The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale

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Title:
The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 3, no. 7 (Apr. 5, 1974)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 9, 1976 called v.4, no. 27 but constitutes v.5, no. 1; issue for July 7, 1989 called v.18, no. 11 but constitutes v.18, no. 13.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44570954
lccn - sn 00229545
ocm44570954
System ID:
AA00014312:00524

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Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward


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Full Text
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aewishFloridians
M OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE
Volume 17 Number 12
Fort Lauderdale, Florida Friday, May 6, 1988
fit*
'rice .'{") Cents
Anniversary Report and Installation of!988-'89 Board Highlights
Federation Annual Meeting May 19 at JCC
Outgoing President
Sheldon S. Polish
"This past year, in many
respects, will be seen as a
benchmark year in the
history of our community
and our Federation. We fac-
ed some new challenges and
opportunities, met them
head on, and became
stronger in the process."
These are the compelling
words of Fort Lauderdale
business professional
Sheldon S. Polish, who com-
pletes his term as president
of the Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale.
Polish, who will turn the
reins over to incoming presi-
dent Tamarac's Woodlands
Country Club entrepreneur
and philanthropist Harold
L. Oshry, told the FLORI-
DIAN, "Our North
Broward County Communi-
ty has indeed come of age in
this, our 20th and the State
of Israel's 40th Anniver-
saries, one that every
Jewish man, woman and
child can look at with
pride."
The outgoing president
will be feted for his exten-
sive service and commit-
ment as the chief executive
officer of the Jewish com-
munity's central organiza-
tion at the Federation's
1988 Annual Meeting and
Installation of Officers and
Board of Directors, Thurs-
day, May 19, 7 p.m., in the
Levin Gymnasium at the
Soref Jewish Commmunity
Center, Perlman Family
Campus, 6501 West Sunrise
Blvd., Plantation.
Working diligently on the
meeting are co-chairmen
Richard Finkelstein and
Lois Polish, who together
with their committee, have
planned an informative and
interesting evening for the
more than 300 expected to
attend. Committee includes:
Rita and Walter Bernstein,
Susan Finkelstein, Anita
Fischer, Marge Lehrer,
Marsha and Alan Levy, and
Lorraine and Gerald
William.
Polish, who served as the
1987 general campaign
chairman, extended a
special congratulations to
Oshry, who as this year's
general chair, has worked
Incoming President
Harold L. Oshry
with special diligence and
precision in helping to
achieve close to $7 million
for Federation/UJA.
Continued on Page 2
U.S. Rep. Shaw Reports on Jewish Issues
and leaders of the solidarity
movement. Poland is cur-
rently going through a
period of economic transi-
tion, with expansion into a
more capitalism socialist
system and increased
foreign investment. Shaw
related that he was surpris-
ed that the Polish people
were so outspoken of the
failures of their economic
system. He was also
astonished to learn that the
Poles like Americans and
fear the Soviets.
AMSTERDAM The
Yad Vashem Award was
presented here recently to
40 Dutch families or groups
who saved Jewish lives dur-
ing the Nazi occupation of
Holland in World War II.
PARIS An Israeli
diplomat reportedly has met
here with Soviet officials in
connection with the
American peace initiative
launched by Secretary of
State George Shultz when
he visited the Middle East in
March.
BONN The opposition
Green Party is supporting a
parliamentary initiative to
exhibit art produced during
the Nazi era in West Ger-
man museums. But the par-
ty also insists on both of-
ficial recognition and
reparations artists declared
degenerate by the Nazis,
who banned their works
from public display.
Congressman E. Clay
Shaw, Jr. held a press con-
ference recently at the
Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale
headquarters office on West
Oakland Park Boulevard
regarding his recent trip to
Poland's concentration
camps and other topical
issues.
Shaw was part of a
delegation of six con-
gressmen who traveled with
members of the Helsinki
commission on a six-day
tour of Poland and London.
Shaw, who had never
been to the concentration
camps, said that he was hit
with "shock and horror."
"The afterthoughts plague
you," he said.
Shaw said that the most
Congressman Shaw, second from left, meets with Federation
leaders, from left, Leo Goodman, past Federation president;
Federation vice president Daniel Cantor; Community Relations
chairperson Barbara Wiener; and Federation executive director
Kenneth Bierman.
pathetic things he saw at
Auschwitz were bins of baby
shoes. He was further
numbed when he saw the
"starvation cages" in the
camps. "I had never seen
anything like this designed
specifically for human suf-
fering," Shaw added.
During his visit to Poland,
the congressman met with
leaders of the government
On the subject of the new
Soviet openness or policy of
Glasnost, Shaw remarked,
"I don't buy the fact that
the Soviet government has
changed overnight they
are using Glasnost to serve
their own purposes."
Continued on Page 2
INSIDE
Israel '40 Day
.. Page 3
Mideast Plan
...Page 4
In The Spotlight Yom HaShoa Community Program...
' \-------------------------------------"------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- "--------------------------------------------------------------------
Remembrance Memorial at Temple Beth Am
."For those of us
blessed to live in this
country, we must never
rest, tolerate, or stand
Fred Levine
still to allow the
spreading of slander
and hatred of the
Jewish people ... we
must never take our
freedom for granted."
Those were the words
of Rabbi Paul Plotkin,
who hosted the
Holocaust Remem-
brance Day program
held at Temple Beth
Am in Margate
Close to 1,000 men,
women, and children
came out in support of
those North Broward
survivors of the
Holocaust, and to
acknowledge the loss of
6 million Jewish lives
during the war.
Rabbi Plotkin succinc-
tly stated the purpose of
this gathering: "We are
here to remember, to
say Yiskor, and to rein-
force and remind
ourselves that never
again and never
anywhere will this hap-
pen ... Am Yisrael
Chai, the people of
Israel live."
Following Rabbi
Plotkin's remarks there
was a Mincha service
lead by Rabbi Howard
Addison of Temple Beth
Israel. A proclamation
was then read from the
Broward County School
Board stating the
County's commitment
to having the communi-
ty remember this tragic
event.
Norman Gitler, presi-
dent of the Holocaust
Survivors of South
Florida, then addressed
the audience. Gitler
reminded those in at-
tendance that 40 years
after the Holocaust
many still live with the
memories of its utter
destruction. He also
urged that all our
children must be taught
the history and meaning
of the Holocaust so that
it won't become fiction
to them.
There was a student
candlelighting proces-
sional by youth from
area Temples and youth
groups, with the kids
Continued on Page 7
I


