The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 3, no. 7 (Apr. 5, 1974)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 9, 1976 called v.4, no. 27 but constitutes v.5, no. 1; issue for July 7, 1989 called v.18, no. 11 but constitutes v.18, no. 13.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44570954
lccn - sn 00229545
ocm44570954
System ID:
AA00014312:00542

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Jewish Floridian of North Broward


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jewishFloridian
W OF GREATER FORT LAUDE
Volume 18 Number 1
Fort Lauderdale, Florida Friday, January 13, 1989
Tn*
Price: 36 cents
Knesset Rejects
PLO Talks
Opposes Palestinian State
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
Knesset issued a statement
ruling out the Palestine Liber-
ation Organization as a negoti-
ating partner and affirming
Israel's rejection of a Palestin-
ian state.
The statement, which wound
up a session on political mat-
ters, including the PLO's
recent peace offensive, had
wide support from Likud,
Labor, Agudat Yisrael and the
National Religious Party.
But some Labor doves and
members of leftist opposition
parties accused the govern-
ment of not wanting peace.
Divisions in the Knesset
deepened when 32 right-wing
members signed a letter urg-
ing the law enforcement agen-
cies to prevent four of their
colleagues from going to a
meeting in Paris that will be
attended by PLO representa-
tives.
The Knesset statement,
adopted by a substantial
majority, made clear that poli-
ticians here believe the PLO
still aims at Israel's destruc-
tion, American opinions to the
contrary not withstanding.
It stated that Israel is pre-
pared to negotiate with Pales-
tinian representatives who
recognize Israel, reject terror-
ism and accept UN Security
Council Resolutions 242 and
338.
The United States main-
tained that the PLO met pre-
cisely those conditions when it
decided last month to open a
dialogue with the PLO.
The Knesset insisted, how-
ever, that "the PLO, which is
based on the Palestinian Cove-
nant, and any other organiza-
tion which negates the exist-
ence of Israel and the national
existence of the Jewish people,
or which exercises terrorism,
cannot be partners to negotia-
tions."
According to the Knesset
statement, "Israel will insist
that the solution of the Pales-
tinian problem be within a Jor-
danian-Palestinian frame-
work.
"Israel negates the estab-
lishment of an additional sep-
arate Palestinian state in the
territory between Israel and
the Jordan River," the state-
ment said.
Foreign Minister Moshe
Arens told the Knesset he
believes 1989 will be a year of
progress in the peace process.
He said Israel is preparing a
series of proposals to advance
the process.
Arens said at a reception
here for foreign ambassadors
that Israel is considering a
number of peace initiatives,
none of which has yet passed
through the decision-making
channels.
The right-wing members'
letter, addressed by 32 Knes-
set members to the minister of
police, the minister of justice
and the attorney general,
refers to a trip planned by Ora
Namir and Arieh Eliav of
Labor, and Shulamit Aloni and
Yossi Sarid of the Citizens
Rights Movement.
It urges the authorities to
bar their departure from the
country on grounds that the
law forbids Israelis from hav-
ing contact with the PLO.
Eliav told reporters that the
Paris meeting would not
violate the ban.
He said the four Knesset
members do not intend to
negotiate with the PLO, only
to participate in an interna-
tional conference that would
also be attended by Palestini-
ans, including PLO represen-
tatives.
Three other Laborites,
Knesset member Haim
Ramon, former Knesset mem-
ber Abba Eban and Haim
Zadok, reportedly are consid-
ering an invitation to a confer-
ence in The Hague that will be
attended by two members of
the Palestine National Council,
Edward Said and Walid Khal-
idi. The conference is titled
"The Palestinian-Israeli Prob-
lem From A European Point of
View."
Re-examination Of Plastic Bullets
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Attor-
ney General Yosef Harish will
re-examine the use of plastic
bullets to quell disturbances in
the West Bank and Gaza Strip,
in view of the sharp increase in
Palestinian fatalities since
they were introduced, Davar
reported.
Harish informed the defense
establishment of his inten-
tions, the Israeli newspaper
said.
Plastic bullets were
approved to prevent the loss of
life. The orders governing
their use were issued to Israel
Defense Force officers and
ranks only after they were
examined and approved by
Harish, Davar recalled.
During last July, before the
bullets were introduced, seven
people were wounded in the
Gaza Strip. In August, when
their use began, seven were
killed and 90 wounded in the
region.
AMERICAN JEWISH AND ISRAELI LEADERS MEET at a dinner in Jerusalem, From
left are: Israeli Finance Minister Shimon Peres; Morris Abram, outgoing president of the
Conference of Presidents of Major American Jewish Organizations; Israeli Prime Minister
Yitzhak Shamir; and the conference's new president, Seymour Reich. (AP/Wide World
Photo)
Supreme Court
First Menorah/Creche Case
By WILLIAM SAPHIRE
NEW YORK (JTA) Amer-
ican Jewish organizations are
getting involved on both sides
of the first case to come before
the U.S. Supreme Court that
examines the display of a Jew-
ish religious symbol on public
property.
The high court will probably
hear oral arguments in the
case during the spring session,
according to Samuel Rabinove,
legal director of the American
Jewish Committee.
Arguments in the case
almost certainly will be heard
before the court recesses for
the summer, he told the Jew-
ish Telegraphic Agency.
The plaintiffs in the original
case, the American Civil Liber-
ties Union and the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith, are asking the Supreme
Court to affirm a U.S. Court of
Appeals decision barring pub-
lic displays of a Christmas
nativity scene and a Chanukah
menorah on government prop-
erty in Pittsburgh during the
holiday season.
\\nd-of-the-court briefs in
suppOi t of the plaintiffs have
been filed jointly by the Ameri-
can Jewish Committee and the
National Council of Churches,
as well as by the American
Jewish Congress on behalf of
the National Jewish Commun-
ity Relations Advisory Council
and itself.
The Supreme Court in
recent years has dealt with
complaints against the display
of a nativity scene or creche on
public property, but never a
menorah or other Jewish reli-
gious symbol.
The menorah in question
belongs to the Chabad-Luba-
vitch organization, a Hasidic
movement. The creche is the
property of the Holy Name
Society, a Roman Catholic
organization. Both are seeking
to overturn the lower court
ruling.
Nathan Lewin, a Washing-
ton attorney, is representing
Chabad. Lewin is a vice presi-
dent of the National Jewish
Commission on Law and Pub-
lie Affairs, widely known as
COLPA.
COLPA informed JTA it,
too, has filed a friend-of-the-
court brief on behalf of several
national Orthodox Jewish
organizations in support of the
Continued on Page 10


Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, January 13, 1989
Crash Victim Arranged
War Criminal Deportations
By SUSAN BIRNBAUM
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Among the victims of the Pan
Am Flight 103 disaster was an
assistant deputy director of
the Justice Department's
Office of Special Investiga-
tions, who had just concluded
talks with Austria on the sub-
ject of deporting Nazi war
criminals from the United
States to Austria.
Michael Bernstein, 36, was
responsible in OSI for super-
vising the investigation and
litigation of hundreds of cases
of suspected Nazi war crimi-
nals living in the United
States.
A fruit of Bernstein's negoti-
ations with the Austrians will
be the deportation to that
country of Josef Eckert, an
accused Nazi war criminal who
was apprehended in Los
Angeles a year ago.
Bernstein died exactly one
year to the day that OSI filed
the case against Eckert, 74, a
native of Austria-Hungary
who is accused of having par-
ticipated, as an SS member, in
war crimes at Auschwitz and
two of its subcamps, Gleiwitz
and Kattowitz, between 1943
and 1944.
Eckert, who is now living in
Los Angeles, will be deported
to Austria within the next sev-
eral months, according to Eli
Rosenbaum, deputy director of
the OSI.
Bernstein died carrying in
his hand papers signed by the
Austrians and the Americans
agreeing to Eckert's deporta-
tion.
Efforts Underway To Save
Ancient Cairo Cemetery
NEW YORK (JTA) The
National Council of Young
Israel has intervened to save
what remains of the ancient
al-Basatin Jewish cemetery in
Cairo.
The Egyptian authorities,
planning a highway and hous-
ing project over part of the
1,020-year-old burial ground,
asked the local Jewish com-
munity to relinquish 5,000
square feet.
