The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 3, no. 7 (Apr. 5, 1974)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 9, 1976 called v.4, no. 27 but constitutes v.5, no. 1; issue for July 7, 1989 called v.18, no. 11 but constitutes v.18, no. 13.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44570954
lccn - sn 00229545
ocm44570954
System ID:
AA00014312:00495

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Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward


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Full Text
^___________
wishFloridian o
OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE
_ Number 37
Fort Lauderdale, Floridm Friday, November 15, 1986
cut

r LipowsKy nonoree congressman Larry Smith Keynotes
[m-Aire UJA Pacesetter Luncheon Dec. 16
More than 300 men and
women from North
Broward will pay tribute to
community organizer and
leader Irving Libowsky at
the Palm-Aire Pacesetter
Luncheon, on behalf of the
Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale
1986 United Jewish Appeal
campaign, Monday noon,
December 16, at the main
Palm-Aire clubhouse dining
room in Pompano Beach.
Presently a first-hand
"off-the-record" report of
the explosive Mideast situa-
tion will be U.S. Con-
gressman Lawrence J.
Smith, Democrat from
Florida's 16th District,
whose role as a leader in the
99th Congress has brought
about changes in both
foreign and domestic
legislation.
Libowsky, secretary of
the Federation board of
directors, is chairman of the
Federation's Elderly Nutri-
tion and "Gathering Place"
and serves as chairman of
the Federation/UJA Palm-
Aire Division. He is being
honored by the Palm-Aire
committee and will join
other area honorees in a
campaign Hall of Fame,
which will include those
outstanding citizens of
North Broward county
selected annually to be
honored in perpetuity for
their contributions to the
Jewish community locally
and worldwide. Libowsky,
who is the first recipient of
the newly formed Hall of
Fame, was selected for this
prestigious honor for his
Continued on Page 2-

m
Congressman Larry Smith
I
Id New;
WS AIRES In
cedented gesture in
Dlitical history of
President Raul
accompanied by
Minister Dante
Interior Minister
po Troccolin and
Minister Alconado
uru, attended the
| annual Jewish com-
er here where he
I the Jewish contribu-
te Argentine Na-
I World Jewish Con-
orted.
tEAL- The first
I Assembly of Moroc-
opened with a
welcome from
's Ambassador to
and a plea by the
lent of Quebec's
K community "to
en our attachment
|orocco" and "to
v our 2,000-year
Py. culture and
[XEMBOURG
deputy Premier and
* Minister Yitzhak
.Wd Italian Foreign
F Uioho Andreotti
Pate dinner that Italy
** other European
?mic Community
'members should
V?lr attitude
F^pLO in the light
lls surrounding the
f the Achille
cru'se ship.
Israel Conflict on
Peace Negotiations
The Likud and Labour
partners in Israel's national
unity government were at
loggerheads last week over
Prime Minister Shimon
Peres's policies towards
negotiations with Jordan.
While most Labour leaders
closed ranks behind the
prime minister, Defense
Minister Yitzhak Rabin
publicly differed from Peres
in his assessment of the role
of King Hussein.
Rabin, formerly a rival of
Peres's for leadership of the
Labour Party, said that
many of the recent terrorist
outrages had been planned
by the PLO in Jordan, and
that this "was not lost on
the king."
Foreign Minister and
Likud leader Yitzhak
Shamir said last week that
Peres's statement in Vienna
saying that Hussein was
sincere about peace was
"premature." But he added
that Israel's only priority at
present must be to achieve
direct talks with Jordan,
without any preconditions,
and without the participa-
tion of the PLO. Shamir said
that Peres was also "un-
doubtedly" working for the
Continued on Page 15
Pope and Jews: Strain
Amid Vatican Meeting
ROME Pope John Paul
II met with a group of Jews
recently to celebrate the
20th anniversary of a Se-
cond Vatican Council docu-
ment that revolutionized
Roman Catholic teaching on
Judaism. The meeting came
amid signs of difficulty in
Catholic-Jewish relations.
It was two decades ago to-
day that the Council
adopted "Nostra Aetate"
("In Our Times"), a docu-
ment that, among other
things, declared the Roman
Catholic Church's view that
Jews as a group could not be
held responsible for the
death of Jesus.
The document also said
that the church "deplores
the hatreds, the persecu-
tions and displays of anti-
Semitism directed against
the Jews," and referred to
Christianity's "common
patrimony with the Jews."
"October 28, 1965, was
both a historic and revolu-
tionary date," Rabbi
Mordecai Waxman, the
chairman of the Interna-
tional Jewish Committee on
Ceatiaaed oa Page 4-
Strangers in Germany Jews Feel Emotional Burden
By WLADIMIR STRUMINSKI
Jerusalem Pott
On the occasion of the re-opening of the synagogue in
Augsburg, Bavaria, on Sept. 1, Chancellor Helmut Kohl
said that West Germany wishes to become once again a
"fatherland and home" to its Jewish citiiens. His wish,
however, is not likely to be enthusiastically received by Ger-
many's 30.000 Jews. Although most are well-established in
business and profeeaional life, they hardly have a feeling of
really belonging to the Federal Republic.
German patriotism, for which the large Jewish population
had been known before the Nazi era, is no more than a
recollection of a distant past. In addition to the memory or
the Holocaust, there are other reasons, for as we"-
Moat older Jews in Germany are of East Europeanongur
Their roots in German culture and l"*^ *ere J^
only after moving to Germany tarWorld Warl Lor
deciding to remain there after liberated from German con-
centration camps. The percentage of pre-war German Jews
who have remained in the country is very small.
For many years after the war, there was a widespread
fee.mgT.hime and guilt among ><%* w
had bten Hitler's country. Many P^^KfcV^X"
going to emigrate to Israel, "as soon as possibleor when
we collect enough money to start a business there Thus
rnany Swish children, today in their th.rt.es and forties
^ bZTraiaed with the feeling that (Jermany is not their
ta^Sd no^veta desirab.e p.ace <*&
children's relationships with young German, was otanm
balanced, too. Many Jewish children had two sepan.
cbteof friends: a Jewish one and German one.
Materuuly. though, life in ^ZT^LMTy
-^fX^=^-t-rS Third
Berlins' Jews congregating outside the synagogue.
Reich has always been a prominent topic ot public debate in
West Germany. Other Germans were bent on seeking
reconciliation with the Jews. For them, the Jewish com-
munities in their own country were welcome partners for
dialogue.
On the political level, the Jewish community has been
awarded a status out of proportion with its size. The Ger-
man authorities recognize the community as a "socially
relevant" group along with the two main Christian chur-
ches, the trade unions and employers' associations, profes-
sional associations and others.
In practical terms, this status means that Jewish
representatives are allocated seats in public boards, like
those of radio and television authorities. A number of Jews
are active in municipal affairs in German cities more
oflan than not representing Jewish interest, rather than
haling with general problems. The Jews in Germany are de
faeto national minority which is occupied largely with its
own affairs. There is little inclination and little time left to
engage in all-German .politics. Also, it remains to be seen
Continued on Page 10


Page 2 The'Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, November 15, 1986_
Foundation Quarterly Meeting Highlights the Benefits of Found
Over 40 people attended
the recent quarterly
meeting of the Federation's
Foundation of Jewish
Philanthropies, which was
held in the Main Library,
downtown Fort Lauderdale.
Jacob Brodzki. chairman of the
Foundation, presided at the
meeting, which was highlighted
by the formation of the "Jack and
Betty Molasky Philanthropic
Fund.-' Betty Molasky attended
the meeting and discussed the for-
mation of a fund in memory of her
husband, who had discused such a
fund prior to his death. The pro-
vider of this fund will benefit pro-
grams for the elderly.
Guest speaker was Mel Kart-
zmer. chairman of the Board of
Pension Master of Florida. Inc.
Kartzmer is also a member of the
million dollar club of Miami's
Foundation.
Kartzmer. who was well receiv
ed by those in attendance, spoke
about making a beginning and the
importance of a Jewish Founda
tion for the Jewish people. He
spoke of the importance of star-
ting Foundations, which need not
be large, but when pooled can be
effective in providing funds for
community growth
According to chairman Brodzki.
the meeting and cocktail hour/buf-
fet, was highly successful.
Palm-Aire UJA Pacesetter
Campaign Luncheon Dec. 16
Continoed from Page 1
Smith Amendment.
Pictured at the Foundation of Jewish Philan-
thropies Quarterly meeting are, from left,
Judah Ever, chairman of the Tax Committee;
Mel Kartzmer, guest speaker; Jacob Brodzki,
vwl
chairman of the Foundation LmM
zict. chairman of Investment t
VictorGruman, chairman oft
lifelong effort by a board of
his peers.
At the luncheon Palm-
Aire residents will acclaim
Irving and his wife. Esther,
for their unstinting effort
and genorosity to their
brethren in need regardless
of the cause.
His lifelong service to his
fellow man started in Atlan-
ta where he was post com-
mander of the Jewish War
Veterans of the Southeast
L'.S. He was active in the
Bureau of Jewish Education
and Service with the Atlan-
ta Zionist District.
As chairman of the Palm-
Aire Division. Libowskys
leadership has been a prime
factor in more than tripling
the UJA campaign contribu-
tions in the last four years.
Israel's staunchest sup-
porter Congressman Smith,
a member of the House Sub-
committee on Europe and
the Middle East played the
most prominent role in
blocking the sale of advanc-
ed weapons to Jordan
without further peace ad-
vances, when the President
recently signed into law the
His presence in the Con-
gress is known throughout
the country as he spends
countless hours working on
behalf of his constituents
among which include the
congressional caucus for
Women's issues, en-
vironmental and energy,
arts, travel, tourism, crime,
military reform, sunbelt and
social security amendments
designed to aid the elderly.
In the 98th Congress, he
was the only newly-elected
member to pass a bill into
law.
The recipient of numerous
awards from education,
community and civic
groups, he has been named
Democrat of the Year for
the Young Democratic Club
of Broward County, and
received the JNF tree of
Life Award, State of Israel
Bonds Scroll of Honor and
this year the B'nai B'rith
National Public Service
Award.
CO-chairman of the
Pacesetter Luncheon are
Marty Cain and Jim
Goldstein.
CUSTODIAL
( I
2
i
U.
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INSURANCE AVAILABLE
"A" BEST RATED COMPANY
c%_
WALTER FRADIN
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408
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N
4
Why Aunt Sadie missed j
her sister Ida's funeral.
It could have been different with
The GUARDIAN PLAN* program.
It s not easy for a seventy-five year old woman to travel over 1200 i
miles from Plew York to Florida for a funeral. So. when Ida died suddenly.
in Florida. Sadie couldn't get there. She was heartbroken. It could haw
been different. Ida had bought a cemetery plot In Florida instead of u*
the family property up North. She thought it would be too expensive^
too much trouble to hold funeral services back home.
But the fact is. it's not.
Funeral service between Florida and the Mew York metropolitan a
can be accomplished at surprisingly low cost. And in a manner that
makes it as easy as possible for the family. In fact. RIVERSIDE and the ]
other members of the guardian family of Jewish funeral directors-
BOULEVARD PARK WEST. SCHWARTZ BROTHERS and JEFFE-ha*j
been helping families in this way countless times each year.
So before you make a decision, talk to The QUARDIAri PLAN
counselor in your area. He'll tell you about The QUARDIAri PLAM
msurance funded prearranged funeral program. He II compare services
"L. rth w,lh tnose ln Florida. And he II show you how planning
ahead with The GUARDIAN PLAN program can provide you with pe*e
mind and save money. Then you can decide
what s best for you. Call toll free 1
____Write Guardian Plans Inc.. P.O. Box 459. i -ROO-432 0853
Maitland. Fla 37251 or call us toll free. 1'OUU *.** ^
_ Riverside sponsors Nf^/
The GUARDIAN PLAN. W
insurance funded prearranged program
of the most respected names in funeral preplanning.
MriM
One


