The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 3, no. 7 (Apr. 5, 1974)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 9, 1976 called v.4, no. 27 but constitutes v.5, no. 1; issue for July 7, 1989 called v.18, no. 11 but constitutes v.18, no. 13.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44570954
lccn - sn 00229545
ocm44570954
System ID:
AA00014312:00501

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Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward


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j'ewi hFlor idian o
f
OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE
Volume 15 Number 8
r
_-
Fort Lauderdale, Florida Friday, February 21, 1986
>Fn
Price 35 Cents
Gladj/8 Daren to Lead All-Dau 'Phone-A-Thon'Event...
'Super Sunday II' Rings for UJA March 16
Gladys Daren
More than 300 men and
women will conduct a
telephone Phone-A-Thon as
part of the 1986 "Super
Sunday II" drive, on behalf
of the Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauder-
dale/United Jewish Appeal
Campaign, all day Sunday,
March 16 beginning with
five two hour phone sessions
at 9 a.m. through 7 p.m., at
the Tamarac Jewish Center
9101 N.W. 57th St.,
Tamarac.
Gladys E. Daren of
Tamarac, member of the
Jewish Federation Board of
Directors, chairman,
Federation/UJA Cash Col-
lections and Women's Divi-
sion leader, is chairperson of
the event which will help
raise tens of thousands of
dollars to support the
urgent needs facing World
Jewry, in the North
Broward Jewish communi-
ty, in Israel and in more
than 33 lands overseas.
"Super Sunday H" is an
annual Regional fund-
raising appeal designed to
reach a large number of con-
tributors in the shortest
period of time. Phone-A-
Thons will be held in
Federation locations in
Hollywood, Boca Raton,
Palm Beach as well as Fort
Lauderdale, in an effort to
reach community residents
with the important message
of providing a life-saving,
life-sustaining pledge to this
year's campaign.
According to Daren, "For
Super Sunday to be a suc-
cess, we need the com-
munity's assistance. Your
participation as volunteers
and contributors will help
make Super Sunday as ei-
Continued on Page 2-
Sign Up Now. For
Recruitment
campaign coupon
See page 7.
Attorneys March 8
Features Chief Judge
World News
STRASBOURG -
President Hosni Mubarak of
Egypt, addressing the
European Parliament, took
a tough stance on Middle
East issues. He called for an
international conference
with participation of the
Palestine Liberation
Organization, and stressed
several times in his speech
to the 21-nation assembly
that the PLO is the only
legitimate representative of
the Palestinian people.
BONN A West German
official's public suggestion
that rich Jews ought to be
killed to help balance the
budget has triggered
outrage here for the second
time during the month of
January over anti-Semitic
remarks by politicians link-
ed to Chancellor Helmut
Kohl's ruling Christian
Democratic Union (CDU)
coalition.
PARIS Jack Lang, the
Minister of Culture, called
on the Paris Municipal
Council to name one of the
city's streets after the late
Prime Minister Pierre
Mendes-France, who was
Jewish. Lang, himself a.
Jew, spoke while unveiling a.
plaque on the house where
Mendes-France was born
near the "Pletzel" as the old
Jewish quarter of Paris is
called.
One of South Florida's
leading jurists, the
Honorable Miette Burns-
tein, Chief Judge of-the
Broward County Circuit
Court, will keynote the At-
torneys Division Dinner, on
behalf of the Federa-
tion/UJA campaign, Satur-
day evening, March 8, 7:30
p.m. at the Deerfield Beach
Hilton, 100 Fairway Drive,
Deerfield Beach.
"Our Members of the
legal profession will show
their heartfelt concern for
their brethren in need by at-
tending this event of special
significance to our com-
munity," stated Division
chairman Jeffrey Streitfeld.
Streitfeld, a partner in the
law firm of Becker,
Poliakoff and Streitfeld,
said that each of the men
and women attending the
dinner-dance will make a
minimum commitment of
$125 dollars to the Jewish)
community's major philan-
thropy. Division co-
chairmen are Larry Behar.
Barry Mandelkorn and
Mark Schorr.
Streitfeld emphasized
that the meeting will play a
key role in helping the cam-
paign reach their $6.5
million dollar goal for the
1986 Federation/UJA drive
in Greater Fort Lauderdale.
Women's Super Sunday
Drive '86 Committee
Deborah Hahn
Spotlight on the Soviet Union ...
Chairing the Women's
Division Super Sunday II"
campaign for the Jewish
community's major philan-
thropy will be Deborah
Hahn, Division Campaign
co-chair. Working diligently
with the chairperson in the
organization and prepara-
tion for the all-day event, is
a committee of campaign
leaders who will be at the
forefront of the March 16
Phone-A-Thon. The women
representing North
Broward communities in-
clude Lee Dreiling, Alvera
A. Gold, Bess Katz, Hilda
Leibo, Esther Lerner,
Continued on Page 2

The Jews of Samarkand: Outpost of Faith in Asia
The Torah is a focal point for the members of
Samarkand's remaining synagogue (top left). A
prayer for the Soviet Union (top right) is recited before
major services, such as the one (above) led by a
synagogue elder.
By ADRIEL BETTELHEIM
SAMARKAND, USSR Three blocks from a
stately minaret on a dusty street called Khud-
zhunskaya stands a drab brick building with no
distinguishable markings, where early each mor-
ning the sounds of Hebrew prayer break the
stillness of the Central Asian dawn.
Here in this synagogue in the heart of the
Islamic region of the Soviet Union, as daybreak
comes with the shouts of laborers and the blare of
truck horns, religious Jews stroll the mosaic floor
.of their one remaining house of worship, mur-
muring morning devotions.
Twenty men, wearing the characteristic square
hats of the region called tubitekas, recite from
memory prayers as old as the city of Samarkand.
They flip through the pages of prayer books and
carefully scan the face of each new arrival. When
one is recognized, he is flashed gold-toothed grins
and greeted with the Tadjik welcome: Salom.
The Jews of the Republic of Uzbekistan trace
their roots to fifth-century Persia. For nearly a
millenia and a half, they have prospered and suf-
Continued on Page 15-A


Page 2 The Jewiaji Flpridian of Greater Fort J^derdgJe/Friday, February 21, .1986
Hebrew Day School Super-
Thon Feb. 26 Needs You
The Hebrew Day School will be having a Super-Thon on
Wednesday, Feb. 26, at 9:30 a.m. The purpose of this Super-Thon
is to raise some much needed funds to purchase AV Equipment.
The Day School hopes to be able to raise $5,000 from the Super-
Thon.
' According to Assistant Director Tema Friedman, "Our Super-
Thon represents a way in which the public can help us help
ourselves. During a one-hour time period, each participant will
walk, run or jog around a 220-yard track as many times as he or
she can. For the next few weeks, the children will be busy asking
neighborhood friends and businesses to sponsor them for so much
money per lap. For example, if you sponsor a child for 25 cents
per lap and he/she jogs 20 laps, then your pledge would only be $5.
Most joggers should be able to complete 25 to 35 laps.
When the Super-Thon is over, you will be mailed a thank you
letter which will let you know how many laps your joggers com-
pleted and the total amount of your pledge."
Hebrew Day School is a non-profit organization, and your paid
pledge is tax-deductible.
For further information, please contact Tema Friedman, at
583-6100. Thank you for your much-needed support.
0
OevnsH^pH I LANfHRpPieS
From Israel's Consul General
Dear Friend:
I would like to comment on the Syrian and Lybian responses to
Israel's interception of the Lybian aircraft as follows:
The governments of Syria and Lybia have sharply condemned
Israel's action and have issued violent threats of retaliation.
On November 10, 1958, the Syrian air force intercepted King
Hussein's jet in Syrian airspace after Damascus had given permis-
sion for his aircraft to enter Syria. When he refused to obey the
Syrian orders to land his plane in Damascus, they tried to shoot
him down. King Hussein discussed this incident in his 1962 book
Uneasy Lies the Head, calling it "the narrowest escape from
death I have ever had."
On July 22, 1971 following a coup attempt against Sudan's
leader Numeiri (then an ally of Khadafy), a BOAC airplane on a
flight from London to Khartoum was ordered, while flying in Ly-
bian airspace, to land at Benina airfield near Benghazi. On board
the plane were 105 passengers and two of the Sudanese coup
leaders, Colonel Babiker al-Nur and Major Hamadalla. The pilot
tried to change his course and fly to Malta and when the Maltese
authorities denied his request to land there, he was forced under
Lybian threats to land at Benina. The two Sudanese were taken
off the plane and transferred to Tripoli, after which the plane was
permitted to return to London. The Lybians delivered the two
Sudanese prisoners to the Sudanese authorities, who had them
executed.
The above two examples demonstrate the hypocrisy of Syria
and Lybia, a cynicism even more blatant when one considers that
Syria and Lybia took aggressive unjustified action against the air-
craft of countries with which they were at peace, while Israel
acted in self-defense in an attempt to apprehend terrorists backed
by countries who have declared themselves to be in a state of war
with Israel. YEHOSHUA TRIGOR
Consul General
Super Sunday
Continued from Page 1 the Fort Lauderdale Sym-
fective as possible. We need phony and the Historical
your dedication and commit- Society, she is a past presi-
ment more than ever this dent of
year, for we all care very Sisterhood.
deeply about the survival of
our brethren in need."
Working with Daren is a
committee of community
leaders representing all
areas of North Broward
County.
In 1985, a record $151,000
was raised in Fort Lauder-
dale on Super Sunday accor-
ding to John Streng,
General Campaign chair-
man, who announced that
this year the Federa-
ls tion/UJA hopes to achieve
*t record-breaking totals in the
fc one day event.
$ Daren, who has been in-
evolved with countless civic
([and community organiza-
tions since coming to South
J Florida, is a past president
lot the Federation Women's
(Division, served on the
board of directors of the
Jewish Community Center,
and is a life member of both
Hadassah and Brandeis
University. She played a
key role as luncheon chair-
man of the successful ALS
event held recently at the
Fountainbleu. A-sponsor for' '
ORT and
THE FOUNDATION of
Jewish Philanthropies held its
quarterly update recently at
the Jewish Federation
building. Pictured above,
seated from left, Victor
Gruman, chairman of develop-
ment; Libo Fineberg, former
Foundation chairman; Burt
Levinson, trustee; and Ludwik
Brodzki, chairman of invest-
ment. Standing, from Usft,
Richard Breit, recording
secretary and Seymour Ger-
son, trustee. Pictured at left,
are Alvera A. Gold, Esther
Lerner and Anita Perlman,
Foundation trustees.
Women's Division
Continued from Page 1
Carole Skolnik, Claire
Socransky and Esther
Wolfer.
Hahn, who stated that the
committee is still in forma-
tion, stressed that these
women will lead a corp of
volunteers who will call on
women in Greater Fort
Lauderdale to help reach
the $6.5 million goal for the
1986 Federation/UJA drive.
Pdssover
of the Concord
Wed. April 23-Thurs. Moy 1
The observance of tra-
dition, the magnificence
of the Sedarim. the beauty
of fhe Services, the bril-
liance'of the Holiday Pro-
gramming.
Cantor Herman
Malomood. assisted by
the Concord 45-voice
Symphoic Chorale, di-
rected by Mofhew Lozar
and Dan Vogel, to officiate
at the Services and
Sedarim.
Outstanding leaders
from Government, Press,
the Arts and Literature.
Great films. Music day and
night on weekdays.
Special programs for tots,
rweeners and teens.
Rabbi Simon Cohen
ond resident Rabbi Eli
Mazur oversee constant
Kashruth supervision ond
Dietary Low observance.
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Friday, February 21, 1966/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 3
SftM Participant* toAttend UJA Fifth
National^Young Leadership Conference
NEW YORK Three thousand
young Jewish leaders from more
than 100 communities throughout
the United States will attend the
United Jewish Appeal's Fifth Na-
tional Young Leadership Con-
ference in Washington, D.C.,
March 2-4. The theme of this
year's conference is "Reaching
the Dream." In making the an-
nouncement, Conference
Chairmen Peter Alter of Detroit
and Maria Gflson of Washington,
D.C., stated that those planning
to attend should make immediate
reservations due to the severe
shortage of available hotel rooms.
Representing Greater Fort
Lauderdale are:
Co-chairmen Howard Gaines
and Jo Ann M. Levy, Elliot
Stand Up and Be Counted
Mission Programs to Israel
Editor's Note: The following is a letter from Rabbi Elliot Skid-
dell, Spiritual Leader, Ramat Shalom and a member of the
Federation Missions Committee.
For information concerning Federation/UJA Missions to Israel
call Sandy Jackowitz at 748-8400.
Dear Friends,
Do you remember, when you were a child, the neighborhood
bully would pick on everyone and when you were the victim your
Mom or Dad would say "stand up to him, he's just a bully and if
you stand up to him he'll back down!" I remember incidents like
that and I'm reminded of them by recent events in Europe and
the Middle East.
You see, there is a bully in the Mediterranean neighborhood and
his name is PLO sponsored terrorism. Just like the neighborhood
bully of childhood the only response to this bully is to stand up to
him! We cannot give in to the threats and the attacks for that is
exactly what the bully wants. We have to stand up to the PLO
Bully!
What do the terrorists want? Among other things they want
you and me to be afraid to travel to Israel so that Israel's economy
will suffer. Many people are cancelling or postponing trips to
Israel but I say that is the wrong response.
The right response is to go to Israel now, or to plan to go soon,
so that we show the bully that we will not be intimidated. If you
are planning a trip or a vacation for this summer and have ruled
out Israel I implore you to go to Israel. If you were planning on
another destination Europe, Mexico, the Islands change
your mind and go, instead, to Israel.
The people of Israel need to know that we are with them and the
terrorists need to be shown that we will not be intimidated.
It doesn't hurt that El AI is acknowledged to be the world's
safest airline or that direct flights to Tel Aviv with no European
stops are available from Miami, so please consider a trip to Israel
to show Israel, the world and, especially the terrorists, that we
will not be bullied.
Think about it! Let's not be bullied!
Shalom,
Rabbi Elliot Skiddell
Member Mission Committee
Barkson, Steve Barnett, Renee
Barnett, Larry Behar, Mindy
Bramston, Linda Gaines, Dr.
Mark Gendal, Thomas Katz,
Elissa Katz, Barbara Kent, Jo
Ann Levy, Joel Levy, Mark Levy,
Steve Lewin, Sheryl Lewin, Joel
ReinBtein, Pearl Reinstein, Susan
Symons, Bruce Tabachnick, and
Ken Kent, and Ken Mintzer, staff
associates.
Speakers addressing the con-
ference will include Senators Gary
Hart and Howard Metzenbaum,
and Congressman Jack Kemp.
Benjamin Netanyahu, Israel's
Ambassador to the United States,
will analyze recent Middle
Eastern events.
Through a series of high level
briefings, seminars, workshops
and study sessions, participants
will take part in discussions and
dialogues with Cabinet members,
high ranking State Department
diplomats and strategic planners
from the Defense Department and
the National Security Council.
Morris Abram, Chairman of the
National Council for Soviet
Jewry, will brief the participants
as they conduct a candlelight
march past the Soviet Embassy,
demonstrating support for their
brethren who are unable to lead a
free Jewish life behind the Iron
Curtain.
Workshops will cover a wide
range of activities and topics in-
cluding "Israel," "Soviet Jewry,"
"Terrorism," "The Media and the
Holocaust," "Intermarriage,"
"The Federal Budget," "The
Third World," and "Prospects for
Peace."
There will also be a gala buffet
and dance including a Mary
Travers concert which will be
broadcast to the Soviet Union by
the Voice of America.
Conference Co-chairmen are
Nancy Beren, Andy Eisenberg
and Robert Shulman. Michael
Adler is Chairman of the Young
Leadership Cabinet and Ann-
Louise Levine is Chairman of the
Young Women's Leadership
Cabinet.
: PASSOVER AT BROWNS 5

