The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 3, no. 7 (Apr. 5, 1974)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 9, 1976 called v.4, no. 27 but constitutes v.5, no. 1; issue for July 7, 1989 called v.18, no. 11 but constitutes v.18, no. 13.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44570954
lccn - sn 00229545
ocm44570954
System ID:
AA00014312:00536

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Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward


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Full Text
-
IfewishFloridian
f^) OF GREATER FORT LAUDE
'i&*
Volume 17 Number 24
Fort Lauderdale, Florida Friday, October 21, 1988
Fratfttocftrt
Price: 35 cents
*LO: Declare
Palestinian State
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) Leaders of the various Palestine
I Liberation Organization factions have agreed unanimously to
declare an independent Palestinian state in the West Bank and
[Gaza Strip, according to reports here.
The decision was adopted during a three-day meeting of the
PLO leadership in Tunis. It was reported by Salah Khalaf, a
I senior PLO official popularly known as Abu Iyad.
The unified command of the Palestinian uprising in the
I administered territories issued a statement urging the Palestine
National Council to declare an independent state. "Communique
No. 27" suggested that such a state be put under international
| auspices for the present.
According to Khalaf, the PNC will convene to act on the
(matter before the Israeli elections on Nov. 1.
The PNC is sometimes referred to as the Palestinian parlia-
| ment in exile. Israelis consider it to be an adjunct of the PLO.
Moves to declare an independent Palestinian state have
gathered momentum since King Hussein of Jordan announced
July 31 that he was severing all ties to the West Bank.
Close aides to Yasir Arafat have endorsed the idea, but the
PLO chairman himself has appeared unwilling to make such a
move without achieving a consensus among the terrorist
organization's rival factions.
PNC meetings aimed at reaching such a consensus have been
I repeatedly postponed since August.
HOLOCAUST MUSEUM CEREMONY. More than 1,200 invited guests, including kOO
Holocaust survivors, attended the dedication of the cornerstone of the U.S. Holocaust
Memorial Musuem in Washington D.C. As President Ronald Reagan, left, and Harvey
Meyerhoff, chairman of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Council, unveiled the cornerstone,
Reagan noted that the Holocaust must be comprehensible: "We must make sure," said the
president, "that from now until the end of days all humankind knows what this evil looks
like and how it came to be. and only then can we be sure that it will never come again."
Shultz Lauded ff0iocaust Museum
For Soviet Fight DedimtedIn Washington
U., BIIGAKI HIDXIRAIIU "ha^aiico nur t>ffnrt nn t.n that. *^
By SUSAN BIRNBAUM
NEW YORK, (JTA) -
Secretary of State George
Shultz cautioned here that the
recent loosening of Soviet emi-
gration restrictions on Jews
"can change," and urged Jew-
ish leaders to "never let up in
our efforts to help people
leave."
Shultz was being honored by
the Hebrew Immigrant Aid
Society for his work on behalf
of human rights, and Jewish
emigration in particular.
The secretary addrexited
about 270 people at a dinner at
the Grand Hyatt Hotel, at
which he received the HIAS
1988 Liberty Award for his
"determined pursuit of free-
dom of emigration for Soviet
Jews."
Shultz said he accepted the
award with a greater feeling of
appreciation than when he was
honored in 1984 by the
National ('(inference on Soviet
Jewry.
"1 didn't feel good about
receiving that award," he said,
"because our efforts up to that
time had not been very suc-
cessful. But I feel a lot better
now. We have seen results in
human terms.
"Still, we must never let up
in our efforts to help people
leave if they wish, or to live the
kind of life they want to lead
where they are.
"We have to keep working
on it. It can change. So we
must stay with it, and keep
working," he said.
The award was presented by
Ben Zion Leuchter, president
of HIAS, the international
immigrant aid society of the
Jewish people, founded in
1881.
Leuchter praised Shultz's
perseverance on behalf of
Soviet Jews and all persons
seeking human rights.
Speaking of .Jewish "historic
memory," Leuchter specu-
lated "how different world his-
tory would have been, how
different Jewish history would
have been, if this good and
great man had been secretary
of state from 1937 to 1946."
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
President Reagan dedicated
the cornerstone of the U.S.
Holocaust Memorial Museum
with a denunciation of anti-
Semitism and a vow that "the
Jewish people will never stand
alone against tyranny."
Former President Jimmy
Carter, in a message to the
ceremony, said the museum is
a promise that "never again
will the world stand silent,
never again will the world look
the other way or fail to act in
time to prevent this terrible
crime of genocide."
He reminded the audience
that he had created the Presi-
dent's Commission on the Hol-
ocaust in 1979, which even-
tually led to the decision to
create the museum.
He said he was "looking for-
ward" to joining Reagan and
his successor at the ceremony
when the museum opens in
late 1990. The museum is on
land donated by the federal
government, but the $170 mil-
lion needed for construction
and exhibits is being raised
privately.
Harvey Meyerhoff of Balti-
more, chairman of the U.S.
Holocaust Memorial Council,
said funds are coming in, rang-
ing from the pennies of school
children to large donations of
$1 million or more from 19
individuals, families and foun-
dations.
In denouncing anti-
Semitism, Reagan attacked
those in the United States who
are engaged in the "disgusting
task of minimizing or even
denying the truth of the Holo-
caust. This act of intellectual
genocide must not go unchal-
lenged."
Reagan is chairman of the
honorary campaign committee
for the museum.
Three other members of the
honorary committee were on
the dias: Warren Burger, for-
mer chief justice of the U.S.
Supreme Court; Jeane Kirkpa-
trick, former U.S. ambassador
to the United Nations; and Dr.
Billy Graham, the evangelist.


Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, October 21, 1988
Anti-Semitism Still A Concern
By
ANDREW SILOW CARROLL
NEW YORK (JTA) The
majority of Jewish voters con-
tinue to favor a Democrat for
president over a Republican,
according to a survey con-
ducted in April and May on
behalf of the American Jewish
Committee.
But despite their consis-
tently liberal views on a host of
domestic issues, those voters
are showing an increased anxi-
ety over anti-Semitism that
may guide their selection on
Election Day, an analyst said.
"To what extent Jews will
perceive anti-Semitism on
either side will be a key fac-
tor" in the upcoming election,
said Steven Cohen, professor
of sociology at Queens College
in New York, who conducted
the study of Jewish political
attitudes and values.
He discussed his study at a
news conference at AJCom-
mittee offices here.
His analysis is based on two
simultaneous surveys one
dealing with 1,252 Jews and
the other with 1,217 non-Jews
by Market Facts Inc., a
national research organiza-
tion.
The survey found that Jew-
ish Democrats outnumbered
Republicans 61 percent to 14
percent; or better than 4-1;
and Jews overwhelmingly
favored a Democrat over a
Republican for president, 58
Kahane Appeals Decision
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) "I
am neither a Nazi nor a rac-
ist," Knesset member Meir
Kahane told the High Court of
Justice.
Kahane was appealing an
almost unanimous decision by
the Central Election Commit-
tee, which barred the Kach
party from running in the Nov.
1 Knesset elections on grounds
that it is racist and opposed to
the country's democratic insti-
tutions.
The decision was grounded
in an 1984 amendment to the
Basic Law, which bans parties
that engage in racial incite-
ment.
The controversial New
York-born rabbi insisted that
the ideas his Kach party
espouses are rooted in the
Torah.
Kahane appeared before the
court with his attorney,
Aharon Pappo.
Deputy Attorney General
Dorit Beinish, arguing for the
state, submitted as evidence
bills Kahane introduced in the
Knesset and quotations from
Kach literature.
She said they proved the
party is "racist, contrary to
the democratic character of
the state."
These included proposed leg-
islation that would make inter-
marriage or cohabitation
between Jews and non-Jews a
criminal offense; would separ-
ate Jews from gentiles at
beaches; and would deny non-
Jews the right of appeal to
YOUR CAR IN ISRAEL
Israel's supreme court.
"Everything (I say) is based
on halacha and the Bible," said
Kahane. "This is not an
attempt to ban Kahane, but
rather a Judaism which is
thousands of years old."
His lawyer was more circum-
spect, claiming that the media
was biased against Kahane
and therefore took his remarks
out of context.
He insisted that Kach is not
undemocratic "because it does
not question the structure of
elected agencies and the elec-
tions to the Knesset."
The movement "is not racist
because racism can only be
interpreted on a biological and
hereditary background,"
Pappo contended.
percent to 16 percent.
But support for both parties
dipped when Jews were asked
about the influence on their
parties by Jesse Jackson and
Pat Robertson, former candi-
dates for, respectively, the
Democratic and Republican
presidential nomination.
Fifty-nine percent said Jack-
son was anti-Semitic, and only
10 percent disagreed.
When asked how they would
vote if Jackson became the
Democratic vice presidential
nominee, Jews gave a majority
vote to the Republicans, 44
percent to 24 percent.
Likewise, 41 percent said
Robertson was anti-Semitic,
and support for the Demo-
cratic candidate increased to a
59 percent to 10 percent mar-
gin when Jews were asked
about Robertson as a vice pres-
idential nominee.
Cohen said the results were
consistent with a separate
finding, which showed that
three-quarters of those Jews
surveyed believe anti-
Semitism is a serious problem
a far greater proportion
than he found in surveys con-
ducted in 1983,1984 and 1986.
Jews remain "extraordinar-
ily liberal" in terms of support
of social issues, including legal-
ized abortion, the rights of
homosexuals, and the separa-
tion of church and state, said
Cohen.
But their votes, he said, may
well be influenced by who is
perceived as the more anti-
Semitic, the conservative
Republicans or the liberal
Democrats.
BBYO Sponsors Teen
Anti-Drug Program
A well-known personality people so that they may learn
will be guest speaker at a from his experience with sub-
Wlli uc 6^- ~r -
community program for the
youth of South Florida spon-
sored by the B'nai B'rith
Youth Organization (BBYO)
on Sunday, Oct. 23, 7 p.m., at
the David Posnack Jewish
Community Center in Davie.
The speaker will discuss his
own battle with drugs in an
effort to reach out to young
stance abuse.
There is no admission charge
for the program, which is open
only to teenagers. BBYO is
sponsoring bus transportation
from outlying areas for a $3
fee.
For information: 581-0218 or
434-0499, extension 335.
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'
Two Day SE Area
Na'amat Conferenece
Friday, October 21, 1988/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 3
Sports Stars To Meet Again At Madison High Reunion
Esther Zackler, a past
national president of Na'amat
USA who moved to Israel sev-
eral years ago, will be a princi-
pal speaker at the annual
southeast area conference of
Na'amat USA to be held Mon-
day, Oct. 31 and Tuesday, Nov.
1 at the Deauville Hotel, Miami
Beach.
A former president of the
Association of Americans and
Canadians in Israel, Zackler
will speak at the 6 p.m. dinner
on Monday.
On Monday morning, an
11:30 a.m. brunch will be
chaired by Gert Aaron of Hal-
landale, regional coordinator.
Brunch participants will
include Shulamith Salzman of
Margate and Sandra Cohen of
Delray Beach, president of
Palm Beach Council.
A slide show, "Light Up
Their Lives," will follow the
brunch. At 1:30 p.m., a group
dynamic session will be co-
chaired by Mildred Weiss of
Deerfield Beach and Fort
Lauderdale resident BeBee
Pullman, both members of the
national Na'amat board.
From 3-4 p.m., conference
participants will break up into
several groups with presenta-
tions by Aaron, Pullman, Rae
Hoff of Palm Beach, Rita Sher-
man of Boca Raton and Felice
Schwartz of Miami Beach.
Monday night's dinner will
feature Zackler, with an Israeli
perspective, and Gerald
Schwartz, who will outline an
American point of view during
Students Can
Study Abroad
Qualified high school stu-
dents are offered an opportu-
nity to spend an academic year
or summer holiday in Scandin-
avia, Germany, France, Swit-
zerland, Britain, Holland,
Spain, Russia (a student travel
group), Italy, New Zealand,
Australia, or Canada (French
or English speaking) as part of
the ASSE International Stu-
dent Exchange Program.
Students, 15-18 years old,
can qualify on the basis of
academic performance, char-
acter references, and a gen-
uine desire to experience life
abroad with a volunteer host
family.
According to an ASSE
spokesperson, host families
are "carefully screened to pro-
vide a caring environment in
which students can learn the
language and culture" of that
country.
Summer exchange students
live with a family abroad who
speaks English. Year students
need not have learned a for-
eign language as they receive
language and cultural instruc-
tion as part of the ASSE pro-
gram. They attend regular
high school classes in the host
country.
The non-profit program is
affiliated with the National
Swedish and Finnish Depart-
ments of Education and is a
participant in the President's
International Youth Exchange
Initiative.
For information, contact
Patrick Soderqvist, 8888 N.W.
1st St., Coral Springs, FL;
(305) 752-7970.
a discussion on Israel's four
decades of independence.
Schwartz is associate national
chairman of Friends
of Na'amat USA and national
vice president of the American
Zionist Federation.
Tuesday's activities will
begin with breakfast at 8:30
a.m., at which Zackler and
Na'amat National Vice Presi-
dent Harriet Green, who is
also president of the South
Florida Council of Na'amat
USA and chairman of the
board of the American Zionist
Federation of South Florida,
will discuss "The Empower-
ment of Women/Status of
Women."
Miami Beach Mayor Alex
Daoud, a frequent visitor to
Israel and legal counsel
to Na'amat USA in Florida,
will be the featured speaker at
Tuesday's noon-time luncheon.
His talk will follow a special
presentation at 10:45 a.m.,
titled "The Women Who Made
It Happen," written by Lillian
Elkin, a national board mem-
ber, and narrated by Salzman.
James Madison High School
of Brooklyn will hold a reunion
luncheon-dance for students
and faculty, all years 1925 to
the present, on Sunday, Feb.
5, noon, at the Crystal Lake
Country Club in Pompano
Beach.
Couvert is $22.50 per person
and spouses, other relatives
and friends are invited to
attend.
Guests of honor will be
Jammy Moskowitz, who
coached basketball for 43