Business Executive Network
Gears Up For Dec. 5 Program
Friday, November 16, 1985/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdaie Page 3
very excited
response to the
Executive Net-
far," stated Net-
lirman Steven
ie Steering Corn-
worked extreme-
i providing the
iness and profes-
ununity with a
gram.*
ess Executive Net-
uly-formed group of
young executives, professional
and business leaders. The purpose
i* to provide a social, education
and professional forum through a
series of discussions on contem-
porary issues.
The group meets on the first
Thursday of the month. The next
meeting will be held on Thursday
Dec. 5 from 5:30-7:30 p.m at
Marina Bay, State Rd. 84 and I
96. An exciting guest speaker is
planned.
The Business Executive Net-
work would like to thank the
following corporate sponsors who
have helped to underwrite the
program; American Savings and
Loan, Gold Coast Savings and
Loan and Lehrer and Company.
If you or your organization
would like additional information
regarding the upcoming program
or becoming a corporate sponsor
contact either Ken Mintzer, Cam-
paign Associate at 748-8400 or
Steven Perry, Campaign
Associate at 563-5202.
NJCRAC The Frontrunner
n Community Policy-Making
ons
d
ary association of
imunity relations
the National
immunity Rela-
visory Council
marking its
Iversary, is the in-
through which its
y of 11 national
local Jewish
jointly iden-
evaluate
nts of concern to
community, plan
ftal effectively with
erns, seek con-
joint policies and
guidelines for ap-
action.
broad, coordinated
activity, Jewish com-
uons agencies seek to
srael's position and
American public and
to marshal) public
behalf of justice and
Soviet Jews and other
wish communities; to
the U.S. equality of op-
ithout regard to race,
cestry or sex; to insure
religion and separa-
lirch and state; and to
amicable relationships
groups.
planning is a con-
arocess requiring the
and participation of
|nal and local agencies.
member agencies of
Ipool their ideas, infor-
experience, seeking
on major problems fac-
ish community at any
mber agencies are
Each engages in
|cto of community rela-
that it deems ap-
to its goals and com-
with its resources. In
" programmatic ac-
tional and local agen-
wmplimentary rotes.
IKrtcy provides that na-
>nt'e* recognize that
CRC's are central bodies with
primary responsibility for local
community relations policy
programming.
NJCRAC policy also provides
for recognition by CRCs that na-
tional agencies are channels
through which local community
relations programs can be
facilitated; for CRC cooperation in
programs of local affiliates of na-
tional agencies; and for respect by
CRCs for the fundamental
philosophies of national agencies,
which should not be asked to com-
promise those philosophies.
The Jewish Federation's Com-
munity Relations Committee is an
action committee which confronts
those issues and problems that are
pertinent to the Jewish communi-
ty. As a member of NJCRAC, the
CRC uses their guidelines to pro-
mote local policy and take stands
on various issues of Jewish in-
terest. Serving as chairman of this
committee is attorney Richard
Entin.
For further information about
NJCRAC or Federation's CRC,
contact CRC director Debbi
Roshfeld at 748-8400.
Of Jews and Tattoos
THESE DAYS it seems
nothing lasts forever. Not even a
tattoo.
Yes, those once permanent
pieces of body artwork can now be
undone, thanks to a Jewish der-
matologist in San Francisco.
Dr. Lewis Taoenbaum reports
that the intense heat of a laser,
such as that used in surgery, can
vaporize the pigment of a tattoo
and make it go away.
Tanenbaum noted the benefits
of that by citing the stories of two
of his patients who had gotten tat-
tooed during their younger years
only to come to regret the
decision.
Sandy Barth had a small daisy
tattooed on her wrist at a tattoo
parlor. Mike Krakow, building
facilities supervisor for a San
Francisco Jewish community
center, had a tatoo of a heart and
flower, with the word "mom" tat-
tooed on his shoulder. Both are
now tattoo-free.
Barth, an administrative
secretary at Mount Zion Hospital,
said she got her tattoo "during
the hippie times," when such
markings were considered
fashionable by her peers but the
adornment "quite blew" the
minds of her parents.
That's because Jewish Law
specifically forbids tattoos,
ashington Experience'
Lauderdaie con-
.of young Jewish
'nal men and
will travel to
!> D.C. from
< 1986 to par-
m the bi-annual
,"ional Young
JP Conference.
' ^ng will be held
. NovJ6 at 8 p.m. in
"Linda and Howard
J^rrary with those
jWin participating
" conference.
J^nce provides a
lTjy to meet with
a' ?'"' ,om'"itted
1,25 to 4a years of age.
from every part of the United
States, who want to know the
facts behind the critical issues af-
fecting American Jewish life.
The Fort Lauderdaie Jewish
Federation contingency is rapidly
growing, according to Gaines and
Jo Ann Levy, both co-chairmen of
the conference.
though a tatto does not bar a Jew
from membership in the communi-
ty or from burial rights in a
Jewish cemetery.
As a staff worker at a hospital,
Barth had considered removal of
the tattoo but rejected the
necessary skin grafts and other
surgical procedures. She had
heard about the laser removal
technique on a TV program but
she learned the only place offering
the laser technique was Stanford
University, involving for her a
very inconvenient trip.
A few months ago, a colleague
put her in touch with Tananbaum,
described as one of the few San
Francisco doctors who has a
scaled-down version of the laser
equipment in his office.
Only a year after Krakow got
his tattoo because, when he was
young, "it was the thing to do,"
Krakow came to agree with his
parents he had been wrong and
went to a surgeon for help in the
removal of his tattoo.
He said the doctor used a
"cheese-cutter technique," slicing
through layers of skin to get the
pigment out, an extremely painful
method that left his arm immobile
for days, and failed. When the
sores healed, the tattoo was still
visible.
Commenting there was a cer-
tain stigma against tattooed Jews,
Tannenbaum said his first two pa-
tients for the laser device were
Jews and that he did not think
that was a coincidence.
He has had two inquiries about
removal of Nazi concentration
camp tattoos. Though he has not
performed the laser removal on
any survivor, he said these tattoos
are small and could be easily
removed.
He predicted more tattooed
be interested in
the
Jews would
.w nrocedure, which costs from J1W
For any. interest in joining tne v yuxe inch of pig.
conference, to participate with the ^ ^ ^ learned ^^ it.
briefings by members of Con-
mat, Israeli Government Of-
ficials, and ranking White House
People, contact Ken Kent
748-8400 at the Federation office
The Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdaie will pro-
vide a subsidy for this important
and exciting conference.
Krakow's tattoo, which took
longer to remove than expected,
required cutting through five
layers of skin in a 105-minute
operation. Both Barth and
Krakow said a long period of heal-
ing was involved.
Focus

i
The Jewish Federation's Adult Day Care Center now has a Men's
Group! Under the leadership of volunteer Jack Segal, the
gentUmen enjoy the beautiful JCC grounds and some time away
from the ladies. From left, Vie Romano, Hy Fiddleman, Irving
Checkman, Issie Yettin, Jack Segal, Mike Friedman, Josef Spr-
inger and Louis Hyman.
The Jewish Federation's adult day care center, The Gathering
Place, has a sewing group that is led by dedicated volunteer arts
and crafts teacher, Lenore Tepper. Lenore and her ladies recently
sewed nine pairs of matching curtains to dress up the Kosher
Nutrition dining room in Building C at the Jewish Community
Center. From left Minnie Harris, Mary Nerensky, Lenore Tep-
per, Eva Perlstein, Sally Willner, Rebecca Kamerman and
Goldie Lass.
RESORT
For Boys ft Girls 6-1
OUR MOUNTAIN OF RIM Where Sprii
Comes ft Spends the Summer
MOUNTAIN CITY. GEORGIA
AM Water Sports In Our Own Twin Spring Fed Lakes
White Water Rafting Water skiing Repelling
Aerobics Tennis Arts 4 Crafts Sailing
Gymnastics and Dance Go Carts Trips by
Canoe Horseback Riding Rock Climbing
Basketball Soccer Softball Hockey
Zoological A Science Program All Dietary Laws
Observed Shabbat Services
Medical Stall Available at All Tim*s
Member American Camping Association
"eW"
lam
COACH J. I. MOMTOOMERY. c.C.O.
MORRIS ft SMEILA WALOMAN
Beach Phone 1-538-3434 or Write
P.O. Box 2880, Miami Beach, Fla. 33140
STAFF INQUIRIES NOW
9


Pag* 4 The Jewish FToridian of Greater Fort UudwtkWFriday, November 16, 1985
i
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Play Ball... But Not Everyday
Where have you gone, Sandy Koufax, now that we need you?
Sandy's name is magic to one and all. even two decades after he
called it quits as the All-Universe left handed pitcher for the Los
Angeles Dodgers. The fella was simply unforgettable in ways
that far transcended the tricky business of striking out platoons
of major-league hitters.
All in ail. Koufax set a pretty good example for the youngins' of
America. Particularly if you were young and Jewish and impres-
sionable in 1966. And particularly around World Series time.
At the center of the media fishbowl. Koufax indeed led by exam-
ple. As an athlete. As a man. And as a Jew. That last point really
rings the bell, throws the red flag. In the public eye, in front of the
NBC color cameras, right in the middle of the regular season or in
the World Series, Koufax was closer to his G-d than the pitching
mound, come Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur.
In an age where anti-Semitism stubbornly hangs on here and
there, in a country where millions go through their entire lives
without encountering a real, live Jew. Koufax did his part to
educate the public about an important facet of his faith. It didn't
matter whether he attended synagogue all day. made a token ap-
pearance or kept a low profile behind closed doors in his home.
Koufax. the most public of public figures, could ill afford to not
respect the holidays if he cared any bit about his religion and
what non-Jews thought about it. A man in the limelight like
Koufax had a responsibility not only to himself, but to millions of
other Jews.
Observing the High Holidays in a secterian world has always
prompted conflict;. Not every single Jew who wished to observe
the top holidays on the calendar has been able to take off the time
without problem. Many employers give the time off without ques
tion. But others haven't been so enlightened.
All the more reason for a very public Jew to respect the holidays
- and educate those who might think Rosh Hashana and Yom
,K?pPu/c*re not ver> important in this country. Even during the
World Series. *
It is a sticky issue. It hooks up with one of the bedrocks of the
Constitution freedom of religion. A Jew should be free to prac
?* f JilS0^*"*1 rec*ive ^m* off to do just that on the holiest
days^ Indeed Jet what about the Jews who are ethnically iden
S^.^**' **" d?n',ttwnt to P**e their religion, not on
the Sabbath, not on the High Holidays, not anytime?
The latter group us absolutely guaranteed the right not to be
religious, by law and by most moral considerations But other con-
nderauons enter into this issue for those Jews who are in the
Jews who work on the High Holidays, in positions where
e^none notices notably the top echelon, of governmeT
media and business nghtfully say that how they rt-ervTor
jjoruobaerve. the dates is a private matter. And nofan^ebw"
^J^T^' on*; Jewi* *entify *n. to be everyone's
business* you re a wlebnty or kmeM leader Sooetv *ei~r*Ir*
doesnot break down whether a famous indivxlua^roSuTor
tZ?Z!L*Z!2F* m ?adeS.~ th*t etluc ldentity follow.
That u a salient fact which should be considered bv thus* hnrn
uJSZZ}!?* *","*ll v """* responds
The process of education to eradicate intolerance nH
rail Classic unto himself, and were ail better for it.
Egypt Not A Reliable U.S. Ally
pe^w^a^t^
do was to broker the peace. Which we dkL Wa ABw ** *>
bottom t^juni^^^^S^^Zt^ S
^vuegeof pajring for Egypt's u^WwpSSm^rlii?
got a -reliable ally, a counterweight to Arab radicals. a%L-
oriented regime that would share our interests and^enaftaST!
"M*****1 ** as repugnance regardimr terrorism Y ~i
armed. We had tranaformed .1EdS*E22n^ormer^
chart state mto a Weatern aUy So what | ,t co a^buW
Aa for asthe Egyptians were concerned, we we* oka,*.*.,
tongas we keptshmpmg the money, no string,attadisATWmc?
ment we attached a string, however, we became villains even if
that the string was cooperation in the fight against terorrism.
Heinous demand, we made. Egypt actually had to turn over hi-
jackers, who were also attempted murderers and murderers. As
far as Egypt is concerned, all that is strictly beside the point. We
were simply out to grab an Egyptian plane not its occupants.
We shall not dwell on this typically Arab reversal of foots and
deformation of analysis. It's too obvious to dwell upon. The one
point is clear: Egypt is our ally as long as we come up with the
cash. Besides that, we are not needed.
We wonder if the companion point is eqally dear, namely
Israel's unconditional allegiance to the humanistic values of this
country. To compare Egypt and Israel, look at Israel's behavior at
times of conflict with the U.S. Look at the differences between
Israel's response, in times of American-Israeli stress, and the re-
cent Egyptian reponse.
Israel and America, of course, have often differed. Not once
however, did any Israeli Prime Minister publicly declare that he
and his country had been "wounded" by the ILS. This includes
even the bombastic Menachem Begin. Never once did any Israeli
Prime Minister tell the U.S. "where to go." as Hosni Mubarak
recently did. And remember, the grievances of Israel have arisen
out of circumstances much more threatening to Israel than
Americas interception of any Egyptian plane was threatening to
Egypt. When the Reagan administration cut off arms to Israel in
1981 and 1982. Israel was far more threatened than Egypt was
this month. When the Ford administration cut off arms to Israel
in 1975. Israel was far more threatened than Egypt was last
month. The disappointments expressed by both the U S and
lSneltZ Were *Jw*y8 de*r yet alw,lJri r*P*ful. never demean
ing. What is more, even during periods of strain, Israeli secret
security information kept flowing right into American hands,
without interruption. Contrast that to Egypt's cancellation of
joint American Egyptian military maneuvers in light of
America s successful nabbing of terrorists on an Egyptian plane
So there you have it. Both strategically and diplomaticaHv
Israel has stood with America through thick and thin. Egypt, bv
contrast, responds with a tantrum the likes of which are usually
confined to the sandbox, the minute the U.S. aaks for wholly une
quivocally moral, ethical aid in the incarceration of terroriata.
Put it plain: Egypt and America are on different wavelengths
Israel and America are on the same wavelenth.
Israel
tec,
Coins
Tkone-tkeluit
Capernaum
The 1986 ft*
Pope and Jews: Strain Amid Mee!
Ceertaaeea foam p*,. ,
Interreligious Consulta-
tions, said in a conversation
with John Paul today. "It
marked a turning away
from 18 centuries often
characterized by both
misunderstanding and
persecution."
Papal View of Anti-
Semitism
John Paul replied that
"anti-Semitism, in its ugly
and sometimes violent
manifestations, should be
completely eradicated."
"Better still," he said, "a
positive view of each
religion, with due respect
for each, will surely emerge
as is already the case in so
many places."
The audience was part of
a conference between
Jewish and Catholic figures
on the relations between the
two faiths.
But despite the exchange
of warm words, some Jews
*re dissatisfied with the
P*ce and content of the
d^cuss^ and are worried
t**t the Vatican may be
***** to slow it down.
Although most Jewish
nurea welcome the big im-
provement in Catholic-
*h relations over two
***,^ there are divisions
monfJejrish group, over
* the discussions should
be pursued.
* discussion, after what
** wo-SemhW Jrebav-
j* I^dSin^r.
^*w'Sreithe
Rahtsi M.~ ^nnrishfL
^director of iiterSoS
ffurs for the
Jewish Committee and a
pioneer of Catholic-Jewish
relations, took sharp iswe
with Mr. Singer's view of
the discussion so far.
"I think he's shooting
from the hip," Rabbi Tan-
nenbaum said he believed
there were Vatican officials
who took a "Conservative
view" and were seeking to
slow down the discussion.
But he said that
'progressives" within the
Vatican were seeking to fur-
ther the relationship and
that John Paul's own
statements indicated his
sympathy.
A dear sign of difficulty in
the discussions came last
June, when the Vatican
issued "notes" on how
Roman Catholics should
perceive Jews. The notes
drew sharp criticism from
Jewish figures, including
Rabbi Tannenbaum.
Although the notes
strongly condemned anti-
Semitism and criticized "a
painful ignorance
history and b
Judaism," they
ed passages that
the Jews. The"
Interreligious
referred to the
having "a ret
spirit."
The documents
ample, that the
Israel "should be
not in a perspective
itself religious."
This struck the
groups as den;
religious signifi
Israel for Jews.
The Nan crime*
the Jews were
brief passage
the Committee I
religious
brusque-
Vatican officials
maintained that
had to be read
other Catholic
and were conssteat
policy of
mutual tolerance.