Page?The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, May 6, 1988
Annual Meeting and
Installation Highlights
The Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale, pursuant to
ita By-Laws, is presenting the following slate of officers and
directors, as certified by the Nominating Committee; for election
at the Annual Meeting Thursday, May 19, at 7 p.m., Gymnasium,
JCC Campus, 6501 W. Sunrise Blvd., Plantation. All contributors
to Federation's 1988 United Jewish Appeal campaign are
welcome. Co-chairmen for the Annual Meeting are Richard
Finkelstein and Lois Polish.
1988-89
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
OFFICERS:
President: HAROLD OSHRY
Executive Vice President: BARBARA WIENER
Vice President: DANIEL CANTOR
Vice President: ALVERA GOLD
Vice President: ALAN LEVY
Vice President: IRVING LIBOWSKY
Vice President: DAVID SOMMER
Vice President: BARTON WEISMAN
Secretary: SOL SCHULMAN
Assistant Secretary: ALAN BECKER
Treasurer: GLADYS DAREN
Assistant Treasurer: WALTER BERNSTEIN
Immediate Past President: SHELDON POLISH
BOARD MEMBERS:
ROBERTADLER
* PETER DEUTSCH
SIDNEY DORFMAN
JUDAH EVER
JACK FARBER
STEVEN FAYNE
RICHARD FINKELSTEIN
DONALD FISCHER
MORRIS FURMAN
* MICHAEL GREENBERG
DEBORAH HAHN
DR. PHILLIP KANEV
WILLIAM KATZBERG
* DR. KERRY KUHN
ALEX KUTZ
PAUL LEHRER
HILDA LEIBO
ESTHERLERNER
* AARON LEVEY
JO ANN LEVY
* MARK LEVY
RICHARD LEVY
BEN MARCUS
GILBERT MERRILL
LEON MESSING
SIGMUND NATHAN
HYNATHANSON
JOSEPH NOVICK
' CHARLOTTE PADEK
* DR. JAMES PHILLIPS
LEE RAUCH
DR. MARC SCHWARTZ
BREN SIMON
MORRIS SMALL
ELLIOT SOKOLOW
MARVIN STEIN
MEYER STEINBERG
RABBI KURT STONE
JEFFREY STREITFELD
DANIEL TISHBERG
GERALD WILLIAM
* WOLF WITTENBERG
LIFE MEMBERS
SEYMOUR GERSON ISRAEL RESNIKOFF
SEN. SAM GREENBERG SAMUEL SOREF
CHARLES LOCKE SIDNEY SPEWAK
SAMUEL K. MILLER JOHN STRENG
ANITA PERLMAN
ADVISORY COMMITTEE
PHILLIP COHEN ALFRED GOLDEN
ABRAHAM DAVID *DR. ROBERT GRENITZ
MILTON EDELSTEIN BERNARD LIBROS
LEONARD FARBER SAUL PADEK
IRVING R. FRIEDMAN STUART REICH
RABBIS
RANDALL KONIGSBURG
JOSEPH M. LANGNER
AARON LIEBERMAN
LEWIS LITTMAN
PAUL PLOTKIN
ELLIOT SKIDDELL
HOWARD A. ADDISON
JEFFREY BALLON
AVROM DRAZIN
MARK GROSS
ISRAEL HALPERN
SHELDON J.HARR
new members
Publication of the Nominating Committee's slate in THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN, which is mailed to the homes of 16,000
contributors to Federation's 1988 United Jewish Appeal cam-
paign is deemed, in accord with the By-Laws, to be "appropriate
publicity" to the Federation's general membership.
Additional nominations for any officer or for the board may be
made by filing a petition containing the signatures of 25 members
of the Federation.
WOLF B LIT ZE R ,
Washington Bureau chief of the
Jerusalem Post, is shown here
with Susan Rose Symons,
chairman of the Business Ex-
ecutive Network of the Federa-
tion BEN.
Summer Rentals
Heart of Catskills
Luxurious Townhouse Complex
3 Br 2 Baths/Pool/Rec. Rm.
Housekeeping Service/Laundry Facilities
EDGEWOOD ESTATES 914.434.2023
Loch Sheldrake, N.Y. 12759
Mon.Fri.
Richard Finkelstein
Lois Polish
Brian Sherr
Federation Annual Meeting May 19 at JCC
Continued from Page 1
Fort Lauderdale attorney
and Federation's immediate
past president Brian J.
Sherr is chairman of the
Nominating Committee,
who announced the
distinguished group of men
and women that will lead
Federation in the coming
year.
Nominated to serve the
Oshry cabinet as officers-
elect and to be installed are:
Executive Vice President,
Barbara Wiener; Vice
Presidents, Daniel Cantor,
Alvera Gold, Alan Levy, Ir-
ving Libowsky, David Som-
mer, and Barton Weisman;
Secretary, Sol Schulman;
Assistant Secretary, Alan
Becker; Treasurer, Gladys
Daren; and Assistant
Treasurer, Walter Berns-
tein. (See box for a complete
list of the 1988-89 Board of
Directors.)
In addition to the installa-
tion, keynote addresses by
campaign leaders and the
president's and executive
director's report to the com-
munity, Polish will present
special awards to among
others, campaign division
chairmen and workers,
Women's Division, Young
Leadership, Foundation,
Major Gifts, and outgoing
board members.
A 'Captain of Industry,'
Harold Oshry has devoted
his lifetime to helping his
brethren in need.
For more than thirty
years, he served with great
distinction as a leader in the
Greater New York UJA-
Federation campaign
cabinet, was chair of the
Auto Industry Division,
Queens Industrial Division
and South Shore
Committee.
Since coming to South
Florida in 1981, his
presence in the Greater
Fort Lauderdale community
has been felt in every
aspect.
As general chairman of
this year's drive, he has
created new areas of giving,
developed innovative cam-
paign techniques and
brought about a
cohesiveness of community
that has generated an ex-
citing and wonderful
response from young and
old alike.
For more information on
the Annual Meeting, con-
tact Joel Telles, at Federa-
tion, 748-8400.
ftft^WftSi^^
U.S. Rep. Shaw Reports on Jewish Issues
Continued from Page 1
In terms of the Soviets
allowing more people to
leave the country, Shaw
commented that with more
openness you may have
more immigration, but the
paradox is that as they ease
up on the restrictions, less
people may want to
emigrate.
On the current problems
in the Middle East and in
the West Bank and Gaza,
Shaw stated, "if you think
in terms of survival,
anything that threatens
secure borders is not accep-
table for Israel. I don't think
in our lifetime that we will
see an Israel that is truly
secure."
On Israel's handling of the
uprisings in the area, Shaw
said, "The first plan is to
contain the situation
because once the violence
spreads it becomes more dif-
ficult to control. The Israeli
government has overall
acted in a very responsible
way to the situation if
they sat back and did
nothing you would have
anarchy."
Congressman Shaw ex-
pressed his displeasure with
the idea that the Soviets
should be included in peace
negotiations in the region.
The congressman stated, "I
have great concern with
Russia taking a role in such
a conference I just don't
trust them because they
have sided with countries
who have tried to destroy
Israel."
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Friday, May 6, 1988/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 3
Israel Anniversary "40"
The Samuel and Helene Soref
Jewish Community Center
Perl man Campus
6501 W. Sunrise Blvd.
Fort Lauderdale. Florida 33313 792-6700
By Muriel Haskell, Director of Public Relations
For further information and fees concerning the events or pro-
grams listed please call the center.
RESUME "ISRAEL '40" AT THE JCC
SATURDAY EVE APRIL 16
"JEWISH ARTISTS AT THEIR BEST"
Spectacular variety of art works. Gala Glamorous Get
together!
THE DU-DA-IM IN CONCERT
Four hundred listened and cheered Israel's marvelous, macho,
musical male duo
SUNDAY APRIL 17 AM
Weather Perfect
SOLIDARITY MARCH
Plantation 5th St. Park to JCC. President David Schulman led
500. Families-Individuals-Groups. A powerful demonstration.
"Israel Must Live"
AMandPM
Attendance: 5,000
A GIANT ISRAELI CARNIVAL
Entertainment-Education. A joyous celebration for young and old
COMMENTS
Ivy and Larry Levine, CHAIRPERSONS "ISRAEL '40"
"What a thrill to see the crowds, the color, the spirit! But we
could not have produced this significant event without the
cooperation and support and TALENT of dozens of volunteers,
along with the officers, board and staff. What a Day! Thank you
to everyone."
And cheers, kudos, to the pair of the tireless chairpeople who
put it all together for the NINTH time on the JCC campus. Yes,
they've been chairmen for all nine Israel Independence days on
campus. Todah Robah to Ivy and Larry Levine who again shared
their great imagination, pizazz and aplomb with the JCC!
The JCC is a major beneficiary agency of the Jewish Federation
of Greater Fort Lauderdale, receiving funds from the annual
United Jewish Appeal campaign.
Linda and Jeff Streitfeld enjoy
the AH Shaw.
Representative Norman
Ostrau and Sheldon Polish,
Federation President, about to
march.
0M4tt
I Harold Goldstein's WALL OF
1 FAME featuring portraits of Margo Kline enjoys a ride on
Israel's leaders. the cyclone.
i &fef
Israel 'U0 Children's Community Chorus:
Temple Kol Ami, Temple Beth Orr, Hebrew Day President David Schulman leads the Solidarity
School directed by Arlene Solomon. March.
Jewish Family Service Selects 1988-'89 Board of Directors
The Nominating Committee of
Jewish Family Service of
Broward County has submitted its
slate for 1988-1989.
tein, Howard Gaines, Dr. Mark
Gendal, Alvera Gold, Erwin Gold,
Howard Gaines, Cheryl Gottlieb,
Aaron Harel, Edward Lefkow,
Barbara Lessne, Estelle Loewens-
tein, Susan Malter, Elaine
Schwartz, Ronni Simon, David
Sommer, Florence Straus.
The following have been propos-
ed for election as Officers:
Deborah F. Hahn, President;
Elaine Pittell, First Vice Presi-
dent; Laurence A. Greenberg, Se-
cond Vice President; Mitchell
Habib. Treasurer; and Barbara
Simonds, Secretary.
Nominations and election to the
Board of Directors will take place
at the April 21, 1988 Board
meeting. Installation of the Of-
ficers and the Board of Directors
will take place at the 26th Annual
Meeting on Wednesday, May 25,
at the Meyerhoff Center at 3081
Taft Street in Hollywood at 7:30
p.m.
Ron Rothschild, President of
the South Broward Jewish
Federation, will be the installing
officer. A Viennese Table and cof-
fee will follow the meeting. The
public is welcome to participate in
the event.
Jewish Family Service is a
beneficiary agency of United Way
of Broward County, the South
Broward Jewish Federation and
the Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauieraale.
Deborah F. Hahn
Nominations to the Board in-
clude: Nancy Daly, Gladys Daren,
Lloyd Edelstein, Charles Finkel,
Rabbi Robert Frazin, Dr. Leonard
Heimoff, Jeffrey Herman, Ber-
nard Kopet, Rabbi Shorn
Labowitz, Esther Lerner, Nor-
man Ostrau, Charlotte Padek,
Ellen Platt, Rachel Rogers, Dr.
Perry Seider and Bonnie
Sobelman. Under a new category
of Life Board Member, Israel
Resnikoff has been nominated.
Continuing on the Board and
not standing for reelection are:
Dr. Linda Benlolo. Walter Berns-
JEW1SH FAMILY SERVICE
OF BROWARD COUNTY
Sherwin Roaenstein,
Executive Director
Federation/UJA Missions
Expresses Solidarity
(Editor's Note: An important letter of vital significance to the North Broward County Jewish com-
munity. A Mission awaits call Federation, Sandy Jackowitz, at 7M-8400.)
Mr. Bennett Aaron
United Jewish Appeal
Mission Chairman
99 Park Avenue
New York, New York 10016
Dear Mr. Aaron,
Many of the recent reports from Israel are distorted and unbalanced. One of these distortions is the
position of American Jews. Israelis are led to believe that most are either hostile to Israel, or, at best,
indifferent to its plight and its struggle. Nothing could be further from the truth. The overwhelming
majority of American Jews are constant and unwaivering in their support for Israel. They are
politically active, they offer material support, they correct media falsehoods.
But there is one other way in which Jews today can express their solidarity with Israel, a direct way
that powerfully reinforces the ties between the Jewish State and the Diaspora. I refer to the
UJA/Federation Missions to Israel. By touring Israel, visiting its towns and villages, seeing the fruit-
ful work of how the UJA/Federation Campaign aids so many persons through the Jewish Agency and
the JDC, and meeting Israelis in all walks of life, young American Jews will see an Israel different
from the one commonly portrayed in the media. They will see a people committed not only to survive
but to thrive as Jews in the Jewish homeland. And in the act of expressing solidarity with their people
in a time of trial, these Jews will reaffirm their own Jewish identity the indispensable compass to
give meaning and purpose to their lives. This is why I am pleased to endorse UJA's important mis-
sions program at this crucial time.
Sincerely,
Benjamin Netanyahu
Ambassador


Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, May 6, 1988
Focus, Viewpoints, Opinions, and Commentaries
The vmwi expreaaed by cohimnisu. rcprintad editorial!, mnd copy do not nersessrily
raflett the opinion of th Jav/iah Federation of Greater Fort LmuoVrdal
The Talmud
By STANLEY M. LEFCO
"Of all the books that ancient rabbis have left behind, the most
revealing, the most challenging, and the most rewarding is the
Talmud,' wrote Robert Goldenberg, a professor at the State
University of New York at Stony Brook, in Back To The Sources,
Reading the Clastic Jewish Texts. This softbound volume was
edited by Barry W. Holtz.
The "core" document of the Talmud is the Mishnah, which is a
compilation of oral law. Goldenberg credited Rabbi Akiba of the
second century with codifying this oral law. The Mishnah is full of
unresolved legal disputes as well as stories, interpretations of
Scripture and other matters. It is divided into six Orders, each
dealing with a broad area of Jewish life. The first Order, for ex-
ample, concerns primarily agricultural law such as tithes and first
fruits. However, the first tractate or treatise of the first Order,
deals with the time when the Shema is to be recited, an issue
which apparently is not resolved and points out the strange way
in which the Talmud teaches.
Goldenberg postulated that while the Mishnah may look like a
code of rules for Jewish life, it is apparently something else. It
does, however, cover the main themes of Jewish life and teaches
that Jewish life is one of constant study. Another body of oral
Torah developed with the Mishnah at its core. This included
discussions on the Mishnah as well as the comments of other rab-
binic scholars. This came to be called the Gemara.
Not to confuse matters, there happens to be two Talmuds. The
earlier one is known as the Jerusalem or Palestinian Talmud and
dates from the first half of the fifth century. It is a loose, but
elaborate, commentary on selected tractates of the Mishnah. The
second is the Babylonian Talmud of which the Jerusalem one is
"barely half the size." This one dates from a century or two later.
According to Goldenberg, "The arguments in the legal sections
are far more elegantly presented, with points made more tren-
chantly and with the help of a much larger arsenal of standard
technical terms and rhetorical devices."
When one reads or studies the Talmud, one soon discovers that
there is much more on the printed page. To the sides of the
Talmudic text is the commentary of Rashi, Rabbi Shlomo Itzhaki,
1040-1105, who commented on almost all of the Talmud.
Goldenberg noted that no "traditional Jew will study the Talmud
without having Rashi at hand."
Goldenberg questioned whether the primary concern of the
Talmud is determining law. He concludes, "Its chief purpose is to
preserve the record of earlier generations studying their own
tradition and provide materials for later generations wishing to
do the same. It is a book produced by and for people whose
highest value was the life of study."
The Talmud, however, did not foresee all the situations of a
changing world. Questions arose, which the rabbis attempted to
answer through "responsum". "Hiddushim" also developed,
which were commentaries on the Talmud without specific
reference to a particular case. Since the Talmud may discuss a
topic in several places, it required some type of codification.
Moses Maimonides (1135-1204) came along and wrote the
"Mishneh Torah." Nevertheless, Goldenberg asserted that the
code most influential in modern Jewish life is the "Shulhan
Arukh" (The Set Table), which was written by Rabbi Joseph Caro
(1488-1575).
The Talmud taught Jews how to live, but Goldenberg emphasiz-
ed that the ancient rabbies knew perfectly well that law can never
provide a full set of guidelines for living one's life, (for) one must
also, as later teachers put it, be a "mensch."
The author is an attorney and active with the Young Leadership Group
of the Atlanta, GA Federation.
jewishFloridian o
Building a Constructive
Dialogue for Peace
By EPHRAIM SNEH
Developing a viable autonomy
plan
The Camp David autonomy plan
was unacceptable to the Arabs for
three reasons:
Neither the Jordanians nor
the Palestinians were actively
involved;
The framework of the
autonomy plan did not specify
whether the Palestinian autonomy
authority would control local
water and land resources;
The timetable was stretched
over too long a period of time (five
years) and the outline of final
status arrangements was too
vague.
Thus, a new autonomy plan
must meet these criteria:
Jordan and West Bank and
Gaza Palestinians must be involv-
ed in the decision-making process;
Control over water and land
must be clarified;
The dates for final status
negotiations must be specified and
negotiations must begin within a
short period of time, optimally by
the end of 1988.
Palestinian leadership
The vacuum of leadership in the
territories has created despair
and frustration among the
younger Palestinian generation.
If, however, the peace process
begins to move forward, the
political atmosphere will improve
and the appeal of extremist
elements will diminish
accordingly.
The Israeli public will have to
accept the fact that represen-
tatives elected to any Palestinian
autonomy council will most likely
pledge their support to the PLO.
But despite such declarations by
the Palestinian representatives,
Israel should be ready to talk to
any and all moderate Palestinians
who reject terrorism and accept
Israel's right to exist. Thus, the
composition of the autonomy
council must be clearly defined.
The PLO itself, however, cannot
participate in negotiations,
because it is not a partner for
peace. Even though most of the
Palestinian leadership in the ter-
ritories claims to be PLO, it is
Of GREATER FORT LAUOEROALE
FRED K. SHOCHET MARVIN LE VINE SUZANNE 8MOCMET
Editor and Publisher Director ot Communication* Executive Editor
Published Weekly November throuflh April. Bl-Weekly balance ol yew.
Second Class Postage Paid at Mallandele. Fla. USPS 888420
POSTMASTER: Send addreaa chanfM to The Jewiah Floridian,
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Phone 748*400
Plant: 120 NE 6th St., Miami, Fla. 33132 Phone 1-3734606
Member JTA, Seven Arts, WNS, NEA, AJPA, and FPA___
Jewish FWMtaa Peas Net Greet- Xaesaala ef Miriaiialii Advertised.
SUBSCRIPTION RATE: 2 Yea. Minimum 17.60 (Local Area $3.96 Annual) or by memberahlp
Jewish Federation ol Greets* Fort Laudardale
Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Laudardale: Sheldon S. Pollen, President; Kenneth B. Blerman
Executive Director, Marvin La Vina, Director ol Communications; Ruth A***** ?'%
Communlcstlans CralO Lustoartan. Communications Asaoclale; 8368 W Oakland Perk Blvd.. Fort
SSSntmrM? 746*400. Mail for the Federation and Th,.JewishFloridian of
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Box 26810. Tamarac. FL 333204610
much more moderate than the
mainstream PLO leadership.
Local Palestinians invoke the
PLO's name largely because it has
become a symbol of Palestinian
nationalism. In fact, local Palesti-
nians take and deserve full
credit for initiating the uprising.
As a result, the PLO has lost a
tremendous amount of popularity
in the territories.
Israel and the local Palesti-
nian leadership
A local leadership cannot be ar-
tificially established; it must
originate from among the Palesti-
nians themselves. For Israel to
anoint and embrace certain
leaders would be tantamount to
giving them the "kiss of death."
The role of Israeli Arabs
The support expressed by
Israeli Arabs for Palestinians on
the West Bank and Gaza Strip is
natural and understandable. It
would have been extraordinary if
they did not display any signs of
solidarity or sympathy with the
uprising. Although Israeli Arabs
identify themselves as Palesti-
nians, in ethnic terms, the majori-
ty have no desire to relinquish
their Israeli identity. At the same
time, they do make demands on
the Israeli government in terms of
economic and political equality.
Jordan and the Palestinians
Most Palestinians want a
Palestinian state with boundaries
approximating the 1967 lines,
linked to Jordan though enjoying
a high degree of independence.
Today one-third of the Palestinian
people reside on the East Bank of
the Jordan River and one-third
live in Gaza and the West Bank.
Therefore, linkage with Jordan is
inevitable.
The continuation of the status
quo poses a greater threat to Jor-
dan than does the creation of a
Jordanian-Palestinian confedera-
tion. If the status quo continues,
radicalism from the West Bank
will spread eastward to Jordan
and threaten the King's regime.
Today, at least half of the Jorda-
nian government is Palestinian.
King Hussein is likely to gain
substantial Palestinian support if
he becomes an active participant
in the peace process.
Once negotiations are under-
way, King Hussein can invite
Palestinian representatives to join
a joint Palestinian-Jordanian
delegation. Of course, it should be
understood that the emergence of
any Palestinian leadership that ac-
cepts UN Resolutions 242 and 338
and abandons terrorism will cause
a serious PLO split. Arafat is not
willing to accept these conditions
because his first priority is to
maintain organizational unity, not
achieve a political settlement for
the Palestinian people.
The Palestinians need to believe
that there is a real, tangible
chance of achieving something
before they enter negotiations. On
the Jordanian side, King Hussein
needs to know, prior to entering
negotiations, what he will receive
in return for his participation.
Economic hardship in Gaza
In Gaza, the core problem is
economic, not political. Improving
the local economic situation would
go far toward alleviating much of
the pent-up frustration that has
been vented through the recent
disturbances. Building a deep-
water port for exports would be a
valuable first step toward improv-
ing Gaza's economy. Although
Israel has a moral duty and
responsibility to improve the
"quality of life" of the inhabitants
in the territories, "quality of life"
programs should not be viewed as
a substitute for the peace process.
Such programs, though, do help
improve the political atmosphere
and thereby promote the
emergence of a local leadership.
Israel and negotiations
While there are deep splits
within the Israeli body politic over
various approaches to the peace
process, there is general consen-
sus across the political spectrum
on three conditions for a future
peace settlement:
No Arab army can be permit-
ted to cross the Jordan River;
Terrorism cannot be allowed
to emerge in the territories;
Jewish settlements in the ter-
ritories must remain secure.
The Washington Institute for
Near East Research. Brigadier
General (res.) Sneh is Former
Chief of Israel's Civil Administra-
tion in Judea and Samaria.
RPKCHIN5 "TOE 40+h STEP
Friday, May 6,1988
Volume 17
19 IYAR 5748
Number 12
Serving A World of Jewish Need
in Greater Fort Lauderdale
in Israel
in 33 other counttjesoyprgpaQ