Four hundred graves would
be destroyed, the remains
exhumed and transferred to
other sites.
The cemetery, dating from
969 C.E., is the burial place of
many distinguished rabbis and
scholars. The cemetery was
largely destroyed following
the Six-Day War.
"Judaism has flourished in
Egypt for thousands of years.
We cannot allow that record to
be physically erased," said Dr.
Harold Jacobs, president of
Young Israel.
Reps. Stephen Solarz (D-
N.Y.) and Gary Ackerman (D-
N.Y.) have raised the issue in
letters to the Egyptian ambas-
sador to the United States, El
Sayed Abdel El Reedy.
Young Israel is asking other
Americans to write to the
envoy at the Egyptian
Embassy, 2310 Decatur Place
N.W., Washington, D.C.
20008.
Soviet Praise For Israel
Fortells Improved Ties
By HOWARD ROSENBERG
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
The Soviet Ambassador to
Washington hailed recent
Soviet-Israeli cooperation and
said he foresees an improve-
ment in relations between
Moscow and world Jewry.
Ambassador Yuri Dubinin
made the remarks at a Soviet
Embassy ceremony in which
officials of the American Jew-
ish World Service presented
him a check for $50,000 to help
relief efforts in earthquake-
ravaged Soviet Armenia.
The Boston-based group also
gave $30,000 to the Armenian
primate, Archbishop Torkom
Manoogian, which is ear-
marked for helping Armenia's
estimated 40,000 to 50,000
: amputees, many below the age
iof 18.
. Dubinin said he was "deeply
I moved" by the gift. He also
said the Soviet people are
appreciative of the aid the
Israeli government has pro-
vided in efforts to rescue vic-
tims of the disaster.
The ambassador praised
"cooperation between the
Soviet Union and Israel" over
the recent hijacking of an Aer-
oflot airliner, which landed
safely at Israel's Ben-Gurion
Airport.
Asked if the group's gift
contribution helped improve
ties between Jews and the
Soviet Union, Dubinin
responded: "Of course, of
course. And this is one of the
manifestations of one of the
expressions."
He said that "much more
deep, much more important"
than the money AJWS pro-
vided was the Jewish commun-
ity's "expression of human
deeds."
Plan European Tour For Teens
For the second year, the B'nai B'rith Youth Organization
(BBYO) will run its Capital Cities Tour of Europe for
teenagers, 15 years and older.
The three week trip will begin in Washington, D.C. on
June 29 for sightseeing before winging off to western
Europe and the cities of Amsterdam, Antwerp, Brussels,
London and Paris.
For information: BBYO Capital Cities Tour, 1640 Rhode
Island Ave., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20036.
Reunion of NYC Alliance
New York City's Educa-
tional Alliance alumni will hold
a reunion Sunday, Jan. 15, 2-5
p.m., at the Soref Jewish Com-
munity Center in Plantation.
Guest speaker Robert Melt-
zer, executive director of the
Alliance, will discuss the pre-
sent and future of the second
oldest Settlement House in the
U.S.
The alumni association will
be represented by Si Dublirer,
a member of its presidium. For
information: (305) 456-3510.
Synagogue
News
Trip to Key Largo
Bnai Zion southeast region is
planning a day trip to Key
Largo Sunday, Jan. 29, 8:30
a.m.-7 p.m.
The $30 fee covers the round
trip on an air-conditioned and
lavatory-equipped motor
coach, the visit to John Penne-
kamp State Park Wild Life
Preservation, a barbecue lunch
and a trip on a glass bottom
boat to a coral reef.
Information: 456-1999.
Kids' Program At Library
"Motion Potion," a free pro-
gram of creative drama, stor-
ies and activities with Fyllis
Nadler, will be presented for
children, ages 3-7, Saturday,
Jan. 21, 2 p.m., at the West
Regional Library in Planta-
tion.
For information: 474-5880.
AJCongress Defends
Sunday Worshipper
The American Jewish Congress has filed an amicus
curiae (friend of the court) brief asking the U.S. Supreme
Court to reverse the State of Illinois' denial of unemploy-
ment benefits to a man whose personal Christian faith
precludes him from working Sundays. In the case of Frazee
v. the Dept. of Employment Security, the Illinois Appeals
Court had ruled that, since William Frazee could not prove
that his refusal to work Sunday could be found in the
"tenets or dogma of an established religious sect," he was
not entitled to protection under the First Amendment.
Such strict observance of the Sunday Sabbath,
the Appeals Court said, is not a precept shared by
most Christians in today's increasingly secular world.
AJCongress' brief expresses concern that people who
cannot pinpoint the precise sources of their faith, whose
beliefs are not shared by other worshippers, or whose
views are considered extreme or outdated can be denied
religious freedom.
TEMPLE KOL AMI
On Friday evening, January
13, services will begin at 815
^m. under the leadershin\t
ibbi Sheldon J. Harr and
Cantor Seymour Schwartz-
man. At that time, Jan Gtr
chick, daughter of Shiela Ger
chick and the late Barry Ger
chick, will be called to the
To rah in honor of her Btt
Mitzvah.
On Saturday morning, Jan
14, services will begin at 10:30
a.m. Jared Green, son of Jay
and Linda Green, will be called
to the Torah in honor of his
Bar Mitzvah.
A music festival, featuring
Cantor Seymour Schwartzman
and Joni Shira Schwartzman,
will be held Sunday, Jan. 15*
7:30 p.m. The program
includes Broadway, opera,
cantonal, Yiddish and Israeli
selections. For information
472-1988.
Temple Kol Ami is located at
8200 Peters Road, Plantation.
CONGREGATION BETH
SHOLOM
An art auction will be held at
the synagogue on Sunday, Jan.
15, 2 p.m. Admission is free.
The Sisterhood will hold its
annual installation of officers
Tuesday, Jan. 17, 12:30 p.m.
Myrna Kagan, president of the
Florida Branch of the Womens
League for Conservative
Judaism, will be the installing
officer.
Beth Sholom is located at
1447 Lyons Road, Coconut
Creek.
TOVAH FELDSHUH: ON UNIQUENESS
One of the great
motivating forces in my life
is uniqueness. As an actress
uniqueness is important,
because acting is more than
just role-playing It
requires being able to
expose a quality that is
uniquely you.
In other areas of my life,
I look for uniqueness. Even
in my decaffeinated coffee.
Sanka* Brand Decaffeinated
Coffee is unique, because
it's the only leading.
national brand that is
naturally decaffeinated with
pure mountain water and
nature's own sparkling
effervescence. So, not only
is Sanka* smooth-tasting.
0KOSHEK
but it addresses my concerns
about caffeine and food that
is naturally processed.
All of us have the
potential to be unique. All
we need is to experience that
part of us that's different
and enjoyable. For me, it
can be a challenging role in
a new play, or something as
simple as relaxing with a cup
of Sanka* Uniqueness...
there are so
many ways to
enjoy h!


Senator Weinstein, Dr. Weinstein
Honored by City Of Hope
Friday, January 13, 1989/Th'e Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 3
Programs At Margate Library
State Senator Peter M.
Weinstein and his wife, Dr.
Barbara Weinstein, are the
1989 recipients of City of
Hope's highest honor, the
"Spirit of Life" award, which
will be presented by the
Michael Garment Ramblewood
East Auxiliary at a banquet
Saturday, Jan. 14, at the
Embassy Suites Hotel, Ft.
Lauderdale.
Dr. Weinstein is executive
director of Child Care Connec-
tion of Broward County and is
also a consultant for Baby Talk
Magazine and with the Brow-
ard County Schools and the
Project Independence Task
Force.
She is president-elect of the
Florida Child Care Providers
Forum, past president of the
Brandeis University Women's
Organization, past secretary
of Temple Beth Orr Executive
Board, and has been involved
with the Broward County
Screening Committee and the
County Democratic Executive
Committee.
State Senator Weinstein
was first elected in 1982 from
District 29, which includes
much of northern and western
Broward County, and re-
elected twice more, without
opposition, in 1984 and 1988.
Partner in a civil and crimi-
nal litigation firm, he has been
an assistant state attorney in
Broward County and assistant
district attorney in Queens
County, New York, where he
served as chief of the Supreme
Court Trial Bureau.