VoJaaB,i4_NtrJ7


Friday, November 15.1985/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 5
age Jewish Community Provoked by NeWSWJre/ISrael
wish Involvement Theatre Nov. 26
Iwoman show in
teenage Jewish
will participate
i will be held on
ght, Nov. 26, at 8
program, coor-
iy The Central
Lr Jewish Educa-
tponsored by the
%h School of
ward, the Jewish
Bty Center of
fort Lauderdale,
I'nai B'rith Youth
Ion, promises to
feting evening for
area teenagers. Ms. Fox can
be Aunt Bertha, the classic
Jewish mother, a nebbish, a
Ku-Klux-Klan member, or a
Jew for Jesus. More than
100 characters are part of
the repertoire of this 33
year old actress who will
come to the Greater Fort
Lauderdale teenage com-
munity by way of Ohio.
The teenage audience, will
become counselors in Ms. Fox's
presentation, brought in to solve
the character's problems. Ms. Fox
will divide them into groups of ten
rious Florida Law Firm
Is Foundation Donation
Florida's most
uished and
is legal firms,
r, Traurig, Askew,
j Lipoff, Rosen and
[P.A.. Miami, has
winced a $5,000
Ion from the firm's
opic Fund to the
ions of Jewish
opies of the Jewish
k of Greater Fort
lie.
ouncement was made
k-^oel Reinstein. direc-
i and managing part-
fort Lauderdale office,
sident of the Jewish
I and chairman of the
I'JA Major Gifts Din-
iWDec. HattheJJar .
i Beach Resort.
who recently joined
^ted. "It is the desire of
hropic Fund to help
long-range continuing
i Foundation to build a
I in times of economic
|t<> institute innovative
iis Month
wish History
I Sixtus IV
I Ferdinand and Isabella
the Inquisition in
the Balfour Declara-
i affirms the right of a
neland in Palestine, is
I the Nuremberg trials of
war criminals by an in-
' tribunal begins.
Joel Reinstein
programs required by changing
priorities. Through these Funds,
the Federation wiH keep pace with
growing community needs and to
meet crises when they arise."
According to Jacob Brodzki.
chairman, Federation Founda-
tion, "We welcome the law firm to
the Foundation and for their
heartfelt support and as a member
of our- family of Foundation
friends and know that through
their continued support we can
continue to keep alive the
spiritual, cultural, and social
fabric of Jewish life, regardless of
conditions." He continued, "it is
our fervent desire that more firms
in our business community take
part in this special program."
The Foundation of Jewish
Philanthropies is a separate fund
segregated from the annual
Federation/UJA campaign funds,
whose uses are for special
purposes.
HANUKArl-GETAWAY
I
1
.JO**1'* "O- 1 LUXURY KOSHER IIOTU
*ouHo.trwinio,Aiui >-. *. 153M81'
On tte Oceon at 32nd Sweat. Miami tooch
*-ST"
for discussion after each
character's presentation. Next
Ms. Fox will appear in a new
guise. She might be a rnippity old
lady, a senator about to vote on a
bill important to Israel, or a PLO
gorilla. She may change her voice,
bring out a few props cane, a
shawl but Fox asserts, her
transformation is not a sleight of
hand. "I am the character. I don't
act it. I become it." Ms. Fox ex-
plains that she is trying to grow
an atmosphere conducive to the
audience's involvement with ideas
and the expressions of Jewish
emotion. This is Jewish Involve-
ment Theatre and the concerns of
Sally Fox and her characters are
Jewish. She deals with cults, with
anti-Semitism, and with intermar-
riage. "We are excited about Ms.
Fox's presentation to the Jewish
teenage community" exclaimed
Sharon S. Horowitz, Principal of
the Judaica High School. The
evening promises to be an exciting
addition to the community's
teenage programming.
The Central Agency for Jewish
Education is a major beneficiary
agency of the Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale receiv-
ing funds from the annual Federa-
tion/United Jewish Appeal
campaign.
JERUSALEM A political storm seemed to be brewing up
over the peace proposals made by Prime Minister Shimon Peres
in his speech to the United Nations. Acting Prime Minister David
Levy (Likud-Herut) charged that Peres had "seriously violated"
the agreed policy guidelines of the national united governement.
TEL AVIV There was a 30-40 percent decline in the number
of Israelis traveling abroad this year, the government's Central
Bureau of Statistics announced. It said that in three months Ju-
ly, August and September the number was 40 percent less than
in the same months last year.
JERUSALEM A gloomy forecast regarding employment in
the country was presented to the Cabinet by Labor and Welfare
Minister Moshe Katzav. He predicted that by the end of the fiscal
year, the number of unemployed will total some 150,000, almost
10 percent of the labor force, some 2.5 percent higher than the
forecast by the Treasury.
TEL AVIV The Israel-Asia Chamber of Commerce has
published a catalog in the Chinese language describing Israel's
products and services which are available to Chinese importers
and government bodies. The catalog will be distributed in China
by a Hong Kong firm with experience of the Chinese market
which helped draw it up. The Chamber of Commerce issued the
catalog following several years of quiet contacts between Israeli
business executives and manufacturers and visits by them and
Israeli scientists to China. It was produced for the Chamber of
Commerce by Gittim Image Systems, an Israeli public relations
and advertising agency,.
TEL AVIV The consumer price index rose by 2.5 percent
during the first two weeks of October, the Central Bureau of
Statistics reported Tuesday. It was higher than the 1.5 percent
rise during the last two weeks of September.
By JTA Services
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L
Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort LauderdsJe/Friday, November 15, 1985
The Suffering of Our Brethren Will Forever Remain .^
Campaign Leader Lives A Mission Into P<
By IRVING LIBOWSKY
As our plane approached
the Warsaw Airport we
were all filled with mixed
emotions.
We had chosen to come on
this Mission first to Poland
and then to Israel for our
own personal reasons. It
was a dream with some of us
to see the country and the
"shtetle" where our parents
were from and where at one
time not too distant in the
past, a beautiful culture fill-
ed with Jewish learning and
tradition flourished.
We are introduced to Warsaw
by going to visit the famous War-
saw Cemetery where the great
writers and scholars of Yiddish
literature are buried. We stood at
the tombstones of great Rabbis.
As we walked among the
massive tombstones, reminders of
an era when Jews were able to pay
tribute to their dead with dignity
and respect, we were overwhelm
ed with what we saw.
A massive marble tombstone in
brown color paid tribute to the
Kaminsky family who established
the Yiddish Theater in Warsaw
Mrs. Idea Kaminsky was the
Aunt of the famous American
Jewish comedian Danny Kaye.
As we stood before the magnifi-
cent tombstone dedicated to the
Giants of Yiddish Literature.
"I L. Peretz" and the author of
the "Dybbuk." S. Ansky. we
silently acknowledged their great
contribution to the glory of the
RTeat Yiddish language. Together
with Sholom Aleichem. their great
stones of the "Shtetle" are still
hemg produced and read by
countless Jews throughout the
world.
The Wall around the cemetery
was at one tune a Wall of the
Ghetto and we had the honor to
pay our tribute to the thousands
who fought the Nans and died
We stood in awe at the monu-
ment to the Warsaw ghetto
fighters and saluted the leader of
tbe ghetto fighters. Mordechai
Aneientch. age 22 who died in the
-prising
In Warsaw, we had the great
honor of attending service at the
NoynkSJul The only synagogue
left in Warsaw. We prayed and
met with a small group of elderly
Jews who are part of the no more
than 4-6.000 Jews remaining in all
of Poland A land where at one
time almost 4,000.000 Jews
resided.
We could not beueve that these
Jews, the only survivors of the
Holocaust still living in Poland
would want to stay there.
It was as if a legacy had been
given to them to keep for all
future generations of Jews. They
were the guardians of a beautiful
lgcy of Jewish Literature and
Arts that should not be unknown
to the future generations of Jews
throughout the world
Sitting in the Kaminsky Jewish
Theatre on Saturday and wat
ching and listening to Polish ac-
tors speaking Yidduk in the great
Sholem Aleichem play The Great
Prise." was almost unbeuevahle.
Since there are no young Jews
to play the parts, these actors
Yiddish and the
_ in the audience
_ to a translation in
Poba* with their earphones.
The deaire and the will to earn
on this great tradition is symbolic
of the wil of the Jews to live and
f> perpetuate this civilization.
The nest day would t e one that
none of us wiH ever forget. While
it is true that we had all heard the
Remains of the destroyed Crematorium at
Birkeneau leave a grim reminder.
horror of the concentration camps
and the cruelty and diabolical tor-
ture of the inmates, the visit to
Auschwitz and Birkeneau will re-
main forever etched in our
memories.
We were s group of Amercian
Jews, some grandparents, some
parents, a few with great-
grandchildren.
There are no words to describe
our emotions as we looked up over
the entrance to the camp and saw
the words:
Arbeit Maekt Fm
We had seen it in the movie.
"Holocaust." but standing in
front of the camp had a different
meaning.
There were two survivors and
their wives from New Jersey who
joined our group. One of them had
been an inmate at the Birkeneau
camp. As we went through the
camp he pointed out the various
stations that those who came to
the camp were put through. In
this camp. 4.000.000 people were
murdered, of which 3.000.000
were Jews, including one million
children.
As we came into one area
everyone of us was almost
petrified by the sight that con-
fronted us.
A tremendous room filled with
60.000 pairs of shoes; another one
with clothes of children and
adults. There was not a dry eye in
our group. We wept unshamed at
this horrifying scene We could
not comprehend how a world
could aBow this to happen and,
"hough 40 years have come and
ion*, there has not been an
answer.
On the way to visit the town of
Branak. about 110 miles from
r_vmw- we came near the in-
f*mous death camp of Trehhnka
7**~ 80J.OO0 people, mostly
Jews, had been gassed and beaten
to death. The remains of smoke
stacks which were left from the
crematorians were vivid evidence
where the ovens and gas
chambers had been.
In the town of Branak. I saw
what had been the Jewish
cemetery uprooted and
desecrated. Not a tombstone was
left to tell me where my grand
parents and other family members
were buried.
True to the Nazi boost there was
not a Jew left living or dead
in the place that had given birth to
my family.
It had been a dreadful day for
all H was after what we had
witnessed. We returned to our
hotel and tried to wash away the
smell of death that seemed to cl-
ing to us.
We exchanged our thoughts and
all seemed to agree. We would not
have missed coming to Poland but
nothing in this world could ever
get us to return again.
However, most of us felt that in
going to Israel and seeing there
the modern miracles that are tak-
ing place was as if we had come
out of a morbid deep dark depres-
sion into a beautiful sunlight
I believe deeply that we will be
better Jews, better Americans
*nd really understand what the
words. "Am Israel Chai" mean.
We feel more Jews and Christians
alike wil] gain from treading the
P*ths through Poland as we did.
Irving Liboweky u a member
and territory of the Board of
Director, of the Jewish Federation
of Greater Fort Lauaerdaie Hs is
also chairman of the Federation's
Gathering Ptaet" and Elderly
XutrUion program and has been
earned the honorst at the Federa-
tions I'M Palm Air, Pacesetter
Luncheon, Dee. 1$. Hs was one of
the member, of the UJA leadership
mission that reeentig toured Israel
and Poland.
THE PURITY BEGAN
3500 YEARS AGO!
SwS21,1!Lr*port ,hat ,h# pur- "*
K*u* **>r,S *wr emerg.ng from the
aonngs Ark Urt entered the wound as
^njbou, 3500 v..r, ago ITS*
J^lyh^d DwhvwrwdtO your horn.
Da* Broward
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kT?Dt^t **" omt brethren m the
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Friday, November 15, 1985/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 7
ommentary
THE JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTPR
OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE
6501 W. Sunrise Blvd.
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33313 792-6700
By Muriel Haakell, Director of Public Relation*
FURTHER INFORMATION AND FEES CONCFR*
_ IE EVENTS OR PROGRAMS LISTED PLEASEif All
[center. 8t VALL
pie promise a great selection at
the right prices. Special parent or
grandparent hours will be an-
nounced for the JCC Unique
Boutique!
extended trip for
senior adults
Seniors! Make waves with the
JCC Tuesday Thursday, Dec.
1719. Join a peppy seafaring
group going to Tampa by bus to
take the Tampa Sea Escape Din-
ner Theater cruise and then on to
the Naples Dinner Theater. Two
breakfasts, two dinners, two
shows, two in a room or single
accommodation may be had.
Call the Center for the rest of
the delightful details.
DONT FORGET TONI SISKIN
Join the Brunch Bunch Wed.
Nov. 20, 9:30-11:30 a.m. at the
[iSIC MAKER Center. Hear what the Head of
IBerger. director, teacher *** Bward County School Board
[performer herself, begins
krth year at the JCC.
[of the Center's Senior
{Festival Chorale now
j more than 60 men and
she has trained a fine
group specializing in
Yiddish and contem-
ong selections. Watch for
i Channel 10 this Hanuk-
j-Dwc. 9 at&vward-.
H ft Lauaerafla^V""""
i the 10th. The Chorale has
tied all over Fort Lauder-
lor civic and religious
Illations, accepting
riums to help fund JCC
[adult activities. In addi-
Berger leads the JCC
pn's Choir, Children's
Workshop, the Early
and Summer Camp
programs.
[lauderdale star
with the other three in
t, Berger has recently been
praised for her perfor-
! in "Jacques Brel is Alive
Ml a production of
erdale's Breakers Hotel
theater company. The
Is next vehicle, to appear
vember, is "They're Play-
r Song." Berger has been
music director as well as
I lead! Her lovely dramatic
is suited for musical
p as well as for entertaining
pnizations, country clubs
|condominium functions.
' a fine pianist and has
_been playing or singing
Jhe is five years old. She has
[ music from San Jose Col-
land has studied at the
ty of Miami, the Longy
and with noted private
[teachers.
[NMY LIFE NIGHT
. y mght, Nov. 18 is when
|/re Schoolers and their
1 men dad8> uncle*, pals
together for a lively even-
ton, games and making in-
|HneCraft ,lem8 to*ether to
rafh shopping IS A
'Vljl!JCC EARLY
I X?D BOlJTIQUE! Nov.
"kldren can do their own
"* Moms and Dad.
_nd grandpas, siblings
w will enjoy getting gifts
JjMd personally selected
4 u Philip" and Joan
er> Boutique Chairpeo-
has to say about "Child
Advocacy."
The JCC u a major beneficiary
yency of the Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale, receiv-
ing funds from the annual United
Jewish Appeal campaign.
John Gibson, who with his wife
Lort, operate the Juan Dior
bakm, is pictured giving Joyce
Rubin a new hairdo during the
morning workshop: "Feeling
Good and Looking Good" held
during the Jewish Community
Center's recent Women's Day.
Over 100 women attended this
major event scheduled by JCC's
Adult Department. The day in-
cluded workshops on "The
Family," "Jewish Identity,"
and "Interiorsfor the 80's. "A
fashion show by "Rodeo Drive"
also took place.
Newswire Florida
See how your city got its name.
HILLSBORO BEACH is named for Hillsboro Inlet, which in
Florida colonial days was named after Willis Hill, a British
nobleman.
LAUDERDALE LAKES took its name from its much larger
neighbor, Fort Lauderdale when it was incorporated in 1981.
LAUDERDALE-BY-THE-SEA also coopted its larger
neighbor's name. The tiny seaside town with the long name, in-
corporated in 1949, still endures the odd indignity of the abbrevia-
tion "Ld-B-T-S" in the telephone directory.
LAUDERHILL was the brainchild of William Safire, the New
York Times syndicated columnist, who in the late 1950s was a
press agent for Tex McCrary Inc.
One of the firm's clients was All State Properties Inc., the
developer of Lauderhill; the president of All State was Herbert
Sadkin, a prominent Broward developer for 25 years.
"Herb was talking about this project he had in Florida," Safire
said, "and I said, 'Where is it?' "
When Sadkin said Fort Lauderdale, Safire thought of "hill and
dale," and the word Lauderhill sprang to mind.
"I did not ask if there was an elevation there to justify it,"
Safire said.
MARGATE once was known as Hammonville, after a man nam-
ed Hammon who owned much of the farmland in the area. A Pom-
pano Beach road still bears his name, and somehow a "d" was ad-
ded to it but that's another story.
Margate came from the last name of Jack Marquesse, a
developer who considered the city a gateway to the ocean. It pro-
bably didn't hurt that "mar" means sea in Spanish.
The city seal shows a sturdy looking gate with the initial "M"
inside it.
Linda Krauss holds up her work of Sabbath art created during a
recent JCC Vacation Day. The Jewish Community Center
schedules programs for children of elementary age up to 8th grade
when public schools are closed. These camp-like days include
sports, arts and crafts and special entertainment. Counselor An-
drea Gabel, left, and another Vacation Day participant, Tamara
Gonzalez, are pictured with Linda.
Tim Maber, Deerfxeld High Senior, takes his second lesson behind
the wheel from Gerald Sloan, head of the "Drivers s Ed. pro-
gram held at the Jewish Community Center. JCC sponsors this
program on an ongoing basis in answer to a need as "Driver's
Ed." is presently offered summers only by the high schools. The
course is state-approved and includes classroom instruction with
discussions about the dangers of drug and alcohol, as well as, ex-
perience behind the wheel on the road. For further information
call 792-6700.
Enjoy the taste and spreadability of
whipped butter without the cholesterol.
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633761