*P
MMM>*\*|
Friday, May 6, 1988/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 5
HTX9
D'vash"
%
"... set out from here to
a land of milk and honey"
(Exodus 33:3)
DEBORAH FULLER HAHN
MOTHER'S DAY
Jews all over the world are
celebrating the 40th anniversary
of the birth of the modern State of
Israel. Like many births, there
was a long and tedious period of
gestation and a very difficult
labor. The 'pregnancy' began
about 1904, with the followers of
Theodore Herzl, who was un-
doubtedly the 'father' of the
State. (Jews had always lived in
the land, although they were
generally the Ultra-Orthodox,
who lived on donations from the
Diaspora.) Between 1904 and
1914, about 200 Jewish women
mostly from middle-class Euro-
pean families, arrived in Palestine
to pursue their Zionist ideals of
equality and justice. These women
were surely the mothers of this in-
credible 'baby', born in May of
1948, that was named 'The State
of Israel'.
Many of those young settlers
were between the ages of 17 and
19. They expected to fulfill their
dreams by working on the soil in
their new land. Life was extreme-
ly difficult. They suffered through
wars with the Arabs and the first
World War in Europe, along with
the men. They also fell ill with
typhoid and malaria, along with
the men. Unfortunately, they
were not usually permitted to
work the land along with the men.
Women were almost always sent
to the kitchen or laundry. It was
only the 'exception' ... the
woman who insisted on field work,
who was allowed to till the soil or
plant the trees.
On January 2, 1904, Manya
Shochat, a 24 year old Russian im-
migrant, arrived in Palestine to
join her younger brother,
Nachum. Although she claimed
not to have been a Zionist, it did
not take long before she fell in
love with the country.
Accompanied by her brother,
she made a horseback tour
through Palestine. These are her
own words:
"We rode ten hours a day,
changing horses frequently. In
this way we cut through the entire
Arab settlement from Dan to
Beersheva. We visited Transjor-
dania, too. The entire trip took us
six weeks, and in the course of it
there grew up in me a deep and
passionate love for the country, a
love which filled the brain as well
as the heart. It is a love which has
lasted all through my life, and its
strength seems to be bound up
with the renewal of something
many centuries old."
The following year Manya made
a survey of the Jewish set-
tlements. She visited the Jewish
colonies and asked many ques-
tions with particular emphasis on
details of income, and the employ-
ment of Arab workers. Commen-
ting about colony life, she said,
"... I became acquainted with the
character of our first Aliyah; and I
came to a definite conclusion. My
comrades were absolutely mad!
The way they were working, there
was absolutely no hope of creating
in Palestine a Jewish agricultural
proletariat!"
"The Jewish workers in the col-
ony of Petach Tikvah had ac-
cepted the same conditions as the
Arabs; their pay was 5 paistres
(25 cents) a day. They believed as
Zionists they simply had not the
right to ask for more. They lived
eight to a room ... a small room
... their beds were mattresses on
the floor. When I told them that
they ought to demand houses and
public buildings they answered
proudly that this would be philan-
thropy ... it would only be a
renewal of the evil of the
Chalukah' ... the charity system
for Palestinian Jewry."
Convinced that a Jewish
Palestine was only possible if the
people lived together in collective
settlements, Manya proposed the
idea to others. Traveling to Paris
to do research on collectives, she
attempted to convince the Jewish
Colonization Association to buy
land in the Jezreel Valley. While
in Paris, she also raised money
from Baron Edmond de
Rothschild and others in order to
buy arms for Jewish self defense
in Russia. These she smuggled in-
to Russia where she remained
for three months. Manya records,
"I re-entered Russia illegally.
During the pogram in Shedlitz, I
took an active part in the Jewish
self-defence. Later I organized a
national group to exact vengeance
from the leaders of Russian anti-
Semitism. The police looked for
me in St. Petersburg. I changed
my lodgings every day, never
sleeping twice in the same place.
With clockwork regularity the
police always searched, too late,
the place I had slept the night
before. My name was unknown to
them."
Returning to Palestine in 1906,
Manya again took up the cause of
collective farming, but she realiz-
ed that what she had in mind had
never been done, anywhere.
Critics in France considered the
idea so ridiculous they were ready
to prove that it could never suc-
ceed. Journeying to America on
behalf of her objectives, she
became acquainted with two in-
fluential Zionist leaders, Henriet-
ta Szold and Dr. Judah L. Magnes.
Against much opposition, she
continued to insist that Jewish
workers could not subsist in com-
petition with the Arabs. Jews
could not continue to live in
stables and earn pennies a day .
Apparently, in August 1907, the
Jewish National Fund finally
agreed with her. "By that time '
she reported, "the JNF had begun
to purchase land as the inalienable
property of the Jewish people."
She was given the opportunity to
begin a small collective to prove
her ideas.
Together with 17 other people,
including three teenage sisters,
they created the first collective in
Sedera. Everyone worked in both
the fields and in the kitchen. It
was to be the forerunner of the
modern kibbutz. She said of that
experience:
"The Sedera Collective lasted a
year and a half. It ended its work
successfully. ... We returned in
full the money that had been ad-
vanced, and demonstrated once
and for all that a collective
economy was possible."
Federation Agency in Action...
Yom HaShoa Observed at
David Posnack Hebrew Day School
Lead by Judaica coordinator
Stanley Cohen, students of the
David Posnack Hebrew Day
School participated in a Yom
Hashoa observance program in
the day school chapel.
The kids, teachers, and ad-
ministrators all wore yellow
badges in commemoration of the
six million Jews who perished in
Nazi concentration camps.
As part of the program,
members of the Hebrew Day
School staff lit memorial candles
and recited testimonial prayers.
Representatives of the various
school grades then held candles
and chanted songs of hope in-
cluding "don't let the lights go
out."
Special guest Rabbi Howard Ad-
dison of Temple Beth Israel came
before the students and taught
them of the meaning of the
Holocaust Memorial Day.
Rabbi Addison related, "Those
who say the Jews went into the
camps like sheep are not correct
many struck back at the Nazis,
especially in the Warsaw Ghetto
uprisings."
Joann Folic holds the
Holocaust Torah she donated.
Stanley Cohen, Judaic coordinator, Adam Skolnick, Jill
Shulman, Mr. Nat Green, and Alan Canarick participate in the
Torah reading during the Yom Hashoa program.
Broward's first KOSHER retirement center.
!o^S, m* no io""ct.on. apply lo. oQW^"* O' W*'*"-__________
Licensed A.C.L.F.
Transportation provided
Swimming Pool & Jacuzzi
Beauty Shop
Religious services dally
Easily accessible
RETIREMENT LIVING THE WAY YOU
WOULD LIKE IT TO BE
WE WELCOME INQUIRIES PLEASE CALL 961-8111
3535 S.W. 52nd Ave. Pembroke Park, Florida 33023
Off Hallandale Beach Blvd.
There was also a special dedica-
tion ceremony of a Torah that was
saved during the war a
Holocaust Torah which was
donated by Joann Folic. As part of
the dedication, Folic carried the
Torah around the chapel as four
students held a chupah over her
head.
Folic stated, "Our children hear
about the Holocaust, but this
Holocaust Torah is something
they can feel and thus relate to.'
In other Hebrew Day School
news, Ray Finkel, executive vice
president of the David Posnack
Hebrew Day School announced
that "for their dedication to
Jewish education and for the sup-
port and leadership they have
given to the Hebrew Day School,
we are proud to announce the
naming of the main building the
Ben and Lillian Marcus Hebrew
Day School building."
The presentation was made to
Mr. and Mrs. Marcus at the David
Posnack Hebrew Day School gala
dinner dance held recently at the
Holiday Inn in Plantation.
Rabbi Howard Addison gives a
lesson on the Holocaust.
YOUR CAR
IN ISRAEL
140
'I I' Al I "
HI N t.URiON IMIt RMAHOMAI AIHPORT
III VIV HIBT.'I r. | III n I A S
J| RIISAII M Ml TAM'A HIIRSHIRA
MAllA ASMKIIOM IUAT
< J **-.*-.
> -
-


Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, May 6, 1988
Kol Ishah Woman's Voice HWK *?lp
Special Plaudits to Women's Division Leaders...
Annual Meeting and Installation
Women'8 Division president
Alvera Gold, right, presented
Charlotte Padek with the
Women'8 Division 1988 Cam-
paign chairman'8 award.
Women's Division Campaign Team '89: front, left, 1989 Women's
Division Campaign chair Esther Lerner, president Alvera Gold,
Campaign co-chair Hilda Leibo, and back, Campaign co-chair Jo
Ann Levy, and Major Gifts Claire Oshry.
Gladys Daren, right, chair-
man of the day for the Women's
Division 1988 Annual Meeting
and Installation, with Bess
Katz, left, Women's Division
Nominating Committee
chairman.
WLm
Incoming 1988/89 Women's Division Executive Committee: front,
left, Judy Henry, Shirley Wainer, Charlotte Padek, Esther
Lerner, Hilda Leibo, Esther Wolfer, Selma TeUes, Deborah
Hahn, Marcia Schwartz. Back, Jo Ann Levy, Alvera Gold, Claire
Oshry. Not pictured, Elaine Cohn.
Give a Little...
Help a Lot!
When you donate clothes, furniture, household items or even estates,
not only do you receive your tax deduction, but most important you
receive personal satisfaction. Satisfaction in knowing you're helping support
Hebrew Schools and day care centers as well as the needy. Help keep
our heritage alive, make your donation TODAY!
Now more than ever we need
your help.
We desperately, need your
donations ofc
Furniture
. Clothing
Linens
. Brlc-A-Brac
. Antiques
NO WAIT FOR
FURNITURE
PICKUP
TAX
DEDUCTIBLE
FREE
APPRAISALS
OVER
$5000
1
THE JEWISH THRIFT SHOP
All Merchandise Owned By A Non Profit Organization
962-6046
Hours:
8 A.M. to 6 P.M.
7 Days a week
HALLANDALE
3149 W Hatlandale Bch. Blvd.
Two blocks West of 1-95
r
Claire Oshry, left, receives
Women'8 Division Major Gifts
chairman's award from
Charlotte Padek.
Outgoing 1987/88 Women's Division Executive Committee: front,
left, Deborah Hahn, Charlotte Padek, Lois Polish, Marcia
Schwartz, Jo Ann Levy, Esther Wolfer, Claire Oshry, Judy
Henry. Back, Florence Straus, Alvera Gold, Bess Katz. Not pic-
tured, Anita Perlman.
Charlotte Padek, center, presented the 1988 Women's Division
Campaign co-chairman's awards to Jo Ann Levy, left, and Lois
Polish.
Helping Our Jewish Brethren...
PSYCHIATRIST
SEMYON GLUZMAN
Naberezhnaya Slavutina 27A, apt. 720
KIEV 252210
Ukr. SSR, USSR
Dr. Gluzman, 41, was sentenced in 1971 to seven years in a labor
camp for "anti-Soviet agitation and propaganda" for rejecting
the official diagnosis that Gen. Pytor Grigorenko was mentally ill.
ihree years earlier, Dr. Gluzman turned down a position at a
psychiatric hospital because he refused to be associated with the
boviet practice of committing healthy political prisoners to such
hospitals and medically treating them for insanity. While serving
ins sentence, he decided to emigrate to Israel but was told in 1982
that he, wife Irina and daughter Julia could not emigrate.



Friday, May 6, 1988/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 7
Lively Discussion and Songfest
Highlight Senior's Days...
COMMUNITY RELATIONS COMMITTEE OF
Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale
8358 W.Oakland Park Blvd., Ft. Labderdato, Ft-33351 748-8400 Miami 945 9731
Barbara Wiener, Chairman---------------------------------------------------------
CRC Opens Black-Jewish Dialogue
The elderly participant* of the Jewish Federation's Kosher
Nutrition Program were delighted by a talented select group from
the Cypress Chase Choraleers. It was a morning filled with love
and song. Talented members are Irving Pavony, Roz Tunis,
director extraordinaire, Sol Tunis, pianist, Anne Marks and
Ruth handy. Kudos to a group of talented and caring performers.
If you would like to add your name to our list of friends, please
call Sandy Friedland, 797-0331.
Claire Mitchel, left, Miami
Herald columnist, is shown
greeting one of her fans,
Eleanor Isaacs, upon her ad-
dressing the seniors of the
Kosher Nutrition Program.
Pictured, from left, Augusta Clark, Carolyn Mash, Judy Henry,
and Jeanette Mizell.
In an effort to improve Black-
Jewish relations in our communi-
ty, the Domestic Concerns Sub-
committee of the Community
Relations Committee of the
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale has initiated a
Black-Jewish dialogue group com-
posed of area community leaders
from both ethnic groups which
met for the first time recently at
the home of Judy Henry.
Selma Telles was in charge of
programming the first meeting, a
dinner which was held in Coral
Springs. Seven women attended
the first meeting, including
Augusta Clark, district coor-
dinator for Broward County
Schools; Jeanette Mizell, Broward
teacher; accountant Carolyn
Mash; Alice Solomon, executive
director of the Fort Lauderdale
office of the National Conference
of Christians and Jews; Nancy R.
Daly, Glendale Federal vice-
president of product development;
Judy Henry, business owner; and
Selma Telles, medical
adminstrator.
These women discussed a wide
range of topics that affect both
communities, including family
problems, children, education, and
the future of our society. It is
hoped that the group will expand
to 16 people in the weeks ahead,
as the Federation continues to
reach out to all people to open the
lines of communication and thus
break down the barriers of
mistrust.
The next meeting is scheduled
for May 25, also at the home of
Domestic Concerns Subcommittee
co-chair Judy Henry. For more in-
formation, contact Joel Telles at
the Federation, 748-8400.
Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale
United Jewish Appeal Campaign
8358 W. Oakland Park Blvd. Ft. Lauderdale, Fl 33351 748-8400
Members Alice Solomon and
Nancy Daly.
In The Spotlight
Fred Levine at Holocaust Commemoration Program April 14
Continued from Page 1
performing the tradi-
tional song "Ani
Maamin I Believe."
Then Fran Klauber
presided over a special
candlelighting
ceremony performed by
Holocaust survivors and
second and third
generation families. Mr.
and Mrs. Norman Gitler
lit a candle for Israeli
3oldiers who gave their
lives in defense of the
Jewish state.
Then Jewish Federa-
tion Community Rela-
tions Committee
chairperson, Barbara K.
Wiener, was called upon
to introduce the
keynote speaker
Fred David Levine, the
associate director of the
Florida Regional Office
of the Anti-Defamation
League.
Mr. Levine, in a very
moving speech, related
that "the state of Israel
was not created from
the ashes of the
Holocaust, as the Jews
built the state some 80
years before the
tragedy."
Levine continued that
there are those groups
who are presently
spreading the myth that
there were no gas
chambers and no
crematoriums. These
"revisionists" are try-
ing to rewrite the
history books.
Levine stated, "We
must be aware of the
fact that there are those
who remember the
Holocaust differently,
and as the generation
that lived through the
Holocaust passes we in-
herit a certain task ...
we must see this as a
mission and see our
goals fulfilled in
teaching the history of
this dark chapter to
others."
Levine concluded,
"We as a people were
not consumed for a
reason, let us see that
reason, pursue that
reason, and dedicate
our lives to it."
Rabbi Kurt Stone of the
Tamarac Jewish Center and
CRC chair Barbara Wiener.
Taking part in this year's Yom Hashoa program were Holocaust
Survivors of South Florida members, from left, Percy Kaye, Isaac
Schlomkowitz, president Norman Gitler, Rose GitUrr, and Julius
Eisenstein.
bH t
Members of the Holocaust Sur-
vivors of South Florida light
memorial candles at Temple
Beth Am on Yom Hashoa.
Temple Beth Am Cantor Irving Grossman leads the audience m
prayer on this Holocaust Remembrance program alongwith Fred
Levine, Temple president Pincus Yacknowitz, and Rabbi Paul
Plotkin.
1


Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, May 6, 1988
Federation Not An Impossible Dream
Nowadays we Jews in the United States tend to feel com-
fortable and secure. We've come a long way since the great
waves of immigration in the early part of this century,
when Jews lived in the Lower East Side ghettos of New
York, Chicago's West Side, and Los Angeles' Boil Heights
or South Philadelphia, and worked at menial trades. Most
businesses, professions, educational institutions and social
organizations now accept Jews without question. Anti-
Semitism has declined dramatically in the past 30 years,
although today there have been more visible signs of
lunatic fringe individuals and hate groups not only in Israel
and overseas, but here in our very neighborhoods, touching
all our families. Areas such as Skokie, Illinois, Hollywood,
and Delray Beach, Florida, Kansas City, Missouri, Palo
Alto, California, to name a few. Compared, however, with
the rest of the American population, Jews are better
educated, better off financially, and in the "better"
occupations.
Altogether here is a wonderful picture. Or is it? Consider
a few disturbing facts.
World Jewish population is declining. Of the world's five
billion inhabitants, fewer than 13 million are Jews; that's
one quarter of one percent. American Jews total 5.8
million, about 2.4 percent of the U.S. population. In the
rest of the world, Israel accounts for 3.4 million; the Soviet
Union about two million; Europe about a million; less than
half a million in Central and South America; some 300,000
in Canada; the rest scattered. We are a tiny minority
almost everywhere.
There are fewer Jewish marriages. When we do marry,
we're marrying later and having fewer children. We're ag-
ing; almost a quarter of the U.S. Jewish population is 60 or
older and here in North Broward County, 33 percent of the
population are senior citizens. A growing divorce rate
fragments our households. And our interest in things
Jewish is diminished by apathy, assimilation, intermarriage
and the myriad attractions and distractions competing for
our leisure hours.
A study of Jewish organizations seems to indicate that
we increasingly view these groups as if we were con-
sumers. Many Jews drop their synagogue affiliation from
the community center when they no longer need the day
^HHJ^S.
care or school services. In the past, we joined an organiza-
tion and remained for a lifetime. Today we often shop for
the organization that will gratify a current, usually tran-
sient, need.
But the U.S. Jewish community is not alone. Similar con-
ditions exist in most Jewish communities throughout the
Diaspora. Some scholars say we are committing suicide as
a people because "we no longer have the will to be Jewish."
Only Israel seems impervious to the ominous trends we see
elsewhere. Yet Israel's status as an island of Jewish stabili-
ty has been threatened by recent clashes between
denominations.
And that is where the Jewish Federation, the com-
munity's major central organization is so important. The
mission to help unify the Jewish people, preserve Jewish
identity, provide vital social service, welfare and
humanitarian programs, perpetuate Jewish culture and
ideals, and speak as a voice for peace loving and freedom
loving people everywhere.
But the challenge grows greater by the day. The Federa-
tion and UJA campaign, the fund-raising arm, must be con-
temporary, must be relevant, and must have you, your sup-
port and your dollars. We must persuade the entire North
Broward County Jewish community that we are dynamic
and effective, that we can and do offer a range of services
necessary and attractive to Jews of all ages and income
groups, to singles, married couples, from all walks of life.
Right here in our own community, there are thousands of
Jews, many young and unaffiliated, who have not found a
way to join in the mainstream of our enriching and enhanc-
ing community programs, to address their concerns and ex-
press their Jewishness. We must find the way to reach
these people. And lest it be known we are not alone in this
quest. In Miami, 30 percent of the community has no
religious identification; in Los Angeles, 28 percent; in New
York, 23 percent; in Chicago, 20 percent.
So the task ahead is great, but not insurmountable or im-
possible. And all of us must help dream that impossible
dream of 100 percent participation in all things Jewish, and
truly be the "Chosen People."
-MLV
INVERRARY DIVISION
Lester Fields has done a super
job of fund-raising for the annual
Federation/UJA Inverrary Golf
Classic over the past four years.
This year he was responsible for
getting Commvest Securities Cor-
poration to offer a $10,000 prize
for the first hole-in-one on the
15th hole of the Inverrary East
Golf Course during this year's
tournament.
Fields stated, "Because life has
been good to me, I enjoy devoting
time to these efforts which help
Israel and Jewish people all over."
After retiring from optometry,
Fields became a free lance in-
dustrial designer which he really
enjoys to this day. He is also pro-
gram chairman of Inverrary B'nai
B'rith and was this year's Inver-
rary B'nai B'rith Israeli Bonds
chair.
Lester has been married to his
wife Bessie for 48 years.
Come Join A Mission
At last there's time for a leisurely breakfast,
unhurried conversation and the chance
to enjoy a second (or even a third) cup of
rich, delicious Maxwell House* Coffee It
couldn't be anything but Sunday morning.
K KOSHER OM6QwaFooDiaKi
IT COULDN'T BE ANYTHING BUT MAXWELL HOUSE:
RICHARD AND MARIE Levy
participants on the Federa-
tion/UJA Community Mission
to Israel. They said the Mission
trip was just wonderful and
everyone should have the oppor-
tunity to go to Israel. For more
information on a Federa-
tion/UJA Mission, contact
Sandy Jackowitz at the
Federation, 748-8400.


Friday, May 6, 1988/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 9
.
} CAMPAIGN '88 Federation/United Jewish Appeal
From the Desk of the General Chairman...
$6.8 Million for '88 Reflects Unusual Statistics
By HAROLD L. OSHRY
General Campaign Chairman
Within the coming months, the
'88 Federation/United Jewish Ap-
peal drive is in the final phase
helping to secure our vitally need-
ed $7.6 million goal. To date, our
North Broward County communi-
ty has raised $6.8 million in our
quest for life-saving, life-enriching
services and to procure the future
and well-being of our brethren
here at home, in Israel, and in 34
other lands.
Condo Campaigners in Action...
MEMBERS OF the Pine Island Ridge community recently held a
very successful Federation/UJA breakfast at the Pine Island
Ridge Country Club. Pictured, from left, are co-chairman Dr. B.
Greenspan, Charles Block, Gene Meyers, chairman Max E. Bern-
stein, speaker Dr. Abraham Gittelson, CAJE director and co-
chairman A. Golansky.
Hat's Off to Our
Margate Division Team...
Another season of the Federation/UJA campaign in Margate
has ended successfully.
Ben Kaplan, Federation/UJA Margate Division chairman, is op-
timistic that this year's campaign has exceeded all expectations.
Kaplan attributes the vitality of this year's campaign to several
factors: an active and well-attended Executive Committee, the
large turnout at events held in the 20 condominium area, and a
dedicated group of volunteers that reached out for community
support of the Federation.
For the first time in Margate history, Margate had its own
"Super Wednesday" which was a huge success.
Members of the Margate Federation/UJA Executive Commit-
tee are looking forward to an even better campaign next year. A
special thanks to all the volunteers who worked so hard on this
year's campaign.
What's Happening.
MAY
May 11 Women's Division Meetings. 9:30 a.m.
exec. 10:30 a.m. board.
May 12 Business Executive Network. Meeting.
6 p.m. Marriott Harbor Beach. Speaker: Nor-
man Braman.
May 15-17 AIPAC.
May 17 Women's Division East Side Book
Review. 2 p.m.
May 17 Young Business and Professionals
Cultural Program. 7:30 p.m. Maxine's
Restaurant.
May 19 Federation Annual Meeting and Officer
Installation. Jewish Community Center.
Evening.
May 19 Foundation Executive Committee
Meeting. Noon.
May 23 Shavuot. Federation Offices closed.
Newswlre/lsrael
TEL-AVIV The Peace Now movement, which began in 1978 as
a counterforce to nationalist demands that Israel permanently re-
tain all of the Arab territories it captured in 1967, is celebrating
its 10th anniversary at a time when Israelis are sharply divided
over the situation in the territories and their future status.
JERUSALEM As the even split between the left and the right
in Israeli politics continues to become more and more fixed and
unbridgeable, the significance of the Israeli Arab vote as a poten-
tial factor in coalition building increases, said a visiting American
professor at a recent lecture at the Hebrew University ot
Jerusalem.
There are no words to explain
the importance of our corps of
men and women volunteers who
number in the thousands as they
span the 20-area municipalities
from Da vie to Deerfield Beach,
and from Oceanside to
Bonaventure-Weston; truly they
have been magnificent. And there
is only the greatest of praise for
the more than 28,000 concerned
contributors who have accounted
for our totals to date but, and
there is always a but, when it
comes to providing for our fellow
man, where are the rest of our
dedicated and compassionate
citizens?
What does it take to get the
other residents involved? Do we
have to be on the verge of a crisis
or on a collision course?
What is truly a remarkable
achievement and somewhat con-
fusing is that of our approximate-
ly 28,000 donors, less than 1,100
account for gifts of $1,000 or
more, and some 24,000 plus under
Briefly!
William Gralnick, left,
Southeast Regional director
American Jewish Committee,
Helen Weisberg: Ad-
ministrator North Broward
Midrasha and Rabbi Randall
J. Konigsburg, Temple
Shaaray Tzedek at the final lec-
ture of the Contemporary
Issues of Jewish Life lecture
series. Gralnick spoke on
Jewish Family Life in the 21st
Century.
THE HAGUE The
United Nations formally ac-
cused the United States of
violating its international
legal obligations and asked
the World Court here to in-
tervene. The UN
undersecretary general for
legal affairs asked the
15-judge panel to order bin-
ding arbitration of the
dispute arising from a U.S.
Department of Justice order
in February to shut down
the Palestine Liberation
Organization's observer
mission to the UN in New
York.
that total. And when you break
that down, it reveals that less
than five percent of the con-
tributors are responsible for some
70 percent of the funds leaving 95
percent, the remaining 30 percent
of the monies.
In 1988, we continue to face
stiff challenges that must be met
if we are to remain a viable Jewish
community. The call for new ser-
vices and programs to meet the in-
creasing growth of our population
is beckening; the allocations to our
local social welfare and people
oriented facilities have
skyrocketed while the needs of
our brethren in Israel for
humanitarian needs have not
lessened, regardless of the blaring
headlines; and our obligations
overseas continue to mount yearly
in significant increments.
Truly the crunch for campaign
dollars has arrived. Our leader-
ship response has been dramatic,
they have organized, planned, im-
plemented and provided the ex-
pertise and commitment that has
surpassed our greatest of expecta-
tions. The Woodlands community
accounting for $1.5 million, the
Women's Division nearing that
same mark, Coral Springs recor-
ding a 60 percent increase, and
many other major areas and divi-
sions securing more than '87
amounts.
As a member of our "Federa-
tion Family of Contributors," you
truly are an exceptional individual
Harold Oshry
you have taken the necessary
steps to pledge a heartfelt gift to
the Jewish community's major
philanthropy, and should indeed
feel proud and responsible for
your brothers and sisters around
the world, but your work is not yet
-done. For now, the challenge of
spreading that message to your
friends, neighbors, and business
associates is even greater. We can
no longer rest on our laurels, it is
up to us to perform the intrinsic
role of shaping the future of our
20 year young community,
building the strongest foundation
in Greater Fort Lauderdale that
we can possibly envision.
Help us achieve our urgently
needed goal, set aside some time,
leaf through your personal phone
directory, schedule some calls,
and record some new gifts.,
It is through us, through this
practice of Tzedakah one Jew
caring for another that you will
strengthen the quality of Jewish
life worldwide!
1988
CAMPAIGN PLEDGES
TO DATE
(As of April 26, 1988)
$7,200,000
$7,000,000 -
$6,800,000
$5,000,000
$4,000,000
$3,000,000
$2,000,000
$1,200,000
$1,000,000
Jewish
Federation
of Greater Ft. Lauderdale
United Jewish Appeal Campaign
General Chairman
Harold L. Oshry
CELE1
20
SBRAl
6
me TRADITION CONTINUES



Page 10 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, May 6, 1988
Soviet Move to Thwart
Western Emigration
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Israel is now issuing invita-
tions that Soviet Jews need to
apply for exit visas with the re-
quirement that they go direct-
ly to Israel via Romania. The
move is an effort by Israel to
stop most Soviet emigrants
from going to other countries,
including the United States.
But an Israeli Embassy
source, who confirmed that the
Briefly
The Study Group of the Contemporary Issues of Jewish Life
lecture series met 10 times before and after each lecture to study
in depth the topic of each lecture. Dr. A.J. Gittelson and Rabbi
Howard Addison were leaders of the study group. Standing from
left, Joe Gould, Rosa Seidenberg, Jacob Seidenberg, Jack Miller,
Henry Gorelkin, Dr. A.J. Gittelson and seated Sonya Schlosser,
Shirley Gould, Mitchell Zelking, and Jerry Kaye.
new invitations have been sent
out for the last month, stress-
ed that for now, there is no
change in how Soviet Jews
who receive exit visas leave
the USSR.
Emigrants can go to
Bucharest, as a small number
have done for the last six to
eight months, or to Vienna, as
most emigrants do, and then
on to either Israel or another
country.
If the Israeli requirement
were to become mandatory,
those who receive invitations
would not receive their exit
visas until they reached
Bucharest and would thus
have no choice but to go on to
Israel.
Karl Zukerman, executive
vice president of HIAS, sug-
gested that this mandatory
policy would not go into effect
until Israel is allowed to open a
mission or consulate in the
Soviet Union.
Negotiations have been go-
ing on for some time between
Israel and the Soviet Union,
which broke diplomatic rela-
tions after the 1967 Sue Day
War.
The Dutch Embassy in
^r
TOGET1HISGREAT1ASTE,*
YOU'LL HAVETOGIVEUPCHOLESTEROL.
A small price to pay. Who wants all that
cholesterol in their diet anyway? Nobody.
That's why all Mazola products are made
from 100% pure com oil, so they're choles-
terol-free.
Whether it's Regular, Diet, or Unsalted
Margarine; Com Oil or No Stick Cooking Spray,
all Mazola products are not only good, they're
good for you, too. And they
all carry the Union of Ortho-
dox Jewish Congregations'
symbol on their packages.
GHETTO FIGHTERS MONUMENT Marek Edelman, center,
the last surviving commander in Poland of the 1948 Warsaw
Jewish Ghetto Uprising, stands as the Polish national anthem is
sung at an unsanctioned rally to pay homage to victims of the
Nazi Holocaust in World War II. AP/Wide World Photo
Moscow continues to handle
the invitations from Israel,
and no changes have been
made despite the new wor-
ding, according to Jerry Good-
man, executive director of the
National Conference on Soviet
Jewry.
Both Goodman and the
Israeli Embassy source said
the new requirement would
not prevent Soviet Jews who
have relatives in the United
States, Britain, Canada or
other countries from seeking
to join them. Since last July,
the Soviets have permitted
persons with relatives in the
United States and other coun-
tries to receive invitations
from them, and not just from
Israel, as was the previous
practice.
Goodman noted that for the
past year-and-a-half, the Na-
tional Conference has ad-
vocated a "two-track" ap-
proach whereby Soviet Jews
who want to go to Israel can do
so directly, while those who
want to go to the United
States or another western
country can also go there
directly without the subter-
fuge of asking for a visa to
Israel. Morris Abram, chair-
man of the National Con-
ference, and Edgar Bronfman,
president of the World Jewish
Congress, raised the Roma-
nian route directly with Soviet
officials when they were in
Moscow in March 1987.
I9M B*>t Food.. CPC ktornakorul Inc
WORLD
JEWISH CONGRESS
The Director General of the
Austrian Foreign Ministry on a
visit to Kuwait said his country
would not bow to "Zionist
threats" in the case of Kurt
idheim. The World Jewish
i ongress Office here denounced
the remarks as blatantly anti-
Jewish and an effort to divert at-
tention from the condemnation of
Waldheim's Nazi past made by
Austria's own commission of
historians. Waldheim has been in
virtual diplomatic isolation since
the revelations of his Nazi past
and has received no invitation to
visit any Western country.


4
Foundation of Jewish Philanthropies
Creating A Legacy
For the 21st Century
Jacob Brodzki, Chairman
Friday, May 6, 1988/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
State Rep. Norman Ostrau Co-Sponsors Bill to
Establish Florida-Israel Institute
Page 11
1
FOUNDATION DOLLARS
AT WORK
Unrestricted income from the
(Foundation's Endowment Funds
provides the opportunity to make
grants. The Foundation of Jewish
Philanthropies has an endowment
fund called the, "Jewish Com-
munity Trust Fund," which
makes grants, through its
unrestricted funds, to our local,
national and worldwide Jewish
community.
Grants and interest free loans
have been made to the David
Posnack Hebrew Day School,
Soref Jewish Community Center,
Jewish Federation Elderly Hous-
ing Program, Central Agency for
Jewish Education and otters.
The Jewish Community Trust
fond needs additional donors so
that it will be possible to continue
contributing to a wide range of
Jewish charitable groups. The
Foundation's Board of Trustees,
comprised of caring and concern-
ed volunteer community business
people from all professions,
decides where and to whom the
grants will be made.
THE FOUNDATION OF
JEWISH PHILANTHROPIES
PHILANTHROPIC FUND
GRANT SUMMARY
During the past seven (7) mon-
ths, at the recommendation of our
Philanthropic Fund donors and
the Foundation Executive Com-
mittee, the Foundation of Jewish
Philanthropies has made 118
grants totalling $485,000.
\Norman Braman
Keynotes
Business
Network Event
May 12
Philadelphia Eagles owner Nor-
man Braman will be the guest
speaker at the Jewish Federation
Business and Executive Network
program which will be held at the
Marriott Harbor Beach Resort in
Fort Lauderdale on Thursday,
| May 12, starting at 6 p.m.
Admission to this event is $5
I and will include hors d'oeuvres. A
I cash bar will also be available.
Susan Rose Symons. chairper-
son of the Business and Executive
[Network group, stated, "We are
[privileged that Norman Braman
| has taken the time out of his busy
[schedule and many business com-
mitments to speak before our
|BEN group."
Mr. Braman graduated from
Temple University with a degree
In Marketing. In 1972, he became
president of Braman Cadillac of
Tampa and since then has ac-
quired many dealerships. In 1985,
ie became chairman of Austin
lover Cars of North America, and
Jso took the ownership of the
Philadelphia Eagles Football club.
Braman was campaign chair of
the UJA campaign in Miami in
1981 and 1985. He is on the Board
tf Directors of AIPAC and was
iven a Presidential appointment
is a member of the U.S.
iolocaust Memorial Council.
Mr. Braman will be speaking on
Contemporary issues facing the
pewish community from the
Msis in Israel to the 1988
Presidential elections.
for more information on this
|UCTl< or to make reservation*, con-
ct Mimi at the Federation,
fiB-8400.
88 grants were made to North
Broward County, national and
worldwide Jewish charitable
organizations totalling $445,000.
80 grants were made to local
general charitable institutions
totalling $39,000.
DO YOU HAVE A FLORIDA
WILL AND IS IT UPDATED?
YOU CARE ABOUT THE
FUTURE OF YOUR
CHILDREN AND THEIR
CHILDREN'S CHILDREN?
Update your Will to benefit your
loved ones directly and the Jewish
institutions that contribute to
their well being and quality of life.
For further information about
the Foundation, contact Kenneth
Kent, Foundation Director at
748-8400.
In an effort to develop a college
level exchange of education and
technology between Florida and
foreign countries, State Rep. Nor-
man Ostrau of Plantation is co-
sponsoring a bill that would create
a Florida-Israel Institute.
The bill is designed to help
create an Israeli Institute of
Studies at Florida Atlantic
University and Broward Com-
munity College, which would pro-
vide a selection of courses in
Judaic studies, higher education, a
swapping of technologies, and
cultural exchanges between the
two countries. A similar program
would be run through a yet to be
named postsecondary institution
in Israel.
The Florida-Israel Institute
would be housed in the FAU
Tower located in downtown Fort
Lauderdale. Classes would be
taught at BCC and FAU cam-
puses throughout Broward and
Palm Beach Counties.
Representative Norman Ostrau,
a leader in Federation/UJA,
related, "It's important for our
Jewish Community to have this
center here in southeast Broward
from an educational and an
economic standpoint."
The establishment of a Florida-
Israel Institute would most likely
lead to an exchange of corporate
technology and industry between
the two countries.
The bill is scheduled to come
before both houses of the Florida
Legislature for consideration in
May, and Ostrau is confident that
there will be no major problem in
getting it passed.
HAT'S OFF to Frank
Morgano, a volunteer
photographer for the Flori-
dian. Frank has given un-
tirelessly of himself for the past
decade, in an effort to help
Federation/UJA obtain their
goals.
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Dade. Broward. Palm Beach. Martin. St. Lucie.
Indian River and Okeechobee Counties.


Page 12 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, May 6, 1988
Your FederationUJA Dollars in Action...
A Special Time at the Kosher Nutrition/ Gathering Place Seder
By CRAIG LUSTGARTEN
Rabbi David Gordon, a
member of the Jewish Federa-
tion's Chaplaincy Commission,
led a moving pre-Passover
Seder for 150 members of the
Jewish Federation's Kosher
Nutrition and Gathering Place
programs. The event was held
in Soref Hall on the Jewish
Community Center campus in
Plantation.
As part of the Seder pro-
gram, the kindergarten class
Nat Green and school teacher lead the kindergarten class of the
David Posnack Hebrew Day School in festival songs at the Kosher
Nutrition and Gathering Place Passover Seder held at the JCC.
Rabbi David Gordon jokes with Kosher Nutrition participants at
the recent Passover Seder.
HARBOR ISLAND SPA: WEIGHT LOSS GUARANTEED
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Aerobics Dinner Dancing a Shows
SPA SAVER PLANS
3 DAYS 2 MTM: MS**
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EC 4 26PPOBL OCC M of '74 Roomt-fftjt Ui i tt
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ON BISCATNE BA BilWiiN MIAMI i MIAMI BUCH FLORIDA
of the David Posnack Hebrew
Day School sang the Four
Questions for the Seder par-
ticipants. Cantor Phillip Erstl-
ing gave a superb rendition of
the Seder prayers which led to
the partaking of Matzah, wine,
and other traditional holiday
foods.
Irving Libowsky, Federation
vice president and chairman of
the Kosher Nutrition and
Gathering: Place programs,
stated, "This holiday program
enables people who financially
or otherwise couldn't make a
Seder to come and sit with
others and participate in the
celebration of Passover."
"With the support of our
Federation, we are carrying
out one of the most important
traditions in Jewish life tak-
ing care of the elderly."
Libowsky continued. "I would
like to add that staff members
Sandra Friedland, Bonnie
Krauss, Adele Berman, and
Sara Perlis have done a
marvelous job running these
two very important programs
in our community."
Rabbi Gordon talked about
the meaning of the redemption
theme of the Passover holiday,
saying. "We must continue to
work tor the freedom of Jews
Coral Springs
Program May 25
Coral Springs Federation/UJA
chairman Donald Fischer is proud
to announce that the final seminar
of the Coral Springs Leadership
Development Series will be held
on Wednesday, May 25, at the
Federation's Coral Springs Of-
fice, at 7 p.m.
This month's program is entitl-
ed, "The Bottom Line: Tzedakah
and the Meaning of Campaign."
Carol Effrat, Regional director
of the United Jewish Appeal will
be speaking on this topic.
For more information on
Federation/UJA Coral Springs
Leadership programs, contact
Ken Kent at the Federation,
748-8400.

MAMNMUC
CokK TV* **''
SaSass-
SocWPrognMW""--
Agency Focus
K
Members of the Federation Nutrition Committee include, from
left, John Shabel, Cantor Philip Erstling, Rabbi David Gordon,
Irving Libowsky, and David Krantz. Not shown are committee
member Jerry Kaye and contributor Frank Rosen.
all over the world, and
especially in the Soviet
Union."
Mrs. Sadie Goldberg, a par-
ticipant with the Kosher Nutri-
tion program, remarked,
"This Passover Seder was a
great opportunity to get lonely
elderly people out of their
rooms to mingle with people
their own age. The Seder gave
us a chance to partake of our
Jewish traditions and
heritage, and imbued us with a
feeling that we are part of
something and not all alone."
The Ladies Auxiliary of the Jewish War Veterans No. 780,
recently installed their 1988-89 officers. They included Sylvia
Meyers Prts.; Sylvia Siener Sr. V.P.; Myrtle Yedvobnick Jr.
V.P.; Gloria Fienberg Treas.; Fin. Secty. Esther Keer,; Chaplain
Lil Ginsburg,; Patriotic Inst. Hilda Lipman,; Conductress Cele
Kopit; and Past County Pres. Edythe Morgana served a delicious
Luncheon and acted as Installation Chairman.
(T
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Report of the President...
Friday, May 6, 1988/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 13
&<&&?&&&&::::^&:&
Federation Celebrates a Milestone Anniversary
^!^l$S^$SlS&'Sl$SlS$fS^l$^
From SHELDON S. POLISH
In a few days our North
Broward County major central
organization will cite our report to
the community at the Jewish
Federation Annual Meeting and
Installation, at the Soref Jewish
Community Center.
This year's important event
comes at a time the celebration
of our 20th and the State of
Israel's 40th Anniversaries
when it is appropriate to reflect
on our accomplishments and to ex-
amine the role and purpose of the
Federation. Such an undertaking
will lead us to reconsider the ideas
that are basic to our existence
concepts which often are taken for
granted.
The Young ...
In his initial annual report, the
first President of the Federation,
this year's Anniversary chair Lud-
wik Brodzki, noted that, "Federa-
tion is not only a means to obtain
more revenue, but it spells a
higher order of efficiency. ..."
Simply put, the Federation adds
value to the Jewish community by
providing the most efficient
method of acquiring, managing,
and distributing the community s
charitable resources.
With that in mind, our Federa-
tion and the family of agencies
and beneficiaries, is the embodi-
ment of a basic concept the join-
ing of independent entities to pro-
vide for the common welfare.
Many have celebrated the many
faceted pattern of Jewish life. The
founders of the Federation knew
that approach would survive only
if the community could find a way
to be sure that each element was
strengthened by its affiliation
with the whole.
This past year, we have indeed
acted together, working hand-in-
hand in specific fields of service,
including health care, Jewish
education, care of the aged, in-
dividual and group programs. We
also act together for other
reasons. Part of the way in which
we define ourselves as Jews is our
peoplehood our spirit of com-
munity. It is this sense of solidari-
ty which has enabled us to sur-
vive, not just for the sake of
perserverance, but for the sake of
the values that our beliefs and ac-
tions represent.
This year, Harold L. Oshry, our
general campaign chairman and
his crack team of Federation/UJA
volunteers have accomplished a
remarkable achievement of rais-
ing to date more than $6.8 million
and still counting.
In an era of those who advocate
"doing one's own thing," the
Federation is an amazing crea-
tion. The fact that some 28,000 in-
dividuals are willing to provide us
with voluntary financial support
is, in itself, an impressive result.
That so many of those individuals
are also willing to invest
thousands of hours of their time to
make the Federation more effi-
cient and effective, is the reason
why we are able to achieve what
we do.
And how wonderous that is for
all for our brethren.
In Greater Fort Lauderdale:
Soref Jewish Community
Center programs and activities
that serve children, youth,
families, adults, the elderly in a
warm, caring Jewish
environment.
Jewish Family Service
counseling to individuals, families,
couples and older adults having a
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The Family ...
wide range of personal and emo-
tional difficulties.
David Posnack Hebrew Day
School providing the latest in
programming and facilities with
quality Judaic and secular
education.
Central Agency for Jewish
Education providing Jewish
education and programming
through the North Broward
Midrasha, Judaica High School,
and the Teachers Resource
Center.
Kosher Nutrition and Gather-
ing Place serving our elderly
and frail elderly a hot kosher meal
and a friendly helping hand.
And there are others, our newly
opened Jewish Federation Coral
Springs Activity Center, which
will be the home to a multitude of
programs, classes and instruction
for our North Broward area
residents, the B'nai B'rith Youth
Organisation, Hillel Foundation,
and Aliyah Council to name a few.
All in all, there are some fifty
Clus constituent agencies and
eneficiaries who are able to keep
the doors open and the services
coming thanks to these dedicated
men and woman.
Be it Tel Aviv, through the
United Israel Appeal, Thailand
through the Joint Distribution
Committee or Tamarac through
the Federation/UJA, our presence
is felt.
The system which went into ef-
fect some 20 years ago, is still in
operation. The core of that system
is the heart of our community
striving to help all of our
brethren. Most significantly, the
events and achievements of those
twenty years have evoked a
remarkable commitment to
Jewish identity and Jewish con-
tinuity worldwide. That commit-
ment is the starting point for the
next twenty years!
The Elderly ...
Comedian Glickman at Young B&P May 17 Meeting
The Young Business and Pro-
fessional group of the Jewish
Federation will have stand-up
comedian David Glickman as its
special guest entertainer at its
next cultural program, which will
be held on Tuesday, May 17, at
Maxine's Restaurant and Lounge,
8300 West Sunrise Blvd., Planta-
tion, at 7:30 p.m.
Admission to this event is $10 in
advance and $12 at the door.
There will be a dessert ex-
travaganza with a large variety of
sweets to tempt the palate. A cash
bar will also be available.
Guest entertainer David
Glickman has appeared in clubs
nationwide, including the Comedy
Store in Los Angeles, the Comedy
Cellar in New York, and the Com-
ic Strip in Fort Lauderdale. He is
also the owner and operator of
Miami's Coconuts Comedy Club.
Shana Safer, chairperson of the
Young Business and Professionals
group, related, "Because this is
our last cultural event of the
season, we have planned a very
entertaining evening. David
Glickman, our guest performer, is
an excellent comedian."
The Young Business and Pro-
fessional group of the Jewish
Federation welcomes singles and
young married couples from post-
college age to the mid-thirties to
all events.
To make advance reservations
for this event, call Mimi at the
Jewish Federation, 748-8400.
Rabbi Kurt Stone
at TGIS Program
T.G.I.S. (Thank Goodness It's
Shabbat), an exciting new com-
munity concept where Jewish
singles meet, is holding the next in
its continuing series of monthly
singles programs at the Tamarac
Jewish Center, 9101 NW 57th
Street, Tamarac, on Friday, May
20 at 10 p.m.
On this evening, Tamarac
Jewish Center Rabbi Kurt Stone
will lead a discussion on a topic en-
titled "Images of Ourselves"
what kind of self-images do we
have as Jews and as a community
of Jews.
The Rabbi will also explore the
images associated with the term
JAP (Jewish American Princess)
and how we can turn the phrase
around to mean "Jewish and
Proud."
T.G.I.S. is a singles Shabbat
program geared for the 30-50 age
group. For more information on
this and other singles programm-
ing, contact Joyce Klein at the
Federation, 748-8400.
IF YOU THINK
FLORIDA'S HOT
IN THE SUMMER,
COOL OFF AT
KUTSHER'S
Kutsher's alternative to the summer sun?
A summer star. Kutsher's.. an all new look
for the best vacation imaginable.
Everywhere you turn, there's something
new and exciting, starting with our elegant
new guest building, the Marquis. Plus our
newly re-decorated dining room to satisfy
your appetite for elegance. No detail has
escapee. So take summer to the limit,
follow the sun and the stars to Kutsher's.
SUMMER STARS
NeilSedaka
Bobby Vinton
Shecky Greene
Yakov Smirnoff
Robert Klein
David Brenner
Joan Rivers
More To Come!
Three delicious meals daily, geared to your own special diet.
Golf on an 18-hoie, 7,157 yard championship course, al our front door.
12 all-weather and clay tennis courts. A fully equipped health club.
Lakeside walking trails. Outdoor and indoor pools. Plus much more.
Call us for information about transportation from New York area airports!
Kutsher's Country Club
MontJcello, New York 12701 (914) 794-6000
CALL TOLL FREE: (800) 431-1273
Cosspssw Caanvatioa FadMtts Major CieoM Cawfe Hcaangd


Page 14 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, May 6, 1988
Newswire/Florida
THE NEXT time you fly. you may notice something different. As
of April 23. eight out of ten domestic flights will be smoke-free
thanks to a new Federal law banning all smoking on all domestic
airline flights of two hours or less.
AS A CAUSE of accidental death, pedestrian accidents are ex-
ceeded only by falls and motor vehicle accidents. Each year more
than 8.000 pedestrians die and another 119,000 are injured na-
tionwide. The Broward Sheriffs Office has developed a new
"Walkalert" program to address the problem, especially where
senior citizens are concerned.
THE CREATION of a Center for Interfaith Dialogue, which
will use a computer to match church and synagogue groups in-
terested in ecumenical activities, was announced recently by the
Florida Office of the Anti-Defamation League. In addition to the
computer program, the Center will offer training and guidance to
dialogue leaders, along with publications and videos from the
ADL's library of interfaith and human relations materials.
THE ANNUAL Jewish Federation Fly-In to Tallahassee has been
scheduled for May 25. The fly-in has been an opportunity for
leaders from around the state to join hands and help lobby our
legislators on behalf of the poor, homeless, elderly, and indigent
in our state.
Synagogue Directory
CONSERVATIVE
CONSERVATIVE SYNAGOGUE OF COCONUT CREEK. (975-4666) Lyons
Plasa, 1447 Lyons Road, Coconut Creek 33063. Services: Daily 8 a.m.. 4:30 p.m.; Fri-
day 8 p.m.. Saturday 9 a.m., 5 p.m. Rabfci Arrow Draiin. Caatar Yeaada
Heflaraaa.
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER (721-7660). 9101 NW 57th St.. Tamarac. 33321
Servicee: Sunday through Friday 8:30 a.m., 5 p.m. Late Friday service 8 p.m. Satur-
day 8:45 a.m. Rakbi Kart F. Stoae.
TEMPLE BETH AHM (431-5100). 9730 Stirling Road. Hollywood, 33024. Services
daily 8 a.m.; Monday-Thursday 730 p.m.; Sabbath 8 p.m.. Sabbath morning 8:45 a.m.
RafeM Arraaasa Kaaaak. Caatar Eric Uadaaaaaai.
TEMPLE BETH AM(974-8650). 7206 Royal Palm Blvd.. Margate. 33063. Service.:
Monday through Friday 8:30 a.m., 5 p.m. Friday late service 8 p.m.; Saturday 9 a.m.,
5 p.m., Sunday 8 a.m., 5 p.m. Rabei Paal Pletkia. Rabbi Eawritaa. Dr. 9slsa
GeW. Caatar Irriag Criisasaa
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL(742-4040). 7100 W. Oakland Park Blvd.. Sunrise, 33313.
Services: Monday through Friday 8 a.m.., 5:30 p.m.; Friday 8 a.m., 6 p.m., 8 p.m.;
Saturday 8:45 a.m., 7:45 p.m. Sunday 8:30 a.m. Rabbi Howard A. Asdisoa. Caatar
Maariee A. Nea.
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL OF DEERFIELD BEACH (421-7060), 200 S. Century
Blvd., Deerfield Beach. 33441. Service.: Sunday through Friday 8:30 a.m., 5 p.m.
Friday late service 8 p.m.; Saturday 8:46 a.m., and at candlelighting time. Rabbi
Jests* Laagaar. Caatar Saabtal Acaersaaa.
TEMPLE B'NAI M08HE (942-5380), 1434 SE 3rd St., Pompano Beach, 33060
Sarrieaa: Friday 8 p.m. Caatar Jeaadah Heilbraaa.
TEMPLE SHA'ARAY TZEDEK 741-0296), 4099 Pine Island Rd., Sunrise, 33321.
Sarrieaa: Sunday through Friday 8 a.m.. 5 p.m.; Late Friday service 8 p.m.; Satur-
day 8:45 am., 5 p.m. Rabbi Raadall Ko.ir.txrr Caatar Barry Black. Caatar
EaMritaa Jack Marc seat
TEMPLE SHOLOM (942-6410). 132 SE 11 Ave.. Pompano Beach. 33060. Service.:
Monday through Friday 8:46 a.m.. evenings: Monday through Thursday at 5 p.m..
Friday evening at 8. Saturday and Sunday 9 a.m. Rabbi Albert Troy. Cantor Niaaiai
BerkowiU.
CONGREGATION BETH HILLEL OF MARGATE (974-3090). 7640 Margate
Blvd., Margate. 33063 Sarrieaa: Sunday through Friday 8:15 a.m.. 5:30 p.m. Late
Friday service 8 p.m. Saturday 8:46 a.m., 5:30 p.m. Rabbi Nataaa Zsloaaak. Caa-
tar Joel Coaea.
HEBREW CONGREGATION OF LAUDERHILL (733-9660). 2048 NW 49th Ave ,
Lauderhill. 33313. Sarrieaa: Sunday through Friday 8:30 a.m., 5:30 p.m.; Saturday
8:46 am Rabbi Israel Halaara.
CONGREGATION BETH TEFILAH Ifonaerlr North Laadsraslt Hebrew Coa-
rretratieat (722-7607). 6436 W. Commercial Blvd., Tamarac. FL 33319. Sarrieaa:
Sunday to Friday at 7:45 a.m. Friday at 5 p.m.; Saturday at 8:45 a.m Charles B.
Frier. PraaMeat.
ORTHODOX
TEMPLE OHEL B'NAI RAPHAEL (733-7684), 4351 W. Oakland Park Blvd.,
Lauderdale Lakes, 33313. Sarrieaa: Sunday through Thursday 8 a.m.. 6 p.m.. Friday
8 a.m.. 5 p.m.. Saturday 8:46 a.m., 5 p.m.
SYNAGOGUE OF 1NVERRARY CHABAD (748-1777). 4661 N. University Dr..
Lauderhill, 33361. Sarrieaa: Sunday through Friday 6:46 a.m. 8 am., 5:15 p.m.,
Saturday 9 a.m.. 5:30 p.m. Stady groans: Mea, Saaaays followiag service.:
Woasaa. Taeeaava 8 p.ai. Rakai Area Liobsnaaa.
YOUNG ISRAEL OF DEERFIELD BEACH (421-1367), 1880 W. Hillsboro Blvd..
Deerfield Beach. 33441. Sarrieaa: Sunday through Friday 8 a.m and sundown.
Saturday 8:45 a.m. and sundown. Jesesa at. Reiaer. President
YOUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD-FORT LAUDERDALE (966-7877), 3291
Stirling Rd.. Fort Lauderdale. 33312. Sarrieaa: Monday through Friday 7:30 a.m.,
and sundown: Saturday, 9 a.m.. sundown; Sunday 8 a.m.. sundown. Rabbi Edward
Davis.
CONGREGATION MIDGAL DAVID 726-3683), 8675 W McNab Rd.. Tamarac,
33321. Sarrieaa: Daily 8a.m.; mincha 5 p.m.; Saturday 8:45a.m. and 5:15 p.m. Rab-
bi Caaiai Schneider. Coagrogatioa presidcat: Henaaa Fleischer.
RECONSTRUCTION 1ST
RAMAT SHALOM (472-3600), 11301 W. Broward Blvd.. Plantation. 38326. Sar-
rieaa: Friday. 8:16 p.m.; Saturday. 10 a.m. Rabbi Elliot Skiaaell. Caatar Bella
Mi)ia.
REFORM
TEMPLE BET TTKVAH (741-8088), 8890 W. Oakland Park Blvd.. Ste. 802,
Sunrise, 33861. Services: Friday 8 p.m. Rabbi Deaais WaM. Caatar Raa Graaer
TEMPLE BETH ORR (753-3232), 2151 Riverside Dr., Coral Springs. 33065. Ssr-
rieos: Friday 8 p.m.; flaturday 10 am Rabbi Mark W. Grass.
TEMPLE BNAI SHALOM OP DEERFIELD BEACH (426-2532). Sarrieaa at
Menorah Chapels, 2306 W. Hillsboro Blvd., Deerfield Beach, 3S441, Friday 8 p.m.
i H. Pish. Caatar Marris Lersassa-
TEMPLE EMANU-EL (731-2310). 3246 W. Oakland Park Blvd., Lauderdale Lakes,
33311. Sarrieaa: Friday 8:15 p.m.; Saturday, only on holidays or celebration of Bar
Bat Mhxvah. Rabbi Jeffrey Bailee, Caatar Kite Basra.
TEMPLE KOL AMI (472-1988), 8200 Peters Rd., Plantation, 33324. Services: Fri-
day 8:16 p.m., Saturday 10:30 a.m. Rabbi Bhssasa J. Harr. Caatar Fraak
LIBERAL JEWISH TEMPLE OF COCONUT CREEK (973-7494) Services. Fri-
day night services twice monthly at Calvary Presbyterian Church, 3960 Coconut
Creak Parkway, Coconut Creek. 33066. Rabbi Brace 8. Wsrskal. Caatar Jacob
BarUa.
TEMPLE BAT YAM (928-0410), 6151 NE 14th Ter.. Ft. Lauderdale, 33334. Ser-
vice: Weekly on Friday evenings at 8 p.m. Rakai Lewis Littauta.
Community Calendar
Compiled by Craig Lustgarten,
Federation. 748-8400.
FRIDAY MAY 6
Plantation Chamber of Com-
merce: Plantation Trade Expo.
5:30 p.m. Southern Bell Training
Center, Plantation. 10-4 Satur-
day. 587-1410.
SATURDAY MAY 7
Jewish Community Center: Auc-
tion. 8 p.m. 792-6700.
SUNDAY MAY 8
The Mended Hearts: Meeting 2
p.m. Florida Medical
Auditorium. 484-4519.
Center
Orah Hadassah, Sunrise Lakes:
Meeting. 11:30 a.m. Tamarac
Jewish Center. 742-7615.
SATURDAY MAY 14
National Council of Jewish
Women, University Section:
Moonlight Dinner Cruise. 7:45
p.m. Fort Lauderdale Marriott
Marina. 755-5425.
SUNDAY MAY 15
Women's American ORT, Coral
Springs: Fashion Show. 11 a.m.
Westin Cypress Creek Hotel.
755-3072.
Meeting. Noon. Lauderdale Lakes
Multi-Purpose Bldg. 485-3699.
Hadassah, Scopus Chapter:
Board Meeting. Broward Federal
Savings and Loan. 10 a.m.
426-1076.
WEDNESDAY MAY 18
Jewish Community Center: An-
nual Meeting. 7:30 p.m. Soref
Hall. 792-6700.
MONDAY MAY 9
Amit Women, Golda Meir
Chapter: Meeting. Noon. Temple
Beth Israel. Deerfield Beach.
651-1444.
Sunrise Chamber of Commerce:
Business Expo. 10 a.m. Sunrise
Musical Theater. 741-3300.
Women's American ORT, Pine
Island Chapter: Meeting. 11:30
a.m. Nob Hill Center, Sunrise.
742-7615.
TUESDAY MAY 10
Na'Amat USA, Tamarac
Chapter: Meeting. Noon.
Broward Bridge Recreation
Center, Sunrise. 581-7448.
WEDNESDAY MAY 11
Amit Women, Masada Chapter:
Luncheon. Noon. Broward
Federal Savings and Loan,
Tamarac. 651-1444.
Women's League for Conser-
vative Judaism: Statewide Con-
ference. May 15-17.
TUESDAY MAY 17
Na'Amat USA. Debra Club:
Brandeis University Women's
Committee, Broward West:
Study Group. 1 p.m. 484-6227.
Hadassah, Gilah Inverrary
Chapter: Meeting and Officer In-
stallation. Noon. Tamarac Jewish
Center. 485-7444.
THURSDAY MAY 19
Hadassah, liana Hawaiian
Gardens: Installation Luncheon.
Noon. Inverrary Hilton.
733-8852.
Organizations
Na'Amat USA, Negev Chapter:
Meeting. Noon. Temple Beth
Israel, Deerfield Beach. 427-3635.
Brandeis University Women's
Committee, Broward West:
Meeting. 11:30 a.m. Spkr: Can-
dice Russell. Deicke Auditorium,
Plantation. 581-2369.
THURSDAY MAY 12
Margate Library: Performance
of Yiddish and American Folk
Songs. 7 p.m. 5810 Park Drive,
Margate. 972-1188.
Na'Amat USA, Aviva Chapter:
Anniversary Luncheon. 11:30
a.m. Court of Palm-Aire, Pom-
pano Beach. 973-1959.
B'NAI B'RITH
INTERNATIONAL
The current unrest on the West
Bank and Gaza Strip has gripped
the attention of much of the
world's Jewish teenagers. That
was evident as more than 80
Jewish youths from all over the
world gathered for the 1988 B'nai
B'rith Youth Organization Inter-
national Executive Board
meeting. The meeting was design-
ed to heighten Jewish identity and
leadership ability.
WEIZMANN INSTITUTE
A unique experience of study
and creativity in Israel awaits
American high school seniors and
juniors who qualify for participa-
tion in a world-famous youth
science summer program at the
Weizmann Institute of Science in
Rehovot. Many will earn scholar-
ships covering all expenses.
HOSPICE INCORPORATED
Hospice, Inc., a non-profit agen-
cy caring for patients with a life
threatening illness, needs
volunteers throughout all of
Broward County for respite care,
Hospice House inpatient care,
bereavement and clerical posi-
tions. For additional information,
please call Helen Thomson at
486-4085.?
WOMEN'S
AMERICAN ORT
Women's American ORT has
once again been selected by the
Leadership Conference of Na-
tional Jewish Women's Organiza-
tions as the 1988 convenor of the
Women's Plea for Soviet Jews.
The Women's Plea, which was
first organized in 1971, is a na-
tionwide effort to call attention to
the plight of Soviet Jews.
SHE NEEDS
YOUR HELP
Put your donations
to good use.
Help hundreds of frail indigent
elderly like her by donating to
I
ouglas Gardens
Miami Jewish Home & Hospital
irift Shops
Proceeds used for medicine and supplies for
the elderly of your community
TO HELP THEM, WE HEED YOUR HELP
Furniture Clothing Household goods Appliances
Dade: 625-0620 Broward: 981-8245
Call for free pick-up of your fully tax-deductible donations
or visit our two convenient locations:
Miami
5713 N.W. 27th Avenue
Hallandale
3194 Hallandale Beach Blvd.
n Douglas Gardens Thrift Stops
if 'S a division of ths Miami
H Jevnsh Homa andHosprtalfor
/ffl the Aged al Douglas Gartens
^~J a not-for-profit organization
serving the elderly of South Florida tor 43 years


Friday, May 6,1988/The Jewiah Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 15
Bar/Bat Mitzvah
Israel Bonds News...
I.ebow
Hein
Levine
Cohen
Marcus
Lurer
TEMPLE BETH ORR
On Saturday, May 14, Adam
Kane, son of Harvey and Joanne
Kane, will be called to the Torah
on the occasion of his Bar Mitzvah
at Temple Beth Orr in Coral
Springs.
TEMPLE BETH AM
Symara Rog, daughter of
Melvin and Melanie Rog,
celebrated her Bat Mitzvah at
Temple Beth Am on April 29.
The B'nai Mitzvah of Peter
Abramson, son of Judith Abram-
son Brown and Stephen Abram-
son, and Jeffrey Horn, son of Ar-
nold and Diana Horn, were
celebrated on April 23 at Temple
Beth Am in Margate.
On Saturday, April 16, Jared
Weiasberg, son of Barry and
Carol Weisaberg, and Steven
Bodner, son of Barbara and Paul
Bodner, were called to the Torah
in honor of their B'nai Mitzvah.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
On Friday evening, May 13,
Romi Ross, daughter of Maxine
Stark, will celebrate her Bat Mitz-
vah at Temple Emanu-El.
On Saturday, May 7, Jennifer
Wellins, daughter of Elvira and
Tevi Wellins, will be called to the
Torah in honor of her Bat Mitzvah
at Temple Emanu-El.
TEMPLE KOL AMI
On Saturday morning, May 7,
David Engelson, son of Paula and
Peter Engelson, and Anat
Lebow, daughter ofDafna and
Leonard Lebow, will be called to
the Torah in honor of their B'nai
Mitzvah.
On Saturday, April 30, Jennifer
Hein, daughter of Bonnie Hein,
and Ronald Levine, son of Ivy
and Lawrence Levine, were called
to the Torah in honor of their
B'nai Mitzvah at Temple Kol Ami
in Plantation.
On Friday evening, April 29,
Darleen Cohen, daughter of Lin-
da and Martin Cohen, celebrated
her Bat Mitzvah at Temple Kol
Ami.
RAMAT SHALOM
Adam Marcus, son of Jeff and
Beverly Marcus, will celebrate his
Bar Mitzvah on Saturday, May 14,
at Congregation Ramat Shalom.
The Bat Mitzvah of Kiersten
Lurer, daughter of Robert and
Bonnie Lurer, was celebrated on
April 23 at Ramat Shalom in
Plantation.
A Diversified
Jewish Quiz
By RABBI
DAVID W. GORDON
1- Are physicians required to
keep an incurable patient who is in
agony alive through unnecessary
artificial means?
2- What is Orthodoxy's greatest
educational institution?
3- List the important Orthodox
Synagogue organizations.
4- Why is a minimum of two
candles kindled each Friday in
honor of the Sabbath?
5- When a convert seeks permis-
sion to become a Jew what is the
Rabbi required to do?
6- How did the Baal Shem Tov,
the founder of Chaasidism suc-
cinctly suggest the true aim of the
Torah?
7- What musical instrument did
King David play?
8- What prime function does the
Chevrah Kaddisha (Holy
Brotherhood)? perform?
9- Name the mountain from
which Moses beheld the Promised
Land.
10- What does the Yiddish ex-
presson "Abi Gezoont" mean?
Answers
1- They must allow nature to
take its course when death is
imminent.
2-The Rabbi Isaac Elchanan
Theological Seminary or Yeshiva
University developed by Dr. Ber-
nard Revel (1885-1940) and Dr.
Samuel Belkin (1911-1976).
3- Union of Orthodox Jewish
Congregations founded in 1898
and the Young Israel Movement
with an employment Bureau for
Sabbath observers.
4- To comply with the two dif-
ferent phrases about the Sabbath
in the two versions of the Ten
Commandments, "Remember the
Sabbath" and "Keep the
Sabbath."
5- To discourage him or her by
presenting the difficulties, obliga-
tions and burdens involved in be-
ing a Jew.
6- "That man (each Jew) should
himself become a Torah."
7-The harp
8- To properly prepare the body
of a deceased for burial.
9- Mt. Pisgah
10- "As long as one is healthy"
implying that nothing else
matters.
Holiday Springs Condominiums and State of
Israel Bonds honored Bernard and Lillian
Brivic, center, at a Night in Israel. From left,
Eddie Schaffer, Jerry Kolinsky and Jerry
Layton.
CELEBRATION
201*^40
STATE
Of MM
THE TRADITION CONTINUES...
A
With Rhyme
and Reason
One"
iit
The Lord is ONE. His name is
ONE.
ONE G-d alone have we.
ONE Maker of the earth and sky,
ONE Force eternally.
No other G-d is there for us,
Just ONE and only ONE
Through every ONE-drous sun-
shine ray
Until each day is done.
ONE Sovereign of Strength is He,
ONE Rock, ONE Light, ONE
Shield,
ONE everlasting G-d that thrives
With Kingdom firmly sealed.
A fountainhead of Hope is G-D,
ONE Guide for you and me,
ONE saving truth prolonging life,
That ONE-derful is He!
Oh, Mighty ONE, we do exalt
The unity of name.
The Lord is ONE. Thy name is
ONE,-
Thy ONENESS we proclaim.
Jack Gould
Candlelighting
May 6 7:34 p.m.
May 13 7:38 p.m.
May 20 7:42 p.m.
May 27 7:45 p.m.
Benediction upon Kindling
the Sabbath Lights
BORUCH ATTO AD-ONAI
ELO-HEINU MELECH HO-
OLOM ASHER KID-
SHONU BEMITZ-VOSOV
VETZI-VONU LE-HAD-
LIK NEYR SHEL
SHABBOS.
Blessed art Thou, O Lord our
Grd, King of the universe who
hast sanctified us by thy com-
mandments and commanded
us to kindle the Sabbath light.
From left, chairperson Harriette Sweig, Rabbi
Emeritus of Temple Beth Am, Dr. Solomon Geld,
guest speaker Robert Evans, and hosts Sara and
Chairman Max ModeU at the Temple Beth Am
Breakfast for Bonds, celebrating the UOth
Anniversary of the State of Israel, honoring Hon.
Jack and Lesley Tobin.
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PaEe16___The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, May 6, 1988
Temple Beth Israel Cantor Elected Chairman of Assembly
Maurice A. Neu
At the last meeting of the
Southeast Region of the Cantors
Assembly, Cantor Maurice Neu of
Temple Beth Israel in Sunrise was
elected chairman. In addition,
Cantor Neu has been nominated
to be inducted into the ranks of
honorary fellows of the Cantors
Institute by the administration of
the Jewish Theological Seminary
of America at a Convocation to be
held during the Cantors Assembly
convention in May.
This honor goes to Cantor Neu
in appreciation of over a quarter
of a century of service to the can-
torate and his devotion to the
Jewish people.
GENEVA Yugoslavia
must resume full diplomatic
relations with Israel, says
Yugoslav ambassador to the
United Nations Marko
Kosin. Yugoslavia has en-
joyed good economic rela-
tions with Israel about
$35 million in trade last
year.
Temple News
_
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
Temple Emanu-El Men's Club
and Sisterhood will have a joint in-
stallation of officers at a gala din-
ner on May 17. The featured
entertainer will be Betty Mac. For
reservations and ticket informa-
tion, call the Temple office at
731-7310.
TEMPLE KOL AMI
On Saturday evening, May 7, at
7:30 p.m., Temple Kol Ami of
Plantation will hold its big event.
There will be a super auction
where you can bid on vacations,
clothing, art and beauty services,
video productions, sports,
gourmet dinners and more. Ad-
mission is $12.50. For more infor-
mation, call the Temple at
472-1988.
NOW IS. LOWEST
By U.S. Gen/'t.testing method.
o mm ill man tobacco go
SURGEON GENERAL'S WARNING: Quitting Smoking
Now Greatly Reduces Serious Risks to Your Health.
Competitive tar level reflects the FTC method.
BOX: Less than 0.5 mg. "tar;' less than 0.05 mg. nicotine. SOFT PACK
FILTER. MENTHOL: 1 mg. "tar;' 0.1 mg. nicotine, av. per cigarette, FTC
Report JAN. '85; BOX ICCs: Less than 0.5 mg. "tar;' less man 0.05 mg.
nicotine, SOFT PACK 10Os, FILTER: 2 mg. "taC 0.2 mg. nicotine. SOFT
PACK loo's, MENTHOL: 3 mg. "tar," 0.3 mg. nicotine, av. per cigarette
by FTC method.


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