Weinstein serves as vice
chair of the Senate Judiciary-
Criminal committee and as a
member of the Finance, Taxa-
tion and Claims committees.
He also serves on the Sentenc-
ing Guidelines Commission,
the Crime Prevention and Law
Enforcement Study Commis-
sion, the Chapter II Educa-
tional Advisory Commission
and the Guardianship Law
Study Commission.
A member of the Broward
County Democratic Executive
Committee, Senator Wein-
stein previously served as
Eresident of the Coral Springs
emocratic Club and on the
Coral Springs Planning and
Several special programs are
scheduled at the Margate
Catharine Young Branch of
the Broward County Library
System.
Dr. Albert Green will speak
on "Pain! Is Your Doctor Help-
ing or Hurting You?" Thurs-
day, Jan. 19, 7 p.m.
"Motion Potion," a program
State Senator Peter and Dr.
Barbara Weinstein
Zoning Board and the Brow-
ard County Charter Review
Commission. A U.S. Army vet-
eran and recipient of the Army
Commendation Medal, he is a
member of the Jewish War
Veterans and the Reserve Offi-
cers Association of the U.S.
Proceeds from the banquet
will benefit City of Hope by
establishing the State Senator
Peter M. Weinstein and Dr.
Barbara Weinstein Research
Fellowship.
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Nutrition Lecture
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Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, January 13, 1989
Viewpoint
Tightening Resolve;
Changing Resolve
While the new Israeli government is
attempting to tighten its collective belt in a
move toward fiscal austerity, the Israeli peo-
ple seem to be loosening their resolve vis-a-vis
the Palestine Liberation Organization.
A new, and reportedly surprising, poll just
released suggests that the people of Israel are
moving forward faster than their administra-
tion toward dealing with the PLO.
A slight majority of 54 percent believes that
the State of Israel should negotiate with the
PLO as long as its chairman, Yasir Arafat,
abides by his renouncement of terrorism. Of
those, 21 percent strongly support the move
and 33 percent are in favor of doing so.
Whether or not the resumption of contact
between the United States and the PLO
affects the national Israeli attitude is immater-
ial.
What is worthy of note is that, after a year
of the intifada in the administered territories,
there is some movement toward approaching
new avenues of dialogue between the adver-
saries in the Middle East.
That the U.S. made the first bold move
and is still considered an honest broker can
be considered catalytic.
While not endorsing the PLO, Israelis are
acknowledging that practicality and neces-
sity both may be the mother of reinventing
the peace process.
Good news, bad news
Good is that international pressure on Israel
has lessened as a result of the renewed
identification of Palestinian terrorists with the
threats against world airlines and airports.
Although there is not definitive evidence that
Palestinian extremists destroyed an American
airliner, they are the principal suspects.
In addition, greatly tightened security provi-
sions for all western airlines call attention to
the ongoing linkage of Palestinians and terror-
ists.
Bad news of course is that hundreds are
dead and the costs of the belated security will
mount into the millions of dollars.
Of course, PLO leader Yasir Arafat is being
looked to for assistance in bringing to justice
the Palestinian factions which oppose both
Arafat and recognizing Israel and UN Resolu-
tions mandating the 1967 borders as the
highest possible goal of an Arab state in the
one-time Palestine Mandate.
Arafat knows that even if he knows which
Palestinian terrorists are involved in specific
acts, he cannot inform on them without sign-
ing his own death warrant.
jewishFloridian o
Of OREATEM FORT LAUOEftOALE
Diffusing Potential Conflict
After the annual church/state conflict of
every December fought on city hall lawns
across the country, there is a refreshing
approach to mixing religion and public schools
being advanced.
Scholars are suggesting that while the wall
of church/state separation cannot be breached,
further consideration of learning about reli-
gion could be appropriate to a school syllabus.
The Supreme Court, in fact, validated that
approach while rejecting prayer in public
school.
Perhaps, the new move afoot to put religion
in its proper cultural and historical perspec-
tive might well diffuse the particularistic
efforts of fundamentalists whose sole goal is to
put their version of God in the schoolhouse.
Fateful Ambiguity
By RABBI MARC H. TANENBAUM
The decision of the United
States government to legitim-
ize the Palestine Liberation
Organization through direct
dialogue is fraught with fateful
ambiguity.
It is either a crisis that could
become an opportunity for
peace, or it is an opportunity
that could explode into an even
greater crisis.
There should be no confusion
about Jewish attitudes. The
majority of American Jews, I
believe, trust President
Reagan and Secretary of State
George Shultz. They are true
friends of the Jewish people
and of Israel.
The real issue is that prac-
tically no one trusts Yasir
Arafat or the PLO. Arafat
spent weeks working on a joint
agreement with King Hussein
of Jordan, and then publicly
rejects their written under-
standing.
Arafat, in a circus of pub-
licity, announces that he
accepts America's conditions
for a dialogue, specifically re-
cognition of the State of Israel
and a rejection of terrorism.
At the very same time, the
radical Marxist PLO factions
of George Habash and Nayef
Hawatmeh tell the Arab press
they will never give up terror-
ism or accept Israel. So who
does Arafat really represent?
The critical issue, as I see it,
is how to discover true mod-
erate Palestinians who will
work unambiguously for peace
and not just engage in prop-
aganda warfare.
America and the world have
a great stake in being com-
pletely realistic and in not
being trapped in verbal decep-
tions and massive hype.
LBttOFS mi from our readers:
Grassroot Decisions
MAAAM^MAAAMMAMMMAAA^AAAAMMMMMWMMM
Fnd Shtt**
FREDSHOCHET
Editor and Publisher
SUZANNE SHOCHET
Executive Editor
JOAN C. TEQLAS
Director of Advertising
Published Bl-Weekly
Main Office & Plant: 120 N.E. 6th St., Miami. Fla. 33132 Phone 1-373^805 COLLECT
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SUBSCRIPTION RATE: 2 Year Minimum $7.50 (Local Area $3.95 Annual)
Friday, January 13,1989
Volume 18
EDITOR:
I, for one, have severe reser-
vations as to the long term
viability of the Middle East
peace which has apparently
been engineered by the major
powers and is being forced
upon the parties directly
involved in the conflict.
I feel it is no coincidence that
within the last year we have
had an end to the conflicts in
Nicaragua, Afghanistan,
Namibia, Angola, and Cambo-
dia which have been brought
about by agreements in which
the United States and the
Soviet Union have both played
a major part. If, in fact, the
Cold War is now winding
down, that the super powers
are seeking a resolution to
regional conflicts is part of
that process.
If a peace is forged on Israel
and the Palestinians which
7 SHEVAT 5749
Number 1
does not have wide ranging
grass root support among the
people who would be expected
to live among one another in
peace, than that peace will not
be long-lasting. Even if the
Soviets and the Americans are
not supplying new weapons
and support for aggressions on
both sides, that does not mean
that the historic hates and
fears will disappear overnight.
Much of the U.S. positioning is
meant to put pressure on
Israel which is a change in the
long-standing U.S. policy not
to interfere with the wishes of
a democratically elected sover-
eign government.
I don't think Israel, whose
entire existence and security
relies on strong and vigilant
defense of its national interest,
can afford to just depend on
the good faith of the PLO
leadership or, for that matter,
the Soviet leadership that is in
a politically tenuous position
and could be overthrown by
hard-liners within their own
regimes at any time.
I would suggest that the
U.S. and Israel wait to see if
the desire for the realistic com-
promises that must be made to
achieve a real peace will flow
down to the individual inhabit-
ants of the area who have to
live with one another every
day.
Our government should
allow Israel enough time to
wait and see how sincere the
PLO leadership really is and if
they really can speak for the
Palestinian people on the very
important issues that will have
to be decided for peace to
become a long-term reality for
Israel and her Arab neighbors
BARRY S. GOLDMEIER


Friday, January 13, 1989/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 5
Conference Seeks
Alternative Voice
By
ANDREW SILOW CARROLL
NEW YORK (JTA) When
1,500 Jewish progressives
gathered here for a three-day
conference, no votes were
taken and no leaders were
Nevertheless, the "Tikkun"
conference, sponsored by the
liberal, Oakland-based Jewish
magazine, took on the air of a
political convention.
Wild applause saluted stump
speeches by such stars of the
Jewish and political left as
Irving Howe, Abba Eban,
Letty Cottin Pogrebin and
Todd Gitlin.
Back-slapping delegates
boasted of party unity, while
others bemoaned irreconcila-
ble differences.
And special interest groups
jostled for attention on a
crowded agenda: students,
feminists, animal rights activ-
ists, gays and lesbians.
Most telling of all, there was
a "platform." Its first main
plank was contempt for what
speakers called the conservat-
ism of the organized American
Jewish community.
The second plank was a
belief that Israel's administra-
tion of the West Bank and
Gaza Strip, in the words of
Tikkun editor Michael Lerner,
"is irrational, destructive,
immoral and must be termi-
nated."
But this was no political con-
vention, and participants won-
dered again and again if the
energy of the conference could
be channeled into an organiza-
tion to rival establishment
voices, such as those within
the Conference of Presidents
of Major American Jewish
Organizations.
"I feel that the mainstream
Jewish organizations in the
United States and the main
thrust of the organized Jewish
community in Baton Rouge
don't represent my views,"
said Steven Weintraub, 37, a
professor of mathematics at
Louisiana State University.
Weintraub's complaint was
typical of that of many partici-
pants, and so was his prescrip-
tion. "It's necessary to find a
counterweight to the main-
stream, and I have hopes of a
movement," he said.
"We need Tikkun, as a way
of unifying all the splinter
groups left of center," said
Ruth, 46, of New York, who
asked that her last name not
be used. "The Israeli right has
lost touch with reality, and
they have not been opposed"
by American Jews.
Hopes for unity on the Jew-
ish left were discussed at a
plenary session. Letty Cottin
Pogrebin, founding editor of
Ms. magazine, quoted Eban
when she said, ,4We need a
conference of presidents of
minor Jewish organizations."
She described some of the
institutional initiatives that
were being discussed at the
conference. They included the
Committee for Judaism and
Social Justice, which Tikkun is
promoting as an alternative
vojce on Jewish public policy,
and J-PAC, a Jewish lobby to
counter the influence of the
American Israel Public Affairs
Committee.
Lerner spoke of organizing a
national campaign for "negoti-
"We need a conference of presidents of
minor Jewish organizations.
>>
ranks."
However, said Lerner, an
observant Jew who wears a
chest-length beard and a pie-
sized yarmulke, "This is not an
assemblage of self-hating Jews
or people alienated from
Judaism."
Basing their criticism of
Israeli policy on a "profound
insistence of our love for the
people of Israel," he said,
"many of us will no longer
accept organized Jewry's cri-
teria for how we have to talk
or what tone to take. We are
not the periphery."
ations now," to urge Israeli
leaders to sit down for talks
with the Palestine Liberation
Organization.
But other speakers coun-
seled prudence in forming a
new organization.
Henry Siegman, executive
director of the American Jew-
ish Congress, said he shared
many of the participants' criti-
cisms of the "status quo" in
Israel. But he wondered if the
formation of a new organiza-
tion was more than just a bid
for publicity.
David Gordis, former execu-
tive vice president of the
American Jewish Committee,
said there must be guidelines
followed in criticizing Israel.
"The tone of our criticism
cannot partake of Israel-bash-
ing," he said. "We have to
avoid seeming to agree with
those whose objectives are to
undermine Israel."
In a remark that drew hisses
and boos, Gordis warned par-
ticipants of being "branded as
illegitimate because of the fel-
lowship in which they find
themselves."
Gordis was hinting at the
kinds of criticism of the left,
including charges of anti-
Israel bias, that led many for-
mer Jewish liberals to run into
the arms of neo-conservatism.
Nan Fink, publisher of Tik-
kun, acknowledged those criti-
cisms earlier in the conference
when she said, "The left has
never fully faced the implica-
tions of the Holocaust, the
anti-Semitism in the Commun-
ist Party or the degree to
which it tolerates anti-
Semitism within its own
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Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, January 13, 1989
**#yww*w*#
Bar/Bat Mitzvahs
Lauderdale Children's Theatre
for the governor in Tallahas-
see.
Sharing in Andrea's special
celebration will be her brother,
Samuel; and her grandpar-
ents, Frances Walsh of Way-
cross, Georgia, and Leonard
and Anita Weissman of Sun-
rise, FL.
JAN GERCHICK
Jan Allyson Gerchick,
daughter of Shiela Gerchick of
Sunrise and the late Barry
Gerchick, will be called to the
Torah on the occasion of her
Bat Mitzvah on Friday, Jan.
13, at Temple Kol Ami of
Plantation.
Jan is a student at Bair
School.
Joining Jan in the celebra-
tion of her simcha will be her
grandparents, Claire and Nor-
man Abramowitz of Tamarac
and Ruth and Max Gerchick of
the Bronx; and her brother
Jeffrey.
JARED GREEN
Jared Michael Green, son of
Dr. and Mrs. Jay C. Green of
Plantation, will be called to the
Torah on the occasion of his
Bar Mitzvah Saturday, Jan.
14, at Temple Kol Ami of
Plantation.
Jared is a student at Semi-
nole Middle School.
Joining Jared in the celebra-
tion of his simcha will be his
brothers, Neil and Adam and
his grandparents, Dr. and Mrs.
A. Morton Karlan of Boca
Raton and Rae Green of Miami
Beach.
I
David Posnack Jewish Community Center
MELISSA MINTZ
Melissa Mintz, daughter of
Dr. and Mrs. Ken Mintz of
Plantation, will be called to the
Torah on the occasion of her
Bat Mitzvah at Temple Beth
Israel of Sunrise on Friday,
Jan. 27.
A student at Seminole Mid-
dle School, Melissa has
received scholastic honors as
well as awards for softball and
cheerleading.
Sharing in Melissa's celebra-
tion will be her grandparents,
Florence and Leon Fried of
Livingston, NJ, Abe and Mur-
iel Mintz of Pompano, FL, and
her sister Becki.
CLASSES
The David Posnack Jewish
Community Center is offering
new classes in:
Beginning Hebrew starts
Jan. 16, 8:30 p.m.
Stress Management Self
Hypnosis instructor: Sharon
Busha, starts Jan. 16, six Mon-
days, 8-9 p.m.
Yiddish evening classes
start Tuesday, Jan. 17, 7-8:30
p.m.; morning classes Friday,
Jan. 20, 10:30 a.m.-noon.
Positive Pregnancy Fitness
instructor: Lori
Green, R.N., BSN; starts Wed-
nesday, Jan. 18, 7:30-9:30 p.m.
Stop Smoking Through Hyp-
nosis, six sessions start Mon-
day, Jan. 16, 7:30-8:30 p.m.,
instructor: Sharon Busha, CH.
Spanish instructor: Nancy
Strong; starts Thursday, Jan.
19, 7-8:30 p.m.
Beginning Bridge instruc-
tor: Joan Lavin; morning
classes begin Wednesday, Jan.
18, 9:30-11:30 a.m.; evening
classes, Tuesday, Jan. 17, 7-9
p.m.
Ceramics instructor:
Frances Wool, starts Thurs-
day, Jan. 19, 9:30-noon.
For information about
classes, call Frieda Calbes,
434-0499.
PROGRAMS FOR SINGLES
The Single Parent Support
Group meets at the JCC once a
month to discuss different
topics. Babysitting available
($1 per child/per hour). Infor-
mation: Frieda Caldes, 434-
0499.
Rap groups for single adults
of all ages start Thursday, Jan.
19, 7:30-9 p.m.
Caring and Sharing: per-
sonal growth group focusing
on dealing effectively with
life's transistions, loneliness
and intimacy; facilitator: Janet
Morgentaler, M.S.W., starts
Tuesday, Jan. 17, 7:30-9 p.m.
CURRENT EVENTS
News and Views program:
"Israel and the Law of Return:
What does it mean to the
American Jew?" with Dr.
Leon Weissberg, director,
Office of Jewish Education of
the Jewish Federation of
South Broward. Tuesday, Jan.
17, 7:30 p.m.; information:
Frieda, 434-0499.
WEIGHT CONTROL
WORKSHOP
Basics of Developing Proper
Eating Habits to lose weight
and keep it off; limited to ten
people; facilitator Victor Lev-
itt, M.S.W., six Mondays,
starting Jan. 23, 7:30 p.m.-
8:30 p.m. For information:
Frieda, 434-0499.
PARENTING ISSUES
A Workshop on Parenting
Issues instructor: Janet
Morgentaler, M.S.W. to
explore issues and answers;
Jan. 18 and 25, Feb. 1 and 8.
For details: Frieda at 434-
0499.
SENIOR PROGRAMS
Senior Stretch and Flex,
ongoing exercise program for
55 and over; Monday, Wednes-
day and Friday, 9:15-
10:15 a.m. in the gym. Mem-
bers: free; Non-Members: $15
per week.
YOUTH PROGRAMS
Teen Connection (for grades
6, 7 and 8) members are BBYO
members and receive a specisd
membership pin and card: Ice
Skating, Saturday, Jan. 14
6:45-10:30 p.m.; Lunch and
Kickball Game at the "J" -
Sunday, Jan. 29, 1-3 p.m.
After School Program, for
grades K-8, a bus will pick up
children from local schools.
Vacation Day Programs,
grades K-6, camp-like day
when public schools are on
vacation, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. with
free extended day care availa-
ble.
For youth activities' infor-
mation: Cindy Dale Grossman,
434-099.
The David Posnack Jewish
Community Center is located
at 5850 S. Pine Island Road,
Davie. For information: 434-
0499.
Book Discussion
Gabriel Garcia Marquez's
book "Love in the Time of
Cholera" will be discussed for
adults by Janice A. Feintuch at
the West Regional Library in
Plantation Wednesday, Jan.
18, 1:30 p.m.
DANNY KING
Danny King, son of Sheldon
and Genia King of Plantation,
will be called to the Torah on
the occasion of his Bar Mitzvah
on Saturday, Jan. 21, at Tem-
ple Beth Israel of Sunrise.
A student at Nova Middle
School, Danny has been on the
school's honor roll and is the
recipient of the Presidential
Academic Award. He is also a
patrol member. Danny enjoys
sports, playing the clarinet
and collecting baseball cards.
Joining Danny in celebrating
his simcha will be his grand-
parents, Alexander Gluskiul of
Israel, and Frances King; and
a sister, Ronit Lisa.
FIBER CEREALS.
For People With a Healthy Interest In Eating Well.
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ANDREA WEISSMAN
Andrea Robin Weissman,
daughter of Janet and Mark
Weissman of Coral Springs,
will be called to the Torah on
the occasion of her Bat Mitz-
vah Saturday, Jan. 14, at Tem-
ple Beth Israel of Sunrise. A
student at Nova Middle
School, Andrea has been a
participant in the Duke Univ-
ersity Talent Search and was
invited to perform with the Ft.
Most nutritionists recommend a diet
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1
No Other Sessions Set:
U.S. Acknowledges
PLO Meeting
By HOWARD ROSENBERG
WASHINGTON (JTA) The United States said that its
meeting with the Palestine Liberation Organization last week-
end was initiated by a low-level PLO official who "asked to come
and introduce himself."
"There are no other meetings planned at this time," State
Department spokesman Charles Redman said. Redman had said
before the initial U.S. contact with the PLO on Dec. 16 that no
other meetings were likely before President-elect George Bush's
inauguration on Jan. 20.
A State Department source dismissed reports from Madrid
that a PLO official was to meet with the United States this week.
"That's wrong," the source said.
U.S. Ambassador to Tunisia Robert Pelletreau, the sole U.S.
official authorized to speak with the PLO, did meet for 45
minutes with Hakam Balaoui, the PLO's representative in
Tunis, Redman said.
Pelletreau used the occasion to say the United States "would
welcome any information the PLO is able to develop" on the
terrorist downing of Pan American World Airways Flight 103 on
Dec. 21, Redman said.
Pelletreau told Balaoui that finding the perpetrators of the
bombing is a "high priority for the United States," he added.
Redman refused to discuss other details of the meeting, except
to say the agenda was much smaller than that at the Dec. 16
meeting. Redman added that he will not divulge any information
provided by the PLO to the United States, citing the need for
investigators to work on a "confidential basis."
Friday, January 13, 1989/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 7
Sanz
Medical Center
Located one block from
the Mediterranean Ocean,
the Sanz Medical Center is
the only hospital in the
Israeli city of Netanya.
Within its five block com-
plex is the Jaques Tache
Out-Patient Clincs, which
treated 32,381 out-
patients during the last 12
months.
Tache's 18 clinics
include a wide diversity of
specialities, ranging from
obstetrics to plastic sur-
gery and from ophthalmo-
logy to pulmonary care.
One of its busiest units is
the Hasenfeld/Kupferman
pediatric clinic which, in
cooperation with area
schools, uses state-of-the-
art methods and technol-
ogy to maintain the health
of the city's tens of thou-
sands of children.
The Freundlich Urology
clinic is the only facility of
its kind in Israel, sensitive
not only to the medical
needs of patients but to
their specific halachic
needs.
The American Friends
of Sanz Medical Center
will celebrate the hospi-
tal's 13th anniversary with
a gala dinner March 26 at
the New York Hilton.
I
OUTLAWED PLO SYMBOLS. The "Day of Escalation"
was marked in the West Bank by such symbols as a map of
Palestine spray painted on a house in Bethlehem and the
flying of outlawed Palestinian flags. "The Day of Escala-
tion" is the anniversary of the PLO's first attack in Israel
U years ago. (APIWide World Photo)
Frank House To
Undergo
Renovation
By HENRIETTA BOAS
AMSTERDAM (JTA) The
Anne Frank House will unde-
rgo extensive reconstruction
due to the ever-increasing
number of visitors. The house
has become the second-largest
tourist attraction in Amster-
dam, exceeded in popularity
only by the Rijk Museum with
its famous collection of
Rembrandts.
Amsterdam's foundation for
the protection of monuments
is concerned that the recon-
struction may damage the
original characteristic of the
house.
A house at the back of the
Anne Frank House at 263
Prinsengracht, now separated
from it by a garden, will be
connected with it and made
accessible through a covered
passage through the garden.
Because of the cramped situ-
ation, tourists now endure
long waits outside the house
before they can be admitted.
There were 534,000 visitors
to the Anne Frank House in
1987, and 560,000 are
expected by the end of 1988.
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Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, January 13, 1989
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
tion must pump $600 million
per annum into the adminis-
tered territories to keep the
intifada going, Haaretz
reported, citing a recently pub-
lished PLO document.
But another report in the
newspaper said Israeli bankers
claim that continuation of the
Palestinian uprising does not
require the transfer of foreign
money, and they are not at all
certain the PLO is making
such transfers.
A separate article in Haaretz
said that until the uprising
began a year ago in the West
Bank and Gaza Strip, a sub-
Foreign Funds Support Intifada
stantial portion of the money
earmarked for public works in
the territories was being used
almost openly by the PLO to
acquire political power.
The paper said thai before
the intifada, funds for munici-
palities and various public
institutions came from several
sources.
These included the Israeli
civil administration budget,
some $80 million a year in
allocations from Jordan, some
$75 million in annual aid from
the United Nations Relief and
Works Agency, and economic
assistance from Arab coun-
tries, the United States and
other foreign sources.
Most of that money went to
the leadership and members of
organizations that identify
with the PLO or other Pales-
tinian nationalist groups,
Haaretz said.
Between 1979 and 1983,
$7.5 million was paid to com-
Sensate Palestinians whose
omes were demolished.
Another $7.5 million was
spent on "national scholar-
ships." Some $73 million went
for education in the territories
and $67 million for housing.
Lesser sums were spent to
subsidize workers organi-
zations, community groups,
student associations, women's
In New York City, Charlotte Jacobson, Jewish National Fund
treasurer, and Dr. Samuel I. Cohen, right, JNF executive vice
president, present a $1 million check to world chairman Moshe
Rivlin, capping off his tuHMoeek tour of the U.S. in which he
raised funds to help JNF combat recent attacks of arson on
Israeli forests. Since April, nearly U0,000 acres of forests and
pasturelands have been destroyed. The $1 million contribution
wiU help plant ten new trees for every one destroyed by terrorists.
JNF To Plant Three Million Trees
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
Jewish National Fund will
plant three million trees this
year, largely to replace trees
destroyed by forest fires that
ravaged the countryside last
summer, JNF Chairman
Moshe Rivlin announced.
Much of the destruction was
caused by arson from the inti-
fada.
The B'nai B'rlth Youth Organization, which serves
nearly 700 Jewish teenage boys and girls in 20 chap-
ters in southeast Florida, is seeking adult volunteer
advisors. Volunteers should be at least 21 years old.
Information: 581-0218.______________________
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563-6114
groups, religious organiza-
tions, youth movements and
professional organizations,
including Arab journalists in
East Jerusalem, the report
said.
Several months after the
outbreak of the intifada, the
Defense Ministry clamped
down on the entry of funds
into the territories.
The civil administration
reduced from 2,000 to 200 Jor-
danian dinars the amount of
cash a resident of the territor-
ies could bring in over the
Jordan River bridges without
providing explanation.
Someone carrying up to 500
Jordanian dinars (approxi-
Yeshiva U. to
Honor Trio
Fort Lauderdale attorneys
Alan S. Becker, Gary A.
Poliakoff and Jeffrey E.
Streitfeld will be honored at a
testimonial dinner Sunday,
Jan. 8, 6 p.m. at the Marriott
Cypress Creek Hotel, Fort
Lauderdale.
The dinner will establish a
scholarship fund at Yeshiva
University s Benjamin N. Car-
dozo School of Law in honor of
the three attorneys, who will
be presented with the school's
Distinguished Community
Service Award.
mately $1,000) had no trouble,
but those with larger amounts
had a hard time re-entering
the territories, Haaretz said.
The
beauty
unfolds
At Hamilton House, we know that
beauty is "more than skin deep"...
that it must continually unfold in a
community or a relationship, revealing
more and more of its qualities the
closer you inspect it.. the longer you
know it.
So. we have created a rental senior
living communityHamilton House in
Plantationto set new standards for
excellence and exceed the most
demanding expectations.
Each spacious floorplan includes its
own washer and dryer, separate dressing
areas in each master bedroom, and
walk-in closets. All plans have lovely
views and a screened balcony or patio.
Some also feature bay windows.
Each private residence is tied into
the 2 4-hour medical emergency
network, and has around-the-clock
security. Should the need arise,
assisted living is also available.
Every resident enjoys meals
prepared by our nationally recognized,
award-winning chef served in the
gracious setting of the Hamilton House
dining room.
At Hamilton House, you also receive a
written guarantee that your rent will
never increase more than one-half of the Consumer Price Index
each year.
If you're interested in a full-service senior living community that
surrounds you with comfort, security and caring friends, please
come and see for yourself how the beauty unfolds at Hamilton House.
Our Information Center at 8500 west Sunrise Boulevard in
Plantation, is open Mon.-Fri. 9-5: Sat.-Sun.l -5. Evenings by
appointment. Visit us today!
A New Standard for Senior Living
QMmilton^RmC'
8500 West Sunrise Boulevard, Plantation, Florida 33322 (305) 476-8500


Friday, January 13, 1989/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 9
Jaffe to Teach
At Barry University
Dr. Samuel Z. Jaffe, spiri-
tual leader of Temple Beth El
in Hollywood, will teach a
course in Judaic Studies, dur-
ing the spring session at Barry
University. The class is one of
167 across the U.S. and Can-
ada being underwritten by the
Jewish Chautauqua Society
this semester.
Jaffe, the author of "Reform
Judaism Today" and other
books on Judaism has served
as president of the Southeast
Association of the Central
Conference of American Rab-
bis, the Rabbinical Association
of Greater Miami, and the
South Broward Board of Rab-
bis. Founded in 1893, JCS is
the educational arm of the
National Federation of Temple
Brotherhoods, an affiliate of
Rabbi Samuel Jaffe
the Union of American
Hebrew Congregations.
Lebanon Likely Site
Of Further Terrorism
TEL AVIV (JTA) Reliable
military sources in Beirut have
announced that an escalation
in Palestinian and pro-Iranian
terrorist activity against Israel
is expected in Lebanon within
the next two months, Maariv
reported.
The Israeli newspaper was
quoting Radio Monte Carlo, a
station in Monaco owned by
Arabs with excellent connec-
tions throughout the Arab
world.
The report said several ter-
rorist factions presently based
in Tyre and Sidon, on the
southern Lebanese coast, and
in the Bekaa valley, in eastern
Lebanon, are getting assis-
tance from Syria and Iran to
mount attacks on Israel.
According to Radio Monte
Carlo, the purpose of the esca-
lation is to hurt the Palestine
Liberation Organization
because of Yasir Arafat's
renunciation of terrorism and
Argentina
Anti-Semitism
Law Invoked
Against Daily
A recently passed anti-dis-
crimination law in Argentina
has been invoked for the first
time in connection with an
advertisement in the daily La
Nation eulogizing Nazi propo-
ganda minister Josef Goebbels
on what would have been his
91st birthday.
The law, which carries
prison sentences for anybody
who promotes religious or eth-
nic discrimination in any form,
has limited provisions and,
according to the B'nai B'rith
Anti-Defamation League's
Latin American report, is no
"panacea" for anti-Semitism.
Ultra right wing groups
continued to plague the coun-
try with such anti-Semitic
activities as an arson attempt
on the Golda Meir kinder-
garten, a bomb explosion in
front of a Buenos Aires cur-
rency exchange and tourist
bureau, and anti-Semitic flyers
and graffiti.
Frt-r Federal Consumer
Information ( .i(jI<>k
IJept l)F. I'unhlo. Colorado 81009
recognition of Israel in Geneva
last month.
Leonard H. Sherman of
Chicago has been elected
national president of the Amer-
ican Society for Technion-
Israel Institute of Technology.
An honorary fellow of Tech-
nion and a member of the uni-
versity's international board
of governors, Sherman was
previously a national presi-
dent of the society and presi-
dent of its Chicago Chapter.
During Israel's War of inde-
pendence, he wore the uniform
of the Palmach and was_
wounded in Jerusalem.
Broward's first KOSHER retirement center.
I MAN QJ x> J
1 Where Caring Comet Naturally f
' Tastefully Decorated
1 Nursing Supervision 24 hrs.
Physicians on call 24 hrs.
13 meals dally and snacks
Daily activities, arts & crafts
Licensed A.C.L.F.
Transportation provided
Swimming Pool & Jacuzzi
Beauty Shop
Religious services daily
Easily accessible
RETIREMENT LIVING THE WAY YOU
WOULD LIKE IT TO BE
WE WELCOME INQUIRIES PLEASE CALL 961 -8111
3535 S.W. 52nd Ave. Pembroke Park, Florida 33023
Off Hallandale Beach Blvd.
TriE Court At Palm-Aire
"The Court at
PalmAire doesn't
just have Lifecare.
It's got style."
Lillian T. Alpert
"I was looking for a Lifecare community
because I wanted peace of mind. Knowing extra care is
there if I need it. But I'm used to a certain standard of
living, too. And, frankly, I was disappointed until I saw
The Court at Palm-Aire.
"It's in Palm-Aire, one of Florida's premier
communities, with its world-class spa, golf courses, and
ocean beach club. Then there's The Court itself. Spacious,
elegant public areas. Roomy, attrac-
tive apartments. Delicious meals in
a contemporary dining room. A full
calendar of recreational and social
activities. Not to mention the com-
pany of interesting people like
myself. Plus a new, fully-licensed, Medicare-approved
Healthcare Center. Now I've got both peace or mind
and the lifestyle I always wanted."
For more information on
Tbe Court at Palm Aire, fill
fj out and mail coupon to
address below or call us
today at 305-975-8900.
2701S. Course Drive
Pompom Beacb. FL 55069
Office Hours: Weekdays. 9-5,
Weekends: 11-4
'"" Another Kaplan Organization
***? Lifecare Community
Palm Court Joint Venture is ouver and
operator of Tbe Court at Palm Aire
and assumes all financial and con
tractual responsibility Palm Court
pint Venture is affiliated uitb Tbe
Kaplan Organization 881*8 PKAD 111788
Name(s)
Address m
| City, m .. .. State, Zip
Phone
JF


Page 10 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, January 13, 1989
Ethiopian Jewry Campaign
First Menorah/Creche Case
A campaign to heighten
awareness of the plight of
Ethiopian Jewry has been ini-
tiated by B'nai B'rith Hillel
Foundations, in cooperation
with the World Union of Jew-
ish Students (WUJS) and the
American Association for
Ethiopian Jews (AAEJ).
Engraved silver and leather
bracelets, symbolizing the
struggle for reunification of
some 10-15,000 Ethiopian
Jews with their families, will
be sold with the proceeds bene-
fiting the campaign for rescue
and relief of Jews stranded
and waiting in Ethiopia.
Bracelet purchasers will also
receive the name of a young
Ethiopian Jew living in Israel,
generally without their fami-
lies, with whom they can corre-
spond.
Simon Schwartz, national president of MERCAZ, the
Zionist organization of the Conservative movement, was
elected president of the American Zionist Federation along
with the rest of the executive slate, at the AZF's biennial
convention in Baltimore. Immediate past treasurer of the
AZF, Schwartz, was president of United Synagogue of
America 1977-1981.
Bloomfield To Head Holocaust Council
Sara J. Bloomfield, deputy director for operations of the
U.S. Holocaust Memorial Council since 1986, has been
appointed the council's acting executive director. More
than $55 million of a $147 million goal has been raised and
construction of the museum will begin shortly.
Discover Five Star
extraordinary
Value in Israel
Continued from Page 1
Chabad position.
The ADL, co-counsel with
the ACLU in the case of
ACLU v. County of Allegheny
(Pa.), represents Malik Tuna-
dor, a Moslem. He testified
that as an Allegheny County
taxpayer, he felt excluded by
the erection of a menorah on
the steps of the Pittsburgh
City-County Building and the
annual placement of a creche
in the Allegheny County
Courthouse.
The U.S. Court of Appeals
for the Third Circuit in Phila-
delphia ruled last March 15
that the establishment clause
of the U.S. Constitution's
First Amendment prohibits
the display of religious sym-
bols in or near buildings that
house government offices.
The Supreme Court agreed
four months ago to hear the
case.
Donald Mintz, chairman of
ADL's Civil Rights Commit-
tee, pointed out that "religious
symbols at these locations
communicate the message that
the represented faiths are
endorsed or approved by the
state." He said the message
violates the establishment
clause "because it diminishes
the political stature of those
who do not adhere to the rep-
resented religion."
Rabinove said the "constitu-
tional principle of separation
of religion and government
means the government should
not become involved with reli-
gions unless there is a religious
need that cannot otherwise be
met," such as chaplains for the
armed forces.
"There is no religious need
to place sacred symbols of any
faith in government build-
ings," he stressed.
But Rabinove recalled that
in two previous cases, the
Supreme Court decided
against plaintiffs and upheld
the display of a creche on
public property.
One, in 1984, involved a
creche in Pawtucket, R.I., that
was city property. The court
was influenced by the fact that
it was part of a larger Christ-
mas display that contained hol-
iday artifacts which carried no
religious message.
The other case, the display
of a creche on public park land
in Scarsdale, N.Y., was
decided in 1985 on freedom of
speech grounds.
In the present case, Chabad
argued that government has a
responsibility to counterbal-
ance "the overwhelming
Christian message delivered
by municipal displays that fea-
ture Christmas trees."
But the AJCongress brief
rejects this reasoning, saying
that the Christmas tree is a
secular rather than a religious
symbol and therefore not
bound by the strict rules
placed on religious arrays. The
brief also argues that by high-
lighting the symbols of the
Christian and Jewish faiths,
"other religious groups with-
out a December holiday would
be discriminated against."
$33
Per person in a double room.
$53 per single room.
Child in room free.
Price includes full
Israeli breakfast
15% service charge to be
. added.
Minimum of 7 nights or
more stay at either or
both hotels, valid until
February 28th 1989
* Rooms all beautifully
furnished.
* Color T.V. Video -
individual heating
controls.
* Both hotels have free
entrance to heated
indoor pools.
* In Jerusalem Free shuttle
to western waH.
Dont bs misled by hotel
dvsris with hidden
itras or required add orts.
Raad Km mmM print
Ramada hotalt art baat
valua In laraal
Contact your local
travel agent or
Ramada U.S A
TT 1 800-228-9898, or
201-587-1414
Sd' /('/ llOlll.-df
, Available at Pubiix Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only. Baked Fresh Daily
FRENCH
BREAD.........!S 85*
Available at All Pubiix Stores and
Fresh Danish Bakeries. Maple Walnut
Coffee Cake.......... 1 *1"
Available at All Pubiix Stores
and Fresh Danish Bakeries, Deep South
Carrot Cake.........Z?*2P
Available at Pubiix Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only, Chocolate Iced
Eclairs..................2 for $1
Available at All Pubiix Stores and
Fresh Danish Bakeries.
Zucchini Muffins 6., *189
Available at Pubiix Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only. Plain
Baking Powder
Biscuits..............6 ^ $129
Raisin Baking Powder Biscuits............. 6 for $1.39
wheie shopping is o pleosu [3
Pubiix
Prices effective Thurs.. January 12 thru Wed..
January 18. 1989. Quantity Rights reserved. Only
in Dade. Broward. Palm Beach. Martin. St. Lucie.
Indian River and Okeechobee Counties.


COMBEBVATTO
CONSERVATIVE SYNAGOGUE OP COCONUT CREEK (97l>466. Lvrm. P1.
daily 8 am.; Mo^y-Tlwrsday 7:30 p.m.; ifcbbath 8 p.m. SJAJhirwrmVTui
am., Jr. Cong. 10 amJtakU Avrakaai Kaaa>ak. Cu>r hT&SmT
^yn^CJC&f* "^- 'g-.^N "S? ** 8 P--: Saturday 9
*mlL.5 g^J.f'Sfo 8* y-,6 P m "* P"^ "**" Easarltaa, far.
ailMN mm. Untr Irriag GrNnui.
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL (742-4040), 7100 W. Oakland Park Blvd Sunris* *aan
Service Monday through Thursday 8 la. 5:3o7m~PridVyiIm sTrrT'gTm
Saturday 8:46 am.. 5 p.m. Sunday 8 am. Kak* Hawir. AA4*Wc'
Mitrkc A. Nets.
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL OP DEERFIELD BEACH (421-7080) 200 S Canto.
ShakUiA^amn ?m" 8atU"1*y fc46 ,Lm- nd awUeughting time. Caster
lyfitJZ}S? CENTI.E-,Tf!??JJ apA'ABAT T2EDEK (741-0296). 4099
fT SS? ""^ 8?>ri*' ""L8"''""' Sunday through Friday 8 am., 5p.m.;
Late Fnday service 8 p.m.; Saturday 9 am.. Candle lighting fan- bjjjg *-.**
Preater. Caater Barry Black. Caator EaterUu Jack Marchaat. ~~
TEMPLE SHOLOM (942^)410), 132 SE 11 Ave., Pomp.no Beach 33060. Serrice.
Monday through Friday 8:46 am., evenings: Monday through Thuraday at 5 p m
Friday evening at 8. Saturday and Sunday 9 am. Dr. N. Saal Goldaua Rabbi'
Caater Nisei. BerkowiU. ^^
CONGREGATION BETH HILLEL OP MARGATE (974-3090), 7640 Manrate
Blvd.. Margate 83063. Service*: Sunday through Friday 8 am., 6 p.m. UteFridav
service 8 p.m. Saturday 8:46 am.; 5 p.m. RabM A Treat Draaia. Cantor Jeel Cefcea.
HEBREW CONGREGATION OP LAUDERHILL (733-9660), 2048 NW 49th Ave
Lauderhill 33313. Sarvicea: Sunday through Friday 8:30 am.; 5:30 p.m.; Saturday
8:46 am. Rabbi Israel Halpera.
CONGBEGATION BETH TEPILAH (forsserly North Laaderdale Hebrew Caa>
rregation) (722-7607), 6435 W. Commercial Blvd., Tamarac FL 33319 Services-
Sunday to Friday at 7:46 am. Friday at 5 p.m.; Saturday at 8:45 a.m. Charles B
Fyler. President.
BNAI AVIV (389-4780) at Weston/Bonaventure. Services: Friday 8 pm at
Country Isles Elementary School, Weaton. Rabbi Leoa Flak.
ORTHODOX
CHABAD LUBAVITCH COMMUNITY SYNAGOGUE (344-4865) 9791 W Sample
Road. Coral Springs 33065. Services: Monday and Thuraday 6:46 am. Tues., Wed &
Friday 7 am. Saturday 9 am., Sunday 8 am. Rabbi Yoasie Deaburg.
Synagogue Directory
Friday, January 13, 1989/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 11
TEMPLE OHEL B71AI RAPHAEL (788-7684). 4861 W. Oakland Park Blvd..
Lauderdale Lakes 88813. Services: Sunday through Friday 7:30 am. (Pellium) A
8 am.. 6 p.m., Saturday 8:46 am., 6 p.m.
SYNAGOGUE OP INVERRARY CHABAD (748-1777). 4661 N. University Dr.,
Underbill 33861. Services: Sunday through Friday 6:46 am., 8 am., 6:16 p.m...
Saturday 9 am.. 5:80 p.m. Staar graaaw: Maa. Saadars folUwiag services;
WasMa, Tanaayi 8 >.-. RabM Area I l.sirwsa.
YOUNG I8RAEL OP DEEFIELD BEACH (421-1867). 1880 W. HUlsboro Blvd.,
Deerfield Beach 83441. Services: Sunday through Friday 8 am. and 6:30 p.m.
Saturday 8:46 am. and sundown: Joseph M. Reiner. Prseiaaat.
YOUNG ISRAEL OF BOLLYWOOD-FORT LAUDERDALE (966-7877), 8291
Stirling Road. Fort Lauderdale 33312. Services: Monday and Thursday 6:15 am. A
7:15 a.m. & Sundown. Tuesday, Wednesday A Friday 6:16 am. A 7:30 am. and
sundown; Saturday, 7:16 A 9 a.m., A sundown; Sunday 8 am. A sundown.
Rabbi Edward Davis.
CONGREGATION MIDGAL DAVID (726-8688), 8675 W. McNab Road. Tamarac
*! JS?***e***{Jyf *-m' mu**a 5 pjn.; Saturday 8:46 am. and 5:15 p.m.
- RECONSTRUCTIONIST
RAMAT SHALOM (472-8600). 11801 W. Broward Blvd., Plantation 33325
Services: Friday, 8:15 p.m.; Saturday, 10 am. Rabbi Elliot SkiAeMI. Caater Bella
***
Candlelighting
REFORM
TEMPLE BET TIKVAH (741-8088), 8890 W. Oakland Park Blvd., Ste. 302, Sunrise
33351. Services: Friday 8 p.m. Sealer RabM Morris Gordon. Assistant Rabbi
Steven Perry. Caator Roe Graaor.
TEMPLE BETH ORR (768-3232), 2151 Riverside Dr., Coral Springs 38065.
Services: Friday 8 p.m. except last Friday of month at 7:30 p.m.; Saturday 10 am.
RabM Mark W. Gr
TEMPLE B'NAI SHALOM OF DEERFIELD BEACH (426-2632). Services at
Menorah Chapels, 2305 W HUlsboro Blvd., Deerfield Beach 38441. Friday 8 p.m.
Rabbi Alton M. Winter. Caater Moshe Levinsoa.
TEMPLE EMANU-BL (731-2310), 3245 W. Oakland Park Blvd., Greater Ft.
Ijiuderdale 33311. Services: Friday 8:00 p.m.; Saturday, only on holidays or
celebration of Bar Bat Mitzvah. Rabbi Edward M. Maliae; ( aatorial Soloist Kim
Otahaaaky.
TEMPLE KOL AMI (472-1988), 8200 Peters Road, Plantation 33324. Services:
Friday 8:15 p.m., Saturday 10:30 am. RabM Sheldon J. Hair. Caater SeyaMur
Scbwarte
Jan.13
Jan 20
Jan 27
Feb3
5:32 p.m.
5:37 p.m.
5:43 p.m.
5:48 p.m.
LIBERAL JEWISH TEMPLE OF COCONUT CREEK (973-7494) Services:
Friday night services twice monthly at Calvary Presbyterian Church, 3950
Coconut Creek Parkway 33066. Rabbi Brace S. Warshal. Caater Jacob Barkis
TEMPLE BAT YAM (928-0410), 5161 NE 14th Terr., Ft. Lauderdale 33334.
Service: Friday 8 p.m. Saturday 10:30 am. Rabbi Lewis Littsaaa.
/tft///f/f/-SffssSS"w-w.'s
7ZZZZZZL
VltYxrssYyyyssssssssf.
Benediction upon Kindling
the Sabbath Lights
BORUCH ATTO AD-ONAI
ELO-HEINU MELECH H0-
OLOM ASHER KID-
SHONU BEMITZ-VOSOV
VETZI-VONU LE-HAD-
LIK NEYR SHEL
SHABBOS.
Blessed art Thou, 0 Lord our
G-d, King of the universe who
hast sanctified us by thy com-
mandments and commanded
us to kindle the Sabbath light.
Area Deaths;
iiiii)i.
Annual Midrash Lectures Kick-off Jan. 15
This year's Contemporary
Issues of Jewish Life lecture
series titled "Encounters With
Current Challenges" will open
Sunday, Jan. 15 at Temple
Beth Torah in Tamarac with
Leonard Fein speaking on
"Israel and American Jews:
the Next Chapter." Founder,
editor and publisher of
Moment magazine until 1987,
Fein is the author of "Israel:
Politics and People" and
"Where Are We? The Inner
Life of American Jews."
The series continues on Sun-
day, Feb. 5, at Temple Beth
Israel, Sunrise, as author
Rachel Cowan speaks on
"Mixed Blessings: Jews,
Christians and Intermarri-
age;" Sunday, Feb. 26, Temple
Beth Am, Margate, with TV/
movie critic Michael Medved
on "Baby Boomers and Jewish
Identity;" Sunday, Mar. 12,
Temple Kol Ami, Plantation,
Julius Lester on "My Journey
to Judaism;" and Sunday,
Mar. 26, Temple Beth Orr,
Coral Springs, historian/
author Martin Gilbert, "Soviet
Jewry, Crisis in the Midst of
Glasnost."
Tickets for the series or indi-
vidual lectures are available at
the Central Agency for Jewish
Education of the Jewish Fed-
eration of Fort Lauderdale
and all participating institu-
tions of the North Broward
Midrasha programs.
ROSS
William, a resident of Coconut Creek,
died Friday, Dec 23, at the age of 74.
He was a past board member of Beth
Torah Congregation. Ross was the
husband of Shirley; father of Ellen
Kornfield of Plantation, Sara Hillock
of Sunrise, and Stella Ross of Boston;
the brother of David Ross of Delray
Beach; and grandfather of Marc,
Michael and Joshua, Funeral services
were held at Levitt Weinstein, Hol-
lywood, with interment at Beth David
Cemetery.
SHE NEEDS
YOUR HELP
Put your donations
to good use.
Help hundreds of frail indigent
elderly like her by donating to
I
ouglas Gardens
Miami Jewish Home & Hospital
Thrift Shops
Proceeds used for medicine and supplies for
the elderly of your community
TO HELP THEM, WE HEED YOUR HELP
Furniture Clothing Household goods Appliances
Dade: 625-0620 Broward: 981-8245
Call for free pick-up of your fully tax-deductible donations
or visit our two convenient locations:
Miami
5713 N.W. 27th Avenue
Hallandale
3194 Hallandale Beach Blvd.
Douglas Gardens Thrift Shops
is a division of trie Miami
Jewish Horns and Hospaal lor
the 4ged at Douglas Cardans
a not-tor -profit organuakon
serving tht elderly of South Ftonda tor 43 years
Midwestern city, pop. 120,000 & 1988 All American
city finalist (top 25 cities in USA); searching for
Conservative Rabbi with traditional values to pro-
vide leadership for Congregation of 225 families.
Highly competitive compensation package. Send
resume, including salary history and requirements.
All inquiries held in strictest confidence.
Respond to box MCP
% Jewish Floridian P.O. Box 012973
Miami, FL 33101.
Are You Considering Making A Pre-Arranged Funeral?
If your answer is YES
COMPLETE AND MAIL THE ATTACHED FORM
BLASBERG PARKSIDE FUNERAL CHAPELS, INC. will give you a
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If you have been thinking of Pre-Arranging a funeral,
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IRA M. BLASBERG MICHAEL C. BLASBERG
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Page 12 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, January 13, 1989
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