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Luxurious accomodatwns, great sports
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Howard Gaines
Jo Ann M. Levy
Newswire/lsrael
TEL AVIV Histadrut. Israel's trade union federation, has
sent a two-man delegation to South Africa to establish permanent
links with Black trade unionists there. According to The
Jerusalem Post, the mission has the behind-the scenes blessings
of the Israeli government, despite ties with the apartheid regime
in Pretoria.
JERUSALEM Edgar Bronfman, president of the World
Jewish Congress urged inclusion of the Soviet Union in the Mid-
dle East process, but only after Moscow resumes diplomacy rela-
tions with Israel.
TEL AVIV Libya has established more than 20 training
camps for terrorists where more than 7,000 terrorists from all
over the world are receiving training in terror, assassination,
subversion and sabotage activities, according to a 43-page booklet
on Libya's connection to international terror, just released by the
Israel Defense Force spokesman's office.
JERUSALEM The resounding defeat sustained by the
"Who Is A Jew" amendment to the Law of Return in the Knesset
its third defeat in recent years was a major disappointment
to the religious parties which had forced the issue once again to
the Knesset floor.
JERUSALEM The Gush Emunim chalked up a victory with
serious political implications when 13 apartments, renovated for
Jewish occupancy, were consecrated at a religious ceremony in
the heart of Hebron.
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Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, February 21, 1986
ViewDoint
The views express**, by columnisU. reprinted editorials, and copy do not neceaaar.-
\y reflect the opinion of the Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Tragedy and Hope in Space
The nation wept last month. We wept for the fallen men and
women of the Challenger space-shuttle mission that ended in
tragedy shortly after it began.
President Reagan voiced our shared sense of loss simply and
eloquently, and as we sifted through the emotional ashes of this
frightening firestorm in space, we knew we shared much besides
the anguish of the moment.
We Americans talk of our commitment to pluralism loudly and
often. At the same time, however, many of us act in a very dif-
ferent manner, distrustful and suspicious of those who do not
share our world view.
We may well be a mosaic rather than a melting pot, enjoying
our ethnic differences and celebrating our individuality, but that
sense of identity can and must be used positively.
Nowhere is American pluralism, and the commitment to ex-
cellence shared by all of the groups that together make up our
society, more apparent than in the colorful corps of astronauts.
These modern pioneers, these explorers of the frontier of space,
come from a variety of racial, religious, ethnic and cultural
backgrounds. They share the joy of discovery, the hunger for ex-
ploration, the relish for new and untried experiences. From their
drives and accomplishments, we all grow richer.
The terrible tragedy in space threw a bright spotlight on seven
Americans. Together, they were pushing humankind forward
another step along a road filled with both promise and peril.
Others will fall in behind them now because as a species it is
our nature to keep moving forward, to keep learning.
Astronaut Judith Resnik, a Jewish American, died with her
companions aboard Challenger. She was revisiting space. Her
presence had focused the attention of her fellow Jewish
Americans on Challenger's mission in much the same manner as
the nation's schoolchildren followed the shuttle because teacher
Christa McAuliffe was aboard. Each astronaut was accompanied
by a special as well as a general, cheering section.
And so we celebrated our pluralism and the hopes and
dreams that bind us together.
There was great tragedy in space and hope for the future as
well.
jewishh loridian o
__________________________________________Of OWEATW TOUT LAUOSWOAU
FREO K SMOCMET MARVIN LE VINE SUZANNE SHOCMET
E*I(X*nd r>ut>t uoiisneo Weekly Mx) SecMemoer through Mid Ma, BtWsefcly balance Second Daai Postage *Wd at HallanOaJe, Fla USS 8W420
POSTMASTER: Send address change* to The Jewish Rortdian.
P.O. Box 012S73, Miami, Ha. 33101
Fofl Lauderdale Hollywood Oilica: I3MW Oakland Fan. ami. Fort Lauderdale. FL 11321
Fhona74M400
Plant tNE6tnSt.M.am. Fla 13132 Phonal 373 4*05
MemtoarJTA. Sevan Arts. WNS. NEA. ajpa. and FPA
Jaa*d>iPlli0aNataaai>ialiiKaaiiiaia>ll>W>iiidJii > ii1ii<
SUBSCRIPTION RATES 2 Yaw Minimum I'M (Local Arsa SI M Annual) or by member ship
jawiah Feder ai>on oi oreaier Fort I aiiderdate
JawMrt Federation ol Greater Port Lauderdale Brian J Sharr. Praaldant; Joat H. relies. EMCutlva
Dlractor. Marvin La Vina, Director of Communications; Lort Ginsberg, Aaalalant Olractor ol Commu
nlcationa: MM W. Oakland Park Blvd Fort Laudardala. FL 33321 Phona (30* 74B4400. Man lor in.
Fadaratlon and The Jewish Fwndian ol Greater Fort Lauderdale should Be addressed Jewish
Fadaratlon ot Greater Fort Laudardala PO Bon 2M10. Tamarec, FL 11320-0810
Fred Skaeliel
Friday, February 21,1986
Volume 15
121ADAR5746*
Number A .
United States
uf America
Congressional Hecorfl
PROCEEDINGS AND DEBATES OF THE 99^ CONGRESS. FIRST SESSION
Vol. lit
WASHINGTON, MONDAY, DECEMBER 16, 198?
No. 174
EDITOR'S NOTE: The following
is part of the Congressional
Record that appeared in Volume
131, number 1U, December 16, Judaica High School u a
1985, from South Florida Con- h^M^ffPl.^^S "^
gressman Lawrence J. Smith. tumJUJA campaign.
House of Representatives
JUDAICA HIGH SCHOOL OP
NORTH BROWARD. PL, PRESS-
ES PRESIDENT REAGAN ON
HUMAN RIGHTS ISSUES
HON. LAWRENCE J. SMITH
OF FLORIDA
IW THB HOUSE OP REPRESEWTATIVES
Monday, December 16,1985
Mr. SMITH of Florida. Mr. Speaker,
today I riae to salute the energetic effort of
the student* of Judaica High School of
Broward County. FL, In their project to pe-
tition President Reagan on behalf of reli-
gious freedom in the Soviet Union.
These high school students wrote the
President:
Whereas, November 10, 1985, marks the
tenth anniversary of United Nations Resolu-
tion 3379 which declares that Zionism is
racism; and Whereas. President Reagan will
be meeting with Soviet Premier 'Mikhail
Gorbachev; Whereas. It is necessary for us
as Jews to take action and make issues such
as Soviet Jewry a prime concern of Presi-
dent Reagan: Therefore, on this 12th day of
November. 1965. the Judaica High School of
North Broward, PL. hereby proclaims No-
vember 10. 1085. to December 10, 1985.
Social Action Month.
As members of the next generation, these
young adults wanted to express their con-
cern that peace without human righto is a
meaningless peace. It pleases me to. see
young people involved in such a timely
issue of world concern. Efforts like those
of the Judaica High School are very impor-
tant in keeping the spotlight of public at-
tention on the human righto violations of
the Soviet Union. Only through constant
pressure will the Soviet Union change its
treatment of Soviet Jews. I commend these
students and encourage them to continue
their efforts on behalf of the Jews and
other persecuted minorities of the Soviet
Union.
I will continue to speak out so that one
day Soviet Jews wilt have the fundamental
rights that all human beings enjoy.
Jewish is Hip
By MARJORIE LEVIN
I love collecting the small but telling signs that Jewish is hip.
Show business, of course, has always loved things Jewish.
There have always been so many Jews involved, especially in the
creative end. Yiddish expressions, inflections, ways of looking at
life have long been part of the entertainment scene, among non-
Jews as well as Jews.
Journalism is more and more affected by the Jewish turn of a
phrase. Certain words, such as "chutzpah" or "mishegas," are
not even defined any more. A person or business presented as ex-
pert in computers or shoes or financial planning is called a maven,
with no explanations offered.
And food well, breathes there an American who is unfamiliar
with the more common Jewish foods?
Actually, there is one American I know who never heard of mat -
za. She was born and bred in central Pennsylvania and lived a big
chunk of her adult life in Kansas City, Mo. I can't imagine how she
lived to age 36 without encountering matza; Kansas City is
Midwest, but it's not unhip. The lady is, sadly, but I'm working on
her. Where there's life, there's hope.
My parents moved to Manhattan from Boston, when billboards
all over read "You don't have to be Jewish to love Levy's
(bread)." I'll never forget my amazement at the enormous stand-
up Hebrew National delis, where hoards of Midtowners who
didn't all "look Jewish" feasted on kosher corned beef and
kugel and four varieties of knishes.
I want to say, for the record, that in no other place I've been,
not even the Big Apple or Philly, can they make a good Boston
knish. (Someday I'll find out what's in it. It's meat, but not liver.
If anyone out there knows, tell the world; it needs that knish.)
The bagel, of course, has been "with-it" for years, but now it's
made the big time. I'm referring to the Sara Lee company, which
is, according to full-page ads in this month's magazines, introduc-
ing its own bagels.
Now, I'm not going to give up my Sunday morning ritual of
selecting fresh bagels, one at a time, from the bags in the wooden
baskets at my corner grocery, but when Sara Lee notices bagels,
they've become as universal as a corned-beef special.
Speaking of meat, have you noticed how many otherwise non-
kosher establishments carry kosher deli? Around my way, it's de
rigueur, at least with the more upscale eateries. A "fancy-foods
emporium" advertises party platters heaped with brisket, corned
beef, pastrami, roast beef, salami all Hebrew National and
Empire Kosher turkey breast.
The proprietors say this Kosher meat is the best, and that's why
they sell it, and there's absolutely nothing contradictory, in their
view, about their selling ham as well.
"Kosher" is another word that's part of the vocabulary of every
hip American. It might refer to food, or to a business deal, but
everyone understands it.
In the Dec. 30 issue of Newsweek, the "Top of the Week" sec-
tion had an interesting detail. The section quoted. Leslie Wexner.
chairman of the Limited, Inc. as saying he ^ias "terminal
shpUkes" that drives him to try something new.
Newsweek defined the word "Yiddish for 'antsiness' but
what I find interesting is not the definition or the fact that Wex-
ner so expressed himself. It's the fact that if Newsweek chose
"shpiles" to entice readers, then "shpilkes" is becoming hip.
A young comedian did a "shuck" on Johnny Carson New Year's
Eve. He said one of his parents is Catholic and the other is Jewish
He said he was brought up Catholic, but he approached his
Catholic education "with a Jewish mind." If he'd been working
the Catskills, you just know he would have said he had iT
Kopf
Gemayel Resists
Syria's attempt to impose a
"peace plan" upon Lebanon's
warring factions is meeting
strong resistance from President
Amin Gemayel. Gemayel, who
would be stripped of much of his
power under the Syrian plan, is
fighting Syrian-backed militias
near Beirut. Artillery was used by
both sides in battles ten miles
from the capital. The Associated
Press reports that Syrian army
units have been deployed in moun-
taintop positions to back the
militias against forces loyal to
Gemayel.
Pro-Syrian Druze leader Walid
Jumblatt blames Gemayel for the
latest round of fighting. He
predicted that Gemayel would at-
tempt to consolidate an area that
would extend through Druze ter-
ritory down to Israel's security
belt in South Lebanon. He said
that Lebanon's problems would
not end until Gemayel is "in his
coffin." Israeli observers
noting that Israel no longer plays
any role in the Lebanese struggle
aay that most Israelis are not
unhappy at seeing Gemayel stand
up to Damascus as it attempts to
consolidate its hold on Lebanon.
Oil Plunge
"Massive output by producing
countries in the face of slack de-
mand" and a mild winter in the
northern hemisphere contributed
to a fall in oil prices "to levels not
seen since 1979" (Associated
Press, Jan. 22).
The major U.S. domestic grade
of crude, West Texas in-
termediate, sold for $20.90 a bar-
rel, and Great Britain's North Sea
crude recovered 60 cents a barrel'
to reach $20.30 (by way of com-
parison, the price of oil in 1980
went as high as $84 a barrel).
The Saudis, who had kept prices
up by producing at a 20-year low,
"are now making up for lost time
and pumping far more oil than
their agreed (OPEC) rate," AP
quoted Britain's Financial Times
as saying. "As a result, the oil
price is indeed falling out of
bed .. this is partly, then, a
struggle for power" among oil
producers. "vIv.y



KR


!H s -I ..
1



,!
Friday, February 21, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 5
Central Agency for Jewish Education
Judaica High School to
"Trial and Error" a dramatic
presentation based on actual cour-
troom notes of Yuri Edelstein's
trial will be presented at 8 p.m. on
Feb. 25, at the Jewish Community
Center, 6501 W. Sunrise Blvd. by
the Community Relations Com-
mittee of the Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale in con-
junction with the Judaica High
School of North Broward. The
dramatic presentation will sen-
sitize the teenagers to the plight
of Soviet Jewry.
A Ha Bima Theatre production,
"Trial and Error" was written
and produced by Wayne
Firestone, a University of Miami
student. Wayne Firestone is cur-
View Soviet Jewry Play
rently a candidate for the Rhodes,
Marshall and Fullbright scholar-
ships. He has interned with the
Anti-Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith and has written in Jewish
journals about his trip to Poland.
The play, which is open to the
community, is based on actual
courtroom notes smuggled out of
the Soviet Union earlier this year.
"Trial and Error" reveals the in-
justices of Soviet treatment of
Jews through the true story of one
individual Refusenik Yuri
Edelstein. First performed at Tel
Aviv, Israel, the play attempts to
educate the audience about the
plight of Soviet Jews. An or-
thodox Jew is charged with
possession of narcotics but as
fellow Refusenik Yosif Begun said
prior to his arrest, "Let there be
no mistake: If my activities are
represented as hostile to the
Soviet Regime, mine will be a trial
of Jewish culture." Sharon
Horowitz, principal of Federa-
tion's Judaica High School, fur-
ther explained that the play "will
help our teenagers clarify their
priorities in helping fellow Jews
around the world." The presenta-
tion will conclude with a letter
writing campaign to Soviet Jews
in an effort for our teenagers to
show their support for our
brethren.
For more information, contact
Sharon S. Horowitz, 748-8400.
Peres Lays Wreath at Bergen-Belsen
By DAVID KANTOR
BONN (JTA) Premier
Shimon Peres of Israel laid a
wreath at the Jewish memorial
monument on the site of the
Bergen-Belsen concentration
camp near Hannover last week. A
cantor recited Kaddish, the
prayer for the dead. The Israeli
leader visited the documentation
center where he examined
photographs and fragments of
literature attesting to the
atrocities committed there more
than 40 years ago.
Peres walked along the rows of
deserted barracks, vestigial re-
mains of the Holocaust. He said
little. He was visibly moved and
fought to hold back tears. At least
20 members of his family were
among the hundreds of thousands
of Jews and others who perished
at Bergen-Belsen.
Peres' visit to the site was
described as private, something
quite apart from the political and
economic aspects of his official
three-day visit to West Germany.
Although he was accompanied
by a ranking politician, Prime
Minister Hans Albrecht of the
federal state of Lower Saxony, on
his tour of Bergen-Belsen, their
conversation concerned the past
and plans to expand the documen-
tation center into a research and
educational facility that will serve
as a meeting place for German
youth, the post-war generation
with no memories of the Third
Reich.
Peres said after the visit that he
went to Bergen-Belsen in part to
promote understanding and
reconciliation with the German
people. He spoke of the new
democratic Germany with which
Israel wants to establish coopera-
tion and promote understanding.
The Israeli Premier said he was
primarily interested in launching
a dialogue but this could not be
done unless memories of the past
are kept alive. In an interview
with the German newspaper BUd,
Peres said of the Holocaust that
Israelis and Jews all over the
world "cannot forget or let this be
forgotten." He added that "a new
Germany has arisen from that hell
and that gives me reason for
hope."
Peres' words about reconcilia-
tion were reminiscent of those
spoken by the last prominent
visitor to Bergen-Belsen, Presi-
dent Reagan, though in a dif-
ferent context. Reagan, who
visited West Germany last May,
went to the death camp site in a
last-minute change of itinerary in
order to deflect criticism and
outrage over his plans to place a
wreath at the Ge man military
cemetery at Bitburg, where about
50 members of the notorious Waf-
fen SS are buried among other
German war dead. Reagan's visit
to Bergen-Belsen was boycotted
by Jews, as was his appearance a
few hours later at Bitburg.
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Vi cup EGG BEATERS
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Vi teaspoon van*, extract
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6 cups all-purpose flour
2 tablespoons sugar
2 teaspoons salt
Dash powdered saffron optional
1 package FLEISCHMANN'S
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1 cup hot water (125* to 130f)
V4 cup FLEISCHMANN S Sweet
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1 cup FLEISCHMANN'S EGG
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4 (VMnch thick) slices Low
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In shallow dish, beat FLEISCHMANN'S Egg Beaters, vanilla and cin-
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Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, February 21,1986
Aaencv Focus
Newswire/Washi ngton
::
"YOU NEED to know only a moment of ostracism to unders-
tand what joy there is in receiving any sort of communication
from the free world. I needed, you gave. I thank you and pray that
you may understand the great depth that lies beneath these sim-
ple words." The writers? Not Soviet Jewish refuseniks or other
Jews living in such places as Syria or Iran. They are Jews behind
bars in the U.S., serving time for crimes for which they are con-
victed Jews reaching out to their religious heritage in their
time of need.
U.S. REP Dan Mica (D-Fla.) hosted a luncheon for former Na-
tional Security Advisor Zbigniew Brzezinski Feb. 3 at the Boca
Raton Sheraton.
CONGRESSMAN LARRY SMITH (D-Fla.), chairman of the
House Foreign Affairs Committee's Task Force on International
Narcotics Control, praised recent actions by several airplanes to
help the U.S. Customs Service reduce drug smuggling by im-
plementing strict self-inspection activities.
AMERICANS ARE healthier and living longer, but also paying
steeply for it, the government said in its annual report on the na-
tion's health. Life expectancy is at a record high and infant mor-
tality at a new low, the report said.
Peres' Visit to Britain a Success
By MAURICE SAMUELSON
LONDON (JTA) Israeli
Premier Shimon Peres sealed the
success of his official visit to Bri-
tain by convincing many of his
hosts that it is up to Jordan rather
than Israel to take the next impor-
tant Middle East peace step.
After years of being cast as an
intransigent obstacle to peace,
Israel was convincingly portrayed
by Peres as being genuinely anx-
ious for an end to the conflict,
ready to compromise on pro-
cedural matters, and sensitive to
the needs of its Arab neighbors.
On the bilateral level, he
secured Prime Minister Margaret
Thatcher's agreement to be the
first British Premier to pay an of-
ficial visit to Israel. Thatcher is
also reported to have agreed to
terminate the British govern-
ment's processing of Arab boycott
documents, a long-standing bone
of contention between London
and Jerusalem.
Such achievements were al! the
more remarkable as the
recently coincided W
British government iail,
culminating in the resignation
from the Cabinet of Leon Brittan.
Secretary for Trade and Indu-
with whom Peres had himself
conferred.
On bilateral matters, I'- M *aid
he had seen no s.gn of Britain
relaxing her arms embargo on
Israel. However, on the Arab
boycott, it was reported here that
Thatcher has agreed to -top the
Foreign Office's practice of
authenticating lawyers'
signatures on documents certify-
ing that goods sold to the Arabs
do not originate in Israel.
Such a practice, regarded as
discriminatory against a friendly
country, has been strongly
criticized by a House of Lords
Committee, which recommended
its discontinuation. But Arab
trade circles have frequently
warned that it would damage Bri-
tain's business in the Middle East
and so far the Foreign Office has
taken such threats seriously. It
now remains to be seen how quick-
ly Thatcher's reported promise
will be implemented.
Besides his political talks, Peres
had lunch with Prince Charles and
the Princess of Wales, and met
Jewish communal organization
lead*-, i and groups at academics.
His only trip ou- is London was
to Ali Souls C 'e, Oxford, to
dine with phi) >er Sir Isaiah
Ber
an
!
I
WORKSHOP LEADERS of the recent state
wide conference for Jewish educational ad-
ministrators held in Fort Lauderdaie are
shown from left, Dorothy Herman, Educa-
tional Director, Temple Beth Am, Miami;
Karen Kaminsky, Educational Director,
Temple Solel, Hollywood; Dr. Pesach
Schindler, Director, United Synagogue in
Tftrael: Sandra Ross, Director of Education,
Jewish Federation of South Broward; Rabbi
Wallace Green, Principal, Hillel Community
Day School; and Fradle Freidenreich, Direc-
tor, Department of Instructional Services,
Jewish Educational Services of North
America; Abe J. GUtelson, Director of Educa-
tion, Jewish Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdaie.
LENDER'S AND PHILLY,
A BREAKFAST TRADITION
SINCE 1927
For nearly 60 years sitting
down to breakfast of Lenders
Bagels and PHILADELPHIA
BRAND Cream Cheese has
been a defcooos tradition.
Recognized as the first
name in bagete since 1927.
the Lender family stHI person
afly supervises the baking of
their bagels-guaranteeing
that every variety has a taste
and texture second to
none. In kjst minutes.
Lenders Bagels toast
up enspy on the out-
side and soft and
chewy on the inside, ready to
be spread with either plain
PHILLY or one of the tempting
fruit or vegetable flavors. And
because PHILLY has half the
calories of butter or mar-
garine, you can enjoy this
satisfying combination every
day.
And. of course, both am
certified Kosher.
. Soffyouwant
to enjoy a tradition
tomorrow, pick up
the Lenders and
Soft PHILLY today
. IMCKrl. m, M KRAFT


Friday, February 21, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 7
.. WHE1S YOUR PHOHE LINE BECOMES A LIFELINE
More people will participate in the Regional
Super Sunday II than in any other South Florida event
off the 1986 United Jewish Appeal Campaign. This is
your chance to be one of them... and make fund-
raising history, too.
Join hundreds of volunteers in four Federations
across Broward and Palm Beach counties in an all-out
telephone drive to reach more people and raise
more money in a single day than ever before.
Qive us two hours of your time on Super Sunday II.
To call your friends and neighbors.
To ask them to join in helping our fellow Jews
at home, in Israel and around the world
through our community campaign.
The caWs you make may determine the quality of
Jewish life in the years ahead.
Reserve your Super Sunday telephone now.
Super Sunday II
Sunday, March 16th
South Florida Regional Phone-A-Thon
on behalf of the
1986 Jewish Federation/UJA Annual Campaign
Join us at...
Phone Central: Tamarac Jewish Center
9101 N.W.57thSt. Tamarac, FL
Jewish Federation of Greater Ft. Lauderdale
United Jewish Appeal Campaign
8358 W. Oakland Park Blvd. Ft. Lauderdale 748-8400
mmm
111
HI 11 HI
Brian J. Sherr
President
John Strong
General Campaign Chairman
Gladys Daren
Super Sunday II, Chairperson
JoelH.Telles
Executive Director
... When Your Phone Line
Becomes o Lifeline
ONE PEOPLE, ONE DESTINY
TEAR OFF AND MAIL
Please reserve a telephone for me.
Name______________________
Address
Telephone # (Home)
Affiliation_________
(Bus.)
I will be able to staff the telephone from:
? 9:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. ? 11:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. ? 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.
D 3:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. ? 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.
NOTE: Times include Orientation and Training. If you have not made your 1986 pledge, you will
be given the opportunity to do so at the close of your Orientation and Training session.
I
_


*
rimy o *ne jewisn f tondmn ot Greater ton btttMertuue/E'riday, February 21, 1986
THE TAMARAC DIVISION Jewish Federa-
tion/United Jewish Appeal campaign honored
the Tamarac Jewish Center for its many years
of service to the community at the Division's
annual breakfast rally on behalf of the 1986
Jewish Federation/United Jewish Appeal
campaign. Over 850 people attended to make
their commitment to UJA and to see a
touching ceremony of the plaque presentation,
which was handed to each of the seven past-
presidents of the Temple. According to
Tamarac Division chairman Sam Federman,
the Division is well on its way of reaching Us
$95,000 goal. Pictured at the function, from
left. Cantor P. HiUel Brummer of the Jewish
Center; Joel H. Telles, executive director of the
Jewish Federation; David Krantz, immediate
Temple past president; Rose Port, Tamarac
Division UJA co-chairman; Sam Federman,
Division chairman; Samuel K. Miller,
Federation vice president and guest speaker;
Rabbi Kurt F. Stone, spiritual leader of the
Jewish Center; Seymour Wildman, new
Jewish Center president and Nat Ginsberg,
Tamarac Division UJA co-chairman.
CORAL GATE CONDOMINIUMS will hold
a cocktail party on behalf of the 1986 Jewish
Federation/United Jewish Appeal campaign
at 8 p.m. Tuesday Feb. 95 at the Coral Gate
Model and Sales office. Coral Gate/UJA chair-
man Jacob Kushner announced that William
Katzbera will be the guest speaker. Pictured
are members of the Coral Gate Committee,
whose overall campaign falls under the um-
brella of the Greater Margate Area Divi
sion/UJA campaign. From left, Ruth Burech,
Janice Yarmove, Shirley Kass, Jacob
Kushner, Stanley Kass, Betty Kushner, Myr-
na Kleinman and Ruth Levine.
WOMEN'S DIVISION
THE WOMEN'S DIVISION will hold a first-
ever golf and tennis tournament and luncheon
on behalf of the 1986 Women's Division/UJA
campaign, on Thursday March 6, beginning at
9 a.m. with the tournament, followed by a 1
p.m. luncheon. The tournament is open to all
Inverrary women who make a minimum com-
mitment of $100 to the Women's Divi-
sion*'Inverrary Division campaign. Reserva-
tions are $25 which include green and court
fees, carts, luncheon and prizes. Pictured
planning the event, which promises to be a
huge success are, seated from left, Edith
Greenstein, Sylvia Bayer, Florence Karp,
Rose Mehlman, chairperson of the golf tourna-
ment; Ruth Westrich and Hilda Leibo,
chairperson of the Women's Division "Play a
Day for UJA u event. Standing from left, Lois
Levin, chairperson of the tennis tournament;
Eleanor Newman, Betty Feldman, Deborah
Hahn, Women's Division campaign co-
chairperson; Rhoda Gray, Demise Jerrold,
Estelle Feerst, Tillie Levison and Vivian
Herz.
SUNRISE LAKES PHASE III recently held a special gifts
breakfast on behalf of the 1986 Jewish Federation/United Jewish
Appeal campaign, jvhere over 280 people attended to make their
commitment for 1986 to UJA. According to Estelle Gedan,
chairperson, attendance has tripled from the first year the $100
minimum event was held. Pictured with Gedan, left, is Federa-
tion Board Member Irving Spector, who was the guest speaker.
Also chairing the Sunrise Lakes Phase III UJA drive are Samuel
and Goldie Herman and Lillian and Abraham Gulker.
O Briefly
Woodmont Dinner-Dance
Sunday Feb. 23
Several hundred Woodmont
community residents will be in at-
tendance at the annual dinner in
behalf of the Jewish Federa-
tion/United Jewish Appeal, this
Sunday evening, Feb. 23, at the
Woodmont Country Club.
Culminating the most intensive
campaign of die past several mon-
ths, those present will hear an ad-
dress by business-leader and
Israeli authority Jerome Gleekel.
Woodmont Division leaders
predict that this year's campaign
results will surpass all prior years
achievements and will set a new
record of giving by the
community.
Leading the campaign effort are
co-chairmen Walter Bernstein,
Jerome Gleekel
Lou Colker and Moe Wittenberg,
and honorary chairman, Dan
Cantor.
Tribute Cards
PLEASE HELP US TO KEEP OUR
EXPENSES DOWN AND OUR CON-
TRIBUTIONS TO KFAR SABA, OUR
| PROJECT RENEWAL COMMUNITY
I CITY UP!
PLEASE CONSIDER BUYING
f TRIBUTE CARDS IN QUANTITY TO
| KEEP AT HOME OR AT THE OFFICE
|SO THAT YOU MAY WRITE YOUR
| OWN PERSONAL MESSAGE AND
HELP US TO KEEP OUR BILLING
COSTS DOWN. EACH TIME THE OF-
FICE SENDS CARDS, TIME AND EX-
PENSE IS INVOLVED IN THE
j FOLLOW-UP FOR BILLING AND
PAYMENT.
THANK YOU FOR YOUR COOPERA-
TION AND HEARTFELT GENEROSI-
TY ON BEHALF OF OUR JEWISH
BRETHREN.


'

Friday, February 21, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 9
CAMPAIGN '86 Federation/United Jewish Appeal
r*
Your UJA Gift in Action...
Absorption From
Supermarkets to Schooling
UJA Press Service
Rina, a homemaker in Beer-
sheva, is one of many Israelis
reaching out to help the Ethiopian
Jews, the newest newcomers in
this land of immigrants.
"I'm a paraprofessional at the
Beersheva absorption center,"
said Rina proudly. "As new im-
migrants come in, I'm called to
assist. I'm assigned to three or
four families. On my first day with
them, I go to their absorption
center apartments, and show
them how water comes out of the
faucet, and how the toilet works,
and so on.
"The next day, I take them to
the supermarket," she added. "I
show them what foods and clean-
ing materials to buy, how to pay
for them, and the safe way to
cross a busy street. Then we go
back to the apartment, and learn
how to prepare and store the food,
and how the stove works."
Two to three weeks are allowed
for this initial settling in. Then in-
fants begin kindergarten, children
are sent to school, and adults start
at ulpan to learn the new
language.
"This is a different kind of
aliyah," said a Jewish Agency
kindergarten teacher in Beer-
sheva, here in Israel's south.
"These children have never
played with toys before. At first,
they are frightened of dolls. But
they learn very fast. It's always
easiest with the kids."
The children learn as much out-
Ethiopianin Israel.
ATTENTION:
WOMEN
GOLFERS
Reservations are still being taken for the "Play-A-Day for
UJA" Golf and Tennis Tourney at Inverrary, Thursday, March 6.
Hilda Leibo, chairman, announced that all women in the Greater
Fort Lauderdale area are welcome to take part in this event and
you do not have to be a member of Inverrary to participate. For
further information or sign-up, contact the Women's Division at
748-8400.
HAWAIIAN GARDENS recently held its an-
nual breakfast on behalf of the 1986 Jewish
Federation/United Jewish Appeal campaign,
where more dollars were raised. According to
Hawaiian Gardens UJA chairman Julius
Mines, more people attended this breakfast
side the kindergarten as in. Eight-
year-old Anat was fascinated by
the leather gloves worn by a
visitor to her class. Hesitantly she
reached for them, took a moment
to work out where the thumb
should be and quickly
discovered their advantage.
"Warm!" she exclaimed.
Some 85 percent of immigrants
past school age arrive illiterate in
any language, so the educational
challenge alone is considerable.
"We've had to develop new
methods for teaching Hebrew to
people who are unaccustomed to
symbols representing sounds,"
said a Negev ulpan teacher, whose
former pupils have included North
African, American, European and
Soviet Jewish immigrants. "But
the motivation of the Ethiopian
Jews is enormous. They're very
cooperative and hardworking."
Language goals are pragmatic.
Names and spellings of local
vegetables are learned as ingre-
dients for vegetable soup, with the
recipe taught too. Classes in
modern Israeli history and
culture, and general knowledge
are enthusiastically received,
although sometimes sensibilities
are offended. When one of the
slides included in a family plann-
ing class for women showed a nak-
ed man, the women walked >a* in
protest.
and made their pledge to FederationfUJA
than the previous years. Pictured at the
breakfast are Dr. Abraham J. GUtelson,
speaker; Sam Delfin, George Glasser, Al
Copans, Willie YabUm, Jerry Davidson,
Lucille Stang and Julius Mines.
CONDOMINIUM UPDATE
Oakbrook Village UJA Rally
Arthur Salnuut
Oakbrook Village Rally, on
behalf of the Federation/UJA
campaign will be held Sunday
Feb. 23, 7:30 p.m., at the
Clubhouse, according to Arthur
M. Salzman, committee chairman.
Working at the event, which will
pay tribute to Oakbrook Village
community leader, Lillian
Holtzman, are:
Ruby Bernstein, Fred Bailes,
Jack Cooper, Nathan Deutsch, Hy
Frank, George Friedland, Harry
Gerwitz. Abby Greenfogel, Mor-
ton Morowitz, Murray Karp, Dan-
ny Katz, Emily Lieb, Norm
Leviss, Lou Levine, Dan Lyon,
Ted Manburg, Ed Sand, Irving
Sandberg, Sam Schwartz, Gert
Unger, Stellie Waxer, and Samuel
White.
Salzman stated that the commit-
tee extends a special 'thank you'
to Ambassador Savings and Loan
Association of Lauderhill who will
pay for the collation.
POLYNESIAN
GARDENS
Carl Jacobs and Sidney
Karlton, chairman of the 1986
Jewish Federation/United Jewish
Appeal campaign at Polynesian
Gardens, have announced that the
community will hold its First An-
nual UJA Breakfast at 10 am.
Sunday March 9 at the Jewish
Community Center, 6501 W.
Sunrise Blvd., Plantation. Special
guest speaker will be Federation
vice president Daniel Cantor.
:sW:W:;S:WS::W:%:y SxWrWWwrW:: x^
WHAT'S HAPPENING
I
FEBRUARY
Feb. 22 Oakland Hills Dinner-Dance.
7:30 p.m. Tamarac Jewish Center.
Feb. 23 Aragon. 11:30 a.m.
Clubhouse.
Feb. 23 Palm Lakes. 10 a.m.
Breakfast. Clubhouse.
Feb. 23 Paradise Gardens III
Cocktail Party. 3 p.m. Home of Mr. and
Mrs. Engelmeyer.
Feb. 23 Oakbrook Village. 7 p.m.
Clubhouse.
Feb. 23 Castle Gardens. 10 a.m.
Breakfast. Clubhouse.
Feb. 23 Woodmont Dinner-Dance. 6
p.m. Woodmont Country Club.
Feb. 24 Women's Division Palm-Airei
Golf and Luncheon.
Feb. 25 Coral Gate Cocktails. 8 p.m. I
Model and Sale Office.
MARCH
March 2 Wynmoor Brunch. 9:30 a.m.
Holiday Inn, Plantation.
March 2 UJA Young Leadership Con-
ference Departs. Through March 4.
March 2 Pine Island Ridge
Breakfast. 10 a.m. Clubhouse.
INFORMATION
For information concerning campaign
events, contact the Jewish Federation at
748-8400.


Page 10 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, February 21, 1986

- '

i<
i
t
'
IL
Organizations
WLI
Anna Neiditz, past national
president and director of
Women's League for Israel and
member of the board of trustees
of Hebrew University arrived
from New York to address the
members of the Heritage Club of
Women's League for Israel on the
occasion of a dinner-dance honor-
ing Lorraine Frost, Florida
Region president and National
Women's League for Israel direc-
tor. Terry Barnett, chairman of
the Heritage Club Dinner-Dance
and president of the Women's
League for Israel Chai Chapter,
hosted all those who pledged
$1,000 toward the grand goal of
one million dollars. Cecile Fine,
Tamarac resident and Florida
Region Women's League for
Israel fund-raising chairman, ex-
plained that 1,000 philanthropists
are sought who will give $1,000
each towards the million dollars
necessary to sustain service pro-
grams in Israel which give life and
dignity to otherwise homeless and
helpless young Israelis. For infor-
mation call 748-6899.
Women's League for Israel
president pro-tern Cecile Fine, has
announced that Sybil Rothbaum
of the Hatikvah Sunrise Chapter,
will serve as the Florida Region
chairman of the Shopping List.
The Shopping List is an inventory
of things needed in the group
homes of Tel Aviv, Haifa,
Jerusalem and Netanya that WLI
supports. For information contact
748-6899.
WLI's Broward Business and
Professional Women's Network
held its second supper meeting on
Feb. 12 where Rose Anthony of
Southern Bell spoke to a cross-
section of women of the communi-
ty. The next meeting is scheduled
for Thursday March 13 where Lin-
da Irwin of Lord and Taylor will
speak. For information contact
748-6899.
AMERICAN TECHNION
SOCIETY
Dr. Irving Greenberg, president
of the Broward County Chapter of
the American Technion Society
announced the appointment of the
following board of directors;
Sydney H. Baum, Harry S. Brody,
Col. John J. Burton, Mrs. Harold
J. Caster, Jacob Fast, Mrs. Irving
Greenberg. Mrs. Florence Hirsch,
Ms. Fay Jaffe, Benjamin Kurz-
man, Dan Levenson, Dr. Kenneth
Levine, Dr. Lawrence Levine,
Mrs. Lawrence Levine, Fred
Lichtman, Mrs. Dorothy P. Rubin,
Ben Schnapp, Mrs. Celia H. Seel-
ing, Mr. and Mrs. Edward
Shandell, Samuel M. Soref, Dr.
Leo Varon, Mrs. Leo Varon, Nor-
man Weinstein, Donald Weitz-
man, Mr. Martin Yohalem, Mrs.
Martin Yohalem, Samuel I. Zack.
AMERICAN FRIENDS
TEL AVIV
UNIVERSITY
Even before the event has
taken place, the American
Friends of Tel Aviv University
consider it a major feather in their
cap: the guest speaker for their
Seminar Associates meeting in
February will be Dr. Edward
Teller, one of the most prominent
scientists in the world.
Dr. Teller will address a
breakfast meeting of the Seminar
Associates on Friday, Feb. 21, at
7:30 a.m.
Teller's name is probably most
familiar to people as one of the
scientists who developed the atom
bomb during World War II. He is
also known as a staunch propo-
nent of what he insists be properly
called the Strategic Defense In-
itiative, though the press and the
public have come to use the
euphemism "Star Wars."
For further information on the
Seminar Associates and the lec-
ture by Dr. Teller, please call the
American Friends of Tel Aviv
University at 392-9186.
BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY
NWC
The Inverrary Woodlands
Chapter of Brandeis University
National Women's Committee will
hold its used book sale on March
21-23, not in April as previously
indicated. The sale will be held at
Coral Springs Mall. Donations are
still needed. Please contact
721-8887 or 722-3271 for pick-up
information.
HADASSAH
The Florida Broward County
Region of Hadassah has announc-
ed the formation of a new Chapter
to be known as Mitzvah-North
Lauderdale Chapter. The
presidium includes Rose Todras
and Lillian Feinstein. Members
will meet at the Hamptoms West
Clubhouse. Interested parties
should call 722-2089.
POMPANO INTERFATTH
COUNCIL
"Religion's Responsibility to
Human Rights" a crucial topic of
these current times, will be the
subject of the next Pompano In-
terfaith meeting. The three
clergymen of the Catholic, Protes-
tant and Jewish faiths to lead the
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discussion will be Father Locking
of Our Lady of Asumption
Catholic Church, Rev. William E.
Hamilton of the St. Martin-In-
The-Fields Episcopal Church, and
Rabbi Samuel April of Temple
Sholom.
The meeting will take place at
Temple Sholom, 132 SE 11th
Ave., on Monday morning, Feb.
24, starting at 10 a.m. preceded
by coffee at 9:30.
Pompano Interfaith programs
are now entering its 8th year, and
has increasingly presented a
forum where men and women of
the different faiths and races can
create a "dialogue."
The meetings are chaired alter-
nately by Rev. Peggy Wilkins and
Esther Cannon, representing the
Christian and Jewish religions
respectively.
Everyone is cordially invited.
There is no admission charge.
February Jewish
Best-Seller List
WASHINGTON Based on a
sampling of Jewish bookstores in
cities across the United States,
The B'nai B'rith International
Jewish Monthly has selected in its
February issue the following as
best-selling books of Jewish in-
terest. They are listed
alphabetically by title.
HARDCOVER
A Certain People. Charles E.
Silberman. Summit. $19.95. The
state of contemporary American
Judaism.
Between Washington and
Jerusalem: A Reporter's
Notebook. Wolf Blitxer. Oxford.
$15.95. The intimate and complex
relationship between the United
States and Israel.
Holy Days. Lis Harris. Summit.
$16.96. The world of present-day
Chasidim.
The Israelis. Amos Elon. Keter.
$35. Three hundred and eighteen
photographs of life in the Jewish
state taken one day in May.
Second Jewish Book of Why.
Alfred J. Kolatch. Jonathan
David. $13.95. More answers to
questions, ranging from the
popular to the esoteric.
PAPERBACK
From Time Immemorial. Joan
Peters. Harper and Row. $12.95.
Origins of the Arab-Israeli
conflict.
Jewish and Female. Susan Weid-
man Schneider. Simon and
Schuster. $10.95. How feminism
has affected Jewish women.
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Agency Focus
Eleanor Bernstein Named
Senior Service Director
Sherwin H. Rosenstein, ex-
ecutive director of Jewish Family
Service of Broward County, is
pleased to announce the appoint-
ment of Eleanor Bernstein as
senior services director.
Mrs. Bernstein has an extensive
background in planning and im-
plementing direct services for the
elderly in Broward County. For
the past five years, she has served
as tie Director of the Southeast
Focal Point Senior Center and
Day Care Center for the
Fnul/Elderly. This program is
sponsored by the Jewish Com-
munity Centers of South
Broward. Previous to this posi-
tion, she was Director of
Homemaking Services for
Visiting Nurses Association of
Broward County. She is a member
of the Florida Council on Aging,
National Council on Aging and
district representative for the
Florida Association of Senior
Center Directors. Mrs. Bernstein
is a member of the Board of Direc-
tors of the United Deaf and Hear-
ing Services of Broward County
and is Vice President of the Board
of Directors of Family Service
Agency of Broward County as
well as a member of the Task
Force for Special Needs of
Children.
She is a resident of Pembroke
Lakes, married and the mother of
three grown children.
One of her responsibilities will
be the development of the Lifeline
Program. Jewish families have
throughout history, maintained a
strong tradition of caring for the
elderly members of their family.
Increased mobility among
American Jews have in many
cases produced separation of
family members and children and
parents live significant distances
apart. The problems created by a
lack of family support systems in-
clude family stress, premature in-
stitutionalization and inadequate
use of existing community
services.
The Lifeline Program will offer
a package of direct service and
case management options design-
ed to help aging clients maintain
independence in their own homes.
The Lifeline Program will func
tion under the Jewish Family Ser-
vice of Broward County. Fees for
these services will be determined
by the frequency and type of ser-
vice required and according to
ability to pay.
Special fund-raising efforts by
the Board of Directors of Jewish
Family Service has provided
necessary funds for a Respite
Care Program.
This service will provide relief
to the primary caregiver (spouse
or other family member) from the
stress and demands associated
with the daily care of the sick or
disabled elderly member of the
family.
For further information regar-
ding Lifeline or Respite Care Pro-
grams call Jewish Family Services
at 966-0966 (Hollywood office).
Jewish Family Service is af-
filiated with the Jewish Federa-
tion of Greater Fort Lauderdale,
Jewish Federation of South
Broward and the United Way.
With Rhyme
And Reason
Oh, teach us, G-d, to count our
days
That wisdom may be ours,
That we may use with diligence
Our appointed hours.
That we may worship You at last
Much better than before,
That we may learn by loving You
To love each other more.
That we may set our virtues free,
Long bound as if in chains,
That we may yield the best in us
In time that yet remains.
Oh, grant that we outdo ourselves
So we can make amends
And teach us, G-d, to do good
things
Before the journey ends.
We pray that we may plan ahead
Day irr, day out, always.
Oh, what a blessing it would be
To wisely count our days!
Jack Gould
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Friday, February 21, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort I^auderdale Page 11
OeWwb H. Roeenatein. Exeottire
Director
JEWISH FAMILY SERVICE OF BROWARD COUNTY
FATHERING:
DOS IS A TATA?
Times are changing. Approx-
imately 20 years ago, a father's
role in pregnancy and birth was
twofold. Nine months after he did
the first one, he handed out the
candy and cigars.
Life then settled down and he
continued or began his singular
parental role as breadwinner. His
emotional and physical role as
father was almost nonexistent, at
least in the early years of the
child's life. At times he may have
felt like an outsider, lonely and
neglected. Perhaps, he wished
that he too could feel the love and
involvement in his child's growth
and care that his wife was feeling.
With the advent of two career
families has come the necessity to
reevaluate our former parenting
roles. When he initially thinks
about it, the father may fear the
added work and a sense of discom-
fort with a nurturing role. Often
the father feels unprepared to
assume a new role. However,
upon further analysis, he thinks
about how nice it would be to
share his children's growing
years, to see them take their first
steps, go off to school for the first
time and to be an important viable
part of the process. How wonder-
ful it would be to make a valuable
contribution to each others' lives.
"Forget it," you say with
resolve. "It's not possible. I have
to work. Someone has to earn
money. I don't know anything
about kids, diapers, feeding or
nurturing. That's for a mother to
do. Besides, what would my
friends, father or co-workers
think if they saw me wheeling a
baby carriage? It was a stupid idea
anyway."
Was it? Is it? Didn't you ever
wish that your own father had had
the time to play ball with you,
read you a story, sit and talk to
only you, or just show he cared in
a way you would have understood
as a child. Isn't your father more
nurturing to his grandchildren
than he was to his own children?
Too bad he deprived himself of all
those joys years ago! Why should
you?
More and more fathers are tak-
ing the challenge, are asserting
themselves as fathers, are ex-
periencing the joys and sorrows of
life in a very real way with their
children. Most feel that the
rewards far outway the effort.
Studies have shown that dual
parental involvement generally
improves a child's sense of self
and strengthens family bonds.
Jewish Family Service can help
you learn to enjoy being an effec-
tive father. We have developed a
unique program aimed at teaching
fathers how to develop a positive
relationship with their children
through positive communications.
Workshops of this nature can be
tailored to all stages of fathering.
Presentations are available at
nominal cost to men's clubs and
other organizations. For more in-
formation call Jewish Family Ser-
vice in Hollywood at 966-0956 and
ask for our Family Life Education
Department.
Jewish Family Service is af-
filiated with the Jewish Federa-
tion of Greater Fort Lauderdale,
Jewish Federation of South
Broward and the United Way.
A Diversified
Jewish Quiz
By RABBI
DAVID W. GORDON
1- Define the Apocrypha.
2- What is the Jewish Chautau-
qua Society?
3- How would you illustrate the
idea that Torah study has no end?
4- What is the Hebrew term
against the causing of pain to liv-
ing cretures (animals)?
5- Name the food the Israelites
subsisted on in the desert for 40
years.
6- What was the full name by
which the Siddur-Prayer Book
was known?
7-Name the Hebrew Prophet
who said: "Have we not one
Father? Hath not one G-d created
us all?"
8- What noted German poet was
a convert to Christianity yet a
staunch defender of Judaism?
9- What are peyot?
10- Define a Chavruta.
Answers
1- From the Greek meaning
"hidden away" they are Biblical
books excluded from the Canon of
the Holy Scriptures and among
them are: Tobit, Judith I and II,
Esdras, I and II Maccabees,
Wisdom of Solomon and Wisdom
of Ben Sira.
2- They disseminate authentic
Jewish knowledge to the non-Jew
as well as spreading good will and
better understanding.
4- "Tzaar Baaley Chayim."
6- Manna, tasted like wafers
made with honey or fresh oil.
6- Seder T'Fillot Ub'Rachot
(Order of Prayers and Blessings).
7-Malachi.
8- Heinrich Heine.
9- Sideburns or earlocks worn
by Chasidim.
10- A study fellowship closely
involved in pouring over Talmudic
texts.
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Both Seders SSSp.p
8 Dinner! A a lunches S22S p.p
Including both Sedan
NEW OCEANFRONT
BARCELONA HOTEL
CemaleWy Weneted and
On the Ocean
,S. lOSttNlflMPacfca
From *595M pp. dW OCC.
3 MEALS DAILY
Strictly Kosher under the Rabbinical super
vision ot Rabbi Bernard Levy ot (Kl Laboratories
Meals only available Sadurim S3S each p p
Botn Seders SSOpp
8 Dinners A 8 Lunches S296 p P
including both Seders
OCCAN FRONT
PALM BEACH HILTON
S. S, 0 11 Najht Packeeee
Free* *1095 w...aMee*
3 MEALS DAILY
Strictly Kosher under the
Rabbtnical supervision
ol Rabbi Bernard Levy (K)
Meets only available on request
FOR INFORMATION RESERVATIONS
PRESTIGE HOLIDAYS
rowaro. isr sm
OAOE 3M-741S
EVENINGS S34-M2S
Bigger and berrier.
**9 ^^9 Not onrv dors new. imoroved Brevers voourt come in a nev
Not only does new, improved Breyers yogurt come ma new
8 -ounce size, it now has much more real fruit More strawberries in the strawberry
more blueberries in the blueberry, than the leading brand, which is why we caH it the
fuli-of-fruit yogurt So go ahead, use the coupon. It'll be the best-tasting twenty cents
you ever made.
20C/2
20C/2
Manufacture** Coupon No Expiration Date
Save 20C when you buy two
8 oz. cups of BREYERS yogurt.
(Any flavor.)
Ftetaaer Kraft. Inc (Dairy Group) will reimburee you lor the faca value ot
Wile coupon plus Be rt eubmitteo in compliance with Kraft'a Coupon
Redemption Policy, previouaiy pro-
vided to retailer and incorporated by
reference herein Vow) where taxed
restricted or prohibited Caah value
1/WOe For redemption, mail to Kraft
Inc (Dairy Group). PO Box1790. Clinton
Iowa 52734
One coupon tf tws neon eurcnatss e
WeaMaiaareisVtly.
!>?.
77356

A



Page 12 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, February 21, 1986
Community Calendar
\ -
Compiled by Lori Ginsberg,
Federation 748-8400.
FRIDAY FEB. 21
Temple Kol Ami: 8:15 p.m. Ser-
vices featuring scholar-in-
residence, Rabbi Howard Bogot
who will discuss, "Maybe Way for
the Image of G-D." At Temple.
Kamat Shalom: 7 p.m. Seder Shel
Shabbat. Attendees should bring
own dinner. At Temple. -
SATURDAY FEB. 22
Bermuda Club Players: 8:30 p.m.
Musical revue, "Happy Times."
Tickets $3. Bermuda Clubhouse.
Also Feb. 23.
Laaderdale Oaks: 8 p.m. Music of
Gino Sorgi Trio featuring Cathy
Barrett. Clubhouse, 3060 NW 47
Terr. 733-9338 or 731-7874.
SUNDAY FEB. 23
Jewish Community Center: 1-3
p.m. "Jewish Community Connec-
tion." Open house. 6501 W.
Sunrise Blvd., Plantation.
792-6700.
Temple Beth Am-USY: Walk a
thon.
Temple Beth Am-Singles Club: 2
p.m. Rap Session. At Temple.
^72-5865.
WLI-Margate Chapter: 9 a.m.-4
I .m. Bazaar Pavilion, David Park,
Margate.
Cincinnati Club of S. Florida: 6
p.m. Dinner and dance. Cost
$12.50. Holiday Inn, 3701 N.
University Dr., Coral Springs.
ORT-Tamarise Chapter: 2-5 p.m.
Bowling. Entire family invited.
Forum Lanes, 8500 NW 44 St.,
Lauderhill. 974-2277.
Temple Beth Israel, D.B.: 8 p.m.
Lecture Series featuring Leonid
Feldman. At Temple, 200 S. Cen-
tury Blvd.
MONDAY FEB. 24
NCJW-Plantation Section:
Valentine Dance.
Temple Beth Torah: 7:30-8:30
p.m. Hebrew class. At Temple.
B'nai B'rith Women-Deerfield
Beach Chapter: 12:30 p.m.
Meeting. Temple Beth Israel,
D.B.
B'nai B'rith Women-Oakland
Estates Chapter: 11 a.m.
Meeting and mini-lunch. Oakland
Estates Social Club, 4200 NW 41
St., Laud. Lakes.
Brandeis University NWC-
Inverrary Woodlands Chapter:
1:30 p.m. Study Group, "Forum
for Fanatics." American Savings
Bank, Commercial and 441.
WLI-Tamarac Chapter: 11
a.m. Meeting. Muriel London will
speak. Italian-American Club,
fif>35 W. Commercial Blvd.
Workmen's Circle Branch 1046:
12:30 p.m. Meeting. Nat Zumoff
will make music with Yiddish.
Laud. Lakes City Hall, 4300 NW
36 St.
Hadassah-Gilah Inverrary
Chapter: Noon. Meeting. Fashion
show by B.J. Scott and luncheon.
Emerald Hills C.C., 4100 N. Hills
Dr., Hollywood.
N. Broward Midrasha: 8 p.m.
Lecture by Rabbi Haskell Bernat.
Ramat Shalom, 11301 W.
Broward Blvd. 748-8400.
ORT-Woodmont Chapter: 7 p.m.
Preview followed by 8 p.m. Art
Auction. Woodmont Country
Club. Donation $1.50. Proceeds to
Bramson ORT Technical
Institute.
Deborah Heart and Lung-
Lauderhill Chapter: Noon.
Meeting. Fashion show by
Lehman Yarn. Castle Rec.
Center, 4780 NW 22 Ct.
TUESDAY FEB. 25
Hadasaah-Somerset Shoshana
Chapter: Noon. Meeting. Lisa
Synlorski will discuss American
Youth Activities. Somerset Phase
I Rec. Hall.
Hadassah-Ramaz Chapter: 8
p.m. Meeting. Kosher Chinese
cooking will be featured. 485-4859
or 752-6120.
Temple Emanu-El-Sisterhood:
Bus trip to Main Library including
lunch. Visit to Ft. Lauderdale Art
Museum.
Hadassah-Blyma Margate
Chapter: Youth Aliyah Dinner
dance. Holiday Inn, Sunrise and
441. 974-7612.
American Jewish Congress-
Shad Polier Chapter of N.
Broward: 1-3 p.m. Meeting. Dr.
William Stronge of FAU will
speak. Holiday Inn, 441 and Com-
mercial Blvd. 971-1226.
WEDNESDAY FEB. 26
ORT-Woodmont Chapter: Noon.
Fashion show and luncheon.
Donation $18. Bonaventure Hotel
and Spa.
ORT-Inverrary Chapter: 11:30
a.m. Meeting. Molly Turner of
Channel 10 will speak. Inverrary
Country Club. 3840 Inverrary
Blvd. 721-7745.
B'nai B'rith Women-Leorah
Council: 12:30 p.m. Meeting.
Central Park, Plantation.
ORT-Lauderdale West Chapter:
Noon. Mini-lunch and meeting.
Jewelry and fashion show. Deicke
Aud., 5701 Cypress Rd.,
Plantation.
Dade/Broward Lupus Founda-
tion: 7 p.m. Meeting. Parkway
Regional, NMB. 474-2280.
NCJW-N. Broward Section: Ann
Ackerman will present book
review. Temple Beth Israel, 7100
W. Oakland Pk. Blvd.
THURSDAY FEB. 27
Temple Emanu-EI: 7:45 p.m.
Board of Directors meeting. At
Temple.
Hadassah-Pompano Beach Chai
Chapter: Noon. Lecture on breast
cancer and a program on Jewish
music featuring Muriel and
Charles Feinstein. Pompano
Beach Rec. Center, 1801 NE 6 St.
Na'amat USA-Broward Council:
9:30 a.m. Meeting. 1303 N. State
Rd. 7, Margate. 979-3311.
Brandeis University NWC-
Inverrary Woodlands Chapter:
1:30 p.m. Rap Session. "Did the
Women's Movement Really
Liberate Us?" Lakes of Carriage
Hills. 975-9045.
Tamarac Jewish Center: 7:30
p.m. Children's Art Auction,
featuring auctioneer Mike
Roberts, WFTL Radio. At Tem-
ple, 9101 NW 57 St.
B'nai B'rith Women-Hope
Chapter: Noon. Bagel break.
Deicke Aud.
Free Sons of Israel-Ft. Lauder-
dale Lodge: 7:30 p.m. Meetine.
Whiting Hall, Sunrise.
WLI-Coconut Creek Chapter: 11
a.m. Luncheon and card party.
Spaghetti Experience, 5460 N.
State Rd. 7. 974-8314.
B'nai B'rith-Pompano Lodge: 8
p.m. Meeting. Palm-Aire Country
Club, East Room. 551 S. Pompano
Pkwy.
B'nai B'rith Women-Tamarac
Chapter: Board of Directors
meeting. Italian-American Club,
6535 W. Commercial Blvd.
Newswire/U.S.A.
B'NAI B'RITH International praised U.S. Secretary of State
George Shultz for "directly confronting the issue of terrorism"
and chiding those European nations which recognize the
Palestine Liberation Organization.
RAFI HARLE V, president of El Al Israel Airlines, announced
: the appointment of David Shein as vice president and general
& manager for North and Central America.
1
| THE 610,000 Member American Federation of Teachers (AFT,
:| AFL-CIO) is kicking-off fund-raising efforts to benefit construe- i
g tion of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum and is embarking in :&
:j|: an educational campaign expected to reach thousands of the na- gj
i tion's students. 8
DONALD S. Scher, director of JWB's Israel office in g
::j: Jerusalem and a member of JWB's executive staff, has beeitnam- ig
jjj: ed to the additional post of executive director of the World Con- :'::
:j|: federation of Jewish Community Centers, it was announced by ::
: Esther Leah Ritz. president of both JWB and the World %
: Confederation.
*:-:*:*:-:*:*:*:::^
where shopping is a pleasure 7days a week
Publix Bakeries open at 8:00 A.M.
/
Available at Publix Store* with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
Cherry
Log Roll
$099
each fa
Available at All PuMx Stores
and Danish Bakeries.
Family Pack, Delicious
Cake Donuts................. bo? $169
Pecan Danish Ring.......each$ 1"
Serve for Breakfast, Heated with Butter
Bran Muffins..............6 $119
Prices Effective
February 20 thru 26.1986.
Available at PubHx Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
Made with Fresh Strawberries,
if Available
Strawberry
Tarts
achf %J
Available at Publix Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
Plain or Seeded,
Sliced or Unsliced
Italian Bread
loaf
79
0
Available at PubHx Stores with Fraah
Danish Bakeries Only.
Almond, Cinnamon, Cream Cheese or
Strawberry Cheese Filled
Croissants....................each 69*
Fresh Baked Daily
Potato Rolls.............12 ^ 89*
Available at Publix Stores with Fresh
Danish Bakeries Only. Fresh Assorted
Donuts
$199
dozen
(Effective Only on Sunday,
February 23,1986.)
Quantity
Righta Reserved.
Publix




ommentary
DAVID SCHULMAN
Everyone who knows David
Schulman agrees that JCC's first
Vice President really knows his
numbers! Beginning his affiliation
with the Center about five years
ago, he immediately joined the
budget committee. To date, he's
still on it continuing to con-
tribute his time and talents to help
guide the Center's fiscal
operations.
Schulman has also ventured into
other areas of service to JCC. He
has held office as Assistant
Secretary of the Board and then
Treasurer, meanwhile serving on
two Center liaison committees,
one with Federation and another
with Hebrew Day School. More?
of course! Schulman, has con-
tributed to the success of many
Center functions, such as Goods
and Services Auctions, and Israel
Independence Day Festivals dur-
ing his membership of the Special
Events Committee. In 1984, JWB
cited him as a winner of a "New
Leadership Award."
Schulman, a graduate of the
Wharton School, is the General
Agent assoicated with the
Massachusetts Mutual Life In-
surance Company for the Fort
Lauderdale-Palm Beach areas.
The comnanv. too, has recognized
( PASSOVER1986
UNIVERSAL KOSHER TOURS INC.
PRESENTS
A TRADITIONAL AND KOSHER
PASSOVER HOLIDAY
AT THE "NEW"
DIPLOMAT, FLORIDA
FROM ,
APRIL 23RD
^. RESORT AND ^
THRU
MAY 1ST
Complete Qlatt Kosher Holiday Program
Prom MM to $1198 par person double occupancy
Plus 16% for tax and gratuities
For Additional Information Contact:
Universal Kosher Tours Inc.
5 Penn Plaza
New York, New York 10001
212-594-0836 800-221-2791
^Exclusive Operator for DIPLOMAT, FLORIDA
Friday, February 21, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 13
THE JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE
6501 W. Sunrise Blvd.
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33313 792-6700
By Muriel Haakell, Director of Public Relations
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION AND FEES CONCERN-
SotSE8 R programs LIsraD BTasecaTl
him by placing him on its
prestigious General Agent's
Committee.
In the community his credits are
many. Member of the Board of
Temple Ramat Shalom. Member
of the Board, Broward County's
Goodwill Industries. Long time
member of Broward's Volunteer
Action Committee which selects
the county's Volunteer of the
Year.
David and Carrie Schulman
have lived in South Florida for the
past 11 years. Their children
Stacey, age eight and Todd,
almost seven, are also JCC
devotees. Carrie has helped chair
and produce many successful
Women's Day functions. Stacey
dances three times a week and
both Stacey and Todd play tennis
on JCC courts. The children have
been enthusiastic summer
campers and Dad joins them
regularly for Father/Child special
events. More? yes! Dad also spon-
sors a JCC Softball Team and jogs
when he has time!
TU B'SHAVAT
CELEBRATION
The Ruytenbeek family made it
a real "down to earth" Tu
B'Shavat celebration for Early
Childhood! Their donation of
three large trees were planted on
the Pre-School playground right
before the entire assemblage of
children and teachers on Tuesday,
Jan. 28. There were prayers and
songs making it a very real
observance of the Tree-Planting
holiday. All the Ruytenbeeks were
on hand to join in the ceremonies
and to receive the thanks, per-
sonally from JCC's Early
Childhood!
50S AND 60'S
THE RIGHT AGE!
A first time dance for Singles in
their 50's and 60's was held at the
JCC Saturday, Feb. 1, with great
success, according to Adele Ber-
man, new Singles Department
staff member. Over 200 attended!
"All of us felt we have begun to
answer a great need for single
people in this age group," says
Berman. "We reached out to all
the communities in South Florida
and how gratified we were to see
the tremendout response." Chan-
nel 4, who was advised of the
event, came to see everyone hav-
ing a good time dancing and
socializing, even interviewing
many of the guests. It was aired
the week of February 10. Next
event a Wine and Cheese Party.
Sunday, March 2 in the evening.
The Center has all the details.
JEWISH HERITAGE WEEK
All those who are interested in
keeping alive our wonderful tradi-
tions by seeing programs in the
Yiddish and Jewish idiom are cor-
dially invited to mark their calen-
dars for the week of Sunday,
March 9 through Sunday, March
16. Details will follow all about the
varied programs of entertain-
ment, lectures and celebrations
taking place every single day of
the week.
PASSOVER FUND
It is not too early to start think-
ing about Passover and realize
that some families less fortunate
than the rest of us are unable to
celebrate the holiday
meaningfully-for lack of funds.
JCC's WECARE (With Energy,
Compassion and Responsible Ef-
fort) is beginning to collect funds
in order to buy supplies now for
making up attractive Passover
Baskets. Wine, matzohs, gefilte
fish and ritual items are always in-
cluded. Allyn Kanowsky,
WECARE chairperson would be
happy to receive your donation or
to put you on a committee to help
pack, sort or deliver.
ROBERT AND LAINIE
If you want the best seats-Come
to the JCC! Patrons and Sponsors
tickets can only be purchased at
the Center for the major benefit of
the season! (General admission
can be bought at the Theatre or
Bass outlets)
The great Robert Klein-Lainie
Kazan show at Sunrise Musical
Theatre is set for Sunday, April 6,
at 8 p.m., and if you'd like to meet
Lainie Kazan she'll be at the
elaborate Special Champagne
Reception taking place after the
show in the theatre's glamorous
Cafe Donjo!
The JCC is a major beneficiary
agency of the Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale, receiv-
ing funds from the annual United
Jewish Appeal campaign.
Planning for "Fashions for the Mature Woman" taking place
Tuesday, March 18, at the Jewish Community Center. From the
left standing: Shirley Weinberger, Sophie Safran, Molly Maryn,
Viola Millnick, Ida Hertz, Charlotte Shrifiman, Grace Mash and
Miriam Roberts. Seated: Florence Fogel, Beverly Tucker, The
Professional Consultant; and Adele Berman, Senior Adult
Associate Staff member.
Allison and Rudy Ruytenbeek and Jacob, a nursery program
participant, and his brother Garrett were there to watch the tree
planting in celebration ofTu B'Shvat.
OUR ISN'T
A FLASH
THEPAI
SORRY,
Star-Kilt S>,Star-K&
SOLID WHITE TUM
Star-Kist* is the only major national brand of tuna that has consistently
maintained its certification during the past 30 years.
So whether you prefer the good taste of our delicious solid white tuna
packed in oil or pure spring water, you can have complete confidence in
Star-Kist. After all. no ones been (y) Kosher longer. Sorry, Bumble Bee"
BumOM B is < regtstwad ada W el Culw and Cooka. Inc
IMS Slarfeat Food* m

J


Page 14 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, February 21,1986
Bar/Bat Mitzvahs
TEMPLE KOL AMI
Jason Reiss, son of Debbie and
Richard Reiss of Plantation, and
Eleanor Anerbaeh, daughter of
Mary and Charles Auerbach of
Plantation, celebrated their B'nai
Mitzvah at the Saturday Feb. 15
service at Temple Kol Ami,
Plantation.
The Bat Mitzvah of Andrea Lyn
Apter, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Michael Apter of Plantation, will
be celebrated at the Saturday
morning Feb. 22 service at Kol
Ami.
TEMPLE BETH ORR
Mark Miahkin, son of Barbara
Mishkin and Michael Mishkin, will
become a Bar Mitzvah celebrant
at the Saturday Feb. 22 service at
Temple Beth Orr, Coral Springs.
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL
j The Bar Mitzvah of Jason
Vogelsang, son of Helen
Reiss
Anerbaeh Apter
Vogelsang
Vogelsang, will take place at the
Saturday Feb. 22 service at Tem-
ple Beth Israel, Sunrise.
TEMPLE BETH AM
Kenneth Schwartz, son of
Rose and Dr. Michael Schwartz of
Coral Springs, will become a Bar
Mitzvah celebrant at the Saturday
Feb. 22 service at Temple Beth
Am, Margate.
TEMPLE
SHA'ARAY TZEDEK
Seth Todd Krieger, son of
Laury and Albert Krieger of
Sunrise, will be called to the
Torah to celebrate his Bar Mitz-
vah at the Saturday morning ser-
vices on Feb. 22 at Temple
Sha'aray Tzedek, Sunrise.
Adam L. Kaplan celebrated his
Bar Mitzvah on Feb. 15 at Temple
Emanu-El, Ft. Lauderdale.
Newswire Florida
DR. HARRY Zankel of Margate has recently had a play
published entitled, "The Cup of Elijah." The play is in three acts,
91 pages and is $3.50. The book may be purchased from Harry by
writing him at 7920 NW 8 St., Margate, FL 33063.
FEARING FLORIDA'S vulnerability to terrorism, Gov. Bob
Graham plans to ask the Legislature to fund an anti-terrorist
squad. The proposal calls for an FBI trained team that could res-
pond quickly to terrorist attacks, especially on popular state
tourist attractions.
OLDER PEOPLE rarely run afoul of the law, but those who do
are likely to be problem drinkers, according to research released
by a University of Florida sociologist.
IF YOU need help in filing your income tax return, the AARP
free tax counseling service for retirees and the older citizen,
residing in Plantation, Sunrise, Tamarac, Coral Springs and
Margate, will be available. For information about locations con-
tact Irving Semmel. Supervising Tax Aide Coordinator at
741-8567.
Temple News
TEMPLE BETH ORR
A select committee has been ap-
pointed at Temple Beth Orr for
the purpose of finding a new
spiritual leader to replace Rabbi
Jerrold M. Levy. The selection of
a Rabbi Search Committee follow-
ed the announcement by Rabbi
Levy that he did not intend to
renew his present contract which
ends June 30 of this year.
The Search Committee, headed
by Dr. Avi Rosenberg, consists of
16 Temple members who repre-
sent a cross-section of the con-
gregation. This group has already
received biographical profiles
from 17 rabbis from all over the
continental United States who are
applyng for the position at Temple
Beth Orr in Coral Springs.
Assisting the chairman on the
Search Committee are Johl Rot-
man, Dr. Alex Shiman, Marion
Fox, Sid Rosenberg, Dr. Eugene
Black, Marilynn Rothstein, Dr.
Philip Averbuch, Lawrence
Kupfer. Rose Domnitch, Joe
Francis, Carol Wasserman and
Raymond Hersh, all of Coral Spr-
ings; also Richard Schwartz of
Lauderhill, Michael KHegman of
Tamarac and Martin Fisch of
Coconut Creek.
TEMPLE
SHA'ARAY TZEDEK
In honor of their 50th wedding
anniversary, Nat and Mollie
Pearlman will host an Oneg Shab-
bat at the Friday night Feb. 21
services at Temple Sha'aray
Tzedek, Sunrise. Nat serves as the
Sunrise Jewish Center Sunrise
Area Federation/United Jewish
Appeal campaign chairman as
well as the UJA chair for Sunrise
Lakes Phase II.
Jack and Ann Polinsky will be
the honored quests at the Tenth
Annual Dinner Dance at Temple
Sha'aray Tzedek on Saturday
March 1. Chairing the function
will be the Temple's newly-elected
president Phil Nelson. Polinsky
has served as Temple president
for the past two years and is a
founder of the Temple's nursery
and Hebrew school. Jack serves as
the Sunrise Jewish
Center/Sunrise Area UJA co-
chairman.
TAMARAC
JEWISH CENTER
Tamarac Jewish Cener will hold
its Third Annual Children's Art
Auction at 7:30 p.m. Thursday
Feb. 27 at the Temple, 9101 NW
57 St. Special guest auctioneer
will be Mike Roberts of WFTL
Radio. Wine and desserts will be
served. Everyone is welcome.
Proceeds will benefit the Jewish
Center's PTO and Nursery
School.
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL
DEEFIELD BEACH
The third lecture of the annual



Original
WEINSTE/i\j
lecture series of Temple Beth
Israel. 200 South Century Blvd.,
Deerfield Beach, features Leonid
Feldman on Sunday evening, Feb.
23, at 8 p.m.
Mr. Feldman is a living example
of the drama of Modern Jewish
History. He has experienced total
assimilation, Jewish rebirth,
violent anti-Semitism, imprison-
ment in Russia as a Zionist, and
total freedom in the West. His lec-
tures to Soviet Jews on Judaism
and to American Jews on Soviet
Jewry have been inspirational to
both groups.
The cost for this lecture is a
donation of $4, and tickets may be
obtained in the Temple office.
For more information, call Mrs.
Beckman, 421-7060.
Holocaust Film
WASHINGTON (JTA) A
U.S. Holocaust Memorial Council
documentary, "The Courage to
Care," has been nominated for an
Academy Award in the best
documentary short subject
category.
Elie Wiesel, chairman of the
Council, narrates the film, for
which Sister Carol Rittner of
Detroit and Sondra Myers of
Scranton, Pa., were the executive
producers.
Gialch-Uandl
Mailman-Millet
antt
Sons
v-ompassioru V-oncerru
V-consideration.
In Chicago. In South Florida. We are the Jewish funeral
directors you have known and trusted for generations.
SOOTH FLORIDA LOCATIONS:
NORTH MIAMI BEACH: 20955 Biscayne Blvd. 9353939
SUNRISE: 6800 W. Oakland Park Blvd. 742^000
MARGATE: 5915 Park Drive at U.S. 441 9750011
DEERFIELD BEACH: 2305 W. HOsboro Blvd.-427-4700
WEST PALM BEACH: 9321 Memorial Park Rd.-627 2277
Funeral Chapels Cemetery Mausoleum Pre Need Planning

"The Courage to Care" will be
shown nationally by the PBS Net-
work. The showing is tentatively
scheduled for Wednesday, May 7.
and Funeral Chapels
1* 9
1 |
I VI
,
Candlelighting Times
Feb. 14- -5:55 p.m..
Feb. 21- 6:00 p.m.
Feb. 28- 6:04 p.m.
Mar. 7- 6:07 p.m.
Mar. 14 6:11 p.m.
CONSERVATIVE
CONSERVATIVE SYNAGOGUE OF COCONUT CHEEK, mart* Broward
Federal Saving*, Lyona Road and Coconut Creek Parkway. Coconut Creek. Ser-
vices: Friday at 8 p.m. and Saturday at 9 a-m. Rabbi Joeiaa Darky.
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER (721-7660). 9101 NW 57th St. Tamarac, 33321.
Service*: Sunday through Friday 8:30 a.m., 5 p.m. Late Friday service 8 p.m. Satur-
day 8:46 .m. Rabbi Kart F. Steee. Aaxiliaxy Rabat Nathaa Zeteaeek. Carter P.
HiUeiT
TEMPLE BETH AM (974-8660), 7206 Royal Palm Blvd., Margate, 33063. Service*:
Monday through Friday &80 am, 6 p.m. Friday late s*rvic* 8 p.m.; Saturday 9 e.m..
6 p.m.; Sunday 8 am.. 6 p.m. Rabbi Paal Plotkia. Rabbi Eawtttas, Dr. Soloatoa
Gold. Caatee Irviag Gtbmii*.
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL (742-4040), 7100 W. Oakland Park Blvd., Sunri**, 38313.
Oarvkaa; Monday through Thursday 8a.m., 6:80p.m.; Friday 8a.m.. 5p.m., 8p.m.;
Saturday 5:30 p.m.; Sunday 9 a.m.. 5:30 p.m. Rabbi Albert N. Tray. Caator
Nee.
| TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL OF DEERFIELD BEACH (421-7060), 200 S. Century
> Blvd., Deerfield Beach, 38441. flarvkee; Sunday through Friday 8:30 am.. 5 p.m.
Friday late atrvice 8 p.m.; Saturday 8:45 am., and at candlelighting time. Rabbi
Skabtal Ackenaa.
TEMPLE B'NAI MOSHE (942-6380), 1434 SE 3rd St, Pompeno Beach, 38060.
Service*: Friday 8 p.m. Cafe Jehad** Heilbraaa.
TEMPLE SHA'ARAY TZEDEK 741-0296), 4099 Pin* Island Rd, Sunri**, 33321.
Service*: Sunday through Friday 8 a.m 5 p.m.; Late Friday atrvice 8 p.m.; Satur-
day 8:45 am., 6:30 p.m. Caator Jack Marckaat.
TEMPLE SHOLOM (942-6410), 189 SE 11 Av*., Pompano Beach. 33060. Bawk:
Monday through Friday 8:46 am., evening*: Monday through Thursday at 5 p.m.,
Friday evening at 8. Saturday and Sunday 9 am. Rabki Sasrael April. Caatee
CONGREGATION BETH HILLEL OF MARGATE (974-3090), 7640 Margate
Blvd., Margate, 33063. Service*: Sunday through Friday 8:15 am., 5:30 p.m. Late
Friday atrvice 8 p.m. Saturday 8:45 am., 5:30 p.m. Caatee Jeei Cekea.
HEBREW CONGREGATION OF LAUDERHILL (733-9660). 2048 NW 49th Ave ,
Lauderhill, 38818. Osuhsai Sunday through Friday 8:30 am.. 5:80 p.m.; Saturday
8:46 am Rabbi laraei Helper*.
NORTH LAUDERDALE HEBREW CONGREGATION (722-7607 or 722-2722).
Service*: at Banyon Lak** CondoCrabhoua*. 6050 Bailey Rd. Tamarac. Friday at 5
p.m., Saturday 8:45 am. Ckarle* B. Fyisr. Pre*idcat.
ORTHODOX
TEMPLE OHEL B'NAI RAPHAEL (788-7684). 4861 W. Oakland Park Blvd.,
IsnnrrHlhU^f.*** '''" n~ty *h<.*'lWhT*m.r5BLm.| iVMay
9 am., 6 p.m., Saturday 8:45 a.m., 6 p.m. Caatee Paal Staart.
SYNAGOGUE OF WVRRRARY CHABAD (748-1777), 4661 N. University Dr..
Lauderhill. Owilsss. Sunday through Friday 6:46 a.m, 8 em., 5:15 p.m., Saturday 9
5:30 p.m. Study graaaat Mea, Saadava feUewiag service*; W****a,
i 8 p.. Rabbi Area Ltebenaaa.
YOUNG ISRAEL OF DEERFIELD BEACH (421-1867), 1880 W. Hillsboro Blvd.
Deerfield Beach. 83441.- Sarvtes*: Sunday through Friday 8 am. and sundown.
Saturday 8:45 am. and sundown.
YOUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD-FORT LAUDERDALE (96S-7877). 8291
Stirling Rd Fort Lauderdal*. 38812. Service*: Monday through Friday 7:80 a.m.,
and sundown; Saturday. 9 am., sundown; Sunday 8am., sundown. Rabbi Edward
Devi*.
CONGREGATION MIDGAL DAVID 726-8688). 8676 W. MeNab Rd, Tamarac,
33321. S*rvke*jDairy8a.m.;mineha Span.;Saturday 8:46am. and 5:16p.m. Rah-
Ml
RECONBTRUCTIONUT
RAMAT SHALOM (472-3600). 11801 W. Broward Blvd. Plantation. 38825
vices: Friday. 8:15 p.m.; Saturday, 10 am. Rabbi Elite* SkkUelL Caator
REFORM
TEMPLE BETH ORR (788-3232X 2161 Riversid* Dr.. Cora) Springs. 88066.
vie**: Friday B p-m.; Saturday 10 am. Rabki JerraM M. Levy.
TEMPLE B'NAI SHALOM OF DEERFIELD BEACH (426-2632). Service, at
Menorah Chap*!., 2806 W. Hillsboro Blvd. Deerfield Beach. 8S441. Friday 8 pir*
Rabbi Nathaa H. Flak. Caator Merri* Leviasea.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL (781-2810), 3246 W. Oakland Park Blvd., Laudertko* Lakes.
38811. Service*: Friday 8:15 p.m.; Saturday, only on holidays or celebration of Bar-
Bat MHxvah. Rabbi Jeffrey Bailee. Caator Rita Share.
TEMPLE KOL AMI (472-1988). 8200 Petew Rd. Plantation. 88824. Ssrvkse: Fri-
day 8:16 p.m.. Saturday 1030 am. Rabbi fft llii* J. Harr. Caator Oeae Cerbara.
LIBERAL JEWISH TEMPLE OF COCONUT CREEK (978-7494). Ssrvieee: Fri-
day night service* twice monthly at Calvary Presbyterian Church, 8960 Coconut
Creek Parkway. Rabbi Brae* S. Wankal. Caator Barker* Roberta.
TEMPLE BAT YAM (661-6808), McGaw Hall, 1400 N. Federal Hwy. (adjacent to
Second Presbyterian Church). Ft Lauderdale. 88804. Service: Weakly on Friday
evenings at 8 p.m. Caator Richard Brewa.


.

Friday, Febi-uary'it, i986Tfhe Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale___Page 15
Action Resolutions ...
Genocide Convention
Editor's Note: The following was adopted by the 5J,th General
Assembly of the Council of Jewish Federations, November, 1985,
Washington, D.C., and expresses the view of the delegates of the
member Federations.
In this 40th year since the liberation of the genocidal death
camps the United States Senate may finally be prepared to ratify
the Genocide Convention. President Reagan has now joined every
U.S. President since President Truman in urging ratification. We
urge the United States Senate to pass this ratification by the
necessary two-thirds majority so that the United States may join
with other nations in this principled position for the prevention
and punishment of the crime of genocide. We urge member
Federations to urge their local Senators, in turn, to support swift
passage of this convention.
juggR
A $27 Billion Bargain
rA.
:
BETWEEN
A REPORTERS
NOTEBOOK
Between Washington and
Jerusalem: A Reporter's
Notebook. Wolf Blitzer. Oxford
University Press, tOO Madison
Ave., New York, NY 10016. t59
pages. $15.95.
Reviewed by Zel Levin
Any writer who can convincing-
ly demonstrate that an expen-
diture of $27 billion (that's
BILLION) is a "metziah" a
bargain has indeed turned out a
book deserving of the most
meticulous reading, especially
since this is fact and not fiction.
That's exactly what Reporter-
turned-Author Wolf Blitzer has
done in this incisive look at the
The Jews of Samarkand:
Uzbekistan is
home to 103,000
Jews, a large
number living in
the capital of
Tashkent, the
remainder in the
region's other
cities and small
towns.
fered under the various despots and dynasties
that ruled the area and its prized trade routes.
Local legend has it that Bukhara, a city 130
miles to the west, is the biblical Habor, where the
10 tribes of Israel were exiled.
Recently, however, many local Jews have voic-
ed a different feeling of banishment, along with a
certain bewilderment at their changing society.
As Soviet citizens the 103,000 Jews in this
republic a mixed lot of old Sephardic com-
munities and Ashkenazim sent here from Euro-
pean republics during the 1940s are officially
not permitted to emigrate.
This prospect is doubly depressing, since many
of the Jews have a specific destination in mind.
While other Soviet Jews display an almost in-
satiable curiosity about the West in general and
the United States in particular, the first question
asked visitors here almost always concerns
Israel.
To local Jews, Israel has come to have an
allegoric fascination, fed by accounts of the few
Westerners who bother to seek out the scattered
Jewish quarters in Central Asian cities with con-
fusing pathways and crowded bazaars.
"You tell us about Israel. Are the people there
happy?" asks a rug weaver named Ibraim, in Rus-
sian, sipping jasmine tea in his small apartment.
"You know, many of our young men went there
when they could, about 10 years ago. I have a
nephew there, but I have not heard from him in
four years."
"The life here is not too bad, and we get along
with our Moslem neighbors," says a friend wear-
ing a blue-and-white striped- robe. "But we are
too few here. We wish for more of our own."
A long silence follows when they are asked
whether they have applied to emigrate.
"I thought about this," Ibraim finally admits,
picking at a small turquoise rug on his loom. "But
I am too old and I would lose too much."
Uzbekistan's Jews are surrounded by a popula-
tion of Sunni Moslems that in recent years has ac-
counted for a baby boom of sorts in this'republic.
The effort has been supported by Soviet
authorities, who award women the title of
Mother Heroine after the birth of a 10th child,
with a medal and certificate to prove it.
In Uzbekistan, according to 1983 government
figures, there were 35.3 births per 1,000 citizens
- a birth rate second only to that of neighboring
Tadjikistan among the 15 Soviet republics.
"Oh, yes, the Moslems have very large families,
many more than us," says a metal worker, carv-
ing a floral pattern on a brass plate on Charaga
Street. Pointing to a mosque down the road, he
smiles, "We are, of course, all equal here. We
have our peace and our bread. But I would like to
see something different more of us."
Outpost of Faith In Asia
When the Russian empire first rode into Cen-
tral Asia in the 19th century, most of the Jews
were liberated from local emirs' fiefdoms,
granted judicial equality and even the right to ac-
quire real estate.
The Bolshevik Revolution in 1917 bolstered
Uzbekistan's Zionist movement, and many of the
area's Jews made arduous treks to Palestine. A
Jewish-Bukharan branch of the Communist Par-
ty was formed, which lobbied for the right to
maintain synagogues and Hebrew schools.
But Jewish elements in the Russian Communist
Party, intent on promoting an officially atheist
state, lobbied against maintaining religious tradi-
tions. By the Stalin era in the 1930s, members of
the yevsektsia, the Jewish sections of the pro-
paganda machinery, had succeeded in eliminating
many public religious observances.
However, the Jews and Moslems persisted, and
today both appear freer to worship here than in
the Soviet Union's European cities. But there
still is an underlying fear evident to a visitor.
Militiamen are stationed in the Jewish quarters;
many Jews have become informers for the secret
police.
"I am careful with who I talk to," says Amu, a
bearded 24-year-old in the Samarkand
synagogue. "There are many things I could tell
you about the police, about this city. But I really
don't trust anyone outside the family."
Discussing the status of Jews with local
authorities brings assurances about the separa-
tion of church and state and about religious
freedom.
"Your aid from America gets to these people,"
says a government spokesman. "But the govern-
ment has little to do with religious affairs. These
people can pray, and there are no problems."
The official maintains that the police are out-
side synagogues and Jewish homes at the request
of the Jews themselves.
In a community where individual expression is,
at best, subdued and where collective action is
unheard of, a visitor is left with the impression of
people desiring more but unable to find a suitable
way to express themselves.
"Each year on Yom Kippur we ask for
forgiveness," says Amu. "And we always say
'Next year in Jerusalem.' But we really cannot
expect things to change here. The best thing now
is to hope."
A woman standing in a doorway in the old town
at dusk holds up a small medallion imprinted with
a Star of David.
"You can't say where this came from," she
says, "but see, we make such things."
In her small, lighted house, several old men
chew pistachio nuts and drink bubbly sweet wine
while talking about the day's affairs. They raise
glasses and recite a blessing.
Down the street, as the moon peers over the
brick houses and their flat aluminum roofs,
prayers begin again in the synagogue.
"Hear, O Israel," the men chant. "The Lord is
our God. The Lord is one."
sometimes puzzling, always com-
plicated relations between the
United States and Israel.
Calling on an almost unique
frame of reference developed in
his many years as the highly
respected Washington correspon-
dent for the Jerusalem Post,
Blitzer has written an infor-
mative, useful book that should be
studied and appreciated by both
Jews and non-Jews.
It is no exaggeration to classify
Between Washington and
Jerusalem as the definitive book
on a subject that all too often has
been handled cavalierly by an un-
caring, uninformed corps of
writers. It is written as a good
reporter should write objective-
ly and devoid of sensationalism. It
encompasses the factors that have
tied Israel to this country since its
painful birth in 1948.
Blitzer describes not only what
happened but why. He takes us
behind the scenes in the trying
periods prior to Israel's major
wars. We're right there as he in-
terviews presidents and con-
gressmen, cabinet members and
visiting statesmen. He explains
without being didactic.
But even as he goes from topic
to topic, from Presidents Truman
through Reagan, from peace plans
to the perplexing Palestinian
situation, from arms deals to con-
gressional debates, he makes clear
that the pervasive theme affecting
virtually every action of the
United States vis-a-vis Israel is
how to maintain strong ties with
Israel while at the same time
developing equally strong rela-
tions with the oil-rich Arab states.
And while the author does not say
so in so many words, the wonder
of it all is the fact that Uncle Sam
has not slipped off the tightrope
more often than he has.
Names that have been in the na-
tional and international news for
decades are interwoven in this
timely report and while Blitzer
reaffirms the friendly attitude of
such officials as the late Senators
Henry Jackson and Hubert H.
Humphrey and the questionable
tactics of the Arab-leaning State
Department, he commendably
avoids labeling major figures as
"good" or "bad," but rather
shows both sides of human nature.
For example, President
Reagan. His relations to Israel,
says Blitzer, "are defined by con-
tradiction ... his gut instincts are
extremely pro-Israel and he has
demonstrated he is prepared to
risk upsetting the Arabs." Yet,
there was Bitburg and even
earlier, a reneging of his 1980
campaign promise when, despite
vowing no betrayal of old friends
and allies, he pushed for the sale
of AWACs to Saudi Arabia, he
suspended arms delivery to Israel,
and he invoked the specter of dual
loyalty of American Jews.
Kissinger is equally com-
plicated. He, too, was willing to
provide arms to Arabs but he
unalterably opposed an indepen-
dent Palestine state on the West
Bank and Gaza.
And yes that $27 billion dollar
bargain! That's how much money
in loans and grants the United
States has given Israel since 1948.
But balance that figure with the
estimated $50 billion to $80 billion
that the United States spends AN-
NUALLY to support NATO in
Western Europe'. Balance that
with the fact that while the United
States must maintain 300,000
troops in Western Europe and
150,000 troops in the Far East, it
has only a handful of advisors in
the Middle East where it relies on
the strong Israeli armed forces.
Zel Levin is a Rhode Island
newspaperman whose communica-
tions background dates to the kite
tO's. Currently he is editor of the
national prize-wining "Voice,"
monthly publication of the Jewish
Federation of Rhode Island.
A


t...l .. -,.

16 The Jewiah Florkfcan of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, February 21, 1986
L
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