The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale

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Title:
The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 3, no. 7 (Apr. 5, 1974)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 9, 1976 called v.4, no. 27 but constitutes v.5, no. 1; issue for July 7, 1989 called v.18, no. 11 but constitutes v.18, no. 13.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44570954
lccn - sn 00229545
ocm44570954
System ID:
AA00014312:00526

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Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward


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Full Text
cfe^ishFloridian^
fufy OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE
Volume 17 Number 14
Fort Lauderdale, Florida June 3, 1988
rt*
Price: 35 cents
'88 A Year of Challenge Opportunity Achievement___
Federation-'Cornerstone of the Community'
A visibly moved Harold L.
Oshry was proudly installed
as the new president of the
Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale
before a large audience who
gathered for the Jewish
Federation Annual Meeting
and Installation held in the
Harry Levin Gymnasium at
the Soref Jewish Communi-
ty Center, Perlman Family
Campus in Plantation on
May 19. Meeting co-
chairmen were Richard
Finkelstein and Lois Polish.
Oshry showed tears of joy
as he was installed as
Federation president for the
1988-'89 year by his son
Michael and Rabbi Kurt
Stone of the Tamarac
Jewish Center.
Stone looked at Mr. Oshry
as he spoke, saying, "We
are honored to have you in
this community, to
recognize you as president
of our Jewish Federation,
and to follow your leader-
ship for what I am sure will
be a year of great success."
Oshry succeeds Fort
Lauderdale Certified Public
Accountant Sheldon S.
Polish, who during his term
saw the fruition of many
Federation sponsored pro-
jects, including the new
David Posnack Hebrew Day
School building on the
Perlman Family Campus,
the opening of a Federation
satellite office, and the
Jewish Federation Coral
Springs Activity Center in
the northwest suburb.
At the meeting, Polish
and Oshry related, "The
success of this Federation is
the direct result of the com-
mitted leadership we seem
to possess." After recogniz-
ing the past presidents who
were in attendance, awards
were presented including
Young Leadership Awards
to Paul Lehrer and Jo Ann
Levy.
In his remarks, outgoing
Federation president
Sheldon Polish spoke about
the tremendous growth of
the Federation during the
past year. He remarked,
"To be successful, every
Federation president needs
a good campaign chairman
at the outset I didn't have
Mr. President Harold L. Oshry and the first family, Claire and
son Michael.
a good general campaign highlights of the evening,
chairman, I had a great one Oshry presented Joel Reins-
in Harold Oshry." tein with an award for being
There were several other Continued on P**e 2
Area Rallies at Jerusalem Day Celebration
WoridNm
I. i
UNITED NATIONS -
The United States vetoed a
resolution in the Security
Council recently that con-
demned Israel's recent in-
cursion into southern
Lebanon. U.S. Ambassador
Vernon Walters said the
draft, sponsored by six non-
aligned countries, was one-
sided.
Over 300 individuals joined
in the 21st anniversary of the
reunification of the city of
Jerusalem at the sixth annual
Yom Yerushalayim (Jerusalem
Day) observances, May 15
coordinated by the Central
Agency for Jewish Education
at the Tamarac Jewish Center.
The program was introduced
by a dramatic reading and the
blowing of the Shofar by Rabbi
Kurt Stone, Beth Torah
spiritual leader, followed by
the Shalom dancers who thrill-
ed the audience with their
spirited Israeli folk dances.
Helen Weisberg, North
Broward Midrasha ad-
ministrator and coordinator of
the program welcomed the
assemblage, together with Joel
Telles, Administrative director
of the Jewish
Greater Ft.
Federation of
Lauderdale.
The Shalom dancers.
Mayor Norman Abramowitz of
the City of Tamarac, read a
proclamation from the city at-
testing to the recognition of
Jerusalem as a leading
spiritual center, and declaring
May 15 as Jerusalem Day in
the city of Tamarac.
Following the opening
ceremonies, nine concurrent
workshops were held led by
leading Rabbis, educators and
community figures. They con-
centrated on three aspects of
Jerusalem Faith and Vision,
Life and Creativity, and Con-
flict and Accommodation.
Speakers included:
Rabbi Kurt Stone, Beth
Torah; Rabbi Elliot Skiddell,
Ramat Shalom; Rabbi Mark
W. Gross, Beth Orr; Rabbi
Nathan Zolondek, Beth Hillel;
Rabbi Theodore Feldman,
Bnai Torah, Boca Raton;
Cantor Hyman Lifshin; Joel
Telles, Jewish Federation; Dr.
Abraham J. Gittelson, CAJE;
and Efrat Afek, Department
of Education and Culture,
World Zionist Organization.
Keynote speaker of the day
was Professor Thomas Mayer,
Middle East expert who has
written widely on Islamic fun-
damentalism in the Near East.
He spoke on "The Struggle for
Peace in the Middle East"
focusing on placing contem-
porary events in Israel in a
broad perspective of the
historical and sociological
forces operating in that
region.
Continued on Page 11
1!


Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, June 3, 1988
Report to the North Broward County Community at the...
Jewish Federation AnnuaTMeeting May 19
1988-89
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
OFFICERS:
President: HAROLD OSHRY
Executive Vice President: BARBARA WIENER
Vice President : DANIEL CANTOR
Vice President: ALVERA GOLD
Vice President: ALAN LEVY
Vice President: IRVING LIBOWSKY
Vice President: DAVID SOMMER
Vice President: BARTON WEISMAN
Secretary: SOL SCHULMAN
Assistant Secretary: ALAN BECKER
Treasurer: GLADYS DAREN
Assistant Treasurer: WALTER BERNSTEIN
Immediate Past President: SHELDON POLISH
BOARD MEMBERS:
ROBERT ADLER RICHARD LEVY
* PETER DEUTSCH BEN MARCUS
SIDNEY DORFMAN GILBERT MERRILL
JUDAH EVER LEON MESSING
JACK FARBER SIGMUND NATHAN
STEVEN FAYNE HY NATHANSON
RICHARD FINKELSTEIN JOSEPH NOVICK
DONALD FISCHER CHARLOTTE PADEK
MORRIS FURMAN DR. JAMES PHILLIPS
* MICHAEL GREENBERG LEE RAUCH
DEBORAH HAHN DR. MARC SCHWARTZ
DR. PHILLIP KANEV BREN SIMON
WILLIAM KATZBERG MORRIS SMALL
DR. KERRY KUHN ELLIOT SOKOLOW
ALEX KUTZ MARVIN STEIN
PAUL LEHRER MEYER STEINBERG
HILDA LEIBO RABBI KURT STONE
ESTHER LERNER JEFFREY STREITFELD
* AARON LEVEY DANIEL TISHBERG
JO ANN LEVY GERALD WILLIAM
MARK LEVY WOLF WITTENBERG
LIFE MEMBERS
SEYMOUR GERSON ISRAEL RESNIKOFF
SEN. SAM GREENBERG SAMUEL SOREF
CHARLES LOCKE SIDNEY SPEWAK
SAMUEL K. MILLER JOHN STRENG
ANITA PERLMAN
ADVISORY COMMITTEE
PHILLIP COHEN ALFRED GOLDEN
* ABRAHAM DAVID DR. ROBERT GRENITZ
MILTON EDELSTEIN BERNARD LIBROS
LEONARD FARBER SAULPADEK
IRVING R. FRIEDMAN STUART REICH
RABBIS
HOWARD A. ADDISON RANDALL KONIGSBURG
JEFFREY BALLON JOSEPH M. LANGNER
AVROM DRAZIN AARON LIEBERMAN
MARK GROSS LEWIS LITTMAN
ISRAEL HALPERN PAUL PLOTKIN
SHELDON J.HARR ELLIOT SKJDDELL
* new members
Outgoing President's Award to
Sheldon Polish from Harold
Oshry.
Annual meeting
Lois Polish.
co-chairman
Israel's Population Totals $4.43 Million
TEL AVIV (JTA) Israel's
population on the 40th anniver-
sary of its independence stood at
4.43 million, of whom, 3.63 million
are Jews, according to figures
released by the Central Bureau of
Statistics on Independence Day.
In the four decades since the
Jewish state was founded, its
overall population has grown
more than five and a half times,
and its Jewish population slightly
more. This was due primarily to
immigration.
There were only 650,000 Jews
in Israel (806,000 total) when it
won independence in 1948. Since
1984, some 1.8 million immigrants
have arrived in the country.
Outstanding Award for the
HUD 202 Elderly goes to
Representative Peter Deutsch.
!988-'89 officers Gladys Daren, Barton Weisman, Irv-
ing Libowsky, Barbara K. Wiener, Daniel Cantor and
Alvera Gold. Not pictured, Harold Oshry, Alan Levy,
David Sommer, Sol Schulman, Alan Becker, and
Walter Bernstein.
Judaica High School students report on 'March of Liv-
ing' trip.
Super Sunday chairmen
honorees Ava and Jim
Phillips.
Special Campaign Awards to
Leon Messing and Lee Rauch.
Executive director Kenneth B.
Bierman and Nominating and
Installation chair Brian J.
Sherr. '
Annual meeting chair Richard
Finkelstein
'Cornerstone of the Community'
Continued from Page 1
this year's major gifts chair-
man. Lee Rauch and Leon
Messing received awards as
outstanding workers. Jacob
Brodzki received an award
as Foundation chairman.
The Super Sunday award
went to Jim and Ava
Phillips, who have agreed to
be chairpersons of Super
Sunday in January of 1989.
Irving Libowsky, Palm-Aire
major gifts chairman was
honored for his years of ser-
vice to the Federation. A
Council of Jewish Federa-
tions certificate was
presented to Sheldon Polish
for his distinguished service
as president of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale.
One of the most touching
moments of the evening**oc-
curred when eight Judaica
High School students who
were part of a contingent of
1,500 who went on the
"march of the living" trip to
Poland's concentration
camps and to Israel came to
the podium to speak about
their experiences. Many
members of the audience
were in tears as one student
passionately spoke of the
tragedy of our people in
those camps due to Hitler's
attempted annihilation of
the Jews. She spoke of her
commitment to see that
something like that never
happens again to
Jewish men, women, and
children.
Harold Oshry, new
Federation president, in his
address to the audience,
stated, "I wUl remember
this night for all time I am
only beginning to appreciate
the responsibility and covet
of becoming this Federa-
tion's president."
Federation executive
director Kenneth Bierman
emphasized that the increas-
ing growth of the North
Broward County Communi-
ty calls for a 'reaching out'
among the more than 20
municipalities, and credited
the members of the Federa-
tion staff for a job of great
accomplishment.


Friday, June 3, 1988/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 3
'88 A Year of Challenge Opportunity Achievement
Federation 'Cornerstone of the Community'
Hebrew Day School students and Gerald William.
Area Chairmen Awards to, from left, front, Marvin
Stein, Hilda Leibo, and Donald Fischer; middle row,
Mark Schaffer and Irving Libowsky; and back, Paul
Lehrer and Jeffrey Streitfeld. Not pictured, Mark
Levy and Joseph Kranberg.
Presenting Women's Division
Paul Lehrer and the Young report is president Alvera
Leadership Award. Gold.
Meeting Awards
Presentations
General Campaign Chairman........................Harold L. Oshry
Major Gifts...................................................Joel Reinstein
Special Campaign Co-Chairmen... Alan Becker, Daniel Cantor,
Richard FinkeUtein, Samuel K. Miller
Charlotte Padek, Morris Small
Area Chairmen..................Donald Fischer, Joseph Kranberg,
Paul Lehrer, Hilda Leibo, Mark Levy,
Irving Libowsky, Mark Schaffer,
Marvin Stein, Jeffrey Streitfeld
Super Sunday.......................................Ava and Jim Phillips
Special Campaign..........................Leon Messing, Lee Rauch
Foundation...................................................Jacob Brodzki
Young Leadership..........................Jo Ann Levy, Paul Lehrer
Special President's.....................................Irving Libowsky
Outgoing Board Members......Abraham David, Richard Entin,
Dr. Robert Grenitz, David Krantz
Outgoing President's....................................Sheldon Polish
Helping Our Jewish Brethren...
Among the Thousands
of Soviet Jews
Denied the Right to Emigrate
TEACHER
LEV EPSTEIN
Kargla Libknekhta 116-74
MINSK 60
Bel.SSR, USSR
Although the rest of his family (wife Dora, son Boris, daughter
Maria) have been in Israel 10 years, Lev Epstein, 53, has been
prevented from joining them on the grounds of "secrecy." He did
not come into contact with secret information in his job as a
geography teacher at a school in a labor camp for criminals. He
retired in 1979, seven months before submitting his application to
emigrate.
Special Campaign co-chairmen recipients, from left,
front, Samuel K. Miller, Richard Finkelstein, Daniel
Cantor, and back, Morris Small and Charlotte Padek.
Not pictured, Alan Becker.
Outgoing Foundation chair-
man Jacob Brodzki, right, with
Sheldon Polish.
Recipient of the Major Gifts
Award from Harold Oshry is
Joel Reinstein, right.
Young Leadership Award reci-
pient Jo Ann Levy.
SHE NEEDS
YOUR HELP
Put your donations
to good use..
Help hundreds of frail indigent
elderly like her by donating to
I
ouglas Gardens
Miami Jewish Home & Hospital
Thrift Shops
Proceeds used for medicine and supplies for
the elderly of your community
TO HELP THEM, WE HEED YOUR HELP
Furniture Clothing Household goods Appliances
Dade: 6250620 Broward: 981-8245
Call for free pick-up of your fully tax-deductible donations
or visit our two convenient locations:
Miami
5713 N.W. 27th Avenue
Hallandale
3194 Hallandale Beach Blvd.
Douglas Gardens Thrift Shops
is division of the Miami
Jewish Home and Hospital lor
the Aged at Douglas Gardens,
a not-for-profit organization
serving the elderty ot South Florida tor 43 years


Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, June 3, 1988
Focus, Viewpoints, Opinions, and Commentaries
The vkwi expressed by columnists, reprinted editorial,, and copy do not necessarily
reflect the opinion of the Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale.
Elimination By Stages
During the first few months of the riots in the West Bank and
Gaza Strip, "there was great sympathy in Israel, from the left and
the center, for the uprising," Tel Aviv University's Dr. Clinton
Bailey said recently in Washington. He believes that had the
Palestinian Arabs then said they wanted half a loaf the ter-
ritories, not Israel inside the pre-1967 green line as well and
had they entered negotiations with Jordan, not the PLO, accom-
modation might have been possible. But they did not and, in reac-
tion, Israeli attitudes have hardened.
The Arabs of the territories did not seize a promising opportuni-
ty because they, and other Arabs, are waging a battle beyond the
politics of conciliation and compromise. They still have the whole
loaf in mind and if they cannot get it all now, they are taking care
political arrangements reached in the short run do not preclude
the long-run goal based on the old strategy of the destruction of
Israel in stages.
Why could no Arab members of ABC's "Nightline" debate state
unequivocally that he or she would accept Israel pre-1967 borders
in exchange for self-determination on the West Bank and Gaza
Strip? Partly, no doubt, from fear of departing from the PLO line,
and partly, one assumes, from agreement with that line.
When Yasir Arafat himself plays the moderate, saying he would
accept PLO rule on any land from which Israel withdraws, he
always is careful not to abandon claims to all the land remaining
under Israeli control. In other words, Jericho today, Jaffa
tomorrow.
Leaflet number 14 "issued by the PLO/Unified Command for
the uprising in the occupied territories" repeats the PLO demand
for "our people's national legitimate rights of return, self-
determination and the establishment of an independent Palesti-
nian state." The "right of return" to Israel proper for more
than one million Palestinian Arabs precedes the demand for a
Palestinian Arab state because, in PLO ideology, that state is to
include eventually the territories and pre-1967 Israel.
The 1988 pocket appointment book published by Al-Fajr, an
east Jerusalem newspaper which echoes the line of Arafat's
Fatah group, describes Palestine as comprising the territories
and Israel. Jordan's origins as part of the Palestine Mandate are
conveniently omitted. And the booklet rewrites history to
eliminate Jewish claims, asserting that "none of the conquerers
maintained a lasting presence in Palestine until the Muslim con-
quest of the 7th A.D. Today, Palestine is still under Israeli
occupation."
Saudi staHmtnlTMs cartoon appeared in the Saadi Arabian newspaper Al-Jmzira and
was npchmd in the Apr. 27 edition of Ytdu* Achromoi. a* Israeli daily. It rinm lac
"wind" Iron a Saudi t hincse-byih "Easl Wind" intenrnedialr ranir baHMic missile
Mowing, over a mtmerah bearing the Star of David.
A cartoon from the state-controlled Saudi press repeats in
1988 a theme common to the Arab press from 1948 on: Israel
should be destroyed.
Since Israel is too strong right now to finish off all at once, the
strategy of stages reexerts its influence. Hence the continued
refusal of the Palestinian Arabs to play politics, Western-style,
and settle unconditionally for less than the whole loaf.
Near East Report
SewishFloridian o
Of GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE
FREDK SMOCHET MARVIN LE VINE SUZANNE SHOCHET
Editor and Publisher Director ol Communications Executive Editor
Published Weekly November through April Biweekly balance ot year
Second Claai Postage Paid at Hallandale, Fla. USPS 899420
POSTMASTER: Send addreas channel to The Jewish Floridian,
P.O. Box 012973, Miami, Fla. 33101
r
Fort Lauderdale Hollywood Office 8358 W Oakland Park Blvd., Fort Lauderdale. % 33351
Phone 748-8400
Plant: 120 NE 8th St., Miami, Fla. 33132 Phone 1-3734805
Member JTA, Seven Arts. WNS, NEA, AJPA, and FPA
Jewish riirlHan Daee Net Gaaraatee Kaearata of Merchandise Advertised.
SUBSCRIPTION RATE: 2 Year Minimum $7 50 (Local Area S3 95 Annual) or by membership
Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale Harold L. Oehry, President, Kenneth B. Blermen, Ex-
ecutive Director; Marvin La Vina, Director of Communications. Ruth Geller, Aaslstant Director of
Communications. Cralg Luatgartan, Communications Associate 8358 W. Oakland Park Blvd., Fort
Lauderdale, FL 33351 Phone (306) 7484400. Mail for the FedefifHon and The Jewish Floridian of
Greater Fort Lauderdale should be addressed: Jewish Fedaratldbf OreadH Fort Lauderdale, P.O.
it SIVAN 5748
Number 14
'Nightline' Road Show Chic
Boa 28810, Tamarac, FL 333204810.
June 3, 1988
Volume 17
ABC's "Nightline" began five
days of broadcasts from
Jerusalem on April 25. The net-
work labored mightily, broad-
casting more than seven hours of
late-night television including
interviews, background reports,
the usual commercials and one
three-hour-plus panel discus-
sion/debate to explain the Arab-
Israeli conflict.
"Nightline from the Holy Land"
not Israel revealed much,
confused or concealed enough,
and reconfirmed the perhaps ter-
minal flaws of contemporary
television news. (The April 28
Jerusalem Post cartoon "Dry
Bones" took note of the elided ti-
tle, ascribing it to ABC's desire to
be "evenhanded.")
During the marathon debate
between a three-person panel of
Palestinian Arabs and four
Knesset members, participants
aimed for the gut.
Hanan Mikail-Asharawi, Dean
of Arts at Bir Zeit University,
redefined terrorism as the violent
"symptom of the alienation of
Palestinian Arab rights. A
"foreign, alien occupation" stole
those rights. Stone-throwing
she did not mention Molotov
cocktails, iron bars or knives
constituted only "symbolic
violence."
A haughty, icily-attractive
Madame Defarge, Mikail-
Asharawi like the other Arab
panelists avoided firmly stating
whether "alien occupation"
meant only Israeli control of the
West Bank and Gaza Strip or
Jewish rule in any part of old
Palestine.
Asked if he could make peace
with Israel's Peace Now move-
ment, Dr. Haidar Abdul Shafi,
head of the Gaza Palestinian Red
Crescent, side-stepped: "It would
be accommodating Israeli intran-
sigence and arrogance ... to
recognize it (Israel) while it is oc-
cupying our territory."
Why did Shafi not make peace
with Israel before it gained Judea,
Samaria and Gaza in the 1967 Six-
Day War? Maybe because before
then he was a member of the
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
tion's first Palestine National
Council (PNC), and that group
was intent on "liberating" Israel
inside the pre-1967 green line.
Shafi made it clear that Israel's
crimes began not in 1967 but
"first by bringing hundreds of
thousands of Jewish immigrants
... in violation of the Palestinian
right of self-determination ..
and by (the 1947 UN) partition."
In other words, Jews out.
Saeb Erakat, editor of Al-Quds,
the largest Arabic daily published
in the territories and a political
science professor at An-Najah,
demanded: Which Israel are we to
recognize? The Israel of 1947,
1948, 1967, 1988 Israel is the
only nation-state without
boundaries!"
Of course, the reason Erakat
has multiple dates is that the
Arabs pronounced multiple rejec-
tions of Israel. The reason the
boundaries are not settled is
because the Arabs except
Egypt still insist that Israel
does not rightfully exist.
Erakat tangled himself in
hyperbolic references to Hitler,
then insisted that "occupation is
the highest form of terrorism .
Where are your Jewish values
now?"
Haim Ramon, of the Labor Par-
ty, responded: "I am interested in
the future Are you ready to
compromise? The PLO to this
minute refuses to accept us in any
boundaries."
Dedi Zucker, of the leftist
Citizens Rights Party, reproached
Erakat: "You may not come to
terms with Ehud (Olmert of
Likud). and you won't with me,
not with this kind of vocabulary."
Olmert himself, referring to all
three Arab panelists, observed
that "I never heard from the Arab
side the word compromise."
And Eliahu Ben-Elissar of
Likud, Israel's first Ambassador
to Egypt, asserted, "They want
their state and (they want) me
not to have my state (But) the
world will not see Jewish refugees
again."
"Nightline" let a PLO
spokesman deny that the
organization ever pledged to
destroy Israel, then showed a por-
tion of the "Palestine National
Charter" which calls for Israel's
elimination.
But key points including the
first partition of Palestine, in
1922, creating Arab Transjordan,
and the influx of Jewish refugees
to Israel from Arab countries
got little attention.
At the end, Koppel admitted
that "a few thousand hours of
television coverage out here
doesn't amount to a heartbeat."
Certainly not when
"evenhandedness" becomes a
cop-out for refusing to separate
fact from fiction.
Near East Report
CELEBRATION
20^^40
MMtA'iON
or G'lt
Ot* LAuOftOIUI
STATE
OF ISRAEL
THE TRADITION CONTINUES
In Memoriam to a Great Friend
By STANLEY M. LEFCO
Five days before his tragic and untimely death, Itzhak Sordo,
who served in the Atlanta, GA community as the Israeli shaliach,
approached me while I was at the Zachor Holocaust Center,
located in the lower level of the Jewish Community Center.
Although only an acquaintance, he always made it a point to greet
me on the few occasions we would see each other. He wanted me
to view two films on the Holocaust. One was entitled, "The Bird-
man," which was about a survivor, who raised birds in Israel. The
other was "The Last Sea," the story of the heroic efforts of sur-
vivors to reach Israel.
Although disjointed and of poor quality, the second film related
a most compelling story. The viewer is told that the voices he will
hear are those of people, who actually took part in the events
covered. In the opening scene people are cheering the arriving
allied soldiers. They are hugging and kissing one another.
"Freedom. What will I do with it? I spit on it," a survivor bitterly
states.
Then the screen starkly shows the bodies of those who did not
survive the Holocaust. "My dream was to have a whole loaf of
bread," a survivor relates as we witness an emaciated man sitting
and eating bread behind a barbed wire fence.
Another voice cries, "My dream is to go to Palestine and meet
my brother and father." And another, "I sought the hatred inside
me, but couldn't find it." And yet another, "Why did this happen?
I couldn't find an answer. There is no answer."
People are seen singing and dancing. These are the fortunate
ones, who survived the war and are returning to their homes, but
they were nocvictims of the Holocaust. A voice sadly recalls, "I
was with the group that traveled to the Czech border. I realized I
had no place to return to."
"Maybe, just maybe one of my sisters
another.
perhaps," prays
Then one sees destroyed villages and pictures of Jewish
children, who managed to survive by hiding in such places as
monasteries. The scene changes, and there are coffins and people
crying. The aftermath of a pogrom in Poland is observed. Sur-
vivors were butchered with knives and axes, we are told.
The poignant point is that for Jews Europe was no longer home,
no longer a place to which they could return. A voice confesses,
"There is nothing left for us here (Poland)." And another, "I
dream of going to the synagogue that isn't there." And yet
another, "I thought it was my homeland. I thought I was equal to
my Polish friends. I was wrong."
Jews are seen leaving with their belongings. This time the pic-
tures of the trains show the smiling faces of those emigrating.
This time the hugs and kisses are wishes of safe journeys and
goodbyes. The flag of Israel flutters from a train window.
Then there are scenes of Jews crossing snow-capped mountains
into Italy, bearded Jews of Morocco with their belongings strap-
ped to donkeys, immigrants crowded on Palestine-bound ships, a
confrontation with the British navy and again Jews dying, David
Ben Gurion professing, "We're ready to die for Israel," and final-
ly the fortunate disembarking from one of the 65 illegal im-
migrant ships that reached Israel.
I shall never be able to thank Itzhak for sharing these two
movies with me. Just as these films had a message, he also came
to Atlanta with a message. Let us pray that he and the messages
of hope and love of Israel will be cherished and remembered
always.
The author is an attorney and active with the Young Leadership
Group of the Atlanta, Ga. Federation.


"D'vash"...
%
"... set out from here to
a land of milk and honey"
(Exodus 33:3}
DEBORAH FULLER HAHN
Friday, June 3, 1988/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 5
ART AND JUDAISM
Most Jews are familiar with
the second commandment
which states, "You shall not
make for yourself any graven
image.." (Exodus 20:4). This
injunction has been inter-
preted variously over the
centuries. It has certainly
affected the work of Jewish
artists throughout the ages.
Like Marc Chagall, some
choose never to paint 'lifelike'
portraits. Others have limited
their artistic endeavors to reli-
gious objects such as illumin-
ated manuscripts or Torah
covers. Many ignored the stric-
ture altogether in their search
for creativity.
There is a very interesting
theory put forth by Yaacov
Agam of a specific 'Jewish' art
that reflects the Jewish way of
life and its particular unique-
ness. Agam'8 qualifications to
advance these ideas are many.
An Israeli sabra, he has
become one of the world's
leading contemporary artists.
His masterpieces invite the
viewer to be a participant in
the process of the art. There
are never ropes to keep the
viewer away. Each person is
invited to partake of a
changing experience. Ever-
yone sees each work from a
different vantage point and
will have a different experi-
ence.
His father, an Orthodox
Rabbi, taught him to see
Judaism as a reflection of life.
Just as 'life' is different from
moment to moment, a 'reflec-
tion of life' should also be in
constant motion. He has said,
'We never set foot in the same
stream of water twice because
it is in constant flow. This is
the Jewish view of life .
change, with continuity, but
always active, creative
change."
When Noah and his family
left the ark they were greeted
by a rainbow the visual
symbol of creative renewal
(Gen. 9:13). Agam states,
"Art, like the rainbow, and
like life, has no specific origin
or end, but is continuous ... it
goes on and on. Art is a
unique medium of communica-
tion ... The biblical use of the
rainbow as the first example of
art reflects the essence of
reality. It is ... an invisible
light which, when broken a
certain way, yields a colorful
rainbow. We see the consequ-
ence of the action of light, but
the full essence behind the
rainbow light itself is not
visible.'
Thus the meaning Second
Commandment "Thou shalt
make no graven image." is
interpreted by Yaacov Agam
to mean 'don't make graven
images,' i.e. limiting, enclosing
images. He believes that just
as there is much that is invis-
ible in life, there is much that
is invisible in Judaism. He
says, "We go into a synagogue
... however, the building, the
seats, the Rabbi's voice, the
words of prayer even the
stained glass windows ... are
not in and of themselves the
meaning of the (Jewish) expe-
rience. The reality behind any
religious experience is invis-
ible?'
When we support our Jewish
Federation/U JA ... when we
help ourselves and our neigh-
bors through our local Jewish
agencies when we visit
Israel .. when we offer our
energies, ideas, and resources
for the betterment of the
Jewish people ... at home, in
Israel, and all over the world
... we are challenged to live
creatively. The results may not
be entirely visible but we can
see the rainbow.
Hebrew Day School Gets Holocaust Torah
From London Synagogue
At the recent Yom Hashoa
program held at the David
Posnack Hebrew Day School, a
Holocaust memorial Torah scroll
was donated by Joann Folic to the
day school.
Folic, a former teacher at the
Hebrew Day School, was respon-
sible for procuring the Torah
Scroll from the Westminster
Synagogue in London after a year
of corresponding with the Syna-
gogue's officials and filing various
application papers.
Folic related, "I knew the
Hebrew Day School needed a
Torah and I had heard that one of
this area's synagogues had gotten
one of these scrolls from England,
and so I began corresponding with
the Westminster Synagogue to
attain one."
There were 1,564 sacred scrolls
which came to Westminster Syna-
gogue in 1964 that had been
gathered together in Prague,
from the desolated synagogues of
Posnack Hebrew School
Proposed Slate 1988/89
Board of Directors
The following slate as certified by the Nominating Committee
will be voted at the Annual Meeting June 6, 1988, at the School,
6511 W. Sunrise Blvd., Plantation.
Rabbi Howard Addison Barbara Liss
Steven Baum Heidi O'Mara
Cathy Bierman Ava Phillips
Dr. Karl Brot Dr. Jim Phillips
Gladys Daren Pearl Reinstein
Shelley Epstein Sol Schulman
Libo Fineberg Edith Sherman
Ray Finkel Howard Sherman
Paul Frieser Dr. Marc Schwartz
Rabbi Mark Cross Carole Skolnik
Howard Horowitz Morris Small
David Jackowitz Rabbi Kurt Stone
Judy Levine Stuart Tatz
Marilynn Levine Gerry Zipris
Agency Focus
A Fun Time for Seniors
Why are these talented people smiling? They have just finished a
program of joyful music for the appreciative seniors of the Jewish
Federation's Kosher Nutrition Program. Leo Horowitz, director,
(fourth from the right) of the Sunrise Choraleers, looks forward to
their annual visit because he knows how much his work is loved.
Bohemia and Moravia, by the Nazi
official in charge of the Czech
"Protectorate".
Evidently, Hitler had estab-
lished a museum in Prague as a
memorial to his planned extinc-
tion of the Jewish race every-
thing was expertly gathered and
catalogued. When the liberation
occurred, the museum was left as
it was, but the Torah scrolls were
given in trust to Westminster
Synagogue in London. The Syna-
gogue has in turn lent over 1,000
Joann Folic proudly holds the
Holocaust memorial Torah
Scroll.
of these scrolls to synagogues and
other institutions all over the
world.
The particular Torah scroll that
was lent to the Hebrew Day
School in perpetuity came from
Prague-Smichov and was written
in 1880.
Folic is hopeful that the Hebrew
Day School students will look into
the history of this Torah scroll,
and perhaps even contact survi-
vors from Czechoslovakia to find
out more about the history and
people of the communities in the
Prague-Smichov area.
Folic added, "I hope this Torah
will be used for special occasions
and that it will serve as a living
reminder of the Holocaust; it's
something that can be utilized by
the Hebrew Day School in many
ways."
The Posnac Hebrew School it a
. member of the Federation/UJA
"Family of Agencies."
JNF Fights Propaganda
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The Jewish National Fund
says it has become the target
of a worldwide propaganda
war against Israel.
Moshe Rivlin, JNF chair-
man, himself encountered a
raucous pro-Palestinian
demonstration in Basel,
Switzerland, he told the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency.
He said Arab propagandists
in' the United States and
Europe increasingly are focus-
ing on JNF's long history of
land reclamation, acquisition
and development, pillorying
them as anti-Arab activities.
Rivlin said JNF has opened
its archives to a group of
Hebrew University academi-
cians who are compiling a re-
joinder to a recent, purported-
ly scholarly, study of JNF by
Walter and Uri Davis.
This book, entitled "The
Jewish National Fund," ap-
peared this year under the
Keagan Paul label in London
and New York.
In other ad-hoc defensive ac-
tions, JNF has vigorously and
successfully shown:
That the Switzerland
Forest, on the hills above
Tiberias, is planted on land
designated for afforestation by
the British Mandate and not,
as claimed in a Swiss
newspaper, on the land of six
Arab villages.
That the Queen Beatrix of
the Netherlands Forest also
was planted on land reserved
for trees. Dutch television had
questioned the queen's visit to
Israel two years ago on the
grounds that the area of the
forest belonged to a local Arab
village. The headman of that
village, in fact, attended the
forest dedication ceremony
and personally presented a gift
to the queen.
In a wide-ranging interview
with JTA, Rivlin noted a
shrinkage in the size of JNF
missions to Israel, but no
decrease in the number of
those missions as a result of
concern over the security
situation here.
He stressed that JNF in-
come for the 1987-1988 fiscal
year, just tailed, was
statistically up, and indicators
for 1988-1989 are favorable.
Fire Destroys Archives
NEW YORK (JTA) The
Agudath Israel of America
hopes to be able to reconstruct
at least part of the National
Orthodox Jewish Archives
destroyed by a fire that swept
through one floor of the
organization's national head-
quarters in Lower Manhattan.
No one was hurt in the blaze,
which gutted the 11th floor at
84 William Street. The New
York fire marshal had confirm-
ed that the fire was not of a
suspicious nature and
originated with a faulty elec-
trical fixture.
Rabbi Moshe Sherer, presi-
dent, estimated the damage to
the office in the hundreds of
thousands of dollars. But the
archives were priceless, he
said.
They contained thousands of
documents and photographs
relating to the Holocaust, Or-
thodox Jewish life in pre-
Holocaust Europe and the ac-
tivities of Orthodox Jews in
the United States, before and
during the Holocaust, to
rescue Jews in Europe.
They were "a major
repository of matters relating
to an urgent time in history,'
Sherer said. He said the fire
destroyed 80 to 85 percent of
the archives and what was not
burned is waterlogged.
The waterlogged material
can be restored by profes-
sionals, Sherer said. He said he
hoped much of what was a
total loss could be retrieved
through appeals to scholars
and others who have used the
archives in the past.


Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, June 3, 1988

Foundation of Jewish Philanthropies
Creating A Legacy
For the 21st Century
Joel Reinstein, Chairman
Honor Roll of Donors...
At the April Jewish Federation
of Greater Fort Lauderdale an-
nual meeting, a plaque was
dedicated to 43 individuals,
families and firms who have
established endowment funds
with the Foundation of Jewish
Philanthropies.
The plaque is entitled, "The
Foundation of Jewish Philan-
thropies Honor Role of Donors,"
and more names will be added to
the plaque as individuals establish
a philanthropic fund with the
Foundation.
Establishing a Philanthropic
Fund with the Foundation is your
investment in maintaining the
quality of Jewish life now and in
the future.
Those individuals or families
who have established a philan-
thropic fund with the Foundation
include Max and Bessie Bakal,
Joel and Rita Berman, Walter and
Rita Bernstein, Jacob and Pauline
Brodzki, Ludwik and Pola Brod-
zki, The Bronstein Family, Alan
and Elaine Cohn, Jack and Celia
Farber, Morris E. Goldstein, Leo
and Carolyn Goodman, Norman
and Anita Greenberg, Greenberg,
Taurig, Askew, Hoffman, Lipoff,
Rosen and Quentel, P.A., Evelyn
G. Gross, Victor and Min Gruman,
Deborah Fuller Hahn, Erwin and
Sylvia Harvith, Harold and
Esther Jacoby, Philip and Rita
Kanev, Thomas and Elissa Ellant
Katz, Joseph, Esther, and Robert
Kronman, Kerry and Gail Kuhn,
Louis and Helen Kuriansky, Ar-
thur and Paulette Kwiat, Herbert
and Miriam Lazar, Alan and Mar-
sha Levy, Richard and Marie
Levy, Irving and Esther
Libowsky, Jerome and Pauline
Miller, Jack and Betty Molasky,
Harold and Claire Oshry, Stuart
Reich, Joel and Pearl Reinstein,
Robert and Judith Schulman,
Frederick I, Spitzer, Robert and
Marlene Uchin, Leonard and Jane
Oguss, and Kurt and Alice
Walter.
Those individuals or families
who have established a Charitable
Remainder Trust include Albert
and Barbara Goldstein, Caroline
Goldner, Eddie and Ida Goldberg,
Bruce Fine, Louis and Sylvia
Bornstein, and Gerald and Lor-
raine William.
The Arthur B. Sincoff Memorial
Fund has also been established.
For more information on the
Foundation or establishing an en-
dowment fund, contact Kenneth
Kent, director, at 748-8400.
College Student Summer
Scholarship in Israel
By CRAIG LUSTGARTEN
Thanks to a grant by the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort Laud-
erdale, George Washington Univ-
ersity Student Beverly Wolfer will
be attending a two-month Hebrew
Ulpan course at the Hebrew Univ-
ersity in Jerusalem this summer.
Wolfer, whose mother Esther is
a member of the Women's Divi-
sion Board of the Jewish Federa-
tion, is excited about the prospect
of studying and living in Israel for
the better part of the summer.
Beverly Wolfer said, "I am look-
ing forward to staying with a
family in Jereusalem instead of
staying in the dorms, as it will
force me to speak in Hebrew and
to live daily life like any other
Israeli."
Over the past few years, the
Federation has received occasion-
al requests for scholarship funds,
but had never had a program to
offer monies to those in college or
entering college who wanted to
study in Israel.
So, starting in the 1989 fiscal
year, the Federation Board of
Directors in its effort to assist
Jewish college students whose
families live in the Greater Fort
Lauderdale area has approved an
Israel Scholarship Fund For Col-
lege Students.
The criteria for attaining schol-
arship funds are as follows: (1)
The Student must participate in a
study program that is approved by
the Federation's Education Com-
mittee; (2) The student must
prove financial need; and (3) The
Scholarship funds are to be used
solely for tuition and books for the
study program.
Harold Oshry, Federation presi-
dent, related, "By spending a sum-
mer or some length of time in
Israel, a student will develop that
important initial connection with
the Jewish state, and that support
is needed to ensure Israel's future
and thus the future of our peo-
pie."
Before studying in Jerusalem,
Beverly Wolfer will be spending
three weeks time volunteering her
services on a kibbutz as part of the
Volunteers For Israel Program,
which is also supported by the
Jewish Federation.
Wolfer stated, "I've never
worked on a kibbutz before, so I'm
very interested in seeing what it's
like and to get to know the people
people on a kibbutz have a
different way of looking at
things."
At George Washington Univer-
sity, Wolfer is president of the
Zionist Alliance, a group of stu-
Beverly Wolfer
dents who promote Israel in a
number of different ways on cam-
pus. She was very involved in
coordinating the trip of 500
George Washington students who
were at the Soviet Jewry Rally in
Washington last December.
For further information on the
Jewish Federation Scholarship
Fund for College Students, contact
Joel Telles, administrative direc-
tor, at the Federation 748-8400.
Quarterly Meeting June 15...
Reinstein Named Foundation Chair
Harold Oshry, newly elected
Jewish Federation president, an-
nounced that Joel Reinstein will
be installed as Foundation of
Jewish Philanthropies 1988-89
chairman at the Foundation's
Quarterly Meeting, which will be
held on Wednesday, June 15 at 7
p.m. in the Board of Directors
Room of the Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale on West
Oakland Park Boulevard.
The meeting is open to the
public and donors, perspective
donors, and interested residents
are invited to come and listen to
Mr. Reinstein, who will give a
presentation on financial
awareness and how the Founda-
tion can help potential donors.
Refreshments will be served
following the meeting.
Joel Reinstein has been major
gifts chairman for the past two
Federation/UJA campaigns and
was president of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale in 1985 as well as UJA
General Campaign chairman. He
was the proud recipient of the Ma-
jor Gifts Award at the Jewish
Federation's annual meeting
which was held last month.
Among his many honors and ap-
pointments, Reinstein is on the
Board of Directors of the
American Associates of Ben-
Gurion University, the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith, is one of the founders of
the David Posnack Hebrew Day
School, is a past chairman of the
State of Israel Bonds, and was the
recipient of the Jewish Federa-
tion s Young Leadership Award.
Reinstein is an attorney with
the law firm of Greenberg,
Traurig, Askew, Hoffman, Lipoff,
Rosen, and Quentel.
The Foundation of Jewish
Philanthropies continues to pur-
sue its commitment to the future
of our Jewish community by en-
couraging philanthropy by com-
munity members. The Foundation
is involved in developing a perma-
nent Jewish Community Fund
through endowment and advises
donors with varied interests and
at various levels as to the advan-
tages and income plans for
charitable giving.
Joel Reinstein
For more information on the
Foundation of Jewish Philan-
thropies, contact Kenneth Kent,
Foundation Director, at the
Federation office, 748-8400.
The 10th Annual Donor Lun-
cheon of the B'nai B'rith
Women of Coconut Creek
Chapter 161*8 include from left
co-chairperson Renee Klar-
reich, chairperson Cecile Socks
and Donor credit chairperson
Pauline Aronson.
Congregation Ramat Shalom
TGIS Program June 10
TGIS (Thank Goodness It'Shabbat), an exciting concept where
singles have a chance to meet and enjoy the Shabbat experience,
will hold its next Shabbat program on Friday, June 10 at Con-
gregation Ramat Shalom, 11301 West Broward Blvd., Plantation,
beginning at 10 p.m.
The topic of this month's program is "The Puzzle of Israel
Where do Singles Fit in?"
Rabbi Elliot Skiddell will lead a discussion on the challenges fac-
ing Israel today, the challenge of making Aliyah, and where
singles fit into the picture.
Over 150 singles have attended the monthly TGIS programs at
Fort Lauderdale area synagogues. This will be the last singles
shabbat program of the season and services will resume in the
fall.
Laurie Workman, TGIS chairperson, announced that there will
be some additional singles programming in the summer geared to
singles, single parents, and children. For more information on up-
coming events, contact Laurie Workman at 431-2004 or Joyce
Klein at the Federation, 748-8400.
J
Give a Little...
Help a Lot!
When you donate clothes, furniture, household items or even estates,
not only do you receive your tax deduction, but most important you
receive personal satisfaction. Satisfaction in knowing you're helping support
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Friday, June 3, 1988/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 7
I----------------------------------------------------
Israel's Prime Minister Yitzhak
Shamir and Foreign Minister
Shimon Peres both want peace for
Israel but just have different ideas
about how to achieve it, said U.S.
Rep. Larry Smith, D-Hollywood,
who had the opportunity to speak
to Shamir and Peres while visiting
Israel recently.
"Both Shamir and Peres want
Israel to live in peace with the
Palestinians," Smith said. "We
are just seeing the portrayal of
different approaches to the same
goal."
Rep. Smith Meets With Shamir.
While in Israel, Smith attended
a meeting of Jewish parliamen-
tarians from around the world,
participated in the Fourth Annual
UJA Young Leadership Israeli
Forum, and led an Anti-
Defamation League mission for
congressmen. All of these ac-
tivities allowed him to meet with
Shamir on four different
occasions.
"I gave Shamir my perspectives
as a congressman and a friend
of Israel on the impact of the
rioting," he said. "I didn't tell him
what to do. I just explained the
position of the Congress and let
him know that we would support
Israel in any initiatives it took
toward peace."
Smith added that he has hope
that the violence will subside.
"While all this is going on, I
have to beleive that there are
Palestinian and Israeli Arabs who
deplore this and who don't hate
Jews," he said. "I hope that their
attitude wil prevail."
Smith said Shamir, who has
been criticized for his stubborn
stance on the Shultz Plan, wanted
to relay only one message to the
American people.
"He wants us to know that he
wants peace just like everyone
else," Smith said.
U.S. Congressman Larry
Smith, D-Hollywood, discusses
politics with Israeli Prime
Minister Yitzhak Shamir dur-
ing a recent trip to Israel.

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Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, June 3, 1988
, CAMPAIGN '88 Federation/United Jewish Appeal
f----------_----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Living With the Pride and the Pain...
Ethiopia's Jews in Israel Three Years After Operation Moses
By EDWARD SEROTTA
UJA Press Service
Tall, lanky and black, Uri
Abraham, an Ethiopian Jew
celebrating his second year in
Israel, remembers well his arrival
in the Holy Land. "The first thing
I saw was a man in uniform, just
like the soldiers who shot Jews
dead back in Ethiopia. Then so-
meone took me by the arm and
said, 'Uri, I want to show you
something you've never seen
before: a Jewish soldier.' And the
soldier smiled, shook my hand and
said, 'Welcome to Israel, welcome
home.' "
The Jews of Ethiopia,
persecuted by Marxists, their
farms ruined by famine, began
their quiet and treacherous ex-
odus in 1980. After 8,000 had
reached safety in Israel in 1984,
the Israeli government launched
the top secret Operation Moses.
Between November 1984 and
March 1985, 7,000 were airlifted
from the Sudan to Israel. But
when the story broke in the press,
an angry Sudanese goverment
halted the rescue. It has not yet
been allowed to resume. Approx-
imately 10,000 Jews remain in
Ethiopia.
Of the 15,200 Ethiopian Jews in
Israel, almost all have family still
at home. The mental anguish is
great, but Operation Moses is a
story of remarkable progress.
In Israel, You Never Know Who Will
Be Dropping By To Visit
Yes, in Metulla, up in Israel's
Galilee, you never know who will
be dropping by. Quiet and serene,
Metulla is located at the top of
Israel, bordering on Lebanon.
There, Metulla's Jews long for a
normal life, a place to work, a
place to educate their children,
and most importantly, a future.
And the same holds true for the
West Bank and the Gaza. That's
not too much to ask for, is it?
Yet, not too long ago, it was a
suicide car that dropped by early
one morning crashing through the
Israeli-Lebanese security zone,
driven by fanatics whose last act
on this earth was to deliver death
and destruction to innocent
Jewish people.
Forty times in the last two
A Fun Day For Our Seniors
American Savings, as a public service, provided
a stirring slide show on the 'Diary of Anne
Frank.' From left., Gertrude Cumora and Ida
Goldsmith and center, Savings representative,
Rebecca Magley.
years, the uneasy peace of the up-
per Galilee of Metulla has been
disrupted by the shrapnel of ter-
rorist attack. In Israel, they call
these unexpected attacks "in-
cidents" a journalistic
understatement for their un-
chosen way of life. And, of course,
what is happening in the ter-
ritories has been well documented
and needs no further expansion.
We have never had to live with
the constant threat of drop-in
visitors whose murderous inten-
tions are based on one thing
that we are Jewish.
What's the connection between
you and the Jews of Metulla, the
West Bank, Gaza? We are united
because of our common heritage.
We are all one people, with one
destiny! What threatens their ex-
istence threatens Jews around the
world.
And because we are one people,
with one dream, and one destiny,
we are faced with the responsibili-
ty of unmet needs right here at
home as well.
Locally, the Jewish Federation
of Greater Fort Lauderdale
serves men, women and children
of all ages, from the Soref Jewish
Community Center, Perlman
Family Campus to the Central
Agency for Jewish Education.
Our newly opened Jewish Federa-
tion Coral Springs Activity
Center, and the satellite offices on
University Drive. The magnifi-
cent David Posnack Hebrew Day
School complex to the recently ap-
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National United Jewish Appeal chairman Martin F. Stein joins
Ethiopian students at the Hofim Youth Center in Israel, for the
blessing after meals. Hofim, which specializes in absorbing young
Ethiopian immigrants, is funded largely by the FederationJUJA
campaign. UJA Press Service Photo Robert A. Cumins
"The first thing we learned,"
said Morton Dolinsky of the
Jewish Agency's Immigration and
Absorption Department, "is
whatever you thought you could
take for granted, you couldn't.
These are people who had never
seen a door, a faucet. You see,
when you tell someone class
begins at 8:00, you have to tell
them how to use a clock. But are
they ever fast learners "
Although the majority of Ethio-
pian men had never even seen a
metal tool before, the Amishav
Agency set up technical schools to
teach plumbing, woodworking,
and machine work, placing 2,000
men in factory jobs, and scores of
women in nursing. Young men are
now serving in the Israeli Army.
Many have already been absorbed
into the general society.
Hofim, an educational center
for Ethiopian children, funded
largely by the Federation/UJA
Campaign, was established with
everything from kindergartens to
computers. Rabbi Nachum Cohen,
its director, says, "We have 94
boys in their early 20s. Our goal is
simple to provide 2,000 years of
technical training and make them
job-marketable in 24 months. And
they work harder than anyone
I've ever seen. They know what
they've left behind. And we know
Operation Moses is, for us, ongo-
ing. They have great pride, these
Ethiopians, but there will be pain
for years to come."
proved HUD 202 subsidized hous-
ing apartment units for the elder-
ly in West Sunrise. These and
many more make up the Federa-
tion "Family of Agencies and
Beneficiaries" who operate daily,
thanks to you. From Dimona to
Deerfield Beach, from Fort
Lauderdale to France, the needs
of Jews are aided by your heart-
felt generosity. We all help in a
very tangible way, and for that we
need YOU!
You help keep Jews everywhere
strong by contributing and paying
your pledge to the '88 Federa-
tion/United Jewish Appeal cam-
paign and the time to do so is
NOW!
Please open your heart, and
open your checkbook. Give
generously because so much
depends upon your support!
Mail your gifts to Federa-
tion/UJA, 8S58 W. Oakland Park
Blvd., Fort Lauderdale, FL 83151,
or call 71,8-81,00.
The Community Seder recently
held at the JCC was attended by
over 200, and included Jeanette
Greenbaum, left, and Elaine
Mandel.
Isn't the
yoi
A10-MINUTE
Ft. La
Boca
Miam
Ft Pie
Call on we*
Rales listed >
Southern Be
anoaconr
D* StMun (1 ?) chugn apf*. TImm chwgw do apply *"



Friday, June 3, 1988/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 9
frnm the Desk of the President and General Chairman...
Federation/UJA The Final Result
is World Jewry Benefits
Every Dollar Pledged Must Be Paid
By HAROLD L. OSHRY
Ever get to wondering how significant your con-
tribution is to the 1988 Jewish Federation/United
Jewish Appeal campaign; or, conversely, how im-
portant it is to you, the individual Jewish member
living in North Broward County?
Moses Maimonides, in the Mishneh Torah wrote,
"We are obligated to be more scrupulous in fulfill-
ing the commandment of Tzedakah more than
any other positive commandment. We are
obligated to be more scrupulous because Tzedakah
is a sign of the righteous person, the seed of
Abraham our Father."
EACH GIFT COUNTS
The annual Federation campaign provides the
opportunity for every Jew in Greater Fort Lauder-
dale to contribute to the building and securing of
Jewish life here at home, throughout the United
States, in Israel, and 34 other lands overseas with
one gift. The major community service agencies in
our community, the Jewish Agency for Israel,
which is by far the largest non-governmental
human service organization in the State of Israel,
and some 50 other important Jewish service agen-
cies all benefit from each gift. Every dollar is
important.
As this campaign comes to an end, the funds
raised to date, some $6.9 million are being
allocated to these agencies and beneficiary
organizations. But the true beneficiaries are in-
dividuals men, women and children. They in-
clude the elderly and the frail in the Kosher Nutri-
tion/Gathering Place many who have nothing
beyond Social Security; the family at Jewish Fami-
ly Service trying to straighten out its emotional
problems, the senior citizen or pre-school child at
the Soref Jewish Community Center, the young
boy and girl at the David Posnack Hebrew Day
School, the Ethiopian immigrant in Israel, the
Romanian immigrant whose kibbutz is barely mak-
ing a go of it, the teenager in Morocco thirsting for
an education.
All of these people benefit from your contribu-
tion. The final result is that the whole community
benefits the whole of world Jewry benefits.
PLEDGES VS. DOLLARS
Like almost every Jewish Federation, ours has
an enviable collection record. Almost all of the
money that is pledged is paid. That is one of the
major reasons that our system works. Every dollar
is committed. Every dollar that is pledged must be
paid.
Your participation in the Federation campaign
makes you a builder of a stronger Jewish
community.
Shalom
What's Happening.
JUNE
June 8 Women's Division Meetings.
9:30 exec. 10:30 board.
June 8 CRC Domestic Concerns Com-
mittee Meeting. 7:30 p.m. Federation.
June 10 TGIS Ramat Shalom. 10 p.m.
June 14 Campaign Cabinet Meeting.
5:30 p.m.
June 15 Foundation Quarterly
Meeting. 7 p.m.
INFORMATION
For more information, contact the
Jewish Federation at 748-8400.
Harriette Tucker, who went
on the Federation community
mission said the only way to
really experience Israel is on a
mission. For more informa-
tion, contact Sandy Jackowitz
at 748-8400.
1988
CAMPAIGN PLEDGES
TO DATE
(As of May 24, 1988)
$7,200,000
$7,000,000
$6,830,000 -
$5,000,000
$4,000,000
$3,000,000
$2,000,000
$1,200,000
$1,000,000
Jewish
Federation
of Greater Ft. Lauderdale
United Jewish Appeal Campaign
General Chairman
Harold L. Oshry
Zk
ilo, Everyone
there someone special
you'd like to call:
IINUTE CALL FROM PALM BEACH TO:
Ft Lauderdale $1.90
Boca Raton $1.90
Miami $2.50
Ft. Pierce $1.90
,n weetends or alter 11 p.m. and save even more
listed ove ate in effect 5-11 p.m Sunday-Friday
@
Southern Bell
A BOLSOUTH Company
uthernfteu provides services withm your calling zon.
ind a (*^w toother long dwttree cotnMt**
pplylopon.parMn.coiho(-go-, crtfcngc^ coi.cic^c*crf0.drwrwrxin*er. or to t.m..nd ch.ro. calls Rates sublet to chug. Daytime rw. r h.gherRatw do not reflect Wool, tafrrrt
This Is Southern Bell!
ndkxalt
L AppkM to lntr.-LATA long Mtn* calk) onry.



Page 10 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, June 3, 1988
Century Village Celebrates Israel's Independence
A large crowd gathers in the Century Village Temple members, residents, and organizations
Clubhouse Theatre. march throughout Century Village.
Tom Katz Chosen as 1988
AZA Distinguished Alumni
The Gold Coast Council AZA of
the B'nai B'rith Youth Organiza-
tion is proud to announce Tom
Katz as its choice for the 1988
AZA Distinguished Alumni
Award.
Initiated earlier this year, the
AZA Distinguished Alumni
Award will be presented annually
to a former member of Gold Coast
Council AZA who has distinguish-
ed himself in his professional life
and by his contribution to the
Jewish people. Mr. Katz was
chosen from among many former
alumni by a special committee of
current AZA members.
Mr. Tom Katz was an active
member and leader in the BBYO
program from 1972-75. During
that time he held many offices on
the chapter, Council and Regional
(state-wide) levels of the organiza-
tion, including Aleph Godol (Presi-
dent) of his chapter, B'nai Israel
AZA No. 232 and of the Florida
Region AZA. In the summer of
1973 he attended the BBYO's In-
ternational Kalian, an intensive
four-week Judaism institute, and
the International Leadership
Training Conference (ILTC), a
highly acclaimed three-week
leadership development program.
Following his graduation from
the BBYO program Mr. Katz
earned his Bachelor's Degree in
Economics from the Wharton
School of the University of Penn-
sylvania and his Juris Doctorate
from Georgetown University. He
currently serves as partner in the
law firm of Ruden, Barnett, Mc-
Closky, Smith, Schuster and
Russell, P.A. He is also married
and has one son.
Mr. Katz's extensive involve-
ment in Jewish affairs has con-
tinued into his adult years. He cur-
rently serves as a Trustee of the
Foundation of Jewish Philan-
thropies of the Jewish Federation
of Greater Fort Lauderdale, and
in the Federation/UJA Lawyers
Division, is a member of the Board
of Directors of the Jewish Federa-
tion of South County and is active-
ly involved with both the
American-Israel Public Affairs
Committee (AIPAC) and the
Jewish National Fund (JNF).
ISRAEL'S UNIQUE
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I.IIM .7:0.11 i'i
ON BISCMNl BAT BETWEEN MIAMI I MIAMI BEACH FLORIDA
Over 1500 Century Village/
Deerfield Beach residents came
out to celebrate the 40th anniver-
sary of Israel's Independence last
month at Century Village's annual
Israel Independence Day spectac-
ular.
Early in the afternoon, Century
Village residents along with 105
major organizations in the Village
marched with banners and flags
during a large processional.
Following the march, the cele-
bration continued in the Century
Village Theatre.
Cantor Moshe Levinson deliv-
ered the national anthems before
members of a packed auditorium
and Rabbi Joseph Langner of
Temple Beth Israel gave the invo-
cation.
Entertainment was provided by
three main groups the Century
Village Choraleers, a group of 100
people directed by Claire Kaye;
the Winnie Winkelstein Yiddish
Chorale; and the Century Village
East Barbershoppers.
The guest speaker at the cele-
bration was Dr. Abe Gittelson,
who directed his address on the
accomplishments of the State of
Israel over the past 40 years and
of her bright but difficult future
ahead.
Mayor Gene Robb presented a
plaque to the Century Village resi-
dents proclaiming May 5 as
Israeli Independence Day m Deer-
field Beach.
Irving Friedman, Federation
board member and Century
Village East celebration
chairman, said that "this year's
program went very well, and ever-
yone was extremely cooperative,
especially my assistant Cybil
Hecker."
Friedman added, "My wife and
I just returned from Israel, and
the spirit we came back with
permeated today's festivities
there was just a tremendous
display of sympathy, dedication,
and love for the State of Israel on
this day."
Business Executive Network
Has Outstanding Event
:%?4
The May meeting of the Federation Business f^' *"**''>
Executive Network featured Norman Braman, ^^A "* *^*-*s*
right, shown with Federation president Harold Susan Rose Symons, chairperson, displays her
Oshry. award of appreciation.
Feminist Decision
Creates Orthodox Turmoil
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Israel's Orthodox religious
establishment is in turmoil
over a Supreme Court ruling
that a woman may sit on a
local religious council.
The case involves Lea
Shakdiel, who was elected last
year to the religious council in
the Negev town of Yeroham
but was not seated because of
objections by Orthodox
members.
Israel's two chief rabbis,
Avraham Shapira (Ashkenazi)
and Mordechai Eliahu (Sephar-
di), issued a joint statement
right after the high court's
decision, warning that
scholars and rabbis might
refuse to sit on religious coun-
cils all over the country if
women were allowed to do so.
The chief rabbis observed
that it was "customary for
reasons of modesty, that men
and women not sit together on
religious bodies."
Each city and township in
Israel has its religious council,
composed of nominees of the
local authorities. Their func-
tion is to maintain local
religious facilities, but the ser-
vice they perform is ad-
ministrative, not theological.
Until now they have been a
male, mainly Orthodox,
preserve.
The Supreme Court ordered
the mayor of Yeroham, Amir
Peretz, to endorse Shakdiel's
nomination within 30 days.
The head of the council, Moshe
Peretz not related to the
mayor said he would rather
resign than sit with Shakdiel
and claimed the other council
members felt the same.
The latest confrontation bet-
ween the religious establish-
ment and the high court, a
secular institution, has its
irony. Shakdiel, a school
teacher who brought the test
case to court, is an observant
Jew. Justice Menahem Elon,
who wrote the decision, is an
Orthodox Jew and Talmudic
scholar.
The judges expressed
"regret" that Shakdiel's pro-
blem was not resolved by the
religious authorities. In the
opinion of certain "wise and
good" halachic authorities, a
woman is in fact halachically
permitted to serve on a
religious council together with
men, the court said.
Shakdiel thanked the court
and Mayor Peretz, who she
said stood by her. She said the
decision was a victory for
religious Zionism and for some
rabbis who came out in favor
of her election. It was also a
triumph for women in Israel,
she said.
$50 Million Raised for Memorial
WASHINGTON (JTA) The United States Holocaust
Memorial Museum fund-raising campaign has gone over
the $50 million level in gifts and pledges and is gaining
momentum, according to U.S. Holocaust Memorial Council
Chairman Havey Meyerhoff.
Wiesel and Sisulu Cited
WASHINGTON (JTA) Elie Wiesel and imprisoned
South African journalist Zwelakhe Sisulu are the recipients
of the International Human Rights Law Group's 1988
Human Rights award. Wiesel was cited for organizing a
conference of Nobel Prize laureates to examine pressing
global problems and the abuse of human rights. Sisulu,
whose New Nation newspaper provided widespread
coverage of the anti-apartheid movements, has been de-
tained since 1986.


Friday, June 3, 1988/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 11
Area Rallies at Jerusalem Day Celebration
ontinued from Page 1
The program concluded with
fcirited community singing led
Rabbi Lewis Littman of
emple Bat Yam.
I The day was organized
jirough the Adult Education
[ommittee of the North
Iroward Midrasha, with the
]>onsorship of the Department
Education and Culture of
Jie World Zionist Organiza-
|on. Among those serving in
jjecial responsibilities at the
rogram were Rhoda Dagan,
1AJE staff associate.
The program is part of the
jn-going activities of the
jlorth Broward Midrasha
Ldult Education Institute
fhich includes the Jewish
kook Review Series in con-
iinction with the Broward
fommunity Library System;
he Contemporary Issues Lec-
are Series; the Special Pro-
tramming and Innovative
preative Experiences (SPICE)
/orkshop for Jewish
Irganizations; the Bible and
talmud Study Groups; the
(ultural programming for
srael Independence Day; and
Ihe Benefit Concerts for
lewish Education.
Federation
Chaplaincy
Commission
Seeks
Volunteers
One of the most important mitz-
lahs one can do is to visit someone
eho is sick or confined.
The Jewish Federation's
phaplaincy Commission is cur-
ently seeking volunteers to be
rained in leading services and
ending time with patients in
Tort Lauderdale area nursing
lomes and adult condominium liv-
ig facilities.
Al Golden, chairman of the
lewish Federation Chaplaincy
Committee, stated, "We're asking
Tie community for volunteers
nen and women who have a
[udaic background and a feeling
leart."
Rabbi Albert Schwartz,
Chaplaincy Commission director,
[mphasized that volunteers will be
rained on how to deal with the
llderly and to communicate with
iem on an interpersonal level
bid with sensitivity.
Schwartz added, "The purpose
If these visits is to let people know
lat the Federation and the
Chaplaincy Commission care
[bout those who are isolated by
eing in an institution."
He stated that there is no
Iharge for this profound under-
taking. All of the costs to conduct
folunteer services at the facilities
^re part of the allocated funds to
he commission from the Annual
Pederation/UJA Campaign and all
|he work is strictly voluntary.
Once trained, volunteers will be
pie to set their own schedules for
lie visitations. A commitment of
ust a few hours per week will do
liracles for the infirmed.
Al Golden declared, "The
itisfaction that one receives
from visiting someone in a nurs-
ig home can be one of the most
Ratifying experiences."
For more information on
Munteering with the Chaplaincy
Commission, or if your organiza-
tion is interested in seeing a
presentation by the Chaplaincy
commission, contact Rabbi
Schwartz or Nettie at the Federa-
tion, 748-8400.
Thomas Mayer. Cantvr Lifshin. Efrat
1
Afek.
Joel Telles.
Dr. Gittelson conducting
a workshop.
Organizers Gail Klugerman, secretary; Helen
Weisberg, and Rhoda Dagan.
FISHER
Peanut*
Who's the nut
that left out the MSG?
Fisher* left it out. In fact. Fisher
leaves out nine different enhancers and added
flavorings found in Planters* Fisher deep roasts
instead for a rich, honest-to-good ncss peanut
flavor and aroma. Vhi'II never find MS(i* in our
dry roasted peanuts, mixed nuts, cashews.
pistachios, sunflower seeds or any other
Fisher Nut. Next time you buy dry roasted
peanuts for the holiday, try the nut
without the MSG.
And taste what you've been missing.
Kosher
Parve
FISHER
NUTS^
More peanut flavor
without MSG.
K nm Itantt/HvmMnaaa. Ik
MAMUfACTUflf R COUPON NO EXPIRATION DATE
25*
SAVE 25*
ON THE PURCHASE
OF ANY SINGLE JAR
FISHER' NUTS
T Retailer This coupon will be redeemed at
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void it taxed, prohibited or restricted by law
Cash value vm ot a cent Valid only m u S A
This coupon not assignable or transferable
Customer pays any sales tax Mail coupon to
Beatrice/Hunt-Wesson, Inc P0 Box 20362.
El Paso. TX 79998 c 1988 Beatnce/Hunl-
Wesson. Inc Otter limited to one coupon per
purchase 60322


Page 12 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, June 3, 1988
Federation Missions An Experience of a Lifetime
PRESIDENT'S JUBILEE MISSION
POLAND AND ISRAEL
OCTOBER 9-21, 1988
CELEBRATE THE 50TH ANNIVERSARY
OF THE UNITED JEWISH APPEAL IN ISRAEL
JOIN PARTICIPANTS FROM ALL OVER THE
COUNTRY AT SPECIAL JUBILEE EVENTS
JERUSALEM STREET FAIR
A FACT-FINDING OPPORTUNITY TO GO BEHIND
THE HEADLINES
COMMUNITY COUNTRY CLUB
MISSION
POLAND AND ISRAEL
OCTOBER 13-26, 1988
JOIN OUR PRESIDENT'S MISSION FOR
TWO EXCITING DAYS IN ISRAEL AND THEN ...
GOLF, TENNIS, SPA
LEISURELY PACED ITINERARY
SPECIAL SHABBAT AT THE WESTERN WALL
VISIT KFAR SABA ... OUR "FAMILY" IN ISRAEL
Join your friends, neighbors and business associates and experience a discovery, revelation, and a sense of self. A
Federation Mission is an opportunity to see what has been accomplished by the Jewish people when their energy and
resources are used fully and creatively. It is an opportunity to encounter the reality of life in Israel today.
For more information, contact Sandy Jackowitz, Director of Missions, at 748-8400.
CAJE Bible Study Group Completes Sixth Year
The closing session of the sixth
year of the Hug Tanach, the com-
munity Bible study group,
organized by the Central Agency
for Jewish Education of the
Jewish Federation of Greater Ft.
Lauderdale, took place on Mon-
day, May 16 at the Jewish Federa-
tion building on West Oakland
Park Boulevard.
Designed to provide an oppor-
tunity for intensive study and
analysis of one of the most belov-
ed of all Biblical texts, the Book of
Psalms, the group brought
together some 25 Rabbis,
Educators, Cantors and
knowledgeable laymen who met
bi-weekly.
Members took turns in leading
each session, and through the an-
cient Biblical method of examina-
tion of every word and phrase of
the text, they illuminated the fine
points of each of the verses of the
Book. Rabbi Albert Schwartz,
Federation's Director of
Chaplaincy Services, and a
charter member of the group,
noted that "The joy of Torah
studyis a supreme value in Jewish
life. The existence of such a group
in our community is visible
evidence of the constantly increas-
ing quality of Jewish life and
Jewish learning."
Mystical allusions in the text,
grammatical explanations, tradi-
tional and modern commentaries,
historical analysis and contem-
porary ethical ideals ... all were
part of the interpretations that
flow out of the passionate
religious poetry that comprises
the Book of Psalms.
After six years of study, the
group has completed the first
forty-one chapiters of the Book of
Psalms. Since the Psalms are
traditionally divided into five sec-
tions, with the first section ending
with chapter forty-one, the group
will turn to another of the Biblical
books for its subject in the coming
year. Four years ago, due to the
interest in Jewish study, a second
group was formed to meet directly
after the Bible class. This group,
the Hug Talmud, studied one of
the tractates of the Babylonian
Talmud dealing with the laws,
customs and concepts of the holi-
day of Purim. It included, in addi-
tion to the holiday, elements of
Jewish philosophy, ethics, history,
folk lore and legal matters
relating to a host of other subject
areas.
Rabbi Schwartz served as the
WORLD NEWS-------------
MADRID The Socialist
International's Council
adopted a resolution on the
Middle East conflict recent-
ly that was more moderate
than the Israeli delegates
had expected.
TORONTO Neo-Nazi
propagandist Ernst Zundal,
who published a booklet de-
nying that the Holocaust oc-
curred, was found guilty in
district court of knowingly
spreading false news.
leader for the year. Each member
of the group prepared selected
portions of the text before each
class, so as to engage fully in the
time-honored Talmudic style of
dialectical study.
The Bible group was modeled on
the World Jewish Bible Society
that was founded by David Ben
Gurion, the first Prime Minister of
the State of Israel, and a lifelong
student of the Bible.
Individuals who posses a wide
knowledge of Bible and Talmud
are invited to join the groups
which will resume their studies,
for the seventh year, on Monday,
October 10.
AMIRA DOTAN, former head
of the Israeli Defense Force
Women's Corps, and the first
Israeli woman to be promoted
to the rank of Brigadier-
General, has been appointed
vice president for development
of international relations at
Ben-Gurion University of the
Negev.
Available at All Publix Stores and Fresh Danish
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BRAN
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Available at Publix Stores with Fresh Danish
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Available at Publix Stores with Fresh Danish
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whe [3
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1988. Quantity Rights reserved. Only in Dadc,
Broward. Palm Beach, Martin. St. Lucie, Indian
River and Okeechobee Counties.


Friday, June 3, 1988/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 13
The Samuel and Helene Soref
Jewish Community Center
Perlman Campus
6501 W Sunrise Blvd.
Fort Lauderdale. Florida 33313 792-6700
By Muriel Haskell, Director of Public Relations
For further information and fees concerning the events or pro-
grams listed please call the center.
WILL SHULMAN
VOLUNTEER OF
THE MONTH
FALL '87
Named a Fall '87 Volunteer for
the month of November, Will
Shulman has been inactive over
the winter and spring months for
reasons of health. And it is with
pleasure that everyone at the JCC
joins in welcoming him back on
the scene and wishing him good
health from now on.
Shulman's creativity is famous,
here in Fort Lauderdale for the
past eleven years and in the Long
Island, N.Y. area for many years
previously.
He does it all oil painting,
water color, sculpture, copper
enameling and numerous other
crafts. He is also known as an ac-
tor and an author.
But JCC recognizes Will
Shulman for making its rear, side
and front Center Stage! Coining a
new word, JCC, along with many
other local theatrical associations,
call him a "sceneographer." The
thousands in the area who have
seen "Tzinderella," "Schnav
Vyse" and "Pinuzrio" (Yiddish
take-offs on "Cinderella," "Snow
White"... and "Pinnochio")
have literally stood up and ap-
plauded the imaginative and strik-
ing stage sets which he designed,
helped build and paint so ar-
tistically. And, this past
November, after a good deal of
research, he created a series of
black and white posters, very
authentic, depicting the theatrical
lifestyle of "Second Avenue, circa
1900-1929" for Jack and Rae
Fishman's vaudeville presentation
at the Center called "The-a-tah,
The-ay-tah" a sell-out affair. He
savs he's always ready to
volunteer to work for any produc-
tion promoting Judaic or Yiddish
culture.
Shulman has also "staged"
many other sets. Among them,
"Agency for the Aging" shows at
Bailey Hall, Women's Showcase
productions and, for eight years,
the annual Lauderdale West
musicals. For one of these, he
wrote an original script called
"Razzle, Dazzle," very clever, and
much appreciated by his
audiences.
Off stage, Shulman's contribu-
tions to JCC include the construc-
tion (with Ben Scribner) of the 10
foot Menorah which stood in front
of the Administration Building for
many years and participation in
the production of many props for
Israel Independence days. Among
them: a wonderful replica of the
Jaffa gate, a wailing wall, ar-
chaeological digs, and last year's
"Bibleland," and irreverant walk-
through looks at biblical
characters and events.
In New York, Shulman was in
the juvenile furniture business,
but spent his after-work hours in
the fields of art. He has had one
man shows in the Woodmere
Library and in the Mid-Island
YMHA.
Shulman has a BS in Speech
Education from Columbia
w
Passover services were recently held at Palm Court Nursing
Home, to the enjoyment of residents and volunteers. Rabbi Albert
B. Schwartz, left, Federation Chaplain, director is shown conduc-
ting the service. Photo by Relly Kolar.
JCC Oneg Shabbat All dressed up as the
Sabbath Queen and King are Helene and Sam
JCC's recently formed Jewish Single Parents of Soref who came to JCC Early Childhood on a
Ft. Lauderdale discuss plans for their next event, recent Friday to light the candles, make a motzie
an evening event for parents on June 11 includes and sing some appropriate Shabbat songs with
from left, Anne Warren, Renee Wachtel, who the children, including Jason Perry and Brook
chairs the group and Don Pruett. Gartner.
Federation/UJA Provides Young Leaders...
B'nai B'rith Girls President Enjoys Traveling
Teacher's College. It was there
that "theater" became his first
love, having been an active
member of the college's
"Morning-Side Players," as actor
and as stage set designer.
The Shulman's have three
children and seven grandchildren.
.. "all over the country," he
says.
The JCC is a maior beneficiary
agency of the Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale, receiv-
ing funds from the annual United
Jewish Appeal campaign.
Michelle Blumenthal, current in-
ternational president of B'nai
B'rith Girls (BBG), has been
traveling all over the country
since last September to speak to
members of various regions about
her experiences with B'nai B'rith
Youth over the past five years.
She was recently in Fort
Lauderdale visiting the Gold
Coast Region and was more than
happy to talk about the whirlwind
year she has encountered as
president.
Blumenthal is a 19-year-old high
school graduate who will be atten-
ding the University of Judaism in
Los Angeles this fall. She has
been active in B'nai B'rith Girls
since the eighth grade, and in her
sophomore year decided to
become active on the international
board.
Michelle talked about why she
wanted to assume the responsibili-
ty of BBG international president
for a year: "At the end of five
years, I felt that I still had more to
give to BBG I wanted to give
back some of what I had gained as
a member of this youth group and
to let as many of the girls as possi-
ble know my experiences with the
organization."
The BBG international presi-
dent has traveled to 27 BBG
With Rhyme
and Reason
On Praying
To call upon our G-d for help
Is why we turn to prayer .
By showing love for Torah truth,
We let Him know we care.
We must express our gratitude
For there's much to disclose.
Why should we take for granted
all
The blessings He bestows?
We pray to show allegiance to
Our G-d's edictal rule
That guides our daily lives though
we
Be in or out of Shtd.
We pray to meditate on things
Attesting to His might:
His Spirit and His Mercy that
Encourage us to fight.
To pray is to get close to Him,
Our quintessential Lord.
To know of His reality
Means we will find reward.
Jack Gould
Michelle Blumenthal
regions all across America with
her message. She will journey to
Israel and France this month to
speak at the BBG counterparts in
these countries, and will attend
the B'nai B'rith International
Board of Governors Meeting in
Israel.
Blumenthal related the best
part of traveling was meeting all
the people and seeing how BBG is
perceived all across North
America.
"In each community that I
traveled to, I stayed with one of
the regional families," she said.
"It was nice to see that many of
the families had similar traditions
as mine. It's also nice to know that
if I went back to any of these
places, I would be able to find so-
meone that I had become ac-
quainted with."
BBYO is a member of the
FederationlUJA Family of agen-
cies and beneficiaries.
THE WAY WATER IS
10 TASTE.
1^3 I
Imagine water that tastes fresh and dear as a spring
W&ter without sodium, pollutants, or carbonation Water
with nothing added, nothing taken away. That's water the
way it should taste. That's fresh, pure Mountain valley
Water.. from a natural spring in Hot Springs. Arkansas
Taste it. You'll be tasting water for the very first time.
MOUNTAIN VALLEY WATER
SPRING WATER FROM HOT SPRINGS. ARK
Purely for drinking.
DADE
696-1333
BROWARD
563-6114
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JUNE 17-20 W^
;


Page 14 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, June 3, 1988
Temple
HEBREW
CONGREGATION
OF LAUDERHILL
The dedication of the fully
equipped ambulance to the
ARMDI Red Magen David
Adom of Israel donated by the
Hebrew Congregation of
Lauderhill together with the
sisterhood will take place on
Sunday, June 5 at 10 a.m. in
front of the Hebrew Congrega-
tion Synagogue. Rabbi Israel
Halpem will make the invoca-
tion and refreshments will be
served. The public is invited.
SUNRISE
JEWISH CENTER
The men's club of the
Sunrise Jewish Center
presents three outstanding
acts at a performance to be
held on Saturday, June 4 at
8:30 p.m. at the Temple. The
entertainment will feature the
dynamic singing duo of Kan-
ner and Wheatley, comedy
star Al Nesor, and pianist
Chris Contillo. For more infor-
mation or tickets, call
741-0295.
AMSTERDAM An
Amsterdam district court
judge will have to settle a
dispute between the Jewish
community of Curacao and a
former resident of that
island in the Netherland An-
tilles over ownership of
Judaica auctioned by
Christie's here recently.
Synagogue Directory
CONSERVATIVE
CONSERVATIVE SYNAGOGUE OF COCONUT CREEK. (975-4666) Lyons
Plaza, 1447 Lyons Road, Coconut Creek 33063. Services: Daily 8 a.m., 4:30 p.m.; Fri-
day 8 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m., 5 p.m. Rabbi Avrom Drain. Cantor Yehuda
Heilbraan.
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER (721-7660), 9101 NW 57th St., Tamarac, 33321.
Services: Sunday through Friday 8:30 a.m., 5 p.m. Late Friday service 8 p.m. Satur-
day 8:45 a.m. Rabbi Kurt F. Stone.
TEMPLE BETH AHM (431-5100), 9730 Stirling Road, Hollywood. 33024. Services
daily 8 a.m.; Monday-Thursday 7:30 p.m.; Sabbath 8 p.m., Sabbath morning8:45 a.m.
Rabbi Avrahan Kapnek. Cantor Eric Lindenbaum.
TEMPLE BETH AM (974-8650). 7205 Royal Palm Blvd., Margate, 33063. Services:
Monday through Friday 8:30 a.m., 5 p.m. Friday late service 8 p.m.; Saturday 9 a.m.,
5 p.m.; Sunday 8 a.m.. 5 p.m. Rabbi Paul Plotkin. Rabbi Emeritus, Dr. Solomon
Geld. Cantor Irving Grossman.
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL (742-4040), 7100 W. Oakland Park Blvd., Sunrise. 33313.
Servicea: Monday through Friday 8 a.m. 5:30 p.m.; Friday 8 a.m., 5 p.m., 8 p.m.;
Saturday 8:45 a.m., 7:45 p.m. Sunday 8:30 a.m. Rabbi Howard A. Addison. Cantor
Maurice A. Neu.
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL OF DEERFIELD BEACH (421-7060). 200 S. Century
Blvd., Deerfield Beach, 33441. Servicea: Sunday through Friday 8:30 am., 5 p.m.
Friday late service 8 p.m.; Saturday 8:45 a.m., and at candlelighting time. Rabbi
Joseph Laagaer. Cantor Shabtal Ackerman.
TEMPLE B'NAI MOSHE (942-5380), 1434 SE 3rd St., Pompano Beach, 33060.
Servicea: Friday 8 p.m. Castor Jehudah Heilbraun.
TEMPLE SHA'ARAY TZEDEK 741-0295), 4099 Pine Island Rd.. Sunrise, 33321.
Services: Sunday through Friday 8 a.m., 5 p.m.; Late Friday service 8 p.m.; Satur-
day 8:45 a.m., 5 p.m. Rabbi Randall Kosigsbarg. Castor Barry Black. Cantor
Emeritus Jack Marchant
TEMPLE SHOLOM (942-6410), 132 SE 11 Ave., Pompano Beach, 33060. Servicea:
Monday through Friday 8:45 a.m., evenings: Monday through Thursday at 5 p.m.,
Friday evening at 8. Saturday and Sunday 9 a.m. Rabbi Albert Troy. Castor Nissim
Berkowits.
CONGREGATION BETH HILLEL OF MARGATE (974-3090). 7640 Margate
Blvd., Margate, 33063. Services: Sunday through Friday 8:15 a.m.. 5:30 p.m. Late
Friday service 8 p.m. Saturday 8:45 a.m., 5:30 p.m. Castor Joel Cokes.
HEBREW CONGREGATION OF LAUDERHILL (733-9660), 2048 NW 49th Ave..
Lauderhill, 33313. Services: Sunday through Friday 8:30 a.m., 6:30 p.m.; Saturday
8:46 a.m. Rabbi Israel Halpera.
CONGREGATION BETH TEFILAH (formerly North Laaderdale Hebrew Con-
gregation) (722-7607), 6436 W. Commercial Blvd.. Tamarac, FL 33319. Services:
Sunday to Friday at 7:45 a.m. Friday at 6 p.m.; Saturday at 8:45 a.m. Charles B.
Frier, President.
ORTHODOX
CHABAD LUBAVITCH COMMUNITY SYNAGOGUE (344-4865). 9791 W. Sample
Road, Coral Springs. 33065. Services: Monday through Friday 7 a.m., Saturday 9
am., Sunday 8 am. Rabbi Yossie Denburg.
TEMPLE OHEL B'NAI RAPHAEL (733-7684). 4361 W. Oakland Park Blvd.,
Lauderdale Lakes, 33313. Services: Sunday through Thursday 8 a.m., 6 p.m., Friday
8 a.m.. 5 p.m., Saturday 8:45 a.m., 5 p.m.
SYNAGOGUE OF INVERRARY CHABAD (748-1777), 4661 N. University Dr.,
Lauderhill, 33351. Services: Sunday through Friday 6:45 a.m, 8 a.m., 5:15 p.m.,
Saturday 9 a.m., 5:30 p.m. Study groups: Men, Sundays following servicea;
Women. Tuesdays 8 p.m. Rabbi Aros Liebenaan.
YOUNG ISRAEL OF DEERFIELD BEACH (421-1367), 1880 W. Hillsboro Blvd.,
Deerfield Beach, 33441. Services: Sunday through Friday 8 a.m. and sundown.
Saturday 8:45 a.m. and sundown. Joseph M. Reiser, President.
YOUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD-FORT LAUDERDALE (966-7877), 3291
Stirling Rd., Fort Lauderdale, 33312. Services: Monday through Friday 7:30 a.m.,
and sundown; Saturday, 9 a.m., sundown; Sunday 8 a.m., sundown. Rabbi Edward
Davis.
CONGREGATION MIDGAL DAVID 726-3583), 8575 W. McNab Rd., Tamarac.
33321 Servicea: Daily 8 a.m.; mincha 5 p.m.; Saturday 8:46 a.m. and 5:15 p.m. Rab-
bi Chaim Schneider. Congregation president: Herman Fleischer.
RECONSTRUCTIONS
RAMAT SHALOM (472-3600), 11301 W. Broward Blvd., Plantation. 33325. Ser-
vices: Friday, 8:16 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. Rabbi Elliot Skiddell. Cantor Bella
Milim.
REFORM
TEMPLE BET TIKVAH (741-8088), 8890 W. Oakland Park Blvd., Ste. 302,
Sunrise, 33361. Servicea: Friday 8 p.m. Rabbi Dennis Wsld. Cantor Ron Graner.
TEMPLE BETH ORB (753-3232), 2161 Riverside Dr.. Coral Springs, 33065. Ser-
vices: Friday 8 p.m.; Saturday 10 a.m. Rabbi Mark W. Grass.
TEMPLE B'NAI SHALOM OF DEERFIELD BEACH (426-2632). Services at
Menorah Chapels, 2305 W. Hillsboro Blvd.. Deerfield Beach, 33441, Friday 8 p.m.
Rabbi Nathan H. Pish. Cantor Morris Levisaos.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL (781-2310), 3245 W. Oakland Park Blvd., Lauderdale Lakes,
33311. Services: Friday 8:15 p.m.; Saturday, only on holidays or celebration of Bar-
Bat Mitzvah. Rabbi Jeffrey Ballon. Cantor Riu Share.
TEMPLE KOL AMI (472-1988). 8200 Peters Rd.. Plantation, 33324. Services: Fri-
day 8:16 p.m., Saturday 10:30 a.m. Rabbi Sheldon J. Harr. Caster Frank
Bins
LIBERAL JEWISH TEMPLE OF COCONUT CREEK (973-7494). Services: Fri-
day night services twice monthly at Calvary Presbyterian Church, 3950 Coconut
Creak Parkway. Coconut Creek. 33066. Rabbi Brace 8. Warahal. Castor Jacob
Barfcia.
TEMPLE BAT YAM (928-0410), 5151 NE 14th Ter., Ft. Lauderdale, 33334. Ser-
vice: Weekly on Friday evenings at 8 p.m. Rabbi Lewis Littman.
Briefly Community Calendar
sw a.i____u.i:j. I_ /->.l
At a recent meeting of the
B'nai B'rith Cypress Chase
Lodge, Israel's Consul General
Rahamin Timor, right, meets
with president Milton
Scheingarten.
Compiled by
Craig Lustgarten,
Federation, 748-8400.
MONDAY JUNE 6
Hebrew Day School Annual
Meeting: Perlman Campus. 8
p.m.
TUESDAY JUNE 7
Na'Amat USA, Hatikvah:
Meeting. 11 a.m. Sunrise
Phase I Playhouse.
WEDNESDAY JUNE 8
Na'Amat USA, Negev:
Meeting. Noon. Temple Beth
Israel, Deerfield Beach.
421-7225.
THURSDAY JUNE 9
Women's American ORT,
Tamarac: Luncheon-Card Par-
ty. 11:30 a.m. Italian
American Club. 741-2536.
Na'Amat USA, Broward
Council: Officer Installation.
Noon. Holiday Inn, Coral Spr-
ings. 421-4265.
FRIDAY JUNE 10
TGIS Singles Program: Ser-
vices and Discussion. Con-
gregation Ramat Shalom.
Plantation. 748-8400.
SATURDAY JUNE 11
David Posnack Hebrew Day
School: Art Auction. 8:30 p.m.
SUNDAY JUNE 12
Men of Hope No. 1309:
Meeting. 9:30 a.m. Nob Hill
Center. Sunrise. 741-2032.
MONDAY JUNE 13
Women's American ORT,
Pine Island: Meeting. 11:30
a.m. Nob Hill Center, Sunrise.
742-7615.
TUESDAY JUNE 14
Jewish National Fund: Board
Meeting. 7 p.m. 800 West
Oakland Park Blvd.
State of Israel Bonds Highlights
m
B'nai B'rith Inverrary and Bonds honored Selig
Marko with its Shema Yisrael Award. From left
Emil Cohen, Stanley Broder, Selig Marko, Ilene
Lieberman, and Lester Fields.
Daniel Cantor, chairman oj the Prime
Minister's Club, State of Israel Bonds left is
shown presenting the prestigious President's
Award to Peter Hardiman right, president and
chief executive officer, Coral Savings & Loan, for
their recent purchase of a quarter million dollars
in notes.
CAJE Benefit Concert to Feature
Sunrise Pops Orchestra
The annual benefit concert "A Festival of
Joyous Music" sponsored by the Central Agency
for Jewish Education featuring the Sunrise Pops
Orchestra will take place on Sunday, Dec. 11 at
Plantation High School, 6901 W. 16 St. in
Plantation.
The program will feature two outstanding ar-
tists. Christine Chen, child prodigy on the piano,
has delighted audiences throughout South Florida.
Cantor Barry Black, possessor of a beautiful tenor
voice, will sing cantorial, Israeli and operatic
music. Rhoda Dagan, concert chairperson, said
"The concert is an unequalled opportunity to enjoy
a wonderful orchestra and guest artists, together
with supporting Jewish education in North
Broward."
Group tickets are available for organizations at a
discount. The Sunrise orchestra is the official or-
chestra of the city of Sunrise and is conducted by
Tony Pandy, who is a noted arranger as well. The
orchestra will highlight Broadway melodies and
show tunes, light classical music, Israeli and
Hebrew compositions and popular American
arrangements.
For further information contact CAJE,
748-8400 or Rhoda Dagan, 741-1061. Serving as
co-chairmen of the concert is Relly Kolar.
Shown planning the annual benefit from left, Rel-
ly Kolar; George Wember, orchestra member;
Rhoda Dagan, chairperson; and Rose Papier, or-
chestra librarian.
FLE Programs ... From the Joya
of Aging to JAP Baiting
Is there a joyful aspect to aging?
Why has the Jewish American
Princess become a target of cam-
pus ridicule? How can people deal
with the grief of losing a spouse?
As part of its Family Life
Education (FLE) Program,
Jewish Family Service of
Broward County has clinical social
workers available to lead group
discussions on these topics and
many other secular and non-
secular issues.
"Our goal is to increase
awareness of the value of detec-
ting and treating problems before
they become critical," explains
Susan Kossak, coordinator, Fami-
ly Life Education.
"FLE workshops are designed
to enhance family and personal
relationships by helping people
cope with contemporary issues
and rapidly changing lifestyles,"
she points out.
Kossak emphasized that the
FLE facilitators also act as agen-
cy representatives in the com-
munity, giving participants a bet-
ter understanding of Jewish
Family Service.
Any synagogue, school,
business or civic group can re-
quest an FLE Program on a varie-
ty of topics. Kossak suggests that
scheduling now for the next school
year will insure that Jewish Fami-
ly Service will be able to accom-
modate your request.
Topics include:
The Emotional Aspects of Grief
and Loss
Being Single and Jewish in the
'80s
Values Clarification
Stress Management
Parenting Skills
Parenting Aging Parents
Teenage Suicide
Making it Through Your
Parents' Divorce
Please contact Susan Kossak to
schedule a FLE Program at
749-1505.
Jewish Family Service is a
beneficiary agency of United Way
of Broward County, the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
lauderdale and the Jewish
Federation of South Broward.


Friday, June 3,1988/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 15
Bar/Bat Mitzvah
^^^s^************^^
Goetz
Kapuler
Levine
Teich
Organizations
NA'AMAT USA
Marcia Pevsner of Skokie,
111., a Na'Amat USA member
for 29 years and immediate
past president of its Chicago
Council, has been appointed
chairwoman of the Na'Amat
USA 31st Biennial National
Convention, to be held Aug.
6-9 at the Chicago Hilton and
Towers.
AMERICAN
RED CROSS
The Broward County
chapter of the American Red
Cross is presently looking for
volunteers for telephone
receptionist, office worker, in-
terviewing, sales and
marketing workers,
caseworker and maintenance
personnel. For more informa-
tion, contact the American
Red Cross at 581-4221.
NATIONAL COUNCIL
OF JEWISH WOMEN
Arranging child care
presents enormous problems
for many working parents
with young children according
to testimony presented by the
National Council of Jewish
Women at a hearing before the
U.S. House of Represen-
tatives. NCJW testified that
lack of public and private ef-
forts to increase the supply of
affordable and high quality
child care could force working
mothers with lower earning
power out of the labor force
entirely.
JOINT
DISTRIBUTION
COMMITTEE
Gideon Taylor, a young
lawyer from Dublin, Ireland,
has been selected as the reci-
pient of the 1988 Ralph I.
Goldman Fellowship in Inter-
national Communal Jewish
Service, awarded annually by
the American Jewish Joint
Distribution Committee (JDC).
The Fellow selected serves for
one year of work-study at JDC
overseas.
FRIENDS OF ISRAEL'S
OPEN UNIVERSITY
A major Israeli university
has changed its English name:
HaUniversita HaPtucha will
now be known as the Open
University of Israel. The Open
University was founded by the
Rothschild Foundation in 1974
to make a higher education
universally available in Israel.
A Diversified
Jewish Quiz
By RABBI
DAVID W. GORDON
1- Since smoking causes lung
cancer, heart attacks, em-
physema, and other tobacco-
related diseases, should cigarettes
be banned?
2-Name the outstanding Con-
servative institution in America.
3- Who was its organizational
genius?
4- What is meant by the concept
"Hiddur Mitzvah" the adorn-
ment of the Commandments?
5- How was the elusive tenth
man of a minyan in the days
before the telephone called to the
Synagogue?
6-Which psalm refers to the
musical instruments in the Tem-
ple at Jerusalem?
1- Are there living creatures in
the Dead Sea?
8- Name the American Jew who
sought to establish a Jewish State
on Grand Island.
9- What is meant by "shlock"
merchandise?
10- Who was the founder of the
Jewish Science Movement?
Answers
1- According to the Halacha one
is not permitted to risk his health
and it should therefore be
forbidden.
2-The Jewish Theological
Seminary
3-Dr. Solomon Schechter
(1850-1915) who also helped in the
expansion of the Rabbinical
Assembly and the United
Synagogue of America.
4- To express our high regard
for our ritual objects through
developing special art forms like
an attractive mezuzah, a beautiful
The Bar Mitzvah of Daniel
Bradley, son of Lois Bradley, will
be held at Temple Emanu-El in
Fort Lauderdale on June 11.
TEMPLE KOL AMI
On Saturday, June 4, Matthew
Schreiber, son of Helene and
David Schreiber, and Seth Rosen,
son of Lynn and Carey Rosen, will
be called to the Torah in honor of
their B'nai Mitzvah.
On Friday evening, May 27,
Julie Kantor, daughter of Susan
and Jonathan Kantor, and Gary
Menzer, son of Carol and Allan
Menzer, were called to the Torah
in honor of their B'nai Mitzvah.
On Saturday, May 28, Jason
Gani, son of Dorn and Fred Gans,
and Robert Schram, son of June
and Gerald Schram, were called to
the Torah in celebration of their
B'nai Mitzvah at Temple Kol Ami
in Plantation.
4|4 illl
Candlelighting
June 3 7:49 p.m.
June 10 7:52 p.m.
June 17 7:54 p.m.
June 24 7:55 p.m.
Benediction upon Kindling
the Sabbath Lights
BORUCH ATTO AD-ONAI
ELO-HEINU MELECH HO-
OLOM ASHER KID-
SHONU BEMITZ-VOSOV
VETZI-VONU LE-HAD-
LIK NEYR SHEL
SHABBOS.
Blessed art Thou, 0 Lord our
G-d, King of the universe who
hast sanctified us by thy
commandments and
commanded us to kindle the
Sabbath light.
etrog box, a fine talit etc.
5- By a "Shulklopper" the
fore-runner of the Sexton (Sham-
mash) who knocked on doors with
a wooden mallet to call them to
Services.
6-150 (the last one) in the Book
of Psalms
7- No, it is too salty for them to
survive
8- Mordecai Manuel Noah in
1825 near the city of Buffalo, N.Y.
9- Shoddy or inferior
10- Rabbi Morris Lichenstein in
1922
T
Schram
Kaiser
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL
Jack- Kaiser, son of Martin and
JoEllen Kaiser, will be called to
the Torah on the occasion of his
Bar Mitzvah on June 4 at Temple
Beth Israel in Sunrise.
On Friday evening, June 3, Col-
by Katz, daughter of Paula Katz,
will be called to the Torah in honor
of her Bat Mitzvah at Temple
Beth Israel.
TEMPLE BETH ORR
On Saturday, June 11, Jason
Cohen, son of Bob and Fran
Cohen, and Anitra Goetz,
daughter of Arthur and Karen
Goetz, will be called to the Torah
in honor of their B'nai Mitzvah at
Temple Beth Orr.
On June 4, Brett Kapuler, son
of Gregory and Audrey Kapuler,
will celebrate his Bar Mitzvah at
Temple Beth Orr in Coral
Springs.
TEMPLE BETH TORAH
On May 28, Steven Marks, son
Cohen
of Harvey and Anne Marks,
celebrated his Bar Mitzvah at the
Tamarac Jewish Center.
On Friday, May 27, Stacy
Levine, daughter of Joel and
Sherry Levine, celebrated her Bat
Mitzvah at the Tamarac Jewish
Center.
SUNRISE JEWISH CENTER
Robyn Teich, daughter of Jac-
ques and Susan Teich, celebrated
her Bat Mitzvah on May 27 at the
Sunrise Jewish Center.
TEMPLE BETH AM
The B'nai Mitzvah of Brandon
Lane, son of Paul and Sue Lane,
and Heather Cohen, daughter of
Dr. Alex and Eleanor Cohen,
were celebrated at Temple Beth
Am in Margate on May 28.
TEMPLE BETH AHM
On Saturday, May 28, Jason
Frank, son of Mitchell and Bar-
bara Frank, celebrated his Bar
Mitzvah at Temple Beth Ahm.
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r

Page 16 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, June 3, 1988
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