years and is the oldest living
former Madison High faculty
member; and alumnus Stanley
H. Kaplan, an internationally
known educator. Kaplan lives
in New York City and Palm
Beach; Moskowitz is now a
resident of North Miami
Beach.
Among those attending the
reunion will be former Brook-
lyn Dodgers baseball pitcher
Jimmy Pattison, now of Palm
Bay, Florida. In June of 1927,
Free Federal Consumer
Information Catalog.
Dcpi l)h, I'urblo, l.olor.icloBHKN
at the Polo Grounds, Pattison
was the winning pitcher when
Madison defeated James Mon-
roe High School to win the
NYC high school champion-
ship. Pitching for Monroe High
was Ike Goldstein, who went
on to the Detroit Tigers. Gold-
stein, a long time resident of
West Delray Beach, and Pati-
son will be reunited at the Feb.
5th luncheon for the first time
in 62 years.
The reunion program will
also include tributes to Madi-
son alumni with achievements
in business, law, music, per-
forming arts, literature,
poetry and the sciences.
For reservations and infor-
mation, contact Chairperson
Phyllis Goldfarb, 6070 La
Palma Lane, Delray Beach,
Florida 33484, (407) 498-9375;
Co-chair Jack M. Levine, 5
Bonaire Blvd., No. 608, Delray
Beach, Florida 33446; or Anita
Kessel, 3237 Harrison St., Hol-
lywood, Florida 33031, (305)
961-4881.
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Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, October 21, 1988
Viewpoint
Upgraded Status
On the heels of the warming relations
between Hungary and Israel, it is indeed
welcome news that diplomatic channels with
Poland and the Jewish State are widening, as
well.
When Israel Foreign Minister Shimon Peres
paid his official visit to the United Nations, he
met privately with his Polish counterpart,
Tadeusz Olechowski. The results of that con-
ference may be seen in the upgraded status of
each country's mission in Warsaw and Tel
Aviv.
Instead of being sheltered under the
umbrella of a Dutch aegis, the countries will
take the mutually coordinated steps that
reflect a matured relationship.
It is a long way in miles and tortured history
since Auschwitz, Birkenau and Majdanek. A
more recent strain is linked directly to the Six
Day War, when as did most of Eastern
EuropePoland cuts its diplomatic ties to
Israel in 1967.
Now, as the world grows increasingly
smaller and economic, political and cultural
networks interlock more tightly, the import of
this move multiplies.
Abba.Eban, only recently cut from the
Labor slate, has been tapped as his nation's
emissary to several of the Soviet bloc's coun-
tries in an effort to advance the diplomatic
thaw.
That appointment is appropriate and the
strategy is significant.
First Monday
In October, etc.
The first Monday in October saw the open-
ing session of the Supreme Court. What the
court's calendar will see bodes well for the
nation's conservatives.
Since the appointment and approval of
Justice Anthony Kennedy, there is a definitive
swing to the right predicted on issues on this
country's social agenda.
When cases to be determined come before
the court in the areas of civil rights quotas.
Sabbath observances and church/state
abridgement. Jews would be wise to measure
the movement to the right.
While Ronald Reagan is a lame-duck presi-
dent, his influence will be felt long past Jan. 20
when a new administration will be inaugurat-
ed.
It would be wise, therefore, to look to this
election year's candidates and realize that
their potential reach goes beyond the grasp of
the White House. This year's elected presi-
dent will be the ghost hovering over future
Supreme Court decisions.
Christianity's Historic Obligation
Bv RABBI
MARC H. TANENBAUM
NEW YORK (JTA) For
those who have doubts about
the "practical" value of posi-
tive Jewish-Christian rela-
tions, it would be instructive to
study the critical role played
by philo-Semitism in the crea-
tion of the State of Israel.
In his comprehensive book,
"History of Israel," Professor
Howard Sachar observed that
when Dr. Chaim Weizmann
was desperately seeking to win
the support of Great Britain as
"the protectorate over a Jew-
ish homeland," he found his
greatest response among Brit-
ish Protestant evangelicals.
There was. Sachar writes.
"a mystical veneration with
which many devout Anglo-
Saxon (or Welsh or Scottish)
Protestants regarded the Old
Testament traditions, the Chil-
dren of Israel, and particularly
the Holy Land itself."
These believing Christians
included such central personal-
ities as Prime Minister Lloyd
George; Foreign Secretary
Lord Balfour (who wrote the
final version of the famed
Declaration); Jan Christian
Smuts, a Cabinet member of
South Africa; and Lord Pal-
merston.
Lloyd George wrote that in
his first meeting with Weiz-
mann in December 1914, his-
toric sites in Palestine were
mentioned that were "morl
familiar to me than those
the Western front."
These men, states Sachai
"felt deeply Christianity's hu
toric obligation to the Jews,)
and that among other re(
sons resulted in the Balfoi
Declaration and the mandatj
for a Jewish National Home
Palestine.
In analogous ways, thj
Bible-based philo-Semitisj
exists widely among millior
of American Christians wl
support Israel, with all h
present difficulties. The Je\
ish-Christian dialogue is tl
surest force that nurturt
these positive feelings towar
Jews and Israel.
Jewish
iano
OF ONEATER FORT LAUDCROAIE
: Fr^Skochtt
FRED SHOCHtT
Editor and Publisher
SUZANNESHOCHET
Executive Editor
JOAN C. TEQLAS
Director of Advertising
Published Bi Weekly
Main Office & Plant: 120 N.E. 8th St., Miami, Fla. 33132 Phone 1-373-4805 COLLECT
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Friday, October 21, 1988
Volume 17
10CHESHVAN5749
Number 24
Hunt Family; Philosophy and Genealogy
Bv ROBKRT E. SEGAL
The fabulous Hunt family,
wealthiest in Texas, is back in
the news again this time in
the courts.
Earlier news about them is
remembered from the 1950s,
when Haroldson Lafayette
Hunt, the family patriarch who
Struck oil so deep that his daily
income was estimated at vari-
ous times to run from $200,000
to $1 million a day. was a
point-man for Joe McCarthy.
One device the senior Hunt
employed was publishing and
giving wide distribution to
"Facts Forum." Despite its
claim for accuracy, that hate
sheet became a conduit for
such notorious anti-Semites as
Joe Kamp. Merwin Hart and
Allen Zoll. (In those days, the
I'.S. attorney general listed
Zoll's outfit. American Patri-
ots Inc. as a fascist organiza-
tion.)
Of the three Hunt brothers
Nelson. William and Lamar
now in difficulty with the
law. Ntlxon appears as the
patriarch's scion most devoted
to his daddy's political philoso-
phy.
The contribution he made to
the John Birch Society was
said to be the largest ever
received by that outfit which
depicted President Kisen-
llowei" as "a dedicated, consci-
ous agent of the Communist
conspiracy."
Nelson's buddies these 'lavs
include the Rev. Pat Robert-
EOn, an early candidate for
president, and the Rev. Jerry
Pal well, who once called lor
the Christianization of Amer-
ica, then bit iiis tongue and
told the 1,200 rabbis compris-
ing his audience he was SOITJ
he said it.
Twenty-five years ago. Nel-
aon was in on the discovery of
a huge oil field in Libya, but
that bonanza subsequently fell
into the hands of Moammar
Gadhafl via confiscation.
When the value of oil dipped.
Nelson and William Hunt
redirected their talent for
amassing wealth. They envi-
sioned great opportunities in
acquiring silver. The history of
their romance with that pre-
cious metal provides the back-
drop for their tribulations in
court.
As they traveled the silver
brick road, they fashioned a
plan to market bonds backed
by 83.n billion in silver bullion.
This scheme intrigued Sheik
Mohammad al-Amoudi and
Prince Paisal. who joined
hands with the Texas moguls.
This stratagem soured when
Wall Street frowned on it and
the silver market begun to sag.
Among the big | in the
silver debacle was Minpeco. a
Peruvian minerals marketing
company. That business entel
prise was awarded damages
$134 million in late Augq
when a federal jury in Nei
York concluded that Nelao
Lamar and Herbert Hint hd
conspired to corner the ailvi
market eight years ago.
Still able to engage top law
yers. the Hunts have indicate!
they plan to appeal that costlj
verdict.
As stage hands chang scenes on this drama, it seem:)
only fair to single out oncj
offspring among the 13 chil
dren fathered by H.L. Huntl
who gambled his way into ;|
story-book fortune.
The reference here is to < ar
oline Hunt Schoellkopf. whos
business enterprises
entrusted to the hands of capa
ble. honest managers helptt
account for her designation H!
the world's wealthiest woman.
She is generous with /"'
'<;/., activities, has served as n
bo-ird niemlH-rol Planned Par
enthood and as a director ill
thi' Kennedy (enter in Wash^
ington.
While engaged in ihest
activities, -he has kept her.-cl
at a distance from the oil am
silver adventures of net
bit it hers.


Friday, October 21, 1988/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 5
ADL Links Juvenile Crimes To Bigotry
Delegates to the National
Youth Crime Prevention Con-
ference heard representatives
from the Florida Regional
Office of the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith (ADL)
stress that combatting bigotry
is a necessary component in
the fight against juvenile
B'nai B'rith
Urges
Reconsideration
WASHINGTON, DC -
B'nai B'rith has called upon
the Democratic National Com-
mittee to reconsider the DNC
membership of Willie Barrow
and Robert Farrell, whose
anti-Semitic sentiments have
recently been reported in the
media.
In a letter to DNC chairman
Paul Kirk, Thomas Neumann,
executive vice president
of B'nai B'rith, expressed his
appreciation of the DNC's reit-
eration of the Democratic
Party's "strong support for
Israel and unwavering intoler-
ance of bigotry and anti-
Semitism." But Neumann con-
tinued, "these words are not
enough. In this case, they must
be backed by action."
Neumann pointed out that
according to media reports
Barrow called Louis Farrak-
han "one of the greatest, most
outstanding leaders of our
day," and Farrell refused to
sign a Los Angeles City Coun-
cil resolution condemning Far-
rakhan's anti-Semitism.
"Accordingly," wrote Neu-
mann, "B'nai B'rith adds its
voice to the growing calls from
prominent Americans in-
cluding U.S. Representatives
from both parties asking the
DNC to look into Barrow's
allegiance to a preacher ,of
hatred as well as Farrell's
crass insensitivity to anti-
Semitism, and if warranted,
take the appropriate action."
Take Your
Interest in
Israel
and Mind
Your Own
Business
Translate your commitment
to Israel into
a profitable partnership
with Ampal.
Ampal is an American company with
assets of more than $1.25 billion,
whose stock is listed on the
American Stock Exchange Ampal
was established in 1942 to raise
capital in the United States to finance
and invest in Israels private sector
economy
Now you can enable Israel to
advance towards economic inde-
pendence by selling Ampal securities.
It you are ambitious, self-motivated,
and will take the initiative to make
cold calls for leads. Ampal will assist
you m registering with the NASD and
provide the necessary training and
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To receive more information about
becoming an Independent Ampal
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Jeff FekJman (212) 586 3232 or wnte
SMERL
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crime.
Valerie Berman, associate
director in ADL's Miami
office, told the delegates meet-
ing recently in Miami that
"early intervention in school-
based intergroup conflict can
head off serious confrontations
between religious, racial and
ethnic groups."
At workshops, ADL
described specific strategies to
be used in schools and conflict
management techniques.
Delegates also heard an
overview of extremist and
youth gang activities in Flor-
ida, as ADL's assistant South-
ern counsel Joan Peppard
noted that 80 percent of those
convicted of crimes of bias are
under 20 years old.
In the last few years, ADL
has been closely tracking skin-
head youth gangs whose ideol-
ogy reflects hard-core anti-
Semitic and racism. Last May,
in cooperation with law
enforcement agencies in Dade,
Broward and Palm Beach
counties, ADL initiated the
formation of a tri-county youth
gang task force.
HARBOR ISLAND SPA: LOSE WEIGHT-FEEL GREAT- SUPER RATE
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Pay For 1st Week 2nd WEEK FREE
Rates As Low As $130 P.P., Daily, Double Occupancy
Oct. 16 to Oct. 30
Oct. 30 to Nov. 13
Later Dates Slightly Hiaher
$
65
00
Avt.age Pnc Pet Nighi
For 14 Days Stay PP
Db. 0c:
REOPENS FOR THE SEASON SUNDAY OCT. 16
FREE SATURDAY OCT. 15
Rates Include 3 Meals and 2 Snacks Daily Massages 6auna
All Baths Facial Gymnasium Exercise Yoga
1 Water Exercise Nutritionist Physician Reducing Equipment
Shuffleboard Swirlpool Movie Bingo HtU GOLF
Live Band Nightly Dancing and Entertainment.
Available at Publix Stores with Fresh Danish
Bakeries Only. Plain or Seeded
lib. 7 loaf #7
unmirej v^my, vi _r*:cucu
RYE BREAD
Available at Publix Stores with Fresh Danish
Bakeries Only. With Assorted Fruit Toppings
Available at All Publix Stores and Fresh Danish
Bakeries.
Danish
Almond Ring........ s $1"
Boston
Cream Cake
each
Available at Publix Stores with Fresh Danish
Bakeries Only. A Great Snack Anytime
Carrot Muffins... 6 for
Available at Publix Stores with Fresh Danish
Bakeries Only.
Pumpkin Pie......... L $1"
Available at Publix Stores with Fresh Danish
Bakeries Only.
Fruit Bars..........6fo, 99*
*he o (Mow*
Prices effective Thurs.. October 20 thru Wed..
October 26. 1988. Quantity Rights reserved. Only
in Dade. Broward. Palm Beach. Martin. St. Lucie.
Indian River and Okeechobee Countie*.


Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, October 21, 1988
Lunch/Card Party
To Benefit Library
The Friends of the Sunrise
Library will hold a card party
and luncheon Tuesday, Oct.
25, 11:30 a.m., at Fantasia,
3527 Pine Island Road, Sun-
rise.
Lunch will feature oriental
dishes from won ton soup to
fortune cookies.
There will be door prizes and
raffles. Card players should
arrange their own games and
bring their own cards.
Tickets, at $6.50 per person,
are available at the Sunrise
Library. Funds raised will ben-
efit the library.
Emanu-El Welcomes
New Members
Hadassah
Kavanah Chapter, which is
comprised of career and work-
ing women residing in West
Broward County from Coral
Springs to Pembroke Pines,
meets on the first Wednesday
night of each month.
The chapter's major annual
fund raiser is a fashion show
and brunch to be held this year
Sunday, Nov. 6, at Justin's
Caterers in Sunrise. Fashions
will come from Susan Rose of
Plantation, which specializes
in "attire for that special occa-
sion." Proceeds will benefit
Hadassah Israel Education
Services (HIES).
For information: 476-3109 or
748-9122.
The Masada Margate Chap-
ter will meet Tuesday, Oct. 25,
noon, at Temple Beth Am. The
program will be on "The Nos-
talgia of our Heritage."
A speical pre-Shabbat Ser-
vice dinner for new members
of Temple Emanu-El of Fort
Lauderdale, and their families,
will be held Friday, Oct. 28, 6
p.m., at the synagogue, 3245
West Oakland Park Boulve-
vard.
During last month's Simchot
Torah services, 20 children,
Lecture On
Hearing Loss
Dr. Stephen Geller, an otol-
aryngologist, will speak on
"Turning Your Whats Into
Hows," hearing loss in adults
and children, on Tuesday, Oct.
25, at the Coral Springs Medi-
cal Center.
The program is presented
free of charge as part of the
medical center's 1988 lecture
series. Reservations are
required due to limited space.
For information: 344-3344.
newly enrolled in the Temple
Emanu-El Religious School,
were consecrated bji Rabbi
Edward M. Maline, director of
education and spiritual leader
of the congregation. Over 50
new member families were
also welcomed to the congre-
gation and called to the Bimah
that evening.
Book Fair
The> Parent's Organization
of Sunrise Jewish Center will
hold their second annual Chan-
ukah Boutique and Book Fair
on Sunday, Nov. 13, 10 a.m., -
2 p.m.
Books and other holiday
items wil be featured, as well
as refreshments.
The Sunrise Jewish Center
is located at 4099 Pine Island
Road.
Women's League
For Israel
Garage Sale
The Margate Chapter of
Women's League for Israel
will meet Monday, Oct. 24,
noon, at the Margate Teen
Center.
Representatives of the two
national parties will discuss
the parties' platform. Mildred
Hirsch will moderate.
Refreshments will be served.
The chapter's executive
board will meet at the home of
Leah Janoson on Monday, Oct.
31, 9:30 a.m.
The Pythian Sisters Temple
No. 21 of Fort Lauderdale will
hold a garage and rummage
sale Sunday, Nov. 6, 9 a.m.-2
p.m., at Roarke Hall, 1720
N.W. 60th Ave., Sunrise. The
proceeds will benefit the
Women in Distress.
For directions, call 344-
2556.
THE GREAT TASTE OF PHILLY
HAS COME TO LIGHT
Candlelighting
Oct.21 6:30 p.m.
Oct. 28 6:24 p.m.
Nov. 4 6:20 p.m.
Nov. 11 6:16 p.m.
Benediction upon Kindling
the Sabbath Lights
BORUCH ATTO AD-ONAI
ELO-HEINU MELECH HO-
OLOM ASHER KID-
SHONU BEMITZ-VOSOV
VETZI-VONU LE-HAD-
LIK NEYR SHEL
SHABBOS.
Blessed art Thou, O Lord our
G-d, King of the universe who
hast sanctified us by thy com-
mandments and commanded
us to kindle the Sabbath light.
Shanghai
Studies
MELBOURNE, Australia
(JTA) The first Judaic Stud-
ies Center in China has been
established in Shanghai under
the presidency of Professor
Zhu Weile.
The announcement was con-
tained in a letter to Isi Leibler
here, chairman of the World
Jewish Congress Asia Pacific
branch. It came from Jin Yinz-
hong, vice secretary general of
the Shanghai International
Relations Studies Society.
Enioy PHILLY Light Like all PHILADELPHIA BRAND
products, it's rich, creamy and delicious, but with fewer
calories and 25o less fat. And. like regular PHILLY.
PHILLY Light is K certified Kosher
Try it in all your favorite cream cheese recipes, too!
You'll agree: The great taste of PHILLY has come to Light
OSSKr.ill Iik
Isn't the
yo
A10-MINUT
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Rales listed at
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and ace
Dial Station (1 ?) chargat apply Thaee charges do not apply to f"


Friday, October 21, 1988/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 7
Bar Mitzvah

HBER CEREALS.
For People With a Healthy Interest In Eating Well.
Martin Jacob Schwartz
Martin Jacob Schwartz, son
of Dr. Marc and Marcia
Schwartz of Plantation, was
called to the Torah on the
occasion of his Bar Mitzvah on
Saturday, Oct. 22, at Temple
Beth Israel of Sunrise.
Martin, who is a student at
David Posnack Hebrew Day
School, also enjoys sports and
music.
Special guests invited to
share in Martin's celebration
are his grandmother, Fay
Clarin of Boca Raton; and his
sister, Lesley-Ann and
brother, Eli.
Book
Discussion
The book discussion group,
sponsored by the Friends of
the Sunrise Library, will meet
Tuesday, Nov. 15, 10:30 a.m.
at the library.
Originally scheduled for Oct.
4, the program will feature an
open discussion of "50" by
Avery Corman led by Thelma
Freiberg.

Most nutritionists recommend a diet
which includes foods low in fat and high
in fiber. Exactly the qualities m POST"
Fruit & Fibre" Cereal. POST" Natural
Bran Flakes and POST" Natural Raisin
Bran.
All three delicious cereals give you
the healthful benefits of high fiber and
at least 12 essential vitamins and
minerals. Plus the assurance of Kosher
certification
And now they are kept fresh thanks
to Zip-Pak resealable packaging It
provides airtight storage which keeps
cereal fresh and crisp
So now that you're eating more
sensibly, try all three great tasting
POST" fiber cereals They II ^-
satisfy your appetite for \Aj
healthful food uwiu.
196S General Foods Corporation u\a
Where Keeping Kosher Is A Delicious Tradition."
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here someone special
outt like to call:
UTE CALL FROM PALM BEACH TO:
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ica Raton $1.90
ami $2.50
Pierce $1.90
eekends or after 11 p.m. and save even more.
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Southern Bell
A BELLSOUTH Company
m Bell provides services within your calling zone
i connection to other tang distance companies

*JM :,-
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p ^
lo personio-person, coin, hotel guest, calling card. coMect calls, calls charged to another number, or to time and charge calls Rates subject lo change Daytime rates are higher Rate* do not reflect applicable federal, stale and local taxes. Applies to Intra-LATA long distance cade only
This Is Southern Bell!


Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, October 21, 1988
TEL AVIV, (JTA) The
Health Ministry announced
that the entire population of
Israel will be reinoculated
against polio.
The ministry said that it was
acting on the recommenda-
tions of three international
polio experts, who proposed
that both the Salk and Sabin
vaccines be administered for
maximum protection.
No Epidemic; But Reinoculation
It said sufficient vaccine is
available.
The experts were invited
here by the Health Ministry to
assess the anti-polio measures
taken since an outbreak was
detected in several regions of
the country last month.
They are Professor Joseph
Melnick of Houston, Professor
Walter Orlstein of the Center
for Disease Control in Atlanta,
and Professor M. Rey of the
World Health Organization, a
U.N. agency.
The Salk vaccine, containing
dead virus, is administered by
injection. The Sabin, which
consists of live but weakened
virus, is taken orally.
The experts believe that a
combination of both will induce
natural immunity and that it
should be provided on a
national basis.
In that respect, they differed
with the Health Ministry,
which had confined its vaccina-
tion campaign to the Hadera
and Lod-Ramla regions where
the polio virus was discovered
in sewage.
The ministry announced that
the. campaign had been
extended to the Rehovot and
Acre areas, where contamin-
ated sewage was also found.
Melnick has been observing
polio in Israel for more than 30
years. He brought the first
batch of Salk vaccine here in a
suitcase in the late 1950s.
The recent polio outbreak
never reached epidemic pro-
portions, with no more than
10 confirmed cases.

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Competitive tar levels reflect either the Jan. '85 FTC Report ur FTC method.
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PACK 100's, MENTHOL 3 mg. "tar." (I..'j mg. nicotine, av. per cigarette
hy FTC method.


Shamir And Perez To Debate
By CATHRINE GERSON
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
'remier Yitzhak Shamir and
foreign Minister Shimon
'eres, the two candidates for
jrime minister, will meet face
io face in a television debate
>n Oct. 23, nine days before
the Knesset election.
Nissim Mishal, Israel Televi-
sion's Washington correspon-
dent, has been named modera-
tor, but he must be confirmed
by the chairman of the Israel
Broadcast Authority, Uri Por-
ath, and by Justice Eliezer
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Friday, October 21, 1988/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 9
Goldberg, chairman of the
Central Election Committee.
The debate will last 30 min-
utes. A drawing will decide
which candidate answers the
first and last questions. It is
still undecided whether the
candidates will get the ques-
tions in advance.
&

JC

GLATT KOSHER PESACH 89
April 19th 28th
in LAS VEGAS
You'll stay at the
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An exclusive NON-GAMING
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ALEXIS PARK
( RESORT ? LAS VEGAS )
Featuring:
20 acres of lush greenery,
streams, and waterfalls an
oasis in the desert
All deluxe suites with refrig-
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Health club, 3 swimming pools,
tennis courts, nine-hole putting
green
Complimentary transportation
to and from McCarran Interna-
tional Airport and to the "Strip"
Offering the color and beauty of
nearby Redrock Canyon,
Valley of Fire and the Grand
Canyon for a day of serene
sightseeing. Recreational op-
portunities also include water-
skiing, sailing and fishing at
Lake Mead
Includes:
Nine days / Nine nights
TWo Traditional Seders
TWo Barbecues
Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner
Giatt Kosher Meals prepared
under Strict Orthodox
Rabbinical Supervision
Daily Synagogue Services
Daily Tea Room featuring Ice
Cream Sunday Bar
$1,549.00
per person
plus 22% tax and gratuities
based on double occupancy.
Children under 12 Half Price
(Additional Nights Available)
Limited Capacity
Early Batervatlota Supp#*/#d
For Reservations & Information
Call Las Vegas Kosher Tours
1-800-552-7255
4528 W. Charleston Blvd. Lot Vegas. Nevada 89102
$
How to drive to the Northeast
with your eyes closed.
Just put your car onto Amtrak's Auto
Train. Then sit back and relax. If you want,
you can sightsee in our Dome Car. Meet
new friends over cocktails. Even take in a
free movie. The pS9| Auto Train leaves
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a car travel for 50% off now through Feb-
ruary 20. You can also save over 40% on
private sleeping accommodations. Included is
a delicious I I full-course buffet dinner
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kosher meals are available if you let us know in advance. The best fares go to those who make
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Umtrak's Auto Train. wLM I It'll open your eyes to the comforts of taking the train instead.
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Page 10 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, October 21, 1988
Ask him how
his grades
were last term
Call Israel.
See if your brother really
spends his free time in the li-
brary. With AT&T International
Long Distance Service, it costs
less than you'd think to stay
close. So go ahead. Reach out
and touch someone.
ISRAEL
Economy Discount Standard
5pm-12am 12am-8am 8am-5pm
$ .89 $1.11 $1.48
AVERAGE COST PER MINUTE
TOR A 10 MINUTE CALL*
Avenge cost per minute varies depending on the length of the call
First minute costs more: additional minutes cost tost. AH prices are
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surcharges Can for information or it you d like to receive an AT&T
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Friday, October 21, 1988/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 11
f/S*/S/S'Sff''S"r'"r*f-*rrrrsrr**ssf*wssSf/*SM/M/*f/M/t*
Synagogue Directory
vs*'rs/ssss'*fss/*ss"ss*///fss/s/f"fss/s***s/s/fssff/tfssss*s//"ss*>*/sl
CONSERVATIVE
morning, 9:00 a.m. Rabbi William Marder. Cantor Yehuda Heilbraun.'
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER (721-7660), 9101 NW 57th St., Tamarac 33321
Sunday through Friday 8:30 a.m., 5 p.m. Late Friday service' 8 pm'
Services:
Saturday 8:45 a.m
Rabbi Kurt F. Stone.
TEMPLE BETH AHM (431-5100), 9730 Stirling Road, Hollywood, 33024 Semcer
daily'8a.m.; Monday Thursday 7:30 p.m.; Sabbath 8 p.m.. Sabbath morning8:45 a m'
Rabbi Avraham Kapnek. Cantor Eric Lindenbaum.
Solomon Geld. Cantor Irving Groaiman
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL (742-4040), 7100 W. Oakland Park Blvd. Sunrise 33313
Services: Monday through Friday 8 a.m., 5:30 p.m.; Friday 8 a.m., 5 p.m 8pm
Saturday 8:45 a.m., 7:45 p.m. Sunday 8:30 a.m. Rabbi Howard A. Addison! Cantor
Maurice A. Ne.
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL OF DEERFIELD BEACH (421 7060), 200 S Century
Blvd., Deerfield Beach, 33441. Services: Sunday through Friday 8:30 am 5pm
Friday late service 8 p.m.; Saturday 8:45 a.m., and at candlelighting time' Rabbi
Elliot Winograd. Cantor Shabtal Arkerman.
TEMPLE B'NAI MOSHE (942-5380), 1434 SE 3rd St., Pompano Beach, 33060
Services: Friday 8 p.m. Cantor Jehudah Heilbraun.
TEMPLE SHA'ARAY TZEDEK (741-0295), 4099 Pine Island Road. Sunrise
33321. Services: Sunday through Friday 8 a.m., 5 p.m.; Late Friday service 8 p.m
Saturday 8:45 a.m 5 p.m. Rabbi Bemhard Presler. Cantor Barry Black. Cantor
Emeritus Jack Marchant.
TEMPLE SHOLOM (942-6410), 132 SE 11 Ave., Pompano Beach, 33O60. Services:
Monday through Friday 8:45 a.m., evenings: Monday through Thursday at 5 p m
Friday evening at 8. Saturday and Sunday 9 a.m. Dr. N. Saul Goldman. Rabbi!
Cantor Nissim Berkowitz.
CONGREGATION BETH HILLEL OF MARGATE (974 3090), 7640 Margate
Blvd., Margate, 33063. Services: Sunday through Friday 8:15 a.m., 5:30 p.m. Late
Friday service 8 p.m. Saturday 8:45 a.m.; 5:30 p.m. Cantor Joel Cohen.
HEBREW CONGREGATION OF LAUDERHILL (733-9560), 2048 NW 49th Ave.,
Uuderhill, 33313. Services: Sunday through Friday 8:30 a.m.; 5:30 p m Saturday
8:45 a.m Rabbi Israel Halpern.
CONGREGATION BETH TEFILAH (formerly North Lauderdale Hebrew
Congregation) (722-7607), 6435 W. Commercial Blvd., Tamarac, FL 33319.
Services: Sunday to Friday at 7:45 a.m. Friday at 6 p.m.; Saturday at 8:45 a m
Charles B. Frier. President.
ORTHODOX
CHABAD LUBAVITCH COMMUNITY SYNAGOGUE (344 4855) 9791 W. Sample
Road. Coral Springs. 33065. Services: Monday through Friday 7 a.m., Saturday 9
a m., Sunday 8 a.m. Rabbi Yossie Denburg.
TEMPLE OHEL B'NAI RAPHAEL (733-7684). 4351 W. Oakland Park Blvd.,
Lauderdale Lakes, 33313. Services: Sunday through Thursday 8 a.m., 6 p.m., Friday
8 a.m., 5 p.m.. Saturday 8:45 a.m., 5 p.m.
SYNAGOGUE OF INVERRARY CHABAD (748-1777), 4561 N. University Dr.,
Lauderhill, 33351. Services: Sunday through Friday 6:45 a.m., 8 a.m., 5:15 p.m.,
Saturday 9 a.m., 5:30 p.m. Study groups: Men. Sundays following services:
Women, Tuesdays 8 p.m. Rabbi Aron Lieberman.
YOUNG ISRAEL OF DEEFIELD BEACH (421-1367), 1880 W. Hillsboro Blvd.,
Deerfield Beach, 33441. Services: Sunday through Friday 8 a.m. and sundown.
Saturday 8:45 a.m. and sundown: Joseph M. Reiner, President.
YOUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD-FORT LAUDERDALE (966 7877). 3291
Stirling Road. Fort Lauderdale. 33312. Services: Monday through Friday 7:30 a.m..
and sundown; Saturday, 9 a.m., sundown; Sunday 8 a.m., sundown. Rabbi Edward
Davis.
CONGREGATION MIDGAL DAVID (726-3583), 8575 W. McNab Road, Tamarac,
33321. Services: Daily 8 a.m., mincha 5 p.m.; Saturday 8:45 a.m. and 5:15 p.m.
Rabbi Chain) Schneider. Congregation president: Herman Fleischer.
RECONSTRUCTIONIST
RAMAT SHALOM (472-3600), 11301 W. Broward Blvd.. Plantation, 33325.
Services: Friday, 8:15 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. Rabbi Elliot Skiddell. Cantor Bella
Milim.
REFORM
TEMPLE BET TIKVAH (741-8088). 8890 W. Oakland Park Blvd.. Ste. 302,
Sunrise, 33351. Services: Friday 8 p.m. Senior Rabbi Morris Gordon, Assistant
Rabbi Steven Perry. Cantor Ron Graner.
TEMPLE BETH ORR (753-3232), 2151 Riverside Dr.. Coral Springs, 33065.
Services: Friday 8 p.m.; Saturday 10 a.m. Rabbi Mark W. Gross.
TEMPLE B'NAI SHALOM OF DEERFIELD BEACH (426-2532). Services at
Menorah Chapels. 2305 W. Hillsboro Blvd., Deerfield Beach. 33441, Friday 8 p.m.
Cantor Moehe Levinson.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL (731-2310), 3245 W. Oakland Park Blvd., Greater Ft.
Uuderdale, 33311. Services: Friday 8:00 p.m.; Saturday, only on holidays or
celebration of Bar Bat Mitvah. Rabbi Edward Maline; Cantorial Soloist Kim
Olshansky.
TEMPLE KOL AMI (472-1988). 8200 Peters Road. Plantation. 33324. Services:
Friday 8:15 p.m., Saturday 10:30 a.m. Rabbi Sheldon J. Harr. Cantor Seymour
Schwartzman.
LIBERAL JEWISH TEMPLE OF COCONUT CREEK (973-7494) Services:
Friday night services twice monthly at Calvary Presbyterian Church, 3950
Coconut Creek Parkway, 33066. Rabbi Bruce S. Warsnal. Cantor Jacob Barkin.
TEMPLE BAT YAM (928-0410). 5151 NE 14th Terr.. Ft. Uuderdale, 33334.
Service: Weekly on Friday evenings at 8 p.m. Rabbi Lewis Littman.
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Poll Reflects Mixed Views
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Israelis, by a margin of 65
percent to 32 percent, favor
territorial concessions in
exchange for peace.
But they view a demilitar-
ized independent Palestinian
state as a threat to Israel's
existence by 64 percent to 23
percent; and by 64 percent to
32 percent, would not negoti-
ate with the Palestine Libera-
tion Organization even if it
renounced terrorism and rec-
ognized Israel's right to exist.
At the same time, 53 percent
of Israelis think not enough
force is being used to quell the
Palestinian uprising in the
West Bank and Gaza Strip.
These were some of the
results of a public opinion poll
taken in Israel between Aug.
25 and Sept. 1 on behalf of the
Anti-Defamation League
of B'nai B'rith.
The survey was conducted
by Penn & Schoen Associates
of New York, assisted by
Dahaf, an Israeli polling
organization.
The opinions came from a
random sampling of 1,200
Israeli Jews of diverse politi-
cal, social ethnic and religious
backgrounds. The poll's mar-
gin of error was plus or minus
three percent.
SHE NEEDS
YOUR HELP
Put your donations
to good use.
Help hundreds of frail indigent
elderly like her by donating to
I
ouglas Gardens
Miami Jewish Home & Hospital
Thrift Shops
Proceeds used for medicine and supplies for
the elderly of your community
TO HELP THEM, WE NEED YOUR HELP
Furniture Clothing Household goods Appliances
Dade: 625-0620 Broward: 981-8245
Call for free pick-up of your fully tax-deductible donations
or visit our two convenient locations:
Miami
5713 N.W. 27th Avenue
Hallandale
3194 Hallandale Beach Blvd.
Douglas Gardens Thrift Shops
is a division ot the Miami
Jewish Home and Hospital lor
the Aged at Douglas Gardens,
a not-for-profit organisation
serving the elderly of South Florida lor 43 years
Area Deaths ==
SEGALL
Betty died on Sept. 27. She was the wife
of the late Louis Segall; and the mother
of Annette Jungreis, Estelle Dworkow
and Richard Segall. She is also survived
by grandchildren and great-
grandchildren. Funeral services were
held at Menorah Chapels, Sunrise.
GRUBER
Jacob B.. of Plantation, died Oct 14, at
the age of 87. He came to Florida 20
years ago from Chicago where he had
been in the wholesale food business for
30 years. He is survived by his wife,
Elizabeth; daughter, Geraldine Victor of
No. Lauderdale: son. Donald of Coconut
Yiddish Theater
Now On Video
By MARLENE GOLDMAN
NEW YORK (JTA) The
increasingly popular world of
VCR entertainment now pre-
sents authentic Yiddish thea-
ter, in all its schmaltz.
Specializing in this area is
the recently launched Yiddish
Video Club, the brainchild of
Raymond Ariel and Richard
Slote.
"We're a hamishe opera-
tion," Slote laughed, but it's a
labor of love."
The first fruit born to that
small organization comes in
the form of a two-hour video
cassette of "A Match Made in
Heaven," featuring Reizl
Bozyk, of the hit film "Cross-
ing Delancey."
About 40 people, including
25 performers, 10 technicians
and five post-production oper-
ators, collaborated on the pro-
ject.
"A Match," which ran a full
season at Town Hall in New
York nearly three years ago
before departing on a national
tour, appeals to several gener-
ations, Ariel said, because of
its Yiddish song and dialogue
complemented by English sub-
titles.
"All kinds of people are
interested in this,' said Ariel,
who produced both the stage
show and the video tape. "It's
not just older people.'
Slote, who directed the video
agreed. "The whole family can
sit and watch together. The
grandparent listens to the Yid-
dish and the grandchild follows
along with subtitles."
Grove; six granddaughters, two grand-
sons and two great-granddaughters. Ser-
vices were private with arrangements by
Mason Funeral Home.
HARBER
Carl, a resident of Fort Lauderdale, died
on Oct. 9 at the age of 89. Harber, who
had been a resident here for the past 26
years, was the founder of Tanenbaum-
Harber Insurance Co. in N.Y.C. He is
survived by his daughters, Ellyn Gold-
stein of Miami and Barbara (Robert)
Schneider of Harrison, N.Y.; grandchil-
dren, Linda (Ronnie) Fishman, Cathi
Schneider and Howard Goldstein; three
great-grandchildren, Shalene, Jeannine
and Michael; and friend, Margie Krieger.
Services were held at the Riverside
Douglas Road Chapel.
Are You Considering Making A Pre-Arranged Funeral?
If your answer is YES
COMPLETE AND MAIL THE ATTACHED FORM
BLASBERQ PARKSIDE FUNERAL CHAPELS, INC. will give you a
$100.00 CREDIT towards ANY COMPLETED
PREARRANGED FUNERAL
If you have been thinking of Pre-Arranging a funeral,
DO IT NOW and SAVE $100.00
"Services available in all cemeteries throughout
Broward, Dads and Palm Beach counties"

Blasberg Parkside
FUNERAL CHAPELS, Inc.
LARRIE S. BLASBERG
Funeral Director
IRA M BLASBERG MICHAEL C. BLASBERG
Funeral Director Funefti Director
8135 West McNab Road
Tamarac, Florida 33321
(305)726-1777
720 Seventy-First Street
Miami Beach, Florida 33141
(305)865-2353
BOOKLrN-BRONX-FOBESTHILLS-P^ONTICELLO-WOOOBURY-ROCKVILLE CENTER
Blasberg Parkside Funeral Chapels, Inc.
8135 West McNab Road
Tamarac, Florida 33321
YES! I want to know more about SAVING $100.00 on a Pre-Arranged
Funeral
Name:
Address
Phone:


Page 12 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, October 21, 1988
Another cliche
bites the dust.
Continental's Golden Traveler Passport. And 10% Senior Citizen Discounts.
No other airline offers more ways to save to more of the world.
Continental is retiring a lot of preconceived notions about discount travel programs. With money-saving offers that let you travel the way that's best for you.
First, there's our new Golden Traveler Passport. Good for a fullyear of virtually unlimited travel: Up to 24 round trips per year for travelers
62 years or older. To anywhere we fly in the continental U.S. Over 80 destinations across the U.S. It all starts at just $1299 for the domestic Passport.
At about $55 per round trip. Substantial savings. And for a little more you can add Mexico, the Caribbean and Central America. Or Hawaii. Or Europe.
Or the South Pacific. Or any combination. Your choice.
Or if you're more of an occasional traveler, and don't need a Passport, there's still a great way to save. We're also offering a flat, 10% discount if
you're 65 years or older on any published retail fare. Even Max$avers.
Get all the details by sending in the coupon below. Or call your travel agent or Continental at 1 -800-525-0280 a free brochure.
CONTINENTAL
Working to be your choice.
t '.988 Continental Airlines. Inc
YES. I love to travel. And I love to save money.
Send me all the details on your Golden Traveler
Passport and 10% senior discount.
Mail to: Continental Airlines
Golden Traveler Passport Program
PO Box 521635
Miami. Fla. 33152-1635
Name
Address
Oh.
Stale
-*P_
- -


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