Pnge 8 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauoerddc/Friday, November 15,1986
Where Your Contribution Goes ...
The United Jewish Appeal
The United Jewish Appeal
was created by the
American Jewish communi-
ty in 1939 as a direct reac-
tion to the infamous
Kristallnacht of a year
earlier, when the
synagogues of Germany
were burned and scores of
Jews beaten and killed. The
shattering of the glass of
Jewish storefronts was
brutally symbolic of decades
of oppression and persecu-
tion throughout Europe.
For American Jewry, it was
also the catalyst for creating
a centralized fund-raising
body that could mobilize the
resources needed to meet
the crisis confronting the
Jews of Europe on the eve
of World War IIVs
The three signatories to
UJA"s Charter were Rabbi
Jonah B. Wise, Rabbi Abba
Hillel Silver and William
Rosenwald. They
represented, respectively,
the American Joint
Distribution Committee, the
United Palestine Appeal
and the National Coor-
dinating Committee for the
Aid of Refugees. The UJA
thus became the central
American Jewish fund-
raising organization for the
n >rk of relief and rehabilita-
tion in Europe, for im-
migrantion and settlement
in Palestine and for refugee
aid in the United States.
The United Jewish Appeal
symbolizes the Jewish
lifeline extended by the
Jews of America to
S reserve and strengthen
ewish life everywhere it
exists throughout the world.
While UJA is primarily
devoted to fund-raising, it
has come to which the
American Jewish communi
ty asserts its commitment?
and interests and makes its
views known to the entire
country.
The United Jewish Appeal
serves as the joint fund
raising organization for its
two corporate members, the
United Jewish Appeal. Inc..
and the American Joint
Distribution Committee.
With the funds distributed
throughout its history to
these beneficiaries, the UJA
has contributed to the
rescue, rehabilitation and
resettlement of more than
three million men, women
and children, more than 1.8
million of them in Israel.
This has been accomplish-
ed through annual cam-
paigns in American Jewish
communities. The bulk of
these contributions is
received through allocations
to UJA from the campaigns
of Jewish Federations and
Welfare Funds in major
U.S. communities
Each Federation in-
dependently decides the
percentage of its funds that
will be allocated to the UJA
for worldwide needs.
WOMEN'S DIVlsn
Why Women's Division?

IN ISRAEL
Through the Jewish Agency
An a*-mc*usive on-semester scholars**) tor a
student from a development town.
TIN cut SUM
Hijackers' Purpose:
To Kill In Israel
In an exdusive to the Afar York
Times. Thomas Friedman
reported from Jerusalem that the
PLO hijacking of the Achilles
Lauro was a mistake. The real
target was not the ship, but
civilians at the Israeli port of
Ashdod the ship's next stop.
Friedman is well-connected
with PLO and other Arab sources
from his Pulitzer Prise winning
stint ss the AW York Txmm
bureau chief in Beirut His report
was based on PLO documents
released in Cyprus, as well as on
other Arab sources, and on Israeli
sources. Ail sources, wrote Fried-
man, agreed on essentials.
The PLO hyackers intended to
ride as passengers on the Achilles
Lauro to Ashdod. They had suc-
cessfully boarded the necessary
arms for their planned terrorist
killings upon disembarkation at
Aahdod. Their plan went awry
when their arms were discovered
on the Achilles Lauro. To defend
themselves, they hijacked the
amp. and then, to justify the hi
jacking, they demanded the
Israeli release of SO Palestinian
terrorists, held in Israeli jails a
purely extemporaneous demand
When word reached PLO head-
quarters that the plan had gone
awry, and in the aftermath of
world outcry, Arafat stepped in to
negotiate the hijackers release,
reported Friedman.
Etther Lemer. president of the
Women Division of the Jewish
Federation, came across this arti-
cle and thought that it would dear
up a few questions from women
who are not sure what the
Women s Division it.
Women's Division is an
arm of the United Jewish
community operating its
own fund-raising campaign
and educational programm-
ing. That seems like such a
simple description, but, in
fact, we certainly have been
doing exactly that.
As we proceed with our cam-
paign, we often hear the question,
"Why should I make a pledge
separate and apart from my
husband?"
This seems to be s contradiction
to those who sre so forceful in
seeking their rights in business, in
the professions, in the arts and in
the voting booths. These same
women should not try to abdicate
their responsibilities in this par-
ticular vital area of compassion
and humanity.
It is a moral responsibility that
we, as Jews, must assume simply
because we have no choice cer-
tainly not if we are concerned
with the Jewish survival of our
children and their children after
them. The justification for
Women's Division is the same as
for any other women's organisa-
tion. Women are a part of the
community. h* tfci
nnd have s n.
community.
InthetrsditJOMii-J
"* never heard thTT
mother "lissxifli.
If obligation -
Women. But at si i
Her Own R^fe ^
Fellow Jews. In i^j
rather than her huskv.
ed the puahl"b3
on the wall, and >U|
Iarael and the poor.
The Women'i _
modern expression of (.
womanly involves**. I
ter of evolution and i
technique, not a net
concept We cannot t
fact that through a i
Tolvementcomeitnn
the family, and ofteni
s profound influence oa|
band. Thii is why.
"Why a Women'! I
respond in typical F
with another quest
women not give oft__
their funds for Jews* j
L1j
I
*r
THE WOMEN'S DIVISION Leadership
Development Group recently held it* mcond
meeting at the Plantataum home of Susan
SMWndL 2r' MaH/y" STd' of tie Nova
university Family Center, facilitated a lively
****"?. eoneerni^9 "Transmitting Values
JJ an Affluent Societu." Pictured u Jo Ann
M Levy (standing), ekairman of the commit-
tee, addressing tke group of SO vxmesx
tended tke program. The next momesi
i* scheduled for Dee. Hat the Plaststnti
of Lisa Shulman. For farther aft***
about tke Leadership Development Groig
tact tke Women's Division of tke hf
Federation at 7W-U00.
Jewish Agency To Develop
Tourism To Aid in Galilee
By GERALD 8. NAGEL
UJA Watch Desk Editor
SFAD. Israel Seeking to
ing of ma
build on nature's H rasing
jeatk mountains and the m
Settlement Department plans to
devHop Israel'. Upper GaEee as a
major overseas vacation center.
I,M<^Goureliek. the Agency's
Upper Galilee SettlemenTdirec
tor. said in an interview m this an
atdty with 50.000 current
tinned Meehestm could be initiated
"> the neat five year,. -^^ tf
funds are available.''
"Our budget is f 16 million and
rtmte *<> to three new set-
* ynr." said Gourehck
hose region encompass*,
400.000 acres west and south of
U*borderwith Syria, wefl wirJun
Israel s pre-1967 borders. For
each additional $1-1.5 million, we
could initiate another settlement
We could put $9 million more to
work within a year if we have it."
Gourelick said touriass's
deetupii>ent here would provide
jobs for farm-reared youngsters
]"** non agrarian skflU; diver
any Israel's northern economy.
**** is increasingly high-tech
*of here and north of Haifa,
increase Jewish nopulaliiiii in
Inrsela North, down to leas than
80 percent even counting the
heavily Jewish cities of Nahariya
nd Accoi and encourags Israelis
to vacation, and
income, at home.
Nearly all the 150 Gahlee set
Ueinu. including SO under
Agency care, have a mix of TO """
""* activity, but overall the *"utalm^ZZfr
?y of the Jfosheem **. "* he,*d "^
ngricultural.
The regxms towaal
include t*Sea for boating nd be**,
development, and ft""".
Iiisnlinil mountain! *f
hiking, climbing. Vff
horseback riding J"
tesaperatures are ustf"7'
" nd G^L\
"There-no rsousllwn'
through Succot"
AasarsewJeweak#
blueprints J*-i_-,
dreamland by ***J5i
Jewish Agency Setu
Jewish ApptnJ/*2*7j,
PWtb*nwnJ*


Friday, November 16, 1985/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort UuderddePajeJL
CAMPAIGN '86 Federation/United Jewish Appeal
V
ENS DIVISION PLANTATION
I COMMITTEE met recently at
lo/Afarew Schwartz, Committee
to begin planning for the 1986
division campaign in the Planta-
wda area. Pictured at the meeting
g, left to right): Susan Canarick;
r; Anne Ckernin, Women's Divi-
Mama Schwartz, Plantation
Campaign Committee chairman; and Bar-
bara Wiener, Women's Division Campaign
chairman. Seated (left, to right): Lois Polish,
Lisa Shulman, Marcia Steinfeld and Carole
Skolnik. Serving on the Committee but not pic-
tured are Karen Waxman and Sheila Grenitz.
Anyone interested in serving on the Planta-
tion Campaign Committee, contact the
Women's Division of the Jewish Federation at
7+8-8400.
[ate Division Leaders to Meet Nov. 18
Federation/United
leader* of the 22
areas of Margate
their second city-wide
I Monday Nov. 18 at 10
lie Beth Am, 7205
Blv: Margate.
the initial ground-
ned at the last planning:
Irepresentat w> from the
[condominium areas will
plan tor their
|/UJA functions.
Katzberg 'dairman of
tt Margate Division of
(ration I'.I A campaign,
that Sam Lexell
|as co-chairman for the
has als<> announced
William Katxberg
that he has prepared a 50-minute
slide show about Israel which may
CONDO UPDATE
Woodlands Division
Gearing Up For UJA
The leadership of the Woodlands Division of the
1986 Jewish Federation/United Jewish Appeal
campaign have been meeting on a regular basis
with the Woodlands UJA Committee to map out
plans for the 1986 Federation/UJA campaign, ac-
cording to Dan Klein, Woodlands Division UJA
chairman.
Klein, along with Harold L. Oshry, Woodlands
Special Gifts chairman; Morris Small. Dinner
chairman and Sol Schulman. Dinner co-chairman,
have placed an added emphasis on the needs of
Israel this year.
"Our goal is to raiae the dollars that will support
the social needs of Israel as well as the needs of our
local Jewish agencies here in Fort Lauderdale,"
Klein stated. "Now, more than ever, our help is
needed."
Sass Lexell
be used at special gifts and other
group functions.
MAJOR GIFTS DIVISION
UJA Workshop Oct. t7
featured Elton Kemess, stan-
ding, former executive vice
president of the United Jewish
Appeal. Among the key leaders
attending were, left, Brian J.
Sherr, Federation president
and Daniel Cantor, chairman.
Major Gifts Worker Training.
Builders and Allied Trades
Division Meets Nov. 18
The Builders and Allied Trades Division of the 1906 Jewish
Federation United Jewish Appeal campaign will kick off the cam-
paign with a planning and organ national meeting on Monday,
Nov. 18 at the Oriole Homes Conference Room. Co-Chairing the
Division are Mark Levy and Richard Finkelstein.
Being Jewish In America .
lerdale West
""dale West communi-
ty of the 1986 Jewish
United Jewish Appeal
ill hold its Evening for
fry Dec. 15 at 8 p.m.
Uuderdale West
Chairing the Lauder-
JJ UJA campaign is
nn with Leon Ap-
Wdstem, Louis Grolnic
Horowitz serving as co-
J* > de note, at the
y wrvices conducted
JJk'West residents.
One People,
One Destiny
Excerpts From Charles Silberman's
Book Jews in America.*
Lime Bay
Chairman Eugene Popkin and Mrs. Popkin to host Special Gifts
event for 1986 UJA Campaign, at their Lime Bay Home. The
event will be on Dec. 12 at 7:30 p.m. Jan Salit, Assistant Ex-
ecutive Director will be the speaker. The minimum is $100.
WHAT'S HAPPENING
*BER
k T W??dmont Award*. Kkkoff
5er oodmont Country c,ub
Dec. f Women's Division Executive
Board Meeting. 9:30 a.m. At Federation.
Dae. 12 Community Relations Committee
(CRC) Meeting. 7:80 p.m. At Federation;
Lime Bay Special Gifts Event. 7:30 p.m.
Home of Eugene Popkin.
Dae. 14 Major Gifts Dinner. $10,000
minimum. Marriott Harbour Beach.
For information call 74S-34O0.
... Jewishness no longer is a
significant handicap in running
for any office except that of presi-
dent and, perhaps, vice president
Although fear of anti-Semitism
makes it unlikely that a Jew could
gain the Republican or
Democratic presidential nomina-
tion in the near future, some
younger politicians believe that
that barrier too will fall
.. Some critics of American
Jewish life dismiss the growth in
observance of Chanukah and
Passover as a tnvialization Many
of those who light Chanukah
candles, they point out. do not
recite (or know) the blessings that
are supposed to accompany the
ceremony, and many a Passover
seder is little more thsn a par-
ticularly warm family dinner par-
ty at which matsoh-ball soup is
served and s prayer or two
recited ... The observations are
true enough: they also happen to
be beside the point, for they
reflect a profound misunderstan-
ding of the nature of the change
that has occurred Despite the
frequent forecasts of Judaism's
imminent demise, secular Jews
are turning to religious rituals to
affirm their Jewish identity .
. The question ... is not
whether American Jews are
observant according to some ab-
solute scale; it is whether an inex-
orable erosion is going on,
whereby each generation is leas
observant than the preceding one,
as straight line theory would lead
one to expect. The answer is that
it is not True enough, there had
been s reneration-by-generation
decline in observance of certain
rituals as second- and third-
generation Jews struggle to shed
their image of being an alien,
unaasimilable group, but now that
American Jews are accepted as
fully American, that erosion is a
thing of the past... the
generation-to-generation decline
in observance came to an end
some 20 years ago.
... For all their affluence and
achievements. Jews are not (or
not yet) part of the middle-and
upper-class social world to which
the majority of Republican leaders
belong. In most cities
"five-o'clock shadow." as it is call
ed, still governs social relations
between Jews and Gentiles;
however much they may mix dur-
ing the working day. Jews and
Gentiles generally go their
separate way* when the workday
is over. And even when Jews
are admitted to once
dubs, they continue to
with other Jews.


Page 10 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday. November 15, 1985
Strangers in GermanyJews Feel Emotional Burdi
Continued from Page 1
how Germans would react to Jews in German politics.
Germans are kown to be wary of Jewish motives and ac-
tions even when the Jews are merely defending their own
point of view. The Bitburg affair earlier this year severely
tested the Germans' tolerance toward the Jews, who balked
at U.S. President Reagan's and Chancellor Helmut Kohl's
planned visit to the German war cemetery. Jewish opposi-
tion to this visit angered the chancellor who expressed a
wish that Germany be a home for its Jewish citizens.
Kohl still appears to be angry with the Jewish community.
Before Rosh Hashanah. he sent New Year's greetings to
the Jewish weekly in Bonn, AUgemeine Jwdische
Wochenzeitmg. In his message. Kohl not only defended Bit-
burg as a "self-evident" gesture of mourning, but even
found it appropriate to remind the Jews on New Year's eve
that his government favors the Palestinians' right to self-
determination.
During the Bitburg affair, a number of German politicians
made noises to the effect that Jews were harming German-
American relations. A Jewish member of the community
who is engaged in non-Jewish public life and wishes to re-
main anonymous, said, "Of course, a Jew cannot feel that
Germany is his fatherland. I personally do feel at home, in a
way but this feeling relates to the city in which I live, not to
the country as a whole. If Jews were to live by their emo-
tions, they could only live in Israel, but who lives by his
emotions'"
Many younger German Jews have sought political refuge
in leftist'circles. "I felt that we were fighting for the same
cause and it did not matter that I was Jewish and they were
German." said a Jewish woman in her late thirties. The
romance with these ended for many of the Jewish leftists
during the war in Lebanon in 1982. when the German left's
traditional anti-Israeli sentiments suddenly bore more and
more the face of outright anti-Semitism. "I have been feel-
ing ever more a stranger in this country over the past
years." states a Jewish scientist who holds left-wing views.
Even German philo-Semitism. he says, has turned increas-
ingly into plain anti-Semitism.
Official Jewish representatives would not say this in so
many wordsjjut they in particular te.
much-profeeaed sympathy of GermaiJ ~L****\
can be much a polltTcal'gestu^",
ing anti-Jewiah. at any rate, i, bad sty&H
and may compromise a political carir \$x\
fend the right of the Jews to liveTr "^^
often remind the Germans in publ "^M
presence in post-war Germany hat L, .VN
Republic a part of its international respeSiM
Jews at any rate, are not in acute danm of,
German anti-Semitism. Many youiw fiJ! *
abhor any racial prejudice'and Sffi?'
however, little understanding of the straT^
most Jews in Germany live torn between *J
feeling secure and integrated on the one hL
other, bearing a feeling of estrangement whw,"
away. uan
Many Jews in Israel and abroad feel that thJ
should not live in Germany. In any case it kjk
Germany does extract a heavy emotional toll frj]
If you've reached the
age of 55, you deserve
something for nothing
Introducing Ameri Plus 55.
A special package of Free services
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it provides many extra no-cost financial services.
Plus some special reduced-price services, too.
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Use of 3 automatic teller networks.
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dividend payments.
' FREE. Use of point of sale terminals at gas
stations, supermarkets, and retail stores.
Plus you can get:
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And AmeriPlus 55 customers who open a
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Write all the checks you wish with no monthly
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So if you* re 55 or oldet why pay for financial
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s
JEWISH FAMILY SERVICE OF BROWARD COUNTY
[jj^TWill Be Many Others!
ANN.K0S9AK,MSW
Oj L'fe Edue,UoB
Coordint>r
-iah Family Services
|,(Browrd County
LL-8 the big deal? You're
r ears old. You'll have
[Jeartbreaks before you find
litprl-
this scenario found
i jiaybe when you were a
, your heart was broken
^ arrived. You rationaliz-
Ul he. It's all part of grow-
Friday, November 15. 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdalc Page 11
iybe you were fortunate
'[i friend, parent, teacher.
other special person to
to you; someone to share
(joys and sorrows. Maybe
lre different, and not ao
[pressures were placed upon
l^ybe your parents weren t
Maybe you were
Maybe. Maybe, Maybe -
sti
Iwhit if there were no one to
no one to understand.
if you were also under
, home and peer pressure
same time. What if you
[l5and confused by your feel-
I feeling alone and scared.
jiyour self esteem were lea*
(ideal. What if you saw no op-
1 What if you were told a hun-
Jtimes that this is the beat
(in your life. What if you felt
[thy go on. I hurt so much!
nds of teenagers attempt
teach year Often, needless
Is. What can parents,
land friends who are con-
Iabout this potential risk to
[peopled"*
: Be aware nf the warning
demonstrated by those
i considered to be risk:
Abrupt changes in per-
IIV giving away of a prized
on
A previously attempted
Increased use of alcohol
_ Eating disturbances and
nt weight change
[Seeping disturliances (e.g.,
, insomnia
Inability to tolerate
Withdrawal and rebel-
l^bility or unwillingness to
[Sexual
promiscuity
ruling of
m

ever under
'"tthcn
ire available.
Third:Instill hope. Allow them
to explore options. Don't lecture.
Peart* Respect their privacy,
but don't allow them to be alone
for extended periods. Include
them in family activities.
Fifth: If warning signs are per-
sistent, extreme, or interfere with
normal functioning, seek the help
of a qualified professional. It may
not be a "passing stage".
Jewish Family Services of
Broward County hat social
workers (rained to deal with this
and many other individual, fami-
ly, and marital problems. They
are affiliated with the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
LauderdaU, The United Way of
Broward County, and The Jewish
Federation of South Broward.
Fees are on a sliding scale, accor-
ding to ability to pay. Call
969-0956 in Hollywood: 71,91505
in Fort LauderdaU; and 4S7-8508
in Deer field Beach.
Hillel Honors
Pritskere
The Samuel Scheck Hillel Com-
munity Day School, 19000 N.E.
Z5th Avenue, North Miami Beach,
honored Rose and Myer Pritaker
at their 16th Annual Scholarship
Ball. The gala event took place
Saturday evening, Nov. 9, at Beth
Torah Congregation.
Rose and Myer Pritaker have
been active with Hillel for many
years, having served on the Board
of Governors and currently as
Trustees.
"Their interest in Jewish
Education and their love for
Torah brought them to Hillel,
where they have dedicated
themselves to helping under-
privileged families. This
humanitarianism came to light aa
the Pritakers found homes, jobs,
and educational placements in
Hillel for Russian immigrant
families who came to South
Broward," stated Michael Scheck,
president of the Hillel School.
The Samuel Scheck Hillel Com-
munxty Day School is a
beneficiary agency of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale.
Newswire/U.SA
NEW YORK Senator Richard Lugar (R., Ind.), chairman of
the Foreign Relations Committee, said that the Mideast "peace
process will not progress without a strong Mubarak government
in Egypt giving the U.S. a "big stake" in understanding its cur-
rent political and economic problems.
CHICAGO An Endowment Fund for Immunologies!
Research at the Weirmann Institute of Science has been
established by the Crown Family in Chicago with resources of $1
million.
Income from the fund will be used to support investigations in
the field of immunology, particularly with relevance to cancer,
multiple sclerosis and autoimmune disease.
NEW YORK Israeli Premier Shimon Peres said that "it is
too early to judge" Jordan's official attitude to his new seven-
point initiative to reach peace with the Hsshemite kingdom thst
he unveiled in his address to the United Nations General
Assembly. Peres pointed out thst Jordan has not yet responded
officially.
SEATTLE Ten members of The Order, a violent anti-semitic
Northwest-based sect, are on trial at the federal courthouse here
for carrying out 67 racketering acts including two murders,
three armored car robberies, and counterfeiting as part of their
plot to loll Jews, deport non-whites, and overthrow the federal
government. The trial, which began last month, is expected to
conclude by the end of next month and a verdict handed down
toward the end of December.
Neglecting personal
tfteft and/or vandalism
fkjwssion
f^Kerated and/or extend
^activity and boredom
|k**ss and/or accident
unusually long grief
[** and discouragement
Hostile behavior (e.g.,
*.'" school; bitter
K with U-arhers, sibiinga.
ft*** acadvmic work
[hancy
^difficulty mnrentrating
r^.vd>sru,,tmn (especially
I by a v *"'
l^'^av from home
abrupt
where shopping is a pleasure 7doys a week
PuMix Bakeries open at 8:00 AM
AvatlabJs at Pubtx Starts with
Frtatt Danish Be* arias Oary.
Mead or Unsfctd,
Bakad Fraah Daily
Pumpernickel
Brad
69"
AvaHabts at FuMix Storas with
Fraah Oaniah Bafcsrtsa Only.
Onion Bagels
649*
at All Publx Store*
Maple Walnut
Coffee Cake.................-ch$1w
Tandar and Moist -^ c M
Gourmet Brownies.......ag.M8"
OrMt lot Dunking ^i____
Plain Mini Donuts.......... 99*
Prices Effective
Ktv. 14 thru 20.1985
jfiLa*-***"^
A vailaMa at PubJi Stor with Fraah
Danish Bakortaa Only.
Parfact to Maha Your Horaamado Drssalng
or Stuffing
Stuffing Bread.............. 99*
The tame for famty \ *ge end parties ta getting into fusl
wing. Pick up a bos of del feet frozen, bake and
serve hora'd oewvre e for your gal hectng. We now have two
sizes from which to MAva lebte in Our Freeh Danish
Bakery Department Ordy)
fHHrt pfcg............. .................. f11 ga
10O~cLpk. ------------------------$10.96


Page 12 IV Jewiah Ftoridian of Greater Fort LauderdaWFriday, November 16, 1965
What's it all about,
earn
i
It was exactly 10 years ago. on
Nov. 10. 1975. that the United Na-
tions passed its infamous resolu-
tion equating Zionism with
racism. In this article. Israel's
ambassador to the United States
looks at the true meaning >r
Zionism.
By AMBASSADOR
MEIR ROSEN'NE
What is Zionism?
Precisely 20 years ago, a United
Nations group the Commission
on Human Rights after weeks
of bitter debate and byzantint-
negotiations, drafted an "Interna-
tional Convention on the Elimina
tion of all form of Racial
Discrimination."
That forgotten episode is direct-
ly relevant to today, for it
ultimately had a serious impact on
the subsequent evolution of world
opinion and international law
regarding Israel and Zionism.
The Commission quickly agreed
to adopt a special Article condem-
ning apartheid as a form of
racism. Soon a consensus
developed to specify other such
forms of racism as Nazism and
neo-Nazism
Because the Holocaust was still
fresh in the minds of human rights
advocates and because of an ap-
palling worldwide epidemic of
anti-Semitic incidents in the early
1960s the American represen-
tatives, with rather lukewarm
support from other Western ex-
perts, proposed the explicit inclu-
sion of anti-Semitism in this UN
Convention.
The Soviet representative
staunchly supported by the other
East European Communist
representatives, countered this
move by submitting an amend-
ment to condemn a list of forms of
racialism anti-Semitism.
Nazism. neo-Nazism and
Zionism.
This gave rise to a bitter discus
sion ending in a compromise by
which references to all specific
forms of racism were dropped (ex-
cept apartheid).
With this clever tactic, the
USSR for the first time injected
its own ideology and propaganda
on Zionism and Judaism onto a
world forum. In this, Moscow had
a double victory:
(1) It prevented the explicit
definition of anti-Semitism as a
form of racism, and thus succeed-
ed in downgrading the moral,
political and symbolic weight of
Jew-hatred in the world.
(2) It established the precedent
for linking Zionism and Nazism
which a dozen years later on
November 10, 1975 led to the
overwhelming adoption by the UN
Genera] Assembly of the resolu-
tion that equated Zionism with
racism.
What, then, is Zionism?
Sir Isaiah Berlin, the great
Aago-Jewish philosopher and
historian, has written:
"All Jews who are at all con-
scious of their identity as Jews are
steeped in history. They have
loafer memories, they are aware
of a long continuity as a communi-
ty, than any other which has
survived."
The millennial history of the
Jewiah people has placed Eretz
Israel at the center of its abiding
love. The Love of Zion has been
an eternal strain in the mystique
of devastation, of dispersion and
persecution Eretz Israel Zion
- never ceased to be the heart of
the passion of Jewish history.
Berl Katznelson, the great
moral leader of the Yishuv of
Eretz Israel from the 1920's until
his premature death in 1944. once
wrote:
"What is the source of our love
of Eretz Israel? Is it the physical
link with the soil our feet have
trodden since childhood? Is it the
flowers which have delighted our
eyes, the purity of the air we
breathed, the dramatic landscape,
the sunsets we have known?
"No, no.
" from the timeless verses of the
Book of Books, from the very
sound of the Biblical names. We
loved an abstract homeland, and
we planted this love in our soul.
and carried it with us wherever
we went throughout the
generations."
The story, then, begins with the
Bible with the account in
Genesis of the Patriarch Abraham
and the Covenant he made with
his G-d and his Land: A Covenant
that Jews throughout the world
continue to recall in the ritual cir
cumcision of their eight^iay-old
sons.
The sense of the Covenant
permeated and suffused the na-
tional consciousness ever after
For the Jewish People, Eretz
Israel has from the beginning
been Eretx Hakodesh the Holy
Land, the Promised Land. It was
Holy and Promised because of
that Covenant and all that flowed
from it in Jewish history from
Abraham to Moses to David to
Elijah.
In exile, in dispersion and in
persecution, through the millen-
nia, the Jewish People never
forgot the Covenant.
Throughout the ages and
throughout the world from
birth to death, on ordinary days
and on high occasions, on Sab-
baths and festivals, at home and in
the synagogue, at meals and on
fast days, through unremitting
prayer, study, ceremony, custom
and law an ineradicable and
unassuaged passion for Eretz
Israel for Zion became the
consuming and single-minded pas-
sion of an entire people.
What was "Zionism"?
Three thousand years ago on
a broad hill protected by a
precipitous gorge on three sides
but with higher mountains lying
around it there stood a tiny for-
tified town ruled by a tribe whose
origins are unknown but whom
the Bible calls Jebusites. The town
was called Uru-Shallim. and its
Citadel bore the name of ZION.
This was the city that David -
the warrior-poet King of Israel -
conquered and made his capital. It
was from that moment that
Jewish devotion to the City of
David began forever inter
woven with the prophetic role of
King David in the mythos of the
Jewish people: For it was from
David's line that the Messiah
would spring.
The city grew physically but
even more rapidly in the hearts of
the people as a symbol of the na-
tion's life and religion. As
Jerusalem Zion it was the
central symbol of the reign of
righteousness to which the
Hebrew Prophets called the Peo-
ple of Israel. As Prophetic
Judaism reached deeper into the
understanding of true
monotheism, so also the name of
Zion and Jerusalem grew to
universal moral significance in
Jewish theology:
For out of Zion shall go forth
the Law, and the Word of the
Lord from Jerusalem."
The significance of Zionism to
the Jews was thus always both
temporal and spiritual. It is to the
JZLx*! C*ntf: of ** anc*nt
worldly glory of Israel, the capital
of King David and King Solomon.
J"* by David signified the
establishment of the first Jewiah
Polity in Eretx Israel with
Jerusalem and Zion soon became
*nd remained, synonymous.
The religious and moral
V**** Jhe city was never
divorced from the national destinv
of the Jewish people.
It was only as Eretz Israel as
Zion. as Jerusalem through the
Children of Israel and their Bible
and their descendants who always
cherished it and who never forgot
it, that this land entered into the
world's historical consciusness. its
cultural imagination, and its
spiritual sensibility.
Numerous invaders conquered
the Land of Israel, Assyrians.
Chaldeans, Babylonians, Syrians.
Egyptians, Persians. Greeks,
Romans. Byzantines. Arabs and
Kurds. Mamlukes and Mongols.
Tartars and Crusaders. Turks and
Britons.
Alone among them all. the Jews
there shaped a nation built a
state created a language and a
culture produced mankind's
greatest religious book, which is
at once a treasured literary and
cultural masterpiece molded a
world shaking religion and laid
down a moral law that still speaks
to the Western conscience.
Zion was never the political
capital of any nation but the Jews.
Jerusalem was never the center of
any religion but Judaism.
Then, driven from their land
and scattered to the winds, the
Jews gave expression to the
anguish of Exile and the passion
for Return, and never ceased to
assert their right and title to the
Eretz Israel.
The survival of the Jewiah Peo-
ple through dark centuries was in-
extricably linked to their memory
of Zion and Jerusalem, and to
their determination to return.
This longing and this dream con-
stitute a continuity of faiths and
nation unprecedented in world
history.
And through all the genera
t*>n. through all the centuries of
JWj" Jew n back to
the Holy Land: Always there was
^'^en when wwdgration
was forbidden;
Yehuda Halevi. the greatest
neorew poet of the Diaspora, the
most memorable since the Bible
answered the call in the 12th
century.
Nachinanjdea, a mat common-
St^!?1! Talmud who re-
"*?*>** the Jewiah community
of Jerusalem in the 1 lth century
&^SW rabbis from England
1210 to rebuild Acre. Jerusalem
*nd Ramleh.
So did Jew* I
Spanish InqS J*l
century, and from Chmeln
J~ the UhfiJ
century.
n the 18th century
migrants were HaaL"
GaJiciaandLithuaSt?
century Jews from Italy
co. Turkey and Yemen
Throughout the cent*
retained the spiritual all*
the entire Jewish peopT
theory and practice of
religion and law, as
throughout the Diasi
Jerusalem remained the i
center.
Soon after the Romans',
tion of the Temple and the
quest of Jerusalem in 70 Ci
rabbinic sages of the Mishit
ed upon Tisha BAv the]
day of the Hebrew month of]
as a full day of fasting and i
ing for Jerusalem. On th.
throughout the ages. Jem*
the floor and covered their I
with ashes they chant*
Book of Lamentations -
with numerous other
mourning which were i__
ly added poems comp_
Hebrew poets in medieval!
France and Germany.
Jewish liturgy was
by supplications for the in
mg or the exiles ahd the i
of Jerusalem. The nat
restoration forms the .
theme of the great central |
in every service of the
and the festivals, in theft
after three meals every day.
consecration of a new hoi
the marriage service and
memorial for the dead.
Throughout the ages, one I
resounded in many vanst
the Jewish consciousness:
"O bring us in peace fr
four corners of the earth.|
make us go upright to our I
Speedily and in our days
For thousands of years
theme of Next Yen1
Jerusalem" is the note1
which conclude the most
services of the Jewish
those of the Seder at
Night, and of Yom Kippur
Similarly, the Return of 1
forms the central theme
Hebrew literature of the
throughout the Diaspora
throughout the ages.
And -though the Jews i
in far-off lands where e
conditions differed widely
those in Eretx Israel, the
continued to pray for rain, r
intercede for dew t a
when the dimste of ErettJ
demanded it even
prayers were utterly L
in the land of their actual i
Truly was it said by
"The vineyards of Is"
ceased to exist, but the
Law enjoins the Children i
still to celebrate the not
race that persists in c
their vintage although
no fruits to gather -
their vineyard."
I can think of no better j
sum up. than to quote
Gurion (from stalk her1
lWlfc
'Israel was not estabkd


_
grag^ November 16,1986/The Jewiah Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdaic Page 13
Community Calendar
[or
11Mj br Lori Giasberf,
hE,tio. 748-8400.
FR,DAY NOV. 15
Ridge Chapter: 8
"Sabbath. Temple Beth
^ Margate.
jewiah Center-Young
Group: Road rally.
748-8393.
dab: 8 p.m. Show
L,yne Jordan and
'i'^Hcr Clubhouse.
'^;rOrr:7:30p:nj.GrI.
Temple social hall.
Village Coed: 7:30
|wy show featuring, A
to Dean Martin and Jerry
Also Claudia Genteel.
8200 SW 24 St. Dona-
J.'722-0410.
SUNDAY NOV. 17
10 a.m.-4 P-m. Training
for Board of Directors.
I Tiae Around Club: 7:30
MtfUng. Broward Bank.
L University Dr.
itite Jewiah Singles
p.m. Bowling party.
,Unes. Cost $3. 753-3436.
jt Jewiah Center-Mea's
[Jim. Meeting. At Temple.
, Kol Abu: 7 p.m. Special
Don by Allan F. Solomon
up Coleman. At Temple
[Room
.Beth Aii-Men'a Clmb: 8
Show "A Night in TeJ
Tickets $5. $6. At Temple.
J10 or 721-3609.
Fellows and Kebekaha
IChu: 1 p.m. Meeting. Odd
Temple, 1451 N. Dixie
1564-5184.
a-Kaannah Chapter:
tm. Around the World
Show and champagne
, Inverrary Country Club.
I7J1-0738.
War Veterana-Edward
*r| Poat: 10:30 a.m.
I Services. Star of David
7701 Bailey Rd.
MONDAY NOV. 18
Kol Asu-Siatereood: 8
[Annual paid-up membership
r. At Temple.
" kah Chapter: Noon.
[ind mini lunch. Broward
3000 I'niversity Dr.
(1032.
ate Chapter: 12:30
Meeting. Oscar Goldstein
lin. Teen Center, David
t Margate. 971-2509.
W 1.1-Tamarac Chai Chapter
Noon. Meeting. Italian American
Club, 6635 W. Commercial Blvd
Bui Zioa-Soatbeast Regie*:
7:30 p.m. St. Rep. Peter Deutach
will speak on "Health Care"
Sunrise Savings, 1110 E. Hallan
dale Blvd. 466-1999.
B'aai B'rith Women-Leorah and
N. Broward Comaeils: 9:30 a.m.
Aileen Cooper will speak
Tamarac Jewish Center, 9101 NW
57 8t.
Jewish War Veteraas-Ladies
Aaxiliary 266: Nov 18-21. Trip to
Regency Spa.
TUESDAY NOV. It
JCC: 8 p.m. Cult discussion. 6501
W. Sunrise Blvd., Plantation.
NCJW-PlanUtioa Section: 7:30
p.m. "Stress Management," by
Dr. Irmgard Buccine. Sunrise
Savings.
Jewish Book Review Series:
1-2:30 p.m. "Birthright."
Tamarac Branch.
WLI-Cocoaat Creek Chapter:
9:30 a.m. Installation of officers.
Bob Groves of WNWS, will speak.
Coconut Creek Community
Center.
Temple Sholom-Sisterhood:
Noon. Paid-up membership
fashion show. At Temple.
Hadassah-L'Charim PlanUtion
Chapter: Noon. Mini-lunch and
meeting. Deicke Aud., 5701
Cypress Rd.
B'aai B'rith Woeaea-Laederhill
Chapter: Noon. Meeting. JCC
Choral Group will entertain. Cas-
tle Rec. Center. 4780 NW 22 Ct.
Braadeis Uaiversity NWC-West
Broward Chapter: 12:30 p.m.
Discussion of the book, "Growing
Up/" 473-6162.
ORT-Laaderdale West Chapter
11:80 a.m. Luncheon. Donation
$15. Gibby's. 2900 NE 12 Terr.
472-6832.
WEDNESDAY NOV. 20
Jewish Book Review Series:
1-2:30 p.m. "Birthright." Coral
Springs Branch.
Hadassah-Oriole Scopes
Chapter: Noon. Meeting. Con-
gregation Beth Hillel. 7638
Margate Blvd.
B'aai B'rith Women-Hope
Chapter: Noon. Bagel break.
Deicke Aud.
Hadassah-Iaverrary Gilah
Chapter: 12:30 p.m. Paid-up
membership luncheon. Hi-Greens
Choraleers will entertain. Inver-
Zionism
Coatiaaed
I and colonizing power,
I* by a conquered and oc-
f' *uon throwing off the
Kwegn rule The State of
P"abom in a vision.
P from the vision of Me*
Wemption. and the
firitual and emotional
ll^wtral homeland and
pw* language that the
** Mattered as it was
-f* *** *orld over so
C"nturie. drew the
to withstand all the
Iftu!*Exilend to sustain
[m national restoration
J^rt-t silent, mourn-
Tr" the cactus those
CJ ? worthless soil-
E* **"ed the country
"su in sack doth and
(ij^Pty land, laid waste
7J ; war. abuse and
"d lhe>r ancient
K2^ this BiiUan-
* Wween a People
and a City and a Land this
organic link between the Jews and
Zion is to miss the vital core of
fate and passion of Jewish history.
This is why anti-Zionism is
Quintessential anti-Semitism:
Because it denies the essence of
the historic character of the
Jewiah People. And because, in
making this denial, it rejects the
natural right of this most ancient
of peoples to perpetuate its
existence.
Anti-Zionism particularly in
the virulent form that it takes in
the Soviet Union and at the
United Nations and in the Third
World is the most venomous
manifestation of anti-Semitism in
the postwar world.
It is an unholy alliance of Com-
munist, Arab, Muslim and "non
aligned" regimes, joined in coali-
tion against Israel and the Jews.
It is time to undertake a great
international political education
campaign against this criminal
and obscene denigrstion of
Zionism a campaign that should
indeed be organised by the Zionist
movement.
We owe it to all those in an-
cient times, in the Dark Ages, in
the Holocaust, in Russia today -
who went to prison or who died
far the freedom of the Jewish
People.
rary Country Club.
NCJW-N. Broward Sectioa:
12:30 p.m. Meeting. Lauderdale
Lakes City Hall.
ORT-Woedsaoat Chapter: 10
a.m. Tour of Main Library. Book
review by Tobia Gerberer. Wood
mont County Club.
Senrise Jewish Center-
Sisterhood: Noon. Meeting.
Fashions by "Orchard Street." At
Temple.
Hadaasah-Golda Meir Chapter:
12:30 p.m. Gary Eiaenbeg will
discuss, "In the Religion
Cults." Palm-Aire Social Center.
B'aai Brith-Laaderdale Lakes
Ledge: 7:80 p.m. Meeting.
Lauderdale Lakes City Hall.
THURSDAY NOV. 21
Jewiah Book Review Series:
2-3:30 p.m. "Birthright." Pom-
pano Beach Branch.
Hadassah-Blyaaa Margate
Chapter: Noon. Membership lun-
cheon. Congregation Beth Hillel,
7638 Margate Blvd.
Hadasaah-Ilaaa Chapter: 12:30
p.m. Meeting. Lauderdale Lakes
City Hall.
Free Sons of Israel-Fort Lauder-
dale Ledge: 10 a.m. Meeting.
Whiting Hall. Sunrise.
AKMUi-Col. David Marcas
Chapter: 11 a.m. Meeting and
mini lunch. Sunrise Lakes Phase I
Playhouse.
Chapter: 9 a.m.-9 p.m. Side-walk
sale. Sea Ranch Village Shopping
Center. 782-9747.
Tesaple Beth Israel-Sisterhood:
Noon. Chai Torah Fund luncheon.
Speaker Rebitzer Esther
Jungreiss. At Temple, 200 S. Cen-
tury Blvd., Deerfield Beach.
Baai B'rith Woaaea-Bermuda
Clab: Noon. Meeting Clubhouse.
AOL: ADL function at Woodlands
Country Club.
B'aai B'rith-Pompano Ledge: 8
p.m. Meeting. Palm-Aire Country
Club.
Art/Artifact Displays Needed for
Coral Springs Chanukah Festival
"The Fifth Annual Coral Spr-
ings Chanukah Festival will not be
complete unless we have the
cooperation of our Jewish
neighbors who have Judaica art
and artifacts they would like to
display at the Festival," stated
Stan Kane, chairman of the
Chanukah Festival. "The whole
idea of the day is to celebrate our
Jewish heritage. What better way
to do this than to have it on
display for all to see."
The Chanukah Festival will be
held from 3-6 p.m. Sunday Dec. 8
at Mullins Park, Coral Springs.
"The display tent is usually the
most popular attraction of the
day. We need people to share with
us their beautiful, precious
items," Kane stated.
Kane has announced that all
art/artifacts that will be on display
on Dec 8 will be stored in a
secure, enclosed building with
24-hour security. All items on ex-
hibit will be properly catalogued.
"People need not worry that their
possessions will be in any
danger," Kane added.
Agreeing with that statement is
Adrianne Gerson, who chaired
last year's exhibit. Gerson also
supplied four tables with her own,
private collection of items. "I wish
people would just want to share
their treasures with their Jewish
neighbors. We have a policeman
to secure the area where the ex-
hibit is," Gerson stated. "All the
tables are roped off so nothing can
be handled by the public."
Another participant is Sonny
Kaufman. Sonny creates images
on linoleum. He has depicted
scenes of Sabbath candlelighting,
the Shofar sounding and the
Western Wall. Many of his Jewish
theme works will be on display.
If you would like to become in-
volved and enrich the lives of
others by displaying your art/ar-
tifacts, contact Felice Greenatein
or Adrianne Gerson at 752-2337.
Organizations
B'NAI B'RITH WOMEN
Women from 19 organizations
representing over three million
members celebrated United Na-
tions Day at B'nai B'rith Women
headquarters in Washington,
D.C.. by launching a campaign for
Senate ratification of the UN Con-
vention on elimination of all forms
of discrimination against women.
AMIT WOMEN
The Florida Council of Amit
Women has expanded and now
operates s full tisae office at 633
NE 167 St.. Suite 815, N. Miami
Beach, to service members in
the North Dade and Broward
areas. For information call
661-1444.
ORT
The Woodlands North Chapter
of Women's American ORT
recently held a gala paid-up
membership luncheon and fashion
show. The fashions were imported
from Israel and France, designed
and made by students in ORT
schools.
Program chairwoman Gert Jaf-
fee was assisted by Barbara
Goldstein, chairwoman of the day,
and Hennie Leibowitz, fashion
coordinator.
ALEF
In Dade, Broward and Palm
Beach, a group of Jewish 'bam'
radio operators have gotten
together and called themselves,
'alef.' The group is looking for ad-
ditional members in the tri-county
area. The members meet on the
sir at different frequencies to
talk. On the 20 meter band, 14.327
MC at 7:30 p.m. a group called
"Mispocha" converse. For infor-
mation contact Hy Fox, Klpsk.
8103 NW 100 Ter, Tamarac.
722-6775.
Israel Denounces Apartheid
UNITED NATIONS (JTA) -
Israel sharply denounced South
Africa's policy of apartheid, say-
ing it was against Jewish tradition
and values, and called on the
Pretoria government to im-
mediately stop its apartheid
system.
Addressing the General
Assembly's debate on apartheid,
Binyamin Netanyahu, Israel's
Ambassador to the United Na-
tions, also charged that the Arabs,
who are condemning Israel for its
ties with South Africa, have more
trade and more dealings with the
South African government than
Israel.
According to Netanyahu, 95
percent of the oil imported by
South Africa comes from Arab
sources. He said that Israel's
' trade with South Africa is
marginal and amounts to only 0.4
percent of that country's total
foreign trade.
Charging the Arabs with
hypocrisy and double-talk in their
attacks against Israel's alleged
support of the apartheid policies,
Netanyahu charged that the
Arsbs themselves practiced
policies of supporting racism. He
exhibited the German magazine.
Bunte. which published in its issue
this week an interview with Nazi
war criminal Alois Brunner, who
has been living in Damascus for
many years under the protection
of the Syrian government.
He also recalled that Saudi
Arabia only recently abolished
slavery by law, and charged that
slavery still can be found in prac-
tice in that country.
The Arabs consistently tried to
link Israel to the apartheid
policies of South Africa, charging
it with commercial and military
collaboration with Pretoria.


T|
Page 14 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, November 15, 1986
'I Know What It Meant To Be A Jew:
Herschel Bernardi
Another headline for this story
might be: "How red polka-dot
pants changed my life."
Waiting to go on stage to
reprise his famous role as Tevye in
"Fiddler on the Roof," Herschel
Bernardi happened to glance up at
the Fiddler. He always knew the
Fiddler wore a red costume, but at
this particular moment, Bernardy
looked more carefully and noticed
that his pants were actually red
polka-dotted.
"I saw those red polka-dots as
bullet holes! I received such an
emotional jolt. I felt what it meant
to be a Jew. I knew in another way
what the Fiddler stood for. That
moment, that realization changed
the way I played Tevye and chang-
ed my life as a Jew."
Bernardi's Jewishness has
always been important to him.
He's never been a religious Jew
he was criticized for performing
on Yom Kippur several years ago,
an event for which he has
apologized. But he has always con-
sidered himself a "cultural Jew."
He has contributed to and made
a living from Jewish culture.
Bernardi was born into a family
of traveling Yiddish actors, the
youngest of five children. His
Temple News
An Orthodox synagogue has
formed in Plantation. The first
services will be held on Nov. 16.
For further information contact
485-4859 or 581-0016.
TEMPLE BETH AM
Sisterhood members of Temple
Beth Am are asked to perform
three important functions before
leaving home for a meeting. First,
they should bring canned goods,
which will be donated to the need-
ly. The cans must be marked with
a K or U. Second, members should
consider the extensive inventory
shown by its Judaica Shop. Lastly,
money and/or books are being
constantly collected for a
children's library. As the Hebrew
school has grown, so has the need
for books. Attention to these sug-
gestions will give the members a
lift and characterize her atten-
dance as meaningful in the best
tradition.
Bar/Bat Mitzvahs
RAMAT SHALOM
The Bat Mitzvah of Abby
Levine was celebrated at the
Saturday Nov. 9 service at Ramat
Shalom. Plantation.
TEMPLE KOI. AMI
On Saturday morning Nov. 16,
the B'nai Mitzvah of Sari Sum-
men, daughter of Beaty and
Mark Summers of Plantation, and
James Glataer, son of Gayle and
Abe Glatzer of Plantation, will be
celebrated at Temple Kol Ami,
Plantation.
TEMPLE BETH AM
The Bar Mitzvah of Jeffrey An-
son of Janet and Commis-
sioner Mitch Anton of Coral Spr-
ings, will take place at the Satur-
day morning Nov. 16 service at
Temple Beth Am. Mara-at*
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
Jaaaey M. Becker, son of
Elizabeth and Donald Becker of
Fort Lauderdale, will celebrate
his Bar Mitzvah at the Saturday
morning Nov. 16 service at Tem-
ple Emanu-El. Fort Lauderdale.
Grow
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL
Weady Grose, daughter of
Karen and Jerry Cutler will
become a Bat Mitzvah celebrant
on Friday night Nov. 15 at Temple
Beth Israel, Sunrise.
TEMPLE BETH TORAH
The Bat Mitzvah of Rachel
Sckaltz, daughter of Esta and
Edward Schultz of N. Lauderdale,
will be celebrated at the Friday
night Nov. 15 service at Temple
Beth Torah, Tamarac.
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parent* Helena and Berel Bernar-
di came to the U.S. in 1902 from
Galkia, and Berlin respectively.
Berel Bernardi had been a semi-
star in Berlin but it was in the
U.S. that the couple developed
characters which would become
an indelible part of Jewish folk-
culture.
Helena Bernardi portrayed a
bossy, pushy busybody named
Yenta Tellabenda. Herschel says
it was his mother's character
which synonymixed the name
Yenta with a busybody. He notes
that Shalom Aleichem's original
story on which "Fiddler on the
Roof" was based did have the
name Yenta in it.
Herschel's father played
Yenta's husband, Moishe Kapoier
who did everything backwards.
His name in Yiddish folklore now
means a "sacrifice."
Bernardi speaks woefully of the
disappearance of the Yiddish
theater. "When your audience
dies, you die. People who spoke
Yiddish are not around in large
numbers anymore."
A number of years ago, Bernar-
di, while traveling with his one-
man show, was surprised to learn
that while Yiddish was dying out
in America, there were pockets in
Canada in which Yiddish was very
much alive.
Because the U.S. has a national
image, and Canada does not,
there are enclaves of Yiddish
speaking communities in Canada,
where even the children apeak
fluent Yiddish. "Because there is
no national image to adhere to like
there is here, they do not have the
drive toward assimilation as there
has been in the United States." he
explains.
He falls into the category of ac-
tors such as the late Yul Brynner,
Carol Channing, and Richard Har-
ris who have become closely iden-
tified with a character they have
played on stage over and over
again for many years.
"This is really an old tradition
which has not been kept in the
U.S. In Europe, an actor or ac-
tress would take a classic play and
travel all over the world for the
good part of one's career. An ex-
ample was Sarah Bernhardt.
These actors and actress had
previously proven themselves by
doing all kinds of other thinjrs."
How can an actor or actress
play the tame role every night for
years without burning-out?
"Knowing what you're doing.
Knowing the techniques to keep
fresh."
Everyone knows how popular
"Fiddler on the Roof has been in
America, appealing to audiences,
young and old, Jewish and Gen-
tile. But did you know what a
smash hit Fiddler was in Japan?
When Bernardi was invited to
view the Japanese production of
Fiddler, he couldn't imagine such
a phenomenon. "The Japanese
culture is so alien to our Jewish
culture, except for one thing
the respect for family. The
Japanese loved Fiddler because it
was about the love and respect
found within s family."
Candelighting Times
No?. 1 5:21 p.m.
Noy. 8 5:17 p.m.
Nov. 15 5:14 p.m.
Nov. 22 5:12 p.m.
Nov. 29 5:11 p.m.
A Diversified
Jewish Quiz
By RABBI
DAVID W. GORDON
1- Define a Galitzianer.
1- Define a Galitzianer.
2- What is the immediate
response (Prayer) upon hearing
(G-d forbid) of the demise of
someone?
8- What is the evening Service
called?
4-What is the equivalent
Hebrew phrase to the simple
English expression. "Thank
God5*?
5-Who was known aa "The Peo-
ple's Attorney" and brilliant
Justice of the Supreme Court?
6- What is meant by respect for
the community?
7- In the concept of "Jewish
Chosenness" can you complete
the following quote: "How odd of
G-d to choose the Jews"?
8-Who said, "Spiritually We
Are All Semites?
9- Name the first woman Rabbi.
10- Who said, "More than Israel
Jm kept the SabUfj, *..
has kept I8r*eirn'thJ
** A Jew from (-K-.
wm formerly ZS*1
*ded tofij*
2- One recites "BU-*,
S-Maariv-refit.j
***. the c:d
Services; ShachanW
fecond and Minchiy
the third.
4- Baruch Hashem J
the name of G-d).
6- Louis D. Branow.
6- Never to do ,,
^trading or shameful in L
^'it isn't odd the jj
8- Pope Pius XI.
9- Regina Jonas of
Germany.
10-Achad Ha am i
Ginsberg)
consebvative
CONSEBVATIVE SYNAGOGUE Of COCONUT CREEE. aatt
Fadaral Saving*. Lyona Road and Cleant* Crank Parkway. Coconut O
ncaa Friday at 8 p m and Satin nay at am. Raatt Jaatak Darky.
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTS! (721-7860). 1101 NW 57th St. Tan
Sarricanv8ui>day through Friday 8:30 am. 6 p.m Late r>vty
day 8:46 am. BasM Enrt F "
TEMPLE UTI AH r*746aOL 7106 Royal Pan. Bhrd.. Narrate S3041!
Monday through Frkmjr BJ0 am.. I pm Friday late name* 8 p.m ; Sal
6 pm.; Sanaa? la, 6pm. BahMPunt PMhJa. BaaW EaarRaaDr.:
Cats. Caanar Irtang Dmiis
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL (711 MM0), 7100 W. Oakland Park Bird. Sawka.1
Sai ikon: Monday throogk Tnaranay am.. 6:30 p.m.. Friday 8 am.. 5pn.,
Saturday 5JO p.m.; Sanaa* a.m.. M0 pa. BahM Smart N. Twy
TEMPLE METH UBAEL OP DEEEPTELD BEACH (421 -7000). Mil
Bhrd, Dnarflaid Baaeh. 33441 Sarrtm. Waadij through Pnday 8J0an,l
Friday into aamoa 0 nja,; Waff an) fcq ajny. and at ranflahghtm* mm I
TEMPLE B'NAI MOSHE (Oil 1880), 14S4 BE 3rd St.. Fompano Bam, 1
Sarrieao: Friday p.m. Canaar Jihnaak Hanmraaa
TEMPLE SHAARAY TXEDEE 741-0286). 4000 Pkw bland Rd., Sam* I
Sanhoa: Sunday through Friday S am., 6 p.m ; Late Fnda)- nrnc* 8 p.a.
day 8 46 a.m :30 p.m. RakM Howard 8. Eaaiaa. Canter Jack Mareamt
TEMPLE SHOLOM (9424410). IB SB 11 A*a. Pompano Baas. SMS) I
Monday through Friday 846 am, iamgi: Monday through Thuraoajit!
Friday .....m at 8 Satarday and Sunday t am BahM aamaat AprL '
Banald faanar.
CONGREGATION BETH HILLEL OP MABGATE (T74 30901. 7(40
Bird.. Margate. 38063 anil 111 Saaday throagh Friday 8 15 m 530 pi
Friday aarnea p.m. Saturday 8:46 am. 6:30 p.m. Bakaa Darid Matmar.
HBBBEW C0N6BBCATI0N OP LAUDEBHILL (733-8660). 2048 NW
Laudarhifl. 33318. Smitna Bam day throagh Friday 8:30 am 530 pa
H 46 US BahM laraal Hakyara
NORTH LAUDERDALE BSBBEW CONGREGATION (722 7807 or 78;
Barrkaa: at Banyon Laaaa Coada Chumoaaa. BMh) Banry Rd Tamarac.
p.m.. Satarday 846 am. Camrtaa B. Prior. Plliliiat
ORTHODOX
TEMPLE OREL B'NAI RAPHAEL lis S a.m., 6 p.m. Satarday 8:46 a-av. I pa. Caanar Pan! Stuart
SYNAGOGUE OP LNTERRART CHABAD (748-1777), 7770 NW 44 St.
Park Want, Suariaa. 38821 iMaa, Baaday through Friday 8 am
Saturday t am. 6:80 p.m
TOU>C ISRAEL OP DEEEPTELD BEACH (all 1887). 1880 W Himtorol
Daarftald Baneh. SS441. Bnrrtaaa: Suaday throogk Friday 8 am and I
Saturday 8 46 a. m and auadown
YOUNG I8RAEL OP BOLLYWOOO-FORT LAUDERDALE (***[
Sthimg Rd.. Fort' i\ II 88811 inlini Monday through r- nday.< r
and nindown. Saturday. 8 am., ainns. Baaday 8 am., aundown RakMi
Dark ^
CONCRECATION MIDGAL DAYTD 7MM8R8). 8B76 W ***?*
88811 aarrlaaa:DaMy8aav;naad6n^;8aawday8:45ami15
M Caaha Braiiliii. Ciagtiaatlia iiaajim r
BBRSflaHMBBl
RECONBTRUCTIONIST
RAMAT SHALOM (471-hm 118S1 W. Broward HW-. fjaMMMa
***aa: Friday. 8:16 p.m.; Rial day. 10
BasM EBtat SkidtMl Cl
TEMPLE BETH OBB (768-8281). 61
riaao: Friday 8 p.m.; Batnraai 10
TEMPLE B'NAI
Maaarah CkmpnW.
Dr.. Coral Sonny*J"|
_ OP DEEEPTELD BEACH (^^-STj
W. rKSafccro Bhrd DaarfWd Beach. 83441. Pr
BahM Nathan H Fkm Canaar Mnrria Lnla.ir
TKMPLE EMANU-EL (7818810). SStt W. Oahmad Park Bhrd Lau^J
>m.. Satarday. onry on hohday
RaBoa. Caanar RMa Maor.
31811 Sarrfaaa. Friday H 6 p.ml]
Bat Mtemh Rnkht Jattray BaBa_
TEMPLE KOL AMI (472 IMS). 8300 Pater. Rat. Pmamlini RW^
day 816 pja Saturday 10 SO a.m. BahM BmaMna J. Harr. Canter G**1
URERAL JEWBOI TEMPLE OP COCONUT CBBEK (71*V Sj*
y ?*> twin, monthry at Cnhmry PraakjrlanaB ("nurrh. aw
Croak Parkway BahM Braaa S. Warahal. Caanar Barhara Rahirte-
TEMPLE RAT TAM (Ml 430S1 McGaw Hnl 1408 N. Podaral H^T.^pl
Rataad Pranhyteimn Church), Ft I aailwdali **
naini.atspm Canter Richard Rrown.



v .....*>.>* *** *

,...;, v. fMflfcf* **'*!"* *W W
r
.Friday,November 16, 1985rTt>e Jewish Floridian of Greater FortUuderdaje___Page Uj
jerusaiemwith Love... Newswire/Washington
[daica High School Graduate
ianks Federation For Helping
... mved from David Or-
*i!L,- from Federation; Judaxea
, Broward, currently at
>' ; rMifem. and iw-aten to
feTor /IfrraAam J. GitUtom and
f ,. ,,,/wimsfrator. Judaica /Yi0
Eft* 2ttafft.2S
W* >md. wkirJi enabUd
^syOMorrdbylheJHb.
I Gittebon and Mrs. Horowitz,
.( doing? I am doing just fine.
Cff t" live Fir1 of all. I want to say
Lio both of you. If not for the two of you,
luw where I would be now or what I
TtarninK I remember the first time I
', Judaica High School when you. Dr.
.came to mv th grade Junior Confirma
* | vts so upset and resentful that the
nsbeinc discontinued at Beth Torah.
wt never went to JUS. I am so glad that
rt to learn about Judaism overrode those
So j Went to JUS that first year and en
Lt it was the next year when you came
trowm that things started changing. I
[retting more involved because there was
I be involved in. JUS stopped becoming just
tolearn about Judaism, and became in addi-
Iplace to see my friends (since I made so
%ooes there), and it also became a place I
jnied to go to. something I looked forward
jieek. And then came that day you handed
pamphlet about The Israel Connection."
L probably altered my entire life, for the
Jnght add During those few months that
worked so hard to get my acceptance, we
Inch closer. 1 also became much more in-
[with the Federation and in the Jewish
lly, I got my acceptance, and then,
rtke financial problem I would have paying
mi both helped me get a scholarship. I
Ian-marl a veYy spea*ltifor*h learning and growing experience.
"ausf of JHS and especially the two of you. I
fulfilled a dream that I thought would not be possi-
ble until 1 had children of my own at age 16. When
I returned. Judaism was so much more a part of
my life. As I finished out my high school years. I
realized I needed to learn more about my Judaism,
and though JHS was a big help, I needed
something much more encompassing And so
again with your help here I am living in Jerusalem
and learning at the Hebrew University. If I went
to college in the U.S., I would've had to take
classes that mean nothing and have no relevance
to my life. But here, despite the very large amount
of Hebrew hours I have, I don't think I could have
gotten a better semester schedule or one I would
enjoy as much. Anyway, I just want to say that you
two are very special and I love you both for what
you've done for me. I hope that someday I can
return to the Jewish community what you've both
given me. One word of advice. If you should ever
come across someone else who wants to come here,
help them to go through the American Friends,
not the Aliyah Center. The A-l visa has caused me
a few problems, but that's trivial right now.
My schedule this semester is 19 hours per week
of Hebrew, two hours Hebrew Language Lab
(listening to a tape and answering questions about
it), four hours Talmudic thoughts and methods,
two hours The Arab/Israel Conflict, two hours An
Introduction to Jewish History in Biblical and
Temple periods, and four hours of Issues and
Perspectives in Contemporary Jewish Education.
My schedule is not definite however. Classes start
tomorrow, but we don't have a definite schedule
until Nov. 7. We can sit in on any classes we like to
see if we want them on our autumn semester
schedule until then. Besides my regular classes I
also hope to find the time to sit in on other classes
at a Yeshiva in the Old City. For the Judaic Studies
Departments, I need to speak very fluent Hebrew
by next October, so I probably have to take
another two Ulpans next summer and complete ex-
tra Hebrew levels during the year. So I don't know
how many months it will be before I see you both
again, but you are in my thoughts often.
Love, l
David
THE REAGAN administration lauded both the peace proposal
put forward by Israeli Prime Minister Shimon Peres and the
qualified praise it received from Jordan's King Hussein.
A PROPOSAL to raise the amount of cash transfer funds
designated for Egypt in the 1986 foreign aid bill was blocked in a
Senate subcommittee, reflecting lingering resentment of Egypt's
handling of the Achille Lauro hijacking.
A SPECIAL delegation of Jewish community leaders from up-
per New York State cities Albany. Schenectady, Tory and Buf
falo presented key Congressional figures with a petition bear-
ing the signature of 2,000 Holocaust survivors and their sup-
porters that demanded "immediate and aggressive" deportation
from the United States of "all individuals found guilty of Nazi war
crimes."
THE SENATE, by a 97-1 vote passed a resolution preventing
President Reagan's proposed $1.9 billion arms sale to Jordan
from going through before March 1 unless direct negotiations bet-
ween Israel and Jordan have begun.
Peace Negotiations
Health/Medical Newswire
|T BSEAST
ION
CANCER
hy x-ray ex-
i of the breasts is the
i single method for
breast cancer, accor-
researchers at the
University in SL
Rswuri.
(study published by the
j said the group has
o iiathemaUcal models to
frwins decide when,
dhow a woman should be
far breast cancer. The
friers conclude that
I'W and the competence
Mokfist should be the
nt factors affecting
her decision to have a
mammogram.
The reaearchers' models con-
sider accuracy, financial and
social costs of the tests, future
costs of undetected cancers and
the possibility of radiation ex-
posure inducing breast cancers.
The findings indicate the benefits
clearly outweigh costs, and
women over age 45 should have a
mammogram annually.
The model formulas are on flop-
py disks used with personal com-
puters at the university. This
make* it possible for information
about a woman's age, number of
children, breast-feeding history
and symptoms of breast cancer to
rael Bonds Campaign News
SET
'*? Chasan will be
jnth the Israel Bonds
"Honor at Somerset's
2j5". to be held Tuea-
Hall, Phase 1.2870
Ur've. Lauderdale
'Goodman
" Choral
Harold R
fcr *
'Jj"j sponsored by
[^^Committee*
Tf.n- Sun Schwartz
W'lk*nfeld are Co-
will lead the
Group, with
Rosenberg.
l^AbeL
*d~LUvm *""' be
WET*? with the
STurl0^* Scroll of
^"V. November 20.
Ckaaaa
7:80 p.m. in the Lime Bay Recrea-
tion Hall. 9190 Lime Bay Blvd.
Tamarac. Eddie Schaffer will
entertain.
Refreshments will be served,
courtesy of Joseph Edelman The
event is sponsored by Bnai B'rith
Israel Bond Committee. Chair
man is Cart WeiU. Co Chairman is
Joseph Edelman. and Honorary
Chairman is Joseph Milstein.
be calculated, and it recommends
that the woman have or not have a
mammogram. These disks will be
made available to other health
care facilities in 1985.
The researchers' report sug-
gested that women ask important
questions about radiation level,
frequency of equipment checks
and number of mammograms per-
formed when deciding on a mam-
mographic center.
Data used for the models were
generated by 10.000 women who
made 50,000 visits to the five-year
project in Missouri. During that
time, 152 breast cancers were
detected in the group.
The university's study did not
address the value of breast self-
examination because many of
10.000 participants were not will-
ing to perform the exam
methodically. Consequently, the
researchers suggested combina-
tions of breast cancer detection
methods be used.
They said a woman should con-
duct self-examinations and seek
clinical palpation. And when these
detection measures are incor-
porated with mammography, the
researchers said, the chances of
cancers being detected are above
80 percent.
Regarding radiation risk, the
team concluded that "benefits of
mammography outweigh hazards
in centers where accuracy rates
are high and false alarms are in
frequent, but vice versa at centers
with low detection rates."
They said women should try to
evaluate the competence of the
radiologists who classify mam
mograms at the centers they are
considering. The study s leader
said centers that perform a large
number of mammograms and
have only a few individuals
reading the films are usually good
choices.
Continued
dissolution of rfussein's
partnership with the PLO.
"But what is the point of
showering praises on the
king until he has parted
ways with the PLO"?
Industry and Trade
Minister Ariel Sharon was
among several Likud
members of the coalition
government who attacked
Peres's approach to the
peace process. Sharon said
ne was deeply concerned
that Peres was taking
unilateral steps to talk to
the Arab states involved
without consulting with
Vice Premier Shamir.
Following Sharon's attack
on Peres, Labour Party
secretary-general Uzi
Baram called for the
minister to resign from the
government. Baram urged
hamir to restrain Sharon,
saying that "Sharon is do-
ing what he himself terms
'sticking a knife in the na-
tion's back.* "
In Washington, Prime
Minister Peres, when asked
about Shamir's most recent
criticism of his policy
toward Jordan, expressed
the hope that Shamir would
take another look at the na-
tional unity government's
basic agreement on the mat-
ter of opening negotiations
with Jordan.
His remarks were echoed
by Labour Party leaders in
Jerusalem, who accused the
Likud of violating the coali-
tion agreement by criticiz-
ing Peres while he is abroad.
Many members of the party
secretariat called for the
from Page 1
break-up of the coalition
over the issue.
Absorption Minister
Ya'acov Tsur, Labour, said
that "the two parties differ
too sharply on foreign policy
to make continued partner-
ship in the national unity -
coalition possible. It is
highly doubtful that such a
government could carry on
negotiations with Jordan
ana the Palestinians. If such
talks become a realistic op-
tion, I shall strive to see that
the coalition is disbanded,"
and new elections called.
At week's end, the furore
appeared to subside as
Snamir gave a low-key
justification for the barrage
of criticism from his party.
He said that far from under- ,
mining Peres's sensitive
mission, the criticism
strengthens the premier's
positions.
"Internal disagreements
in the Knesset are an
organic part of our political
life, and some are a bless-
ing," he said.
At the weekend, Shamir
said in a radio interview
that he would know if Peres
had held some secret top-
level meetings recently
for example with Soviet
leader Mikhail Gorbachev,
or with King Hussein.
Shamir stated clearly that
such secret diplomatic
moves, of which he would be
informed, do not have to be
brought to the knowledge of,
the government or even the
inner cabinet, as long as no
operative political decisions
are required.
Before vou sele< i .i I uneral Director
COMPARE
Our Price Our Facilities Our Service
Our Experience Our Pre-arranged Special Plan
In time of need nothing is more important than
personalattention
SIEGEL
MEMORIAL CHAPEL
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Page 16 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, November 16, 1986
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J


Full Text
Pge 8 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday. November 15, 1986
Where Your Contribution Goes ...
The United Jewish Appeal
The United Jewish Appeal
was created by the
American Jewish communi-
ty in 1939 as a direct reac-
tion to the infamous
Kristallnacht of a year
earlier, when the
synagogues of Germany
were burned and scores of
Jews beaten and killed. The
shattering of the glass of
Jewish storefronts was
brutally symbolic of decades
of oppression and persecu-
tion throughout Europe.
For American Jewry, it was
also the catalyst for creating
a centralized fund-raising
body that could mobilize the
resources needed to meet
the crisis confronting the
Jews of Europe on the eve
of World War IIV*
The three signatories to
UJA"s Charter were Rabbi
Jonah B. Wise, Rabbi Abba
Hillel Silver and William
Rosenwald. They
represented, respectively,
the American Joint
Distribution Committee, the
United Palestine Appeal
and the National Coor-
dinating Committee for the
Aid of Refugees. The UJA
thus became the central
American Jewish fund-
raising organization for the
work of relief and rehabilita-
tion in Europe, for im-
migrantion and settlement
in Palestine and for refugee
aid in the United States
The United Jewish Appeal
symbolizes the Jewish
lifeline extended by the
Jews of America to
S reserve and strengthen
ewish life everywhere it
exists throughout the world.
While UJA is primarily
devoted to fund-raising, it
has come to which the
American Jewish communi-
ty asserts its commitment*
and interests and makes its
views known to the entire
country.
The United Jewish Appeal
serves as the joint fund-
raising organization for its
two corporate members, the
United Jewish Appeal, Inc.,
and the American Joint
Distribution Committee.
With the funds distributed
throughout its history to
these beneficiaries, the UJA
has contributed to the
rescