders, the whole
country, of course, is a tribute to this daring and
prophetic man. The Weizmann Institute is a
tribute to the man's scientific brilliance. And his
house, is a tribute to the man's sense of the
esthetic.
But perhaps no tribute to Chaim Weizmann
is more fitting than the telegram he received in
the United States two days after the State of Is-
r;iol s Declaration of Independence in 1948: "On
the occasion of the establishment of the Jewish
. we send our greetings to you. who have
done more than any other living man, towards its
creation." The telegram was signed, among
others, by David Ben Gurion and Golda Meir.
MHMiMriMMIMHl


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AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES


Friday, October 16,1981
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 3
Trial of Accused Nazi Aide Ends
U.S. District Judge James
Paine is expected to make a deci-
sion concerning Bohdan Koziy,
Fort Lauderdale owner-operator
of two motels, accused of being a
Nazi collaborator.
The 14-day trial without jury
ended after Koziy denied that he
had been a Nazi collaborator, and
described himself as a dedicated
Ukrainian resistance fighter
during World War II.
c Judge Paine is expected to
*-v make his decision about the end
of this month or early in Decem-
ber whether to strip Koziy of his
citizenship because of the Justice
Dept. charges that Koziy ac-
tually was a Ukrainian policeman
who killed at least 10 Jews in the
Polish town of Lysiec during the
1942-44 years of the Nazi occupa-
tion of the land
The Justice Dept. charges that
Koziy lied about those war years
to gain admission to this country
and again when he applied for
citizenship
Judge Paine's decision will de-
termine whether Koziy retains
liis citizenship and thus goes free
or whether Koziy has his citizen-
ship evoked and thus face depor-
tation.
Bonds Office in Fort Lauderdale
The State of Israel Bonds
Organization is maintaining its
North Breward office at 2787 E.
Oakland Park Blvd. Suite 407,
according to Rubin Breger, the
newly appointed Executive Di-
rector.
Breger noted that office hours
are from 9-5 daily, Monday
through Friday. He said that
Bond holders may come into the
office to have questions answered
and to complete forms for re-
investment of matured Bonds.
The North Broward Israel
Bond campaign is now independ-
ent from the Miami campaign,
Breger noted, "because of the in-
crease in the Jewish population in
this area."
Nazi War CriminalsThe Search Goes On
On Wednesday, October 21, 8
p.m.. WPBTChannel 2 presents
The Hunter and the Hunted, a
one-hour intense documentary
Attended Special Project in Israel
8MB
Mr. and Mrs. Barry Wiemik of
Coral Springs (pictured), and
their 12-year-old son, were among
a group of 14 American families
who spent a month in Israel in a
special program established
jointly by the Young Leadership
Council and the Aliyah Dept. of
the World Zionist Organization,
Jewish National Fund, local Is-
raeli municipalities, and the Con-
i servative Movement in Israel.
Parents worked mornings in
such pioneering type projects in
Safed and Carmiel, located in the
Galilee, as pruning trees, clearing
fire roads in forests, and working
on barren land. They also had
time for visits, shopping, and at-
tending classes some afternoons
and evenings.
The children went to summer
day camp with local Israeli kids,
and received Hebrew lessons in
the afternoon.
Barry Wiernik, a hotel owner-
manager, on his first visit to
Israel, said: "We came here
strictly to find out about Israel
and to have a living experience.
I'm coming away with a very
good feeling about Israel, and a
special appreciation of life in the
Galilee." He also wanted his son
to have the Israel experience be-
fore his Bar Mitzvah.
This was the third year for the
family living experience program.
Next year the program will be ex-
panded to include similar groups
of Orthodox and Reform Jews
from abroad, according to WZO's
Aliyah Dept.
which reports on the continuing
worldwide search for Nazi war
criminals. The film is narrated by
Jose Ferrer.
During the Holocaust be-
tween 11 and 14 million people
including six million Jews, and
countless million Poles, Czechs,
Dutch, Russians, French,
Yugoslavs, and others lost
their lives. Today, almost four
decades later, the search for those
responsible for the systematic
murder of innocent people goes
on.
Interviewed in this docu-
mentary are Simon Wiesenthal,
the world's foremost hunter of
Nazi criminals; Beate Klarsfeld,
a German non-Jew who has
dedicated her life to bringing
these criminals to justice; former
SS officers Walter Rauff,
murderer of 250,000 people and
Klaus Barbie, alias Klaus Alt-
mann, "the Butcher of Lyon."
Both Rauff and Barbie head the
most wanted list, along with Dr.
Josef Mengele, "the Angel of
Death." Archival film footage is
also highlighted.
The Hunter and the Hunted
was conceived, written, and
reported by British-born 33 year
old Bill Bemister.
Farber Library Underway Leonard L. Farber of Fort Lauderdale, third from left, leads Brandeis
University officials in groundbreaking for new library which will bear his name. Farber, president of the
Leonard L. Farber Co. of Pompano Beach, is joined by, from left, Brandeis University President Marver
H. Bernstein, Board of Trustees Chairman Henry L. Foster and Chancellor Emeritus Abram L. Sachar.
The Fort Lauderdale philanthropist and civic leader provided a $2,250,000 gift toward a $6.5 million
.library complex on the Waltham, Mass. campus.
Shaw Says: Don't
Touch Social Security
In the course of his recent
address to the nation, televised
from the Oval Office, President
Reagan announced his intention
to forward to Congress a new
package of entitlement and wel-
fare reform measuresbut he
made the Doint that these mea-
sures would not include Social
Security.
The President has learned a
valuable lesson about Social
Security. His original proposals
were said to include a three-
month delay in cost-of-living ad-
justments next year, from July 1,
when they are customarily paid,
until October 1, when they would
coincide with the beginning of the
fiscal year.
But he received messages from
the Congressand from Con-
gressman Clay Shawthat such
a measure would not be ap-
proved.
Sahw said: "Many Members of
Congress agreed with me that
Social Security isn't an appropri-
ate place to cut in order to ba-
lance the budget. I personally let
the administration know that I
could not support cuts to the
Social Security system made as
part of a second round of budget
cuts to meet guidelines to balance
the budget by fiscal 1984.
"In my opinion, the Social Se-
curity system is so important to
so many Americans who depend
on it that no changes should be
made to the system for the sake
of balancing the federal budget. I
believe that changes must be
made to Social Securityif not,
the system will go broke but no
changes should be considered in
order to meet designated guide-
lines for reducing the deficit as a
means of balancing the budget.
"But it is a step in the right
direction when the President says
he wants to remove Social
Security from the political arena.
The President has asked House
Speaker "Tip" O'Neill and
Senate Leader Howard Baker to
each appoint five members to
meet with five persons appointed
by him as a bipartisan study
group to review all the options
available to the Social Security
system. Although those appoint-
ments will undoubtedly be won
by senior Members of Congress, I
have expressed to the leadership
my willingness to serve on the
study group."
One and Inseparable
Continued from Page 1
knowledge of the BiMe, to speak
at this gathering ot the world's
leading Biblical scholars.
After a welcome from Dr.
Haim Gvaryahu, chairman of the
World Bible Society (a frequent
visitor and lecturer in South
Florida during the past few
years), the 30 winners introduced
themselves, each in his own na-
tive language.
Swedish, Danish, Flemish,
Spanish, French and Italian min-
gled with Hebrew and English as
youthful voices, one contestant
still in his teens, alternated with
mature and even greying adults.
Some of the winners were Ortho-
dox Jews, others Christian
ministers, still others teachers,
male and female, and some lay
people.
The Bible contest for these 30
winners was still two days off and
the highlight of the evening was
the scholarly presentation of the
relationship of two of the most
fascinating Biblical heroes: the
last of the Judges, Samuel, and
the first of the Kings of Israel,
Saul.
A branch of the World Bible
Society has been meeting in
Miami for the past four years,
with outstanding local and Israeli
scholars lecturing on various
topics within the Bible.
Plans are underway to organize
a similar group in the North Bro-
ward area to explore the timeless
message of the Bible for contem-
porary life.
The Society issues a popular
quarterly magazine on the Bible,
Dor le Dor (From Generation to
Gemeration), which is directed
primarily to interested Jewish
laymen who wish to deepen their
understanding and appreciation
of their Jewish heritage through
study of the Bible. Subscriptions
which cost $10 for the year are
available through CAJE at the
Jewish Federation, 8360 W. Oak-
land Park Blvd., Fort Lauderdale
3321, telephone 748-8200. A
scholarly Hebrew quarterly. Bet
Hamikra. is alo published for a
similar fee.
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9,1981
ie Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdnle
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Brandeis Breaks Ground for Leonard L. Farber Library
l Brandeis University, Walt ham Mass., broke ground
Sept-17 for the new Leonard L: Farber Library as part
0f a multi-million dollar library expansion and renova-
tion program. The new library is being underwritten, in
Dart, by a gift of $2,250,000 from Farber of Fort
Lauderdale, a Brandeis trustees since 1980.
Farber, developer of the Galleria shopping mall on
East Sunrise Blvd., and nationally known for his real
estate developments, has been associated with Bran-
deis for many years first as a President's Councilor and
later as a Fellow. He is a member of the Library Cam-
paign Committee which has begun a two-year campaign
to raise $4,250,000 to complete the five level library
that is part ^* University's S6.5 million program
that includes renovation of the Brandeis Jacob Gold-
" f arb Library and the Rapaporte Treasure Hall.
The Farber Library, designed by Abramovitz-Harris-
Kingsland of New York, is scheduled for completion in
the spring of 1983.
Brandeis President Marver H. Bernstein delivered
the opening remarks and greetings to those attending
the ceremonyBrandeis students, faculty members,
administrators, friends of the University and Brandeis
National Women's Committee members, who have
raised almost $18,500,000 for the University Libraries
since 1948.
L)r. Abram L. Sachar, Brandeis' first president and
now chancellor emeritus, gave the principal address.
Others who spoke included Governor Edward J. King
of Massachusetts; Dr. Henry L. Foster, chairman of
the Brandeis Board of Trustees; Elaine R. Lisberg, na-
tional president of Brandeis' National Women's Com-
mittee; and Farber, who is president of the Leonard L.
Farber Co. of Pompano Beach.
The Farber Librarywhich will be linked to the
Goldfarb Library and Rapaporte Treasure Hall by a
plazawill include an undergraduate study center,
periodical and microfilm collections and a creative arts
center. The new structure will complement the design of
the present library and use natural woods, brick and
glass to create a comfortable and open atmosphere for
library users.
A nationally recognized realtor whose firm has
developed more than 35 major shopping centers in the
United States and Puerto Rico, Leonard Farber has lec-
tured on shopping center development and investment
at the Universities of Georgia, Connecticut, Michigan
and Arizona, and at the City College of New York and
Pratt Institute. In 1969, the Real Estate Club of New
York named him "Realty Man of the Year."
He is a former president of the International Councd
of Shopping Centers and the only life member of its
Board of Trustees. He is a member of the National
Assn. of Real Estate Boards and the American Society
of Appraisers.
A participant in many civic and communal en-
deavors, Farber is a member of the Board of the
Broward County Boys Club, the Fort Lauderdale Sym-
phony Society and Museum of the Arts and the Fort
LauderdaleChapter of the American Red Cross. He also
has served in leadership positions with the Federation
of Jewish Philanthropies, the American Legion and
Temple Emanu-El Men's Club, all of Fort Lauderdale.
As an active supporter of Brandeis, he was chairman
of the first dinner on behalf of the University m Fort
Lauderdale, held in 1977.
Farber served in Europe during World War II and
was awarded the Purple Heart and two Bronze Stars for
bravery in combat.
He is the father of a son, Robert, a 1970 Brandeis
graduate who teaches at the State University of New
York; and three daughters, Peggy. Felicia and Mrs.
Melinda Linder.
Farber and his wife, Antje, are long-time residents of
Fort Lauderdale.
175 Enrolled in Year's First Semester at Judaica High School
A special film series on the
Booh of Genesis, a college credit
course in Comparative Religions,
and a class in Biblical archeology
are among the highlights in the
first semesternow in its second
month-of the Judaica High
School (JHS) co-sponsored' by
most of the synagogues in the
north of Broward county, and co-
ordinated by Central Agency of
Jewish Education (CAJE) of the
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale. Primary sup-
port for the educational program
for youth and adults comes from
the Federation's United Jewish
' Appeal campaigns.
More than 175 teenagers are
now attending North Broward's
Judaica High School classes on
Tuesday and Thursday evenings.
Rabbis, educational directors
and teachers of the local com-
munity, plus veteran Judaica
High School instructors from
Hollywood and Greater Miami,
constitute the faculty for the 25
classes that meet each week.
Phyllis Chudnow, chairperson
of the Federation's Education
Committee, noted that "the high
school years are the time when
teenagers develop the value
systems that motivate their adult
lives. JHS provides the opportu-
nity for Jewish students to ex-
plore their Jewish heritage in a
challenging framework of classes
that deal with the relevance of
Jewish tradition to contemporary
life."
JHS provides three 10-week
(Dje
trimesters with students required
to complete certain core courses
and are free to choose from a
series of electives in Jewish art,
music, history, ethics or litera-
ture.
Mrs. Chudnow said that one of
the most fascinating courses in
this third year of JHS is the one
on Genesis, which is utilizing
Bible Media Project films. The
project, filmed with narration, is
taken solely from the Bible text.
The first of the Five Books of
Moses is covered in 10-minute
episodes. The projection of the
fUm stimulates and motivates
student participation in discus-
sion as they see the conflicts-and
challenges of the Bible narrative
as it relates to life today.
Educators Study
School-Family
Relationships
The third in a series of in-depth
analysis of various aspects of He-
brew school curricula for the
*-Educational Directors of the
Jewish Religious Schools of
North Broward and South Palm
Beach counties will be devoted to
Strengthening School- Family
Relationships."
The collegial colloquium will be
held at noon, Friday, Oct. 16,
Temple Beth Am, Royal Palm
Blvd. Margate. Previous meet-
ings were devoted to "The
Teaching of Prayer" and "Ele-
ments of the Administration of
the Synagogue School."
Making presentations at the
Temple Beth Am meeting, cover-
fag their own school projects, will
be Phyllis Chudnow, educational
director of Ramat Shalpm; Robin
Eisenberg of Boca Raton's Tem-
ple El, Joy Kahn-Evron of Beth
Am, and Barbara Fellner of Beth
Orr.
During the past few years,
more and more attention, it was
reported, has been paid to the
need to enhance the components
of the family as a necessity for
Jewish survival. Throughout the
country, religious schools have
developed programs in a variety
of formats. Materials and re-
sources relating to those pro-
grams as a means of strengthen-
ing the Jewish family will be pro-
vided at the colloquium.
. Abraham J. Gittelson, coordi-
nator of the series in his role as
CAJE director of education for
the Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale, noted that "by
their development of the collo-
quia framework the educational
directors are making visible their
desire to examine the aspects of
their own work in great depth. It
ihOM their own competencies
in the multi-varied tasks of being
educational leaders in their
school and synagogues."
The class in Comparative Reli-
gions seeks to explore the dif-
ferences and similarities between
Judaism and other religions, both
in thought and in practice. The
class sessions are being enriched
by having guest speakers talk
with the students, visits to places
of Jewish interest, and films.
Three college credits are offered
for those completing the course.
Serving as administrator of
JHS is Stan Liedeker, together
with Abraham J. Gittelson,
CAJE director of education for
Federation. The entire curricula
was planned by the educational
directors of the participating
synagogues, together with Rabbi
Shimon Azulay ana Dr. Sandy
Andron, co-directors of the
Judaica High Schools of South
Florida. Joining Federation in
sponsoring the local school pro-
gram are Temples Beth Am, Beth
Israel, Beth Orr, Beth Torah,
Emanu-El also Ramat Shalom,
and the West Broward Jewish
Congregation.
Among special events slated
for JHS are inter-branch gather-
ing, and two area-wide Shab-
batonim (weekend retreats). All
the students will take part in the
inter-branch pre-Hanuka pro-
gram, Tuesday, Dec. 15. The re-
treats include one for the stu-
dents in the college credit pro-
gram, and the other for the
general student body. Students
will also take part in the Sunday
ifternoon Akiva Leadership
Fellowship meetings at CAJE
in Miami. These sessions are de-
signed to sharpen their skills for
prominent roles in Jewish life on
college campuses and in their
adult life.
Students may still register for
first semester class by calling the
Jewish Federation, 748-8200, and
talking with Nettie Berman. Re-
gistration will remain only for a
limited time.
TEMPLE BETH EL
333 S.W. 4th Avenue. Bo< .1 Rjton. Fl 33432
(3051 391-8900 P.ilm Bt\u h |305l 427-9840 Browjrd
THE TEMPLE BETH El FORUM
FOURTH ANNUAL FORUM LECTURE SERIES
MeweM^sassBsa 1981-1982 ssssieMH
All Programs are Sunday Eveninjjs at 8 P\M
OCTOBfR 25 AARON DAVID ROSENBAUM. Middle East Expert,
poliin.il analyst and consultant in Washington, on IS.A -Arabs and
Israel: Conflicts. Pressure and Peace?
NOVEMBER 22: ALBERT VORSPAN, Vice President. UAH.C, and
Director ol its Commission on Social Action, on "Jewish Moral Issues
in the 1980s"
|ANl ARV ) DR. RUTH WISSE. Professor of Yiddish Literature. McCill
University. Montreal. Author "The Best of Sholom Aleichem".
IANI/ARY 17: ROBERT E. WHITE, former U.S. Ambassador to El
Salvador, a career Foreign Service Oflicer for over 25 years. "Should
Human Rights lor All be of Concern to American Foreign Policy"?
EEBRUARY 7: DR. JUDITH LAIKEN ELKIN. Author. Professor of History
and Political Science. Wayne Stale University, former U.S. Foreign
Service Officer. "The Prosper! lor latin American Jewry".
FEBRUARY 28: DAVID HALBERSTAM. Foreign Correspondent. New
York Times. Pulitzer prize winner and author. "The Powers That Be",
an eye opening look al the rise lo power of the American media.
MARCH 14: DR. MICHAEL COON, of the Hebrew Union College-
Jewish Institute of Religion, and Author. "Jewish Perspectives on
Christian Holv Davs iDr Cook will he this year's Scholar in Residence
for the weekend March 12-14)
The Adult Education Committee is happy to bring vou this expanded program, with speakers of merit equal to those
whom we have had in past years.
These programs are open not ortly to our members, but their friends and the general pubic as well.
i The modest price of $17.50 for Temple members, and $22.50 for non-members has been established Tickets for
1 individual programs may be purchased at the door the evening desired, at $4.00 per person. The sale of Season Jickets at
. the special price will cease on October 25. the night ol the first program.
Each program will start promptly at B p.m.: all are on Sunday evenings. There will be no preferred seating. Time will be
allowed at the completion of each lecture for questions from the audience, and discussion with the speaker.
Registration for the series has already begun. It is suggested that these dates be entered in your datebooks, as this is the
only announcement that will be made in this form. Checks MUST be enclosed with reservations, payable to Temple Beth
El of Boca Raton along with a stamped self-addressed envelope.
Ben lafle. Chairman,
Adult Education Committee


Page 4
PageS I
^~
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tar Jfnm* 1.**!*
.J~l-
The Jewish Flnndisut nf/~
The Jewish Floridion of Onattr Fort Lauderdaie
Friday, October 9.1981
JCC Hans Intensive Campaign for New Members
Havery Kopelowitz, membership vice president of
the Jewish Community Center, 6501 W. Sunrise Blvd.,
announced the appointment of Sandy Jackowitz as the
full-time membership director. He acted on the man-
date of JCC President Michael Weinberg and JCC Ex-
ecutive Director Philip Cofman for an intensive mem-
bership development and retention program, noting, in
his report to the Board, that summer enrollment in-
creased the membership total to over 1,100, including
20 patron memberships, nine sustaining, 495 families,
165 singles, 426 seniors.
Formal plans for the new campaign were developed
at a meeting of the Membership Steering Committee,
consisting of Alvera Ackerberg, Larry Behar, Karen
Bussell, Elaine Cohn, JoAnn Folic, Paul Frieser, I.ydia
Golden, Edward Gross, John Jacobs, Kenneth Rehm.
Paula Rushkin. Sam Soref, Myra Statfeld, Judy Trop,
Albert Wahba.
In announcing the names of persons who contributed
additional funds, "tax deductible," Kopelowitz said,
"over and above regular membership dues," those
memberships provide a direct source of funds for schol-
arship memberships who cannot pay all or some ot the
dues to become members. He added that it is stated
JCC policy not to refuse membership to anyone due to
financial inability to pay dues.
The Patron members include:
Mr. and Mrs. David Abrams, Alvera Ackerberg, Mr.
and Mrs. Robert Adler, Mr. and Mrs. Allan Baer, Mr.
and Mrs. Jacob Brodzki, Mr. and Mrs. Irving Fridov-
ich, Mr. and Mrs. Seymour Gerson, Mr. and Mrs. Alvin
Gross, Mr. and Mrs. Victor Cruman, Mr. and Mrs
Henry Hyman, Mr. and Mrs. Ed Kaplan, Mr. and Mrs.
Allen Morris, Mr. and Mrs. Jack B. Nudelman, Anita
M. Perlman, Mr. and Mrs. Richard Romanoff, Mr. and
Mrs. Albert Segal, Mr. and Mrs. Stan Soffer, Mr. and
Mrs. Morton Topfer, Mr. and Mrs. Michael Weinberg.
The sustaining members include: Mr. and Mrs. Alan
Cohn, Mr. and Mrs. Louis Colker, Mr. and Mrs. Leon
ard Farber, Mr. and Mrs. Adam Garnitz. Mr. and Mrs
David Gross. Mr. and Mrs. Joseph H. Kaplan Mr. and
Mrs. Ben Marcus, Mr. and Mrs. Karl Sachs, and Mr.
and Mrs. John Streng.
Kopelowitz said the committee established three new
membership categories: one for corporate membership,
$500 a year, with Mercury Systems Inc., the first
company enrolled; one for Life Membership for a one-
time fee of $5,000, with JCC Past President Anita Perl-
man and Mr. and Mrs. Samuel M. Soref joining this
group, and one for Century Membership, those who
contribute $100 over their regular membership fee.
He said that special privileges will be extended to
these categories of membership.
After-School Program Off to Good Start New Instructor for Aerobics
Forty-six children in grades
pre-Kindergarten through fifth
are participating every weekday
in the Jewish Community Cen-
ter's "After School" program.
JCC provides transportation for
many of the youngsters from
their schools at 3 p.m. to the Cen-
ter for activities until 6 p.m.,
Mondays through Thursdays,
and until 5 p.m. on Fridays.
In the Pre-K and K group run
by Sue Bazer and Shira Cofman,
activities have included Straw
Painting, Tooth-Pick Sculptures,
Rocky Road Pudding and
making Pluto.
In the 1st and 2nd grade group
run by Beth Duff and Mark Solo-
way, activities have included life
size Micky Mouse figures, Pop-
corn, Crab Soccer and Op Art.
In the 3rd, 4th, and 5th grade
group run by Herb Slusher, Fran
Schleihler and Kasa Tamaccio,
activities have included Picture
Frames, Sock Puppets, Pizza, a
demonstration of a volcano and
many sports activities.
Other constructive types of
activity including Drama, Magic,
Arts and Crafts, Cooking,
Science. Story-telling, are
planned. Call Scott Snyder at
JCC.
Swim Team Members Get Awards
Matthew Cohen was listed as the
"most improved boy swimmer" on the
Jewish Community Center's summer
season swimming team, according to
Team Coach Joseph R.. Dispenza. He
gave these additional awards to Stacy
Black, most improved girl swimmer; Lee
Feldman and Sandy Summers, best
team spirit; Peter and Samantha Teaser,
most valuable swimmers, and a special
award for assisting throughout the
season, the team captain, Staci Taub.
In the first home meet, the team lost
to a team from Michael Ann Russell
JCC, then defeated the Lauderhill team
at the opponent's pool, but lost in a four-
team meet to North Miami, Cooper City
and the Michael Ann Russell JCC.
The swim team member* included:
In the eight years arid younger group:
Raphael Wynn, Andrew Fishbein, Lee
Feldman, Jeremy. Slusher, Matthew
Coslow. David Wachtel, Jason Vogal-
sang, Sandy Summers, Samantha Tes-
ser, Shira Caswell, Lisa Wolgin. .
Nine and 10-year-olds included Shaw*
Condiotti, Lawrence Jackowitz, Mat-
thew Cohen, Niel Falk, Alan Kantrowitz,
Stacy Black, Shannon Gumora, Adina
Wachtel.
The 11-13 group included Jason Slus-
ser, John Bomser, Peter Tesser, Dan
Reimer, Court Lantaff, Jeff Harris, Erin
Lantaff, Aimee Gumora, Staci Taub.
The Jewish Community Center
announced the addition of Kris
Glassman to the Physical Educa-
tion staff as Dance Fitness
specialist. Kris has a vast back-
ground in dance expertise in
ballet and jazz. She was one of
Jackie Sorenson's original stu-
dents and instructors in Aerobic
Dance in Baltimore, where her
students nicknamed her the
"Motivating Richard Simmons."
One year ago, Kris moved to
Fort Lauderdaie with her hus-
band Phil, and children Stacey
and Lindsey. Soon she became an
instructor for Gymtique Aerobic
with Janet Slaon, where she has
been teaching until joining the
Center staff.
Aerobic Dancercise, Kris's own
dance exercise program which
combines the best of all dance fit-
ness programs will start Oct. 22.
Kris's classes an uncomplicated
dance exercise routines can be
performed on any level. Kris uses
the up sounds of Neil Diamond,
Barbra Streisand. Michael Jack-
son. Diana Ross and others.
This class will be open to any
adult or teenager interested in a
fun time fitness workout. Aerobic
Dancercise is being offered at the
Center on the following days and
times: Monday and Thursday.
7:15-8:15 p.m. Oct. 22-Nov. 16 -
Kris Glassman
four weeks, fee $18. Class will be
offered in four-week sessions.
every four weeks Sunday after
noons. 2:30-3:30 p.m. Classes will
continue from Oct. 25 to Dec. 13
for eight weeks, fee $18.
Jackowitz Youth Lounge Hours
Monday-Friday: 3:30-5 p.m.
Sundays: 12-5 p.m.
The Youth Lounge Consists of pool
tables, a ping pong table, Bumper Pool,
Atari Video, games, television, darts and
a Juke Box.
Come on down and hang out, the Jewish
Community Center is the place to be.
SAT TUTORING
This is an excellent opportunity to pre-
pare yourself for the SAT's testings in
December. It is an educational service to
JCC members to help learn the skills
necessary to help achieve your highest
possible score on the SAT's. These are
used by most colleges in their admission
programs.
For more information, contact Scott
Snyder.________________
Contests Highlight Book Fair
Jewish Book Month, spon-
sored by JWB Jewish Book
Council nationally from Nov. 20
through Dec. 20, will be cele-
brated with a Book Fair at the
Jewish Community Center to en-
courage the reading of books of
Jewish content.
As a prelude to the per-
formance of JCC s Circle of
Friends Children's Theatre on
Sunday, Nov. 22, Ethel and Da-
vid Rosenberg, who have been
the inspiration and the creators
of the annual event, have an-
nounced writing and picture
story book contests for children
and adults.
Children in grades 1 through 6
may submit an original story,
poetry or a picture story book on
a Jewish theme, and adults may
submit entries baaed on any
subject, although the Rosen-
bergs, who will judge all entries
which'must be submitted to JCC
by Nov. 15, suggest, for children,
themes from the Bible, Jewish
history, customs, or personal ex-
periences, and for adults any
theme related to Jewish Book
month.
Prizes will be awarded in each
age group at the Nov. 22 Book
Month Fair performance of the
Children's Theatre.
EVENTS FOR SI NGLES
For tmryoung adult group of
singles, aged 18 to 35, JCC's
Selma Telles reported that a
"mixer" brunch will take place at
11 a.m., Sunday, Oct. 26. She
said this is a good way to meet
people and make friends. And the
tab is only $1 for Center mem-
bers, $3 for guests. '
' Every Thursday night from 8
to 10 is "drop-in night," another
good way to meet people, ac-
cording to Mrs. Telles can pro-
vide more information about the
activities availables plus
coffee.
TWEEN CORNER
The Tween Program, under the
guidance of Scott Snyder, Direc-
tor of Youth Services, got under
way with 40 Tweens participat-
ing:
Several activities planned in-
clude Sports Night, and Go-
Carting on Oct. 18, along with
regular Tween night activities.
HOLIDAY CLOSINGS.
JCC closings for the holidays
this month include: Yom Kippur,
Monday evening, Oct. 12, the eve
of Sukkot, at 5 p.m. until 6 p.m.,
Wednesday, Oct. 14; at 5 p.m.,.
Monday, Oct. 19, the eve of
Shemini Atzeret, until 6 p.m.,
Wednesday after Simchat Torah
observance.
The normal office hours at JCC
Perlman Campus, 6501 W. Sun-
rise Blvd., are 8:30 a.m. to 10
p.m., Mondays through Thurs-
days, 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Fridays, 9
a.m.-5 p.m., Sundays.
In observance of Shabbat, the
Center is closed Friday night and
all day Saturday.
TEEN TOPICS
. About 20 Teens decided that a
Teen Activitiee Board would be
formed to assist in the nUwnmg
and implementation of Teen ac-
tivities.
Planned for October is an over-
night at the Center and a Sunday
brunch with a guest speaker dis-
cussing Sexual Awareness. In
November, an overnight trip to
Disney world is being planned.
FIRST PROGRAM-
FRIDAY, OCT. 16
The Center is planning full day programs
for all Broward County teacher work
days.
Watch for details!!!
TRIBUTE CARDS
Tribute cards for all occasions are now
available oa an individual basis for $2.50
each. Contact Sandy at JCC 792-6700.
-? ? ?-? *-? ?-? ?-?
The Cantors Assemby of America, Southeast
Region extends its best wishes to the Jewish
Communities in Greater Miami,
Broward and all of Florida
A Gmar Chatimah Tovah
Cantor Edward Klein. Chairman
Cantor Saul H. Breeh,
Vice Chairman
Cantor Maurice Neu. Secretary
Cantor Eleazar Burnatein


- III tt*%
n___ -
V v..V ?>'>. '
vssflonH

Page 10
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lander dale
Friday, October 9,1981
U.S. Intellectuals Out to Get Timerman
By MURRAY ZUCKOFF
One of the obscenities in
American Jewish life is the
spectacle of Jewish rep-
resentatives flying down to
Argentina to get the latest
progress reports about the
Jewish situation there from
the government and the
Jewish community leaders.
From the almost glowing re-
ports they deliver upon their re-
turn to this country about the
Jewish condition in Argentina, it
would appear that these repre-
sentatives go there less for the
sake of assessing the real condi-
tion than to disprove the conten-
tion of Jacobo Timerman that
Argentina is rife with anti-Semi-
tism and manifestations of neo-
Nazism. They return to proclaim
that there is no Holocaust, that
the regime is not a clone of Nazi
Germany and that Jews are rela-
tively safe and secure.
THESE representatives com-
pletely ignore or deny the mas-
sive violations not only of human
rights generally in Argentina,
but the violation of Jewish rights
in particular. They return silent
about the estimated 2,000 Jews
who are among the 20,000 disap-
peared ones and about the count-
less numbers of Jews who are in
prison ana who undergo torture
at the hands of the jailers and the
security forces.
Another obscenity is that of
Jewish and non-Jewish literary
hacks staking out their claims as
rabid witch-hunters and equal
opportunity vilif iers of Timerman
and of those who support his con-
tentions about the rampant anti-
Semitism in Argentina and the
existence of Nazi-like prison
camps such as La Perla.
This cabal, which'* includes
Irving Kristol, Benno Weiser
Varon, Mark Falcoff and William
kept silent when the young, bril-
liant Brazilian Jewish journalist,
Vladimir Herzog, was hounded,
jailed and then found dead in his
cell in Sao Paulo in 1975; and
who support every reactionary
regime in the world so long as
they can characterize them as
"authoritarian" and not "totali-
tarian."
THESE INDIVIDUALS and
their ilk comprise a neo-Judenrat.
But this Judenrat is far more de-
spicable than the Jewish councils
that were imposed upon the Jews
by the Nazis in the European
countries they occupied. Not all
those Judenrate were the same;
some actively collaborated with
the Nazis, some refused to do
their biddings, some looked the
other way when Nazis murdered
Jew, others helped Jews organize
resistance against the Nazi
hordes.
But all the European Juden-
r-.te operated under conditions of
powerlessness; they had no
choice; they were under the gun;
and even the most benign were li-
mited in what they could do to
help save Jews. The neo-Juden-
rat, however, does not operate
under conditions of powerless-
ness but under conditions where
there are options. They can
speak out and tell the truth about
the plight of Argentine Jewry or
they can keep silent or they can
distort the reality which Timer-
man has described.
The neo-Judenrat has opted to
create conditions of powerless-
ness for both the Jews of Argen-
tina and the Jews of America by
Buckley, not only vilify Timer-
man by smearing him as a dar-
ling of the American left and as a
former supporter of left-wing
guerillas in Argentina, but also
try to deny the validity of his
suffering as a Jew while he was in
jail which he described so
poignantly in his book, "Prisoner
Without a Name, Cell Without a
Number."
THE DIATRIBES these hacks
direct against the former pu-
blisher and editor of La Opinion
are not so much for his criticism
of the Argentine Jewish leaders
for being silent about the tragedy
which has befallen the Jews in
their country, but more for his
attacks against the Argentine
junta and the Reagan Admini-
stration which seeks to bolster it
as an ally.
To the extent that the Ameri-
IT'S THE COFFEE THAT'LL
MAKE EVERYONE THINK YOU DID
WHEN YOU DIDNT!
The rich ground aroma and fresh perked taste
makes Maxirrf*the coffee any busy balbusta
would be proud to serve. Especially with the
strudel. Or. the Honey cake. Or the lox n
bagels. Or whenever friends and 'mishpocheh'
suddenly drop in. Maxim* the 100% freeze
dried coffee that'll make everyone think you
took the time to make fresh perked coffee .
when you didn't!
can Jewish representatives and
their poison-pen sidekicks
acknowledge that there is anti-
Semitism in Argentina they
claim it is negligible and on an
unofficial level, and take refuge in
the argument that it has occured
before and that it went away, and
if it is recurring again, this too
shall pass. But at what cost in
the meanwhile to the thousands
of Jews caught in the vise of ter-
ror?
Who are these Jewish repre-
sentatives and their sidekicks?
For the most part they are the
same ones who are silent about
the plight of Ethiopian Jews;
who insist that anti-Semitism in
America is declining and is no-
thing worse than a 24-hour virus;
who claim that the United States
is immune to the historical laws
governing the rise and institu-
tionalization of Nazism; who
disseminating disinformation
about (he situation in Argentina.
This Judenrat pro pounds the
theme that Argentina is not a
"gulag" for those Jews and non-
Jews who are arrested, tortured
or who disappear merely a
slight deviation from the Ameri-
can form of democracy. ^
THUS, THE Argentine regime
is provided with a veneer of re-
spectability and moral and legal
authority in the court of Ameri-
can public opinion. American
Jews are thereby dissuaded from
trying to help Argentine Jewry
and Argentine Jewry is left iso-
lated from American Jewry.
Worst of all, the voices of those
Jews who are victims of the re-
gime's repressions are muffled by
the campaign of disinformation.
Timerman's account, the neo-
Judenrat claims, is clouded by
subjectivity, by bis leftist politi-
cal views,by bis obsessive hatred
of the Argentine government.
His assessment of what is hap-
pening to Jewish and non-Jewish
dissidents in Argentina is, there-
fore, according to this neo-Juden-
rat, suspect. But even if this
were so and it isn't why the
need for a witch-hunt, a smear
campaign against Timerman?
But let's forget Timerman.
Let's pretend he doesn't exist. Is
the reality of predawn kidnap-
pings, indiscriminate jailings,
torture and the disappearance of
thousands changed in any way?
Is the reality that Jews who are
When your fomily wants o snack
treat rhem ro the natural sweetness
and wholesome goodness of
-Maid* Raisins. Blue Ribbon* Figs
and Suns wee-: Prunes.
Yum. Yum i jm
3UND1AMONO GROWERS
OF CALIFORNIA
, _. K CERTIFIED KOSHER


-
I
Re 4
The Jewish Floridiannf Grantor PVw f .-.*J-J-
MW
Page 6
The Jewish Fioridian of Greater Fart Lauderdale

Friday. October 9, lgsj
i
2
P
Handicap Awarness Week Begins Oct. 12 rat *p- Project Re^jaU a*..,.
Exhibits, demonstrations and
live theater presentations will
highlight Handicap Awareness
Week (Oct. 12-17) at the East
Regional Library. 1300 E. Sun-
rise Blvd., Fort Lauderdale.
More than a dozen organiza-
tions, agencies and business will
participate in the week-long
series of events that will feature
speakers, films and the latest
technology available for people
with handicaps. All exhibits will
be open to the public from 10 a.m.
to 6 p.m., Monday through Fri-
day.
Topping the week's activities
will be a presentations of We the
People, an original musical
literary revue. The cast, most of
them handicapped, are members
of the Roadshow Company, a
group that started as a theater
training class at Broward Com-
munity College earlier this year.
We the People presents an un-
usual combination of original
poetry and prose, adaptations
from literature, combined with
music and songs. The hour-long
performance will be presented on
Oct. 15 at 2 p.m., in the auditori-
um of the East Regional Library.
Admission is free.
A free concert worth hearing
and seeing will be held on Oct.
16 in the library's auditorium at
7:30 p.m. Called "A Chorus of
Hands," the concert will be given
in sign language.
Sanctuary

fc^
Both presentations are being
sponsored by the Southern Bell
Telephone Co.
Other events planned for
Handicap Awareness Week in-
clude: Oct. 12, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.,
Southern Bell Telephone Co. and
the Telephone Pioneers will dem-
onstrate special products and
services for people with handi-
caps; Oct. 13, 2 to 4 p.m., demon-
stration of the Kurzweil Reading
Machine and at 7:30 p.m., a
series of short films.
Also, on Oct. 14, 11 a.m., Dr.
Howard Kaplan will discuss
hearing loss and new treatments
and at 2 p.m. radio talk show
host Al Sperber will deliver a
book talk: Oct. 16, 3 p.m., Drs.
Ed Miller and John Renaldo will
talk about advances in low vision
technology: and, on Oct. 17, 2 to
3 p.m., a film will be shown for
young people called 'The In-
visible Children."
Groups participating in
Handicap Awareness Week in-
clude Broward County Library
for the Blind and Physically
Handicapped ("Talking Books"),
American Cancer Society, Social
Security Administration, Insight
for the Blind, Goodwill Indus-
tries of Broward County. Brow-
ard Center for the Bllind and
Diabetes Research Institute.
Also. Cystic Fribrosis Founda-
tion. Southern Bell Telephone
Co., Telephone Pioneers,
Paralyzed Veterans Association
of Florida, Fla. Dept. of Educa-
tion (Blind Services), National
j Multiple Sclerosis Society and
the Broward County Schools.
NEW YORK, Joel S. Bre-
slau of Washington, DC., has
been re-appointed a United Jew-
ish Appeal National Vice Chair-
man by Herschel W. Blumberg
UJA National Chairman. He will
also assume the newly created
post of National Project Renewal
Campaign Chairman.
In making the announcement,
Blumberg described Breslau as
one of the most dynamic leaders
on the American scene today.'
Joel Breslau was chiefly respon-
sible for the growth and success
of our Overseas Programs De-
partment. During his three-year
tenure, he greatly expanded the
scope and outreach of our mission
to Israel, introducing innovative
elements and approaches that
helped make them our most
effective motivational and fund-
raising program. I know he will
bring the same creative energy to
Project Renewal and will contri-
bute significantly to strengthen-
ing this vital human rehabilita-
tion effort."
As Project Renewal Campaign
Chairman, Breslau will help mo-
bilize UJA's full range of staff,
leadership and program resources
to assist communities in rein-
forcing their Project Renewal
campaigns. He is forming a spe-
cial cadre of campaign-oriented
leaders who will sweep the coun-
try in an intensive Project Rene-
wal orientation and solicitation
drive.
GETTING THE CHILDREN
TO EAT A DELICIOUS
, HOT MEAL IS EASY AS
ABC's &123s
from
Chef Boy-ar-dee -
ABC's &123s
from Chef
Boy-ar-dee"
are tasty
pasta alphabet
letters and
numbers covered
with a nch tomato sauce. The
children will absolutely love it as
a delicious hot lunch and as a
tasty dinner side-dish. And so
will the adults' Either way you
serve >t. getting the children to
eat is as easy as Aleph Bez!
Community
Calendar
SATURDAY. OCT. 10
Temple Emanu-El: Las Vegas
SUNDAY. OCT. 11
Temple Beth Am Margate: Cen-
tral meeting
Temple Beth Israel: 7100 W
Oakland Park Blvd.. Games. 7:30
p.m
TUESDAY. OCT. 13
Temple Beth Torah Sisterhood:
Games 12:15 p.m.
HADASSAH:
Kay us Tamarac Chapter:
Tamarac Jewish Center. 12:30
p.m.
Kol Haverim Lodge: North
Beach Hospital, 2835 N. Ocean
Blvd.. 10 a.m.
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 14
HADASSAH:
Bermuda Club Here! Chapter:
Bermuda Club Recreation Hall,
:2:30 p.m.
Hatikvah Cypress Chase
Chapter: Lauderdale Lakes Citv
Hall Safety Bldg.. 12:30p.m.
Oriole Scopus Chapter: Boca
Raton Bank. !224 N. State Rd. 7
' 4-411 Margate.
Brandets Women West Brow
rd Chapter: Deicke Auditorium.
OKT Woodlands North Chap-
u-r: Section Club 1- p.m.
B'nai B'rith Lakes Chapter:
Lauderdale Lakes City Hall.
Pompano Chapter of ORT: Re
:tion Center Pompano Beach,
rrw p luncheon installa-
of officers. 12:30 p.m.
THURSDAY. OCT. lb
HADASSAH:
Blyma Margate Chapter: Con
nation Beth "ilk! Margate
Blvd.
Sunrise Shalom Chapter
Tamarac Jewish 11:30
a.m.
PHILADELPHIA
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But make no mistake about it This is genuine Kraft
Philadelphia Brand Cream Cheese. It's been whipped Jo make
spreading its deliciousness a little easier. For instance, the
children can put il easily on fresh bread without tearing holes
in the bread. Or, if company suddenly drops in-spread it on
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TheCreftmQfd Philadelphia Bran jped Cream Cheese


Friday, October 9,1981
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 6
The Talking Candle' Told to HDS Pupils
Well, now, just because you
't hear something doesn't
At the Hebrew Day School of
port Lauderdale the children
were being prepared spiritually
and emotionally for the High
Holy Days.
The staff instilled in the chil-
dren feelings conducive to the
Holidays. One member of the
staff, Cantor Jack Stateman,
related this heart-warming story,
"The Talking Candle" to the
children:
"Would you believe that a
candle can talk? You wouldn't?
Why? Oh, because you can't hear
it?
can'
mean that it isn't saying some-
thing to you.
"When you are tucked in at
night, just before mother puts
out the light, look into her eyes.
She may not be speaking, but her
eyes are giving you a message.
They say, 'I love you my child.'
"When you are older, you will
learn a big word. It is communi-
cate. That means to send a mes-
sage. It is possible for something
to communicate with us without
a voice being heard.
"For example, look at the flag.
That flag is silent but it is saying
something. It is telling you that
our nation has 50 states, that we
are all fortunate to be living in
this free country.
"If you listen carefully, you
can make out what the candle is
saying. It savs. 'look, I'm bright.
And when I'm brightly lit, look
what's happening to me.'
' When someone is sad and his
heart is dark, you can come along
and say something cheerful or
something helpful, and lighten a
heavy heart.
"The candle has something
else to tell us. It asks us to watch
what happens when one candle
lights its neighbor. The flame of
the candle which kindles the next
one does not glow less because it
has given away some of its fire.
"This is the difference between
the things we call material and
those we call spiritual.
"So the candle really has
something to say. It reveals a
most important secret of life,
namely, that you can give some-
thing away and still hold on to it
and add to the brightness of
others, and thus add to the joy of
your life.
"We should all take a lesson
from the glowing candle."
Abe Gittelson Meets 2 Presidents
Midrasha Offers Adult
Bar/Bat Mitzvah Courses
As prrt of the curriculum of
the Midrasha for Adult Educa-
tion sponsored by synagogues
and the Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale, three
congregations will be offering
courses for Jewish adults who
would like to prepare for adult
Bar or Bat Mitzvah service.
The courses will be open to all
persons who register for them
with Midrasha. but will be re-
quired for those persons who
wish to participate in
congregational service.
Helen Weisberg. CAJE Ad-
ministrator of the Midrasha
program for the Federation, said
each of the synagogues offering
the course has slightly different
requirements.
At Temple Beth Torah in Tam-
arac. Laura Zimmerman will
teach a course in 'Cantillation for
Kaftorah" Tuesday mornings
9:30 to 11. and Rabbi David Gor-
don will provide instruction on
The Cycle of the Jewish Year
trom 11 to noon, also on Tues-
days w ith both courses beginning
Nov. 3 and continuing through
Dec. 15.
Rabbi Samuel Aoril. in his
Medal Honors
Nazi Ace
BONN (JTAI Neo-Nazi
friends of Germany's wartime
flying ace, Hans-Ulrich Roedel,
are minting a medal in gold and
silver to honor him on the occa-
sion of his 65th birthday. The
former Luftwaffe pilot, German's
most decorated war hero, is a
controversial figure The medal
will be distributed through the
Munich-based national zeitung, a
neo-Nazi newspaper that has the
largest circulation of any weekly
in the country.
It will be sold to neo-Nazi sym-
pathizers and other right-wing
extremists. The medal will carry
Roedel's portrait and a Nazi mili-
\riary symbol, although Nazi Sym-
bols are banned by law in West
Germany.
Begin Raps
Newsweek
- JERUSALEM (JTA)
Premier Menachem
Begin is vehemently
denying a Newsweek
magazine report that Sec-
retary of State Alexander
Haig "gave him hell" for
lobbying against the Rea-
gan Administration's
opposed sale of AW ACS
reconnaissance aircraft to
Saudi Arabia. "There is
simply no truth to that
story," tbegin told re-
porters here.
Newsweek claimed that Haig's
last-minute meeting with Begin
at Kennedy Airport in New York
just before the Premier left for
home Sept. 15 was to administer
a sharp reprimand for Begin s
public denunciations of the
AW ACS deal.
home synagogue of Temple
Sholom in Pompano Beach, will
conduct both of those courses
Wednesday evenings with the
cantillation from 7:15 to 8:15,
and the Jewish Year cycle from
8:15 to 9:30 beginning Nov.
through Dec. 16.
Temple Beth Israel, 7100 W.
Sunrise Blvd., is the third con-
gregation offering courses pre-
paring for B'nai Mitzvah service,
also on Tuesday mornings, and
beginning Nov. 3 through Dec.
15. Beth Israel's Cantor Maurice
Neu will teach Synagogue Skills
from 10 to 11 a.m. with Beth
Israel's Rabbi Phillip Labowitz
providing instruction for the fol-
lowing hour on Jewish Values.
Further information on these
and all Midrasha courses can be
obtained from the participating
synagogues or call Federation at
748-8200.
During his sessions in Jerusalem at three dif-
fereilt contentions and seminars for Jewish com-
munal workers from around the world. Abraham
I Gittelson (rightI. Central Agency for Jewish
Education director of the Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale, met many notables. He
was most impressed meeting and discussing a
rariety of subjects with Israel's President Yit-
zhak Savon 'center) and Prof. Ephraim Urbach,
president of the World Union of Jewish Studies.
Enter the Mazel Tov Sweepstakes
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Enlno "unity rnni'fJ by 'uimiiry 11 191J


Friday, October 9,1961
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 7
r
Browsta' thru
reward
with max levine
Doc Watson and his Hawaiian
Gardens merrymaking group, 30
strong, entertained Federation's
Kosher Nutrition elderly at the
Lauderdale Lakes site, 4322 N.
State Rd. 7, for the September
birthday and anniversary cele-
brants ... At that joyous pro-
gram, Alyce and Harry Weedon
marked their 52nd wedding anni-
versary Yom Kippur-sched-
uled exam for job applicants was
re-scheduled by Broward County
government's personnel depart-
ment at request -of Larry
Schuval, director of Community
Relations Committee of Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale.
.. Leonard Nimoy, familiar to
many South Floridians by that
name and more familiar to Stur
Trek fans as Dr. Spook, joined
Ingrid Bergman in Israel to
study background material on
the life of Golda Meir. Nimoy
will have the role of Golda'a hus-
band and Ingrid Bergman will be
Golda in the TV production
Organizations in
The News
B'NAI B'RITH:
Lauderdale Lakes Lodge: Lau-
derdale Lakes City Hall 7:30 p.m.
Tamarac Chapter: Tamarac
Jewish Center 3 p.m.
Chapter No. 345: Roarke Re-
creation Center.
American Mogen David for Isra-
el: General Meeting, Whiting
Hall, Sunrise Lakes.
Free Sons of Israel Fort Lauder-
dale Lodge: Southern Federal
Bank Bldg., University Dr.
ORT: North Broward Section:
Lauderdale Lakes City Hall. 4300
NW 36th St., 10 a.m.
FRIDAY, OCT. 16
HADASSAH: L' Chayim Chap-
ter Deicke Auditorium 1 p.m.,
speaker Dr. Bruce Clarin,
Boutique 11:30 p.m., refresh-
ments noon.
SATURDAY, OCT. 17
Jewish Community Center: Her
Story in History, Part I,
theatrical performance 8 p.m.
Ji ^
MALE NURSES AID
Looking for Home Nursing Care,
Male or Female Patient.
Good Reference. Care. Please
Leave Your Name & Number
474-3932
PLANNING A TRIP
Travel with National Council of
Jewish Women. For new 1961
Brochure describing sen-
sational tours to ISRAEL, with
extensions to EGYPT, GREECE,
and ITALY; Highlight* In Europe,
China and the Orient, Mexico
and the Canadian Rockies.
Please call Lillian Schultz
742-3531 or Elsie Forman ,.
741-4063. :
We do business
the right way.
1HX W. Oaklw* *> Blod
Ft LaudafMM. Fi JM11
OAKLAND TOYOTA
based on the lite ot Israel's late
great prime minister Correc-
tion: The Sunrise Lakes B'nai
B'rith benefit at Bailey Hall
featuring the Miami Opera Sin-
gers will be at 8 p.m., Oct. 18. On
May 16, the Chamber Orchestra
performs at Bailey Hall.
Hyman Silverman of Sunrise
Lakes, president of U S.-Israel
Trade Corp., reports helping
Aurora Solar Systems Inc. of
Fort Lauderdale; headed by Joel
Weinstein, to import solar panels
from Israel. USIT is encouraging
Americans to use Israeli con-
sumer products Sara Mitt-
man of Cypress Chase, Lauder-
dale Lakes, is taking the com-
muntiy's Chora leers to Alden
House nursing home Oct. 12, and
to Manor Oaks on Oct. 27 .
Emunah Women of America, af-
ter president Elizabeth Taylor,
wife of Virginia's Sen. John
Warner, with its Freedom
i Award, announced it will build
the Elizabeth Taylor Warner
I Day Care Center in Jerusalem. .
Joan Friedman is organizing
amateur theatrics in North
Lauderdale Leonard Grand,
chairman of Broward Bank
board, announced office being
built at 2412 N. State Rd. 7 in
Lauderdale Lakes to replace the
temporary facility bank has been
using 10 blocks North of new site
Anita and Norman Goldfarb
will be opening Cafe Bijou in the
new Headway Office Park which
also is located along N. State Rd.
7, near Commercial Blvd. Abe
Rosenfeki expects to be opening a
deli-restaurant there also. Both
expect to be open by Nov. 1.
Larry Fishman of Tamarac has
been appointed general manager
of P. A. Lethbridge Co.'s three
Broward county real estate of-
fices Cindy Cohen is the in-
structor for slimnastics and
bodyshaping classes which meet
at Tamarac City Hall. Temple
Beth Israel at 7100 W. Oakland
Park Blvd. Has openings for
three-year-old afternoon program
in the Nursery of the Temple's
Harry Levin Pre-School Center
Shirley Miller of Broward s
Jewish National Fund is comple-
ting plans for the installation of
officers meeting Tuesday, Oct.
27. to be held at the Samuel M.
Soref Hall, Jewish Community
Center Perlman Campus, 6501
W. Sunrise Blvd.
Young Lawyers Section of
Broward County Bar Assn. is
holding a beach party Saturday
night, Nov. 7 at the Harbor
Beach Surf Club Leon
Messing, member of Federation's
board and chairman of the Immi-
grant Resettlement Committee,
like he has for eight years, con-
ducted High Holy Days services
at Woodlands Country Club. .
Good News Fellowship Church's
TAPES
CARTONS
HANGERS
POLYETHYLENE
BUSINESS FORMS
TAGS LABELS
BAGS BOXES
WIPES
Jim Croft reports the multi-
media portrayal of the history of
Israel, titled Zion, Oh Zion,
expected to be completed in 18
months, has the potential for
awakening new support for Israel
from churches, civic groups and
other organizations across
America.
. Having sold out
Rae and A) Fishman agreed to pot
on the Tzinderella Yiddish show
one more time. But if yon want
tickets for this seventh showing
at 8 p.m., Monday, Oct. 26, at the
Jewish Communtiy Center, you'll
have to hurry over to the JCC of-
fice at 6301 W. Oakland Park
Blvd.
776-6272
HOWARD
|aper a
ACKAGINC
1201 N E 45 STREET
FORT LAUDERDALE
Does your cracker go to pieces
Mien it meets cream cheese?
It's easy to imagine spreading
delicious cream cheese on something
besides a bagel.
But it's a bt harder to do.
Croissants crumble. Chips chip.
And it's terrible to see what hard
cream cheese can do to an
innocent piece of toast. Just terrible.
Temp Tee whipped cream cheese
is whipped.
So it's smooth and creamy, and
very easy to spread.
Even on something as delicate as
a potato chip.
Temp Tee whipped cream cheese.
It's bigger than the bagel.
/
The Spreadable Cream Cheese
SAVE IOC ON TEMP TEE
WHIPPED CREAM CHEESE
IOC
Mr. Grocer: Kraft, Inc. will reimburse
you for the face value of this coupon
plus 7C handling allowance provided
you redeemed it on your retail sales
of the named product(s) and that
upon request you do,i'e to furnish
proof of purchase of sufficient prod-
uct to cover all redemptions Coupon
in.
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applicable tax. For redemption, mail
to Kraft. Inc. Dairy Group. PO. Box
1799. Clinton. Iowa 5?734.
Expires 3/31/82.
11300 IbllbM


r, October 16,1981
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 11
\amir Tells UN Gathering Palestinians
Already Have Homeland in Jordan
UTED NATIONS -
(S) Israeli Foreign Minis-
fttzhak Shamir declared in a
ch to the UN General Aa-
tly that the Camp David ac-
i "have been and remain the
feasibly path to peace," in
lideast.
to other viable solution ap-
on the horizon," he said,
said that the resumed
jny negotiations for the
Btinian Arabs living in
ea, Samaria and the Gaza
ict will be concluded suc-
jlly in the near future,
reiterated Israel's position
the Palestinian Arabs "do
a state on a major part of
territory of Palestine,
oely Jordan, which is already
jlestinian state "by virtue of
agraphy, demography, his
'stated, "there is no need to speak
further of self-determination for
the Palestinian Arabs, their
homeland is already in exis-
tence."
AS FOR the Lebanese situa-
tion, Shamir said that "some
120,000 Lebanese civilians have
been the victims of Syrian and
PLO atrocities" in recent years.
He said Israel hopes "that an in-
dependent and free Lebanon will
soon reemerge and maintain good
relations with all its neighbors,
including Israel."
But, Shamir warned, "this will
be very difficult to achieve as
long as the PLO is allowed to
nest in Lebanon," and plan its
terrorist acts from there and as
long as the Syrian occupation
of Lebanon continues. "The
banon, within its international
boundaries, free of Syrian occu-
pation and PLO terror, "Shamir
said.
Referring to the situation of
Soviet Jewry, Shamir accused
the Soviet Union of preventing
"many thousands" of Jews from
emigrating to Israel. "Over the
past year, we have been watching
with growing anxiety the steady
decrease in the number of Jews
leaving the Soviet Union, to the
lowest number for the last ten
years," he said.
HE CHARGED that "over the
pastsix months, the number of
'Prisoners of Zion' detained un-
der false pretexts and sentenced
by Soviet courts to long prison
terms had doubled." He men-
tioned in that connection the
names of imprisoned Jewish acti-
vists Ida Nudel, Viktor Brailov-
sky and Anatoly Sharansky.
The Israeli minister appealed
to the Soviet Union "to reopen its
gates for Jews who wish to return
to their homeland, and to cease
the persecution of Jews in the
Soviet Union." Shamir also ex-
pressed concern over the harrass-
ment of Syrian Jewry, calling
upon the Syrian government "to
respect the basic human rights of
its Jewish community which it
holds hostage and which it pre-
vents from leaving."
Organizations
government of Israel will at all
culture, religion and Ian- times support the reestablish-
Therefore. Shamir 'ment of a truly independent Le-
irael Condemns Atomic Energy Agency
9tani efforts to produce nuclear
weapons. This proved that the
agency acted in an "arbitrary and
discriminatory" manner against
Israel, the Foreign Ministry said.
THE STATEMENT noted
that Israel has taken several
initiatives to establish a nuclear-
free zone in the Middle East, in-
cluding one at the United Na-
tions General Assembly last
year. "The action in Vienna does
nothing to help achieve such an
objective," it said.
The Foreign Ministry defended
Israel's raid on the Iraqi installa-
tion, saying it was ordered only
after clear information was ob-
tained that Iraq was at the point
of producing nuclear weapons,
the prime target of which was
Israel.
By DAVID LANDAU
And HUGH ORGEL
IRUSALEM (JTA)
The Cabinet has con-
Ined the International
lie Energy Agency
CA) decision to suspend
knical aid to Israel as
>itrary and immoral."
IAEA, meeting in
ma, voted 51-8 with 27
tentions to condemn
kel's air raid on Iraq's
lear reactor last June
to withhold all techni-
ind economic assistance
llsrael on nuclear mat-
lie resolution, sponsored by
tria, Saudi Arabia and
ral Persian Gulf states, and
juced by Yugoslavia, called
ext year's regular session of
|IAEA to expel Israel from
organization unless it agrees
place its nuclear program
tr international supervision.
United States and several
Latin American countries voted
against the resolution.
THE CABINET's statement,
drafted by Premier Menachem
Begin, said: "Enemies of Israel
Iraq, Saudi Arabia and others
of their allies attempted to
expel Israel from the IAEA.
They failed in their design, due
mainly to the attitude and ac-
tivity of the United States. How-
ever ... a sufficient majority was
mustered to condemn Israel for
its operation of national self-
defense (the raid on the Iraqi
reactor) for its act of rescue of
tens of thousands of civilians, in-
cluding children the govern-
ment of Israel condemns this
arbitrary and immoral resolution.
An earlier statement by the
Foreign Ministry said the Israeli
raid on the Iraqi reactor was no
excuse for the IAEA action inas-
much as the agency took no
measures against Iran after it
bombed the Iraqi facility some
months before the Israeli raid.
Nor did the IAEA take action
when India operated nuclear in-
stallations or in response to Paki-
PIONEER WOMEN
The eight clubs in the Broward
Council of Pioneer Women which
cooperates with Na'amat, its sis-
ter organization in Israel, will
participate in a "teach-in" at 9
a-m., Thursday, Oct. 29, at Holi-
day Inn, Coral Springs.
The gathering of the leadership
will have Harriet Green national
vice president, as keynote
speaker, discussing Zionism in
relation to the organization and
its support of educational, voca-
tional and child care services.
Workshops will follow the open-
ing session.
SUNRISE MEN'S CLUB
Three acts of song, comedy and
magic will be presented at 8 p.m.,
Saturday, Oct. 31, by the Men's
Club of the Sunrise Jewish Cen-
ter in the Center at 8049 W. Oak-
land Park Blvd. The performers
will be Magician Jackie Field,
song stylist Constance Melody,
and Mickey Sharp, a creative
comedian. Accompanying them
will be Jerry Carotta at the piano.
Reserved seating for a dona-
tion of $3 is available. Tickets
may be secured at the Center
from 10 a.m. to noon daily except
Saturday.
KOL AMI
The Sisterhood and Brother-
hood of Plantation's Temple Kol
Ami are sponsoring a champagne
art auction Saturday, Oct. 17,
with preview at 7:30 p.m., and
auction at 8:30. Works of famous
artists will be on exhibition.
Three door prizes will be
awarded. Admission is free at the
Temple, 8200 Peters Rd.
DEERFIELD'S
BROTHERHOOD
The Brotherhood of Temple
Beth Israel in Deerfield Beach is
presenting a film, "The Mame-
Loshen." at 8 p.m., Sunday and
Monday, Oct. 25 and 26, in the
Temple's social hail.
This film features comedian
David Steinberg, actor Herschel
Bernardi, author Leo Rosten,
editor of the Daily Forward
Simon Weber, Dr. Joshua Fish-
man of New York, Yeshivo
University and Yiddish scholar
Dr. Saul Goodman. In addition a
Yiddish folk song and poem in
animated fashion called "Afn
Veg Shteyt a Boym" by Itzik
Manger and sung by Josh Walet-
sky. Tickets for these films are
available at the Temple Office at
II.
Mameloshen
Sunny Landsman, leader of the
Broward Circle of Yiddish Clubs,
will teach Yiddish at Temple
Beth Am in Margate, beginning
Monday, Nov. 2, from 10 to 11
a.m.
As part of the North Broward
Midrasha this course will add joy
to the life of the participants. It is
for those who want to learn and
improve their knowledge of
"mameloshen." Join the fun of
entering the joyful world of Yid-
dish. For further information call
748-8200, the Jewish Federation.
Rommel's Son Arrives in Israel
Warm Welcome at Youth Center
L AVIV (JTA) Rom-
has arrived in Israel to a
welcome. But Sunday's
r was not Gen. Erwin Rom-
the "desert fox" who led
er's army to the gates of
Jt in World War II, but his
Dr. Manfred Rommel,
ar of the West German town
(uttgart.
Rommel came at the invi-
In of the Union of Local Au-
Ities in Israel, in recognition
i-s position as head of the
talent organization in West
aany to attend the corner-
i-laying ceremony for a
center for German and Is-
youngsters at the Labor
f's College of Beth Berl near
)MME1. SAID he thought
most Germans today agreed that
it was better for Germany to have
lost the war under Hitler than to
have won it and continued the
Nazi political system.
Manfred Rommel said he was
certain his father, who brought
his army as far as El Alamein
near Alexandria, would have
thought the same had he been
alive today.
It was the West German Local
Authorities Alliance which
donated the funds for construc-
tion of the youth center at Beth
Berl, and Labor Party Chairman
Shimon Peres said at the cere-
mony: "39 years ago the name
Rommel cast fear in all hearts.
But a generation later, his son
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of peace and friendship."
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Lay. October 16, 1981
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Pagei-
rowsin' thru
roward
'ith max levine
Sidney Karlton, who headed
1981 UJA campaign among
residents of Plantation's
jlvnesian Gardens, this week
|d: "We raised $9,000 for 1961.
kw we've committed ourselves
fa goal of $15,000" That's
spirit of "One People
divisible" Sam Hoffman,
publicity purveyor for Sun-
Jewish Center, noting the
son of the year, says people
Duldn't "indulge in hate, greed
quest for power," if you do,
| adds, "you are wasting preci-
i time and that's a crime."
abbi Sheldon Harr, on Mon-
of this week as part of the
\Vat service, held special con-
ca t ion service for Temple Kol
Ji's Religious School's new
dents in its kindergarten and
grade classes the largest
Bring group in five years .
lith Indursky reported
jassah's liana Hawaiian
jens chapter had a paid-up
|mbership luncheon and
lion show at Lauderdale
kt-s City Hall .,. Bernard B.
Jkin noted the death of one of
Irish War Veterans Coral
^ings Post's most active mem-
s. Milton Schwartz.
lichael Satz, Broward
unty's State Attorney, was the
tured speaker at this week's
1st Broward breakfast
embly of the Fort Lauderdale-
Dward County Chamber of
imerce Also speaking to a
1st Broward group this week
Mike Siege! of WNWS-radio.
audience was the Brandeis
diversity National Women's
, m it tee chapter ... Soon
ailable at book stores: a
[initive book on Israel's strug-
for statehood and peace. The
Jthor of Israel's Defense Line
fr Friends and Foes in Wash-
Von is I. L. Kenen, editor-
eritus of the Near East Re-
n. published by the American
el Public Affairs Committee
IP AC) of which Kenen is
jrary chairman Arnold
in Praag is chairman of the
committee planning the Nov. 1
dedication of West Broward
Jewish Congregation'8 "shul."
Irwin Ames and Roz Hirach
have tickets for the concert by Sy
Sugar-conducted Senior "Pops"
Symphony Orchestra of Lauder-
hill to be presented Nov. 15 at the
Lauderhill Senior Center ... A
miniature Sukka, constructed
with loving care and suitable
notations for all its components
by Florence and Morris Posner,
members of Temple Beth Am, is
on display at the Catharine Young
Library in Margate through Oct.
21 {Simchat Torah).
Registration started this week
for members of Pompano's
Brandeis Women's Committee to
sign up for study groups .
Herb Slusher is the youth group
advisor for the 14-18 Senior
Youth Group at Plantation's
Temple Kol Ami where the group
had a pizza party following last
Saturday's Havdalah service.
Morris Posner, the one men-
tioned above, lives at 740 NW
73rd Ave., Margate 33063, is
publicity director for "Baysiders
(N.Y.) in Florida" which is plan-
ning a reunion Nov. 6-8 at Singer
Island. All Baysiders interested
should write to him Charlotte
Rosenzweig, vice president pro-
grams for Hadassah's Blyma
chapter, arranged to have the
Palm Springs III Choral Group
entertain this week at the chapter
meeting at Margate's Beth Hillel
. Iris Starr, former general
manager at Gallaeria's Saks
Fifth Avenue who was so helpful
in arranging a Women's Division
fund-raiser for UJA earlier this
year, is now general manager at
Bonwit Teller in Bal Harbour. .
And the Galleria and its
developer, Leonard L. Farbcr,
won the "Maxi" award presented
by the International Council of
Shopping Centers for the excel-
lence of its grand opening cam-
paign last year.
BUYING A NIW CAR?
Instead of a trade-in on an old car, consider
donating it to the Jewish Federation of Greater Fort
lLauderdale. Call Mark Silverman for details.
|Federation-UJA 748-8200.
A NOVEMBER 20 DECEMBER 20,1981
AN OPEN LETTER
To Jewish Families in North Broward County
who are not affiliated with a synagogue or temple:
needs. It is an invitation which your family
SHALOM:
The faith and values of Jews throughout
the centuries have been shaped and
strengthened by our synagogues. Our
synagogues have helped to pass our heritage
from generation to generation, from parents
to children to grandchildren.
In order to continue their vital services to
today's Jews in our changing world, the
synagogues must be kept vital and growing.
Synagogue membership and support are im-
portant obligations of every Jewish family,
not only for the synagogue's future, but for
their own.
The Jewish families of North Broward
County who are affiliated, the Jewish
Federation and the Synagogue Council
combine to extend an invitation to join a
synagogue which is responsive to your
ORTHODOX
Temple Ohel B'nai Raphael 735-9738
4351 W. Oakland Park Blvd.
Lauderdale Lakes 33313
Nathan Grossman, President
Young Israel of Deerfield Beach
1640 W. Hillsboro Blvd. 421-1367
Deefield Beach. 33441
Morris Septimus, President
The Traditional Synagogue of Inverrary
Dr. David Wolgin, President
Moshe Stern 742-9244
4231 NW 75th Ter., Lauderhill 33319
CONSERVATIVE
Temple Beth Israel 742-4040
7100 W. Oakland Park Blvd.
Sunrise 33313
Rabbi Phillip A. Labowitz
Al Lang, President
Temple Beth Am 974-8650
7205 Royal Palm Blvd.
Margate 33063
Rabbi Dr. Solomon Geld
Harry Hirsch, President
Sunrise Jewish Center 741-0295
8049 W. Oakland Park Blvd.
Sunrise 33321
Rabbi Albert N.Troy
Sam Wolberg, President
Congregation Beth Hillel 974-3090
7640 Margate Blvd.
Margate 33063
Rabbi Joseph Berglas
Harry Fine, President
Temple Sholom 942-6410
132 SE 11th Ave.
Pompano Beach 33060
Rabbi Samuel April
Dr. Milton Isaacson, President
Temple Beth Torah 721-7660
9101 NW 57th St.
Tamarac 33321
Rabbi Israel Zimmerman
Jack Weiner, President
Temple Beth Israel 421-7060
200 S. Century Blvd,
Deerfield Beach 33441
Rabbi Leon Mirsky
Joseph Lovy, President
should accept.
Listed below is brief information about
our local congregations. If you would like
more information or a personal contact,
complete and return the coupon below to the
Jewish Federation. It will be appropriately
referred. Requests for special membership
arrangements, if required, will be treated in
strictest confidence by all congregations.
There are no real barriers to affiliation.
We urge that your family become
congregation members and a link in the
chain that unites Jews from generation to
generation. It will strengthen your family
and your people.
Chaplaincy Commission Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale
and North Broward Board of Rabbis
Hebrew Congregation of Lauderhill
2048 NW 49th Ave. 733-9560
Maxwell Gilbert, President
Temple Israel of Gait Ocean Mile
Meets: North Beach Medical Center
Rabbi David Matzner
Ben S. Marcus, President
4280 Gait Ocean Dr. 566-0954
Fort Lauderdale 33308
Hebrew Congregation of No. Lauderdale
Meets: Western School
Murray Hendler, President
Kal Blumenreich 721-7162
REFORM/
Temple Emanu-El 731-2310
3245 W. Oakland Park Blvd.
Lauderdale Lakes 33311
Rabbi Jeffrey Ballon
Frances Smith, President
Temple Kol Ami 472-1988
8200 Peters Rd.
Plantation 33324
Rabbi Sheldon Harr
Phil Fagelson, President
i
Temple Beth Orr 753-3232
2151 Riverside Drive
Coral Springs 33065
Rabbi Donald R. Gerber
Barry Kantrowitz, President
RECONSTRUCnONIST
Ramat Shalom,
7473 NW 4th St. 583-7770
Dr. Richard Goldman, President
Rabbi Robert A. Jacobs
LIBERAL
Liberal Temple of Coconut Creek
Meets: Calvary Presbyterian Church
Arnie Nestel, Arthur Savitt,
Judge Harry Shooman, Presidium:
971-9729
P.O. Box 4384, Margate 33063
LIBERAL REFORM
West Broward Jewish Congregation
Don Workman, President 741-0121
P.O. Box 17440, Plantation 33318
COMMUNITY
Keter Tikvan Synagogue
Meets: Bank of Coral Springs
Rabbi Leonard S. Zoll 752-3771
P.O. Box 8125, Coral Springs 33065
Herbert Ray, President
_CLIP AND MAIL THIS COUPON.
FOR:
.MORE INFORMATION
.PERSONAL CALL
Synagogues) of Interest
Head of Family:
Address:-------------.-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Send To: JEWISH FEDERATION OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE
2999 N.W. 33rd Avenue, Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33311


Friday, October 9,1981
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 9
^Nursing Home Residents, Others Wished a 'Sweet Year
&
iJMM?1
Rabbi Zimmerman (top left)
sounds the shofar for his Stock-
ade "congregation." At right is
the service being conducted by
Rabbi Gordon in the prison
library and Ruth Horowitz pre-
pares to serve the honey and
^^^pplrs. The second tier (left) is
Br service at Covenant Care with
Sunny Friedman lighting the
candles Center photo: serving
the goodies at Covenant Care. At
ight at Colonial Palm is Nathan
Bodnar sounding the shofar with
Cantor Botoshansky and Rabbi
Geld standing by his side.
Bottom photos Heft) Rabbi Gor-
don at the Prison Library with
Cantor Hansel, next two photos
-hou the women and men of Beth
M f!#i at Colonial Palm.
ZOA Opens
Membership
Campaign
Southeast Regional ZOA Pres-
ident Alan Taffet announced the
beginning of the 'Zion Year"
membership campaign for the
Zionist Organization of America.
Taffet, who had just returned
from a ZOA Conference in Israel,
stated that "American Zionists
are the most important factor in
supporting the continuous
growth of a modem, strong
Israel." He urged that the Amer-
ican people at large understand
the strategic and cultural ties
that bind the two democracies
together.
He reported to the Southeast
Regional group on the extensive
conference attended by several
hundred American leaders of the
Sionist Organization. They met
in Jerusalem to confer with Is-#
raeli leaders and government
officials. The Conference was ad-
dressed by Israeli President Yitz-
hak Navon who stressed the im-
portance to Israel of the Ameri-
can commitment to World Zion-
ism.
Other speakers included ZOA
"esident Ivan J. Novick who
spoke of the many successes of
'he Zionist Organization of
America, such as the Masada
Vouth Program, ZOA House in
Tel Aviv and the educational
\rogram at Kfar Silver.
After the formal Conference,
tne ZOA leaders toured impor-
tant Israeli settlements on the
West Bank and in Egypt.
The ZOA Southeast Regional
Headquarters is at 800 W. Oak-
*nd Park Blvd., Suite 308, Fort
Lauderdale.
I CLIP IMP SAVE 15 I MR. GROCER Kraft. Inc (Retail Food Group) will
J reimburse you tor the face value of this coupon plus 7c
I handling allowance provided you redeemed it on your
' retail sales ol the named product(s) and that upon
I request you agree to furnish proof of purchase of suffi-
cient product to cover all redemptions Coupon is void
I where taxed, prohibited, or restricted by law. and may
not be assigned or transferred by you. Cash value 1 '20*
I Customer must pay any applicable tax For redemption
mail to KRAFT, INC. RFC. P.O. BOX MOO. CANTON,
IOWA 32734.
M1-50
STORE COUPON
AVAILABLE IN AND 10 SLICE
PACKAGES .
REDEEM PROMPTLY-
ONE COUPON PER ITEM
PURCHASED
on any size
package of
LIGHT NP LIVEiy"
process cheese-
product.
21000 11201,1,
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KRAFT]
LIGHT (NP LIVELy

c 198' K'aH lc


Page 10
^^^^h^ujrut^nO^^ti^r^^^ial^nnT
?.Tr-
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, October 16,1981
Shemini Atzeret-Simchat Torah Combined at Liberal Temple
The Liberal Jewish Temple of
Coconut Creek will celebrate the
concluding days of Sukkot (Fes-
tival of Tabernacles) with a
combined Shemini Atzeret-
Simchat Torah service at 8 p.m.,
Monday, Oct. 19, in the Sanc-
tuary of the Calvary Presbyter-
ian Church, Coconut Creek Park-
way, opposite Wynmoor Village.
The service will mark the
eighth day of the festival and the
rejoicing for the presentation of
The Law. There will be a proces-
sional with the Torah serous, ac-
companied by the liturgical
hymns, followed by the conclud-
ing verses of the Book of Deuter-
onomy and the beginning of a
new cycle of reading the Five
Books of Moses with the opening
verses of the Book of Genesis.
Rabbi Bob Ilson, founding
rabbi of the congregation, will
conduct the worship service. He
will discuss "The Never Ending
Cycle: Symbol of Life and the
Eternal People." Following the
service, there will be a collation
and an hour of fellowship.
TEMPLE BETH ORR
Temple Beth Orr's Senior
Youth Group (CSFTY) will assist
the Coral Springs Temple's
Rabbi Donald R. Gerber at the 8
p.m., Friday, Oct. 16, service at
the synagogue, 2151 Riverside
Dr. An Open Forum will follow.
The Temple will host an Oneg
Shabbat.
The Reform congregation is
holding its Simchat Torah service
at 7:30 p.m., Monday, Oct. 19.
The Yizkor service will be held
the following day at 10:30 am.
TEMPLE BETH AM
Friday night services at Tem-
ple Beth Am will be held on Oct.
16 at 8 p.m. President Harry
Hirsch will direct the services,
assisted by first vice-president
Alfred Cohen for the English.
Max Mode 11 will conclude his
two-part series of talks on the
topic "Who Is A Jew." On Oct.
23, Rabbi Geld will answer ques-
tions on this subject submitted to
him in advance. On Oct. 30 Rabbi
Geld will summarize the
thoughts expressed during the
four-week symposium and add
his own ideas. The Temple will
host the Oneg Shabbat.
The Sukkot holidays will end
with the Simchat Torah services
on Oct. 21 at a a.m. Yizkor serv-
ices will be held on Tuesday, Oct.
20 at about 11 a.m.
At the end of each of the
Sukkot services a Kiddush will be
held in the Succah erected by
Jerry Rubinstein and his assis-
tants. The interior decorations
and display of the season's fruits
and vegetables were set up by the
Sisterhood, aided by the school
children and their teachers.
RAMAT SHALOM
Ramat Shalom, 7473 NW 4th
St., Plantation, will have a Suk-
kot service Friday night, Oct. 16,
conducted by Rabbi Robert A.
Jacobs. Members of the congre-
tgation will share the service with
Rabbi Jacobs as the Ritual Com-
mittee has prepared a special
Sukkot service, which in keeping
with the innovative and family
concept approach of Reconstruc-
tionism, features the involvement
of the entire membership.
On Tuesday night, Oct. 20, a
Simchat Torah service will be
held starting at 7 p.m. During
this joyous evening Gillian
Greenstein, guitarist and
vocalist, will be on hand for the
Israeli folk dancing which will
round out the night. Information
on the synagogue and its various
activities, membership and func-
tions can be had by calling 583-
7770 weekdays from 9 to noon.
WEST BROWARD JC
West Broward Jewish Congre-
gation, the newest congregation
in the north of Broward county,
will be holding services in its
newly established sanctuary at
7420 NW 5th St., Plantation.
Services will be at 8 p.m. on Fri-
days.
A dedication ceremony is
planned for 1 p.m., Sunday, Nov.
1.
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Religious Directory
v
LAUDERDALE LAKES
OHEL BNAI RAPHAEL TEMPLE. 4351 West Oakland Park
Boulevard. Modern Orthodox Congregation. Saul Herman. Rabbi
Emeritus.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL. 3245 W. Oakland Park Blvd. Reform Rabbi
Jeffrey Ballon. Cantor Jerome Klement.
SUNRISE
BETH ISRAEL TEMPLE. 7100 W. Oakland Park Blvd. Conservative.
Rabbi Phillip A. Labowitz. Cantor Maurice Neu.
SUNRISE JEWISH CENTER. INC. 8049 W. Oakland Park Blvd.
Conservative. Rabbi Albert N. Troy. Cantor Jack Merchant.
LAUDERHILL
HEBREW CONGREGATION OF LAUDERHILL. 2048 NW 49th
Ave. Lauderhill. Conservative. Maxwell Gilbert, president.
NORTH LAUDERDALE
HEBREW CONGREGATION OF NORTH LAUDERDALE 6:30
Friday; 9 a.m.. Saturday, in Western School. 8200 SW 17th St. Murray
Hendler. president.
FORT LAUDERDALE
TEMPLE ISRAEL OF GALT OCEAN MILE. Conservative. Rabbi
David Matzner. ,
Ocean Blvd.
TAMARAC
TEMPLE BETH TORAH-TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER. 9101
NW 57th St. Conservative. Rabbi Israel Zimmerman. Cantor Henry
Be la sco.
PLANTATION
TEMPLE KOL AMI. Plantation Jewish Congregation. 8200 Peters
Rd. Liberal Reform. Rabbi Sheldon J. Han-
RAM AT SHALOM. 7473 NW 4th St. Rabbi Robert A. Jacobs.
Weat Broward Jewish Congregation.74^0 NW 5th Street.
POMPANO BEACH
TEMPLE SHOLOM.132 SE 11th Ave.. Conservative. Rabbi Samuel
April. Cantor Jacob Renzer.
MARGATE
BETH HILLEL CONGREGATION. 7640 Margate Blvd. Conser-
vative. Rabbi Joseph Bergias.
TEMPLE BETH AM-MARGATE JEWISH CENTER. 7205 Royal
Palm Blvd. Conservative. Rabbi Dr. Solomon Geld. Cantor Mario
Botoshansky.
LIBERAL TEMPLE of Coconut Creek. Friday evening services
Calvary Presbyterian Church. Coconut Creek Blvd.
CORAL SPRINGS
TEMPLE BETH ORR. 2151 Riverside Drive. Reform. Rabbi Donald S.
Gerber. Cantor Harold Dworkin.
KETER TIKVAH SYNAGOGUE. 8 p.m. Friday; 10:30 a.m. Saturday
in Auditorium, Bank of Coral Springs. 3300 University Dr. Rabbi
Leonard Zoll.
DEERFIELD BEACH
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL at Century Village East. Conservative.
Rabbi Leon Mirsky. Cantor Joseph Schroeder. -;
YOUNG ISRAEL of Deertield Beacn. i*>4U W. Hilisboro Blvd. Or-
thodox.
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HEBREW CONGREGATION
North Lauderdale Hebrew
Congregation will hold Sukkot
services at the home of Seymour
and Dorothy Wildman, 2300 SW
81st Terr., North Lauderdale
The Congregation meets for
Friday evening service at 7 and
at 9 a.m. Saturday in the
Western School, Room 3, 8200
SW 17th St.
BNAI MITZVAH
TEMPLE SHOLOM
Beth Gaynor, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Louis Gaynor, will be-
come a Bat Mitzvah Friday eve-
ning, Oct. 16, at the service at
Temple Sholom. Pompano Beach.
Rene* WaaaermaD, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Gary Wasserman,
will become a Bat Mitzvah at
Temple Sholom's Friday evening
service, Oct. 23.
The following day at 6 p.m.
service, Andrew Levy, son of
Mrs. Madeline Levy, will become
a Bar Mitzvah.
BETH TORAH
Bar Mitzvah honors will be ac-
corded Jeffrey Pittle, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Marshall Pittle, and
David Baratz, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Michael Baratz, at the Sat-
urday morning' earvicea, iQct. ?*
of Temple Beth Torah in Tama-
rac.
SUNRISE
JEWISH CENTER
Allan Soloway, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Benjamin Soloway, will be-
come a Bar Mitzvah at the 9 am.,
Saturday, Oct. 16, service at
Sunrise Jewish Center.
BETH ISRAEL
Last Saturday morning, Nich-
olas Ferber, son of Melanie and
Cyril Ferber of Coral Gables, be-
came a Bar Mitzvah at the serv-
ice at Beth Israel, 7100 W. Oak-
land Park Blvd.
pw/^%
Candlelighting Time
Friday, Oct. 166:32
Monday, Oct. 19: Erev Shemini Atzeret6:29
Tuesday, Oct. 20: Erev Simchat Torah7:29
One hour after Sundown
Friday, Oct. 23-:26
,rnhnja rasftp iftj
' t T : it : I v ~:
Ba-ruch A-tah Ado-nye, Elo-haynu Melech Ha-olam.
Asher kid'shanu B*mitz-vo-tav. V'tzee-va-nu
L'had-leek Nayr shel Shabbat.
Blessed art Thou, 0 Lord our God King of the Universe,
Who has sanctified us with Thy commandments
And commanded us to kindling Yom Kippur lights.
once
11th
hool
din
let*
all
oily
I
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2771 N.W. 58th Terr., Lauderhl. f a.
(JUST SOUTH Of INVINABV)

I
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V


Page 4
I .... .
^
T^JwislT^loru^nofd^^lKfi'lMU^rSide
, -

Friday, October 9, 1981
Jewish Fioridian Reaaan Sees Joke in Falling Dow
ot Greater Fort Lauderdal* Cr ____......nn1.w .. .... ,
of Greater Fort Lauderdale
FREDKSHOCHET SUZANNE SHOCHET
Editor and Publnher Executive Edlto-
Published Weekly Mid-September through Mid-May. Bl-Weekly balance of year.
Second Class Postage Paid at Hallandale. Fla. USPS 899420
Poetmaater. Send Form 357return to Jeeneh FKxkNan. P.O. Boa 01 -2tTS, Miami. Fl. 13101
Advertising Supervisor Abraham B. Halpem
Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood Advertising Office Am. Savings 2500 Bldg.
2500 E. Hallandale Beach Blvd.. Suite 707-Q. Hallandale. Fla. 33009. Phone 454-0486
Plant. 120 NE 6th St., Miami. Fla. 33132 Phone 1-373-4605
Member JTA, Seven Arts. WNS, NEA. AJPA and FPA
Jewish Floridlan Does Not Guarantee Kashruth of Merchandise Advertised.
Greater Fort Lauderdale News Office 8380 W Oakland Park Blvd.. Fort Lauderdale.
Fla. 33321 Phone 748-8200
Max Levine. News Editor
SUBSCRIPTION RATES 2 Year Minimum $7.50 (Local Area (3.95 Annual) or by membership
Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale, Victor Gruman, President:
Leslie S. Gottlieb. Executive Director 8380 W Oakland Park Blvd., Fort Lauderdale, Fla 33321
Friday, October 9.1981
Volume 10
11 TISHRI5742
Number 23
Important Bonds Project
In many ways, it was a meeting as important as
any he had with President Reagan in Washington.
We refer to the Israel Bonds "Canal Founders"
luncheon which Prime Minister Begin addressed in
New York during his visit to the United States.
The canal, which will provide Israel with a
waterway across the southern part of the country to
the Mediterranean Sea, is as old an idea as the Zion-
ist vision itself. It was a dream in the days of Theo-
dor Herzl well before the Jewish State became a
reality.
In an address to some 350 Israel Bond leaders
who came from throughout the United States to hear
Mr. Begin, including some from South Florida, the
Prime Minister urged the leaders to "continue in-
vesting in this great and historic project, in the
vision of Herzl and its realization." Israel Bonds has
committed itself to $100 million toward completion of
the project.
The blunt truth about the waterway is that it
would have been no less important even if Israel
never had to give back an inch of the Sinai to Egypt
in the cause of pursuing a Mideast place. It would
have provided Israel with its own private Suez
Canal, thus making her independent of the political
whims of its Arab owners.
Considering the painful geopolitical realities
today, the project is more important than ever.
Considering Israel's current financial problems
at home, the country simply doesn't have the
wherewithal to launch the building of the canl at this
time. Outside capital is the only answer. And that's
how Israel Bonds has been since its founding in the
early 1950's: the organization is taking the initiative
to show prospective investors the way.
We applaud the 450 "Canal Founders" who have
thus far purchased a minimum of $100,000 in Bonds
toward the completion of the interseas energy proj-
ect. And who have helped enroll some 1,000 other
participants in the program besides.
Yigal Barkan Joins UJA
Project Renewal in Israel
NEW YORK Yigal Barkan
of Jerusalem has joined the
United Jewish Appeal as UJA
Project Renewal Representative
in Israel, Robert Russell of
Miami, National Project Renewal
Committee Chairman announced.
"Mr. Barkan will add a vital
dimension in our continuing to
attempt to expand services to
communities both in the United
States and in Israel," Russell
said. "His background and ex-
perience gives us a greater oppor-
tunity to serve the needs of com-
munities in the United States
twinned with neighborhoods in
Israel."
Born in Jerusalem and edu-
cated in the United States,
Barkan is a graduate of Yeshiva
College and Hebrew Teacher's
Institute of Yeshiva University
in New York City. He received
his Master of Arts degree at
George Washington University
Graduate School of Education in
Washington D.C.
Mr. Barkan participated in pre-
doctoral studies in curriculum
development at Hebrew Univer-
sity School of Education in Jeru-
salem. He completed his doctoral
program at George Washington
University and will soon be
awarded a PHD in curriculum
design.
Prior to joining the UJA, Mr.
Barkan was a research fellow at
the Van Leer Jerusalem Founda-
tion in Jerusalem. He has also
been the Director of Education
for Congregation Adas Israel in
Washington D.C; coordinator of
Student Affairs and instructor at
the Center for Jewish Education,
Hebrew University, and program
director for the Jerusalem YM
and YWHA.
Barkan is the author of Aliyah
Coming of Age in Israel, co-editor
and educational advisor for Foot-
loose in Jerusalem and curricu-
lum designer for Teaching
Mitzvot.
In his new position with the
United Jewish Appeal, he will as-
sist in coordinating efforts be-
tween the Jewish Agency Project
Renewal Department and the
UJA headquarters in New York.
He will help to develop a flow of
information and materials de-
signed to facilitate fundraising in
the United States, and also assist
in arranging community and in-
dividual visits to linked Project
Renewal neighborhoods in Israel.
He will work closely with Ameri-
can community delegations who
come to participate in the Project
Renewal budget consultation
process and UJA Missions to
Israel, as well as coordinate fund-
raising for Project Renewal in
Israel.
THE OTHER day. President ^W^W^^^^
Reagan was asked if the plunging
Dow figures on stocks and bonds
bothered him. The President re-
plied with a burst of laughter,
"No, I don't have any."
We are meant to believe that,
of course, the President was
making a joke. But anyone ac-
quainted with Freud's "Wit and
its Relation to the Unconscious"
would have good reason for deep
concern.
Jokes say a lot about the peo-
ple who tell them. In fact, jokes
are only a painfully thin disguise
behind which the unconscious
drives itself itself into the relief of
public expression of what are
often cruel and socially unaccep-
table feelings.
WITH THE excuse that they
couldn't possibly mean what they
have just said, that they merely
meant to be funny, such people
believe they can get away with
saying the most outrageous
things, sometimes even for our
"own good."
David Stockman, Mr.
Reagan's crass, opportunistic
budget hatchetman, made a joke
of his own the very same day
the President played Bob Hope
to the Dow. A handful of Sena-
tors had just gone through a
school lunch authorized by the
Administration in the name of
budget cuts. One GOP legislator
called the lunch an "obscenity."
All the Senators present con-
cluded that balancing the budget
could not rightly be achieved on
the backs of poor school children.
Whereupon Stockman took to
the airwaves to assure the na-
tion's television evening news
audience that nobody was really
meant to take the reduced school
lunch program seriouslyespe-
cially to understand ex-post facto
that the ketchup-as-vegetable
scam was nothing more than a
bureaucratic boo-boo in the first
place.
THE IMPULSE is to conclude
that the Reaganites regard back-
bone America as something to
make jokes about. And there is
no doubt that this is
true especially given Mr.
Reagan's predilection for an im-
perial presidency that may, in the
end, make Richard Nixon's seem
like a poor cousin by contrast.
But there is a far more bitter
lesson to be learned here. It is
not that Mr. Reagan prefers
wealth and power and that he has
a punishing attitude toward the
poor and the needy whom he re-
gards as weak and undesirable.
Few can doubt this very much
longer. After all, Teddy Roose-
velt's self-reliance principle,
taken entirely out of context by
Mr. Reagan from the larger
meaning of the Rooseveltian vi-
gorous life philosophy, is what
motivates him these day to the
point of obsession.
The bitter lesson is that humor
hides hostility given two condi-
tions: (a) the extent to which the
joke-teller is or is not sociopathic,
that is to say, the extent to which
his super-ego responds to the
greater civilizational need that he
must control his hostility as an
acceptable member of the com-
munity; and (b) the extent to
which the object of the joke-
teller's hostility is or is not nega-
tively stimulating enough to
cause him to lose control.
THE FIRST condition ex-
plains why inveterate joke-tellers
and, of course, professional
humorists and comedians are
often keenly tortured people who
in their private lives are-not fun-
ny at all Many of them are frank
to confess, for example, that their
dream is to play tragic roles, say
Hamlet or Macbeth or Lear,
rather than comic roles.
The second condition explains
why there is nothing so
dangerous as the sadistic humor-
ist, the personality that has long
since lost control over the civili-
zational prerequisites for
membership in the community
and that finds humor and even
%
I
nice
\
Leo
MittdUit
1--------------1
joy in punishing the objects of his
hostility with pain.
Joke-tellers who have em-
barked on that road have a low
anger flashpoint. They lose their
tempers easily. Paradoxically,
they are to be found more among
the seemingly mild-mannered,
often the successful socializer,
rather than among the sociopaths
who have long since given up the
pretense that they are
guys."
PRESIDENT REAGAN is the
epitome these days of the "nice
guy." When he made his joke
about the plunging Dow, he was
affable in the extreme. He
showed every aspect of his
pleasing personality that won
him the election last November.
And that, earlier in life, also won
him the Bonzo role. After all, he
did not come to play Bonzo en-
tirely by accident; anyone who
was willing to act in that context
simply had to be a "nice guy."
But then came Scene Two of
Mr. Reagan's script for the very
same day that began when he
played comedian to the Dow. In
the second scenario, the Presi-
dent was called upon to respond
to the news, the very predictable
news, which he clearly did not
anticipate or see that way, that
the Saudis were not at the mo-
ment prepared to accept the
latest GOP scheme to push the
AW ACS sale through the Senate.
This was the scheme that would
have sold the AWACS but re-
quired of the Saudis that they ac-
cept American crew control over
them.
Mr. Reagan's reaction was
clear. His head shook uncontrol-
lably as he dropped the comic
mask for the tragic. His voice
choking with rage at the Senators
lined up against the AWACS sale
under any circumstances, Mr.
Reagan turned Lear, his hostility
bordering on threats of future
punishment for those who were
crossing him. He did not know
"what to do with them," he said,
for failing to support this part of
his military package for |
Saudis. But he would sure come
up with something if they failed
to relent.
THE TWO scenarios are fasci-
nating because they divide along
the lines of the President's emo-
tional imperatives. In the
struggle for budget cuts to which
the Dow has been responding so
negatively, the President could
be his usual, affable self and
make jokes because he was after
all having his way in the war
against welfare America.
But in the arena of military en-
terprise, in the complex world of
the industrial and military fat cat
to which he has elected himself as
heir, Mr. Reagan can see no hu-
mor and will tolerate with only
great control the frustration of
his expansionist soul.
Whether or not the President
goes yet a step further remains to
be seen. He can not readily
punish the Senators of his own
party led by Robert Pack wood of
Oregon who have handed him the
AWACS defeat as it now stands.
But he can punish Israel,
whose interests he presumably
holds in such high esteem. He
can punish Israel in the same way
that, say, Lear punished his be-
loved Cordelia. And whether or
not he attempts this depends
upon which of the two conditions
governing hostility in humor ul-
timately claims him. The time
for an end to Administration
joke-cracking and so-called
bureaucratic boc-boos may well
be at hand.
Readers
Write
Editor:
Must it take a war in the Mid-
East to occur to remind Jews
that they are Jews, and they
should support Jewish causes?
Should Israel be attacked and in-
vaded, their regrets will be of lit-
tle availonly their financial
support will be of value in pro-
viding humanitarian and moral
support to the Israelis. Then,
maybe, they will remember that
being a Jew involves more than
merely attending Friday night
services and belonging to a syna-
gogue club or social organization.
Mortimer D. Abraaokin, M. D.
Fort Lauderdale
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i tie o eivisri
rumuuin u/ urvuwr eon isuaueroxue
r ridey. October 9.1961
The Jewish Argument on Gun Control
By BARBARA FINKELSTE1N
A pudgy young boy with look
of excitement in hia eyes balances
rifle in his IsfJafc Behind Mej
stands his coach, a young man
not yet out of his | twenties.
Nothing unusual here at a firing
range near Texas Canyon, Cant,
except that both individuals are
Jewish.
Lately, various organizations
have appealed to American Jews
to arm themselves. Why do gun
rights campaigns include special
outreach publicity to Jews? Do,
the campaigns manipulate Jew-
ish sensitivity valid or ex-j
aggerated to anti-Semitic
sentiment in this country? Or do!
they play on Jewish embarrass-
ment about "Jewish passivity"!
during World War II?
ONE PITCH for Jewish gun
ownership argues that "it can
happen here. Another urges
Jewish businessmen to defend I
themselves against inner city
crime. The first approach is
specifically Jewish; the second
appeals to Jews as members of
the white middle class, often
frustrated by the inefficiencies of
a bureaucratic legal process.
Occasionally, an organization like
the Seattle-based Second
Amendment Foundation will cite
both reasons as incentives to buy'
guns.
The posture of the major,
Jewish defense organizations;
contrasts sharply with the gun,
lobby position. B'nai B'rith. the
American Jewish Congress, the
American Jewish Communtiy
Relations Advisory Council ail
endorsed their respective gun
control proposals in the early and
mid-seventies. This organi-
zational consensus stems less
from any liberal political]
agenda than from a cultural
revulsion towards guns which
many Jews have inherited. Jews,
it was said long ago, are not
hunters. (
According to a U.S. Depart-1
ment of Justice poll, 11 percent of |
American Jews owned a handgun
or pistol in 1980. Twenty percent
owned a long-barrelled gun. By
contrast, 29 percent of
Protestants owned handguns and
40 percent owned rules; 18
Kercent of Catholics owned
andtruns and 29 percent, rifles.
With" Jewish gun ownership so"
far below the national average,
why has special attention been
focused on the idea of Jews and
guns?
ONE REASON may be op-
portunistic: anti-gun control
Statement of Ownership, Man-
agement and Circulation (re-
quired by 38 USC 3688): 1-Title
of publication: Jewish Florid-
Ian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Publication No. 8M-4S0. 2-Date
of filing September SO. 1981. S-
Frequency of lame: Weekly
Mid-Sept, thru Mid-May. Bi-
weekly balance of year. A No
of liaiei published annually:
27. H Annual subscription
price: 13.96 4-Location of
known office of publication:
2500 E. Hallandale Beach
Blvd.. No. T07G. Hallandale.
Fla. 33009. 0-LocaOon of head-
quarters of publishers: US
NX. Sth St.. Miami. Fla. 83112
-Publisher, editor, managing .
editor: Fred H. Shochet. 120
N.E. 6th Street. Miami, Fla.
33112 7-Owner, Fred K. Shoe
net. 120 N.E. 6thStreet. Miami.
Fla. 33182. 3 Known bondhold-
ers, mortgagees and other se-
curity holders holding or
owning 1 percent or mote of
mmu* of bonds, mart- l
* other wwii Idee, if
Nonet Morcampiettonby I
hprofltorganlxatlone: None.
10- Extent and nature of elrcu-,
lation, green in th
average no noulss each
during preceding 12
followed by actual no
single Issue published nearest
to filing date: A) total no.
copies printed) net press run):
11,781. 16.780; B) paid circula-
tion: 1-sales through dealers
and carriers, street vendors
and counter salsa. 0. 0; 2 mall
subscriptions: 11,MS. 16,140:
C) total paid circulation:
U.MS, 16.140; D) free distribu-
tion by mall, carrier..'or other
pjfjgs ns. samples. complimen-
tary and other free copies, 16,
a E) total distribution, 11,188,
16,140 F) copies not distri-
buted: l) office use, left over,
unaccounted for, spotted after
printing, 548, 610. ) returns
from news agents 0, 0. Q)
Totral: 11.781, 16,780. I certify
that .statements mads by ms
above are correct and
piste.
a Fred K. Shochst. publisher
groups may view Jews as an;
untapped reservoir of supporters.
'Another is the increasing
seriousness with which American
Jews have been discussing anti-
Semitism. And judging by the
space devoted to it in the Jewish
press, the subject makes com-
pelling reading. Often in such
articles the Jewish Defense
League is mentioned or quoted.
"The JDL always knew how to,
use the press," says one former
member. "It was an organization
that replied on images." The
image that the JDL relies on is
the defeated European Jew who
"consented" to his own
destruction. Occasionally the
JDL draws some rather shaky
parallels. For example, JDL
national chairman Irving Rubin
cites the legitimacy of Ku Khix
Klan candidates in recent Cali-
fornia and North Carolina elec-
tions and desecration of syna-
gogues as precursors to another
round of Nuremburg Laws and
mass pogroms. If you don't want
to end up like the Jews of Europe,
the JDL states, buy a gun.
"The fact is," says the former
JDL member, "the argument
that the present is an insecure
time for Jews has at least some
validity. For example, it's
become acceptable in the past
decade to think of Jews as Zionist
aggressors worthy of UN con-
demnation."
WHILE JDL influence may be
far less wide-reaching today than
it was ten years ago, JDL-
sponsored target practices still
draw non-JDL members. A
recent appeal is directed at
Russian Jewish immigrants who
are warned: "There are Nazis in
America! It CAN happen here.
Prepare to defend yourself!
Many Jewish target shooters,
however, are less concerned with
right-wing extremists than with
self-defense against crime. "This
business about a Nazi resurgence
is bull," Philadelnhian Ernest
Brydon told Philadelphia's
Jewish Exponent. "If Jews have
turned to guns it's because they
feel the judicial system has failed
and the streets are full of
recidivist criminals. The public
has lost faith in the law but
this applies to everyone, not just
Jewel*
Brydon's opinion raises an
important question: Just who is
supposed to be the enemy? Is it
the various Klan and Nazi parties
with their poorly attended yet
much publicized anti-black and
anti-Jewish demonstrations? Or
is it the urban criminal who
a Jew in his store or on
the street maybe not as a Jew,
but as a vulnerable touch?
THE ISSUE is further con-
fused by the man-sized silhouette
targets emblazoned with
swastikas used at a JDL firing
range. If Jews learn to shoot in
ranges lute this one in order to
defend themselves against street
crime, are they also absorbing the
implied political message that
anyone who harms a Jew is a
Nazi? ,v
"Gun Control Works: Holo-
caust,", expounds a bumper
sticker, leapfrogging over cause
and effect. The message is clear,
albeit glib: Buy a gun or be a
victim. A Jewish victim.
BUYING A NEW CAR?
Instead of a trade-in on an old car, consider
donating it to the Jewish Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale. Call Mark Silverman for details.
Federation-UJA 748-8200.
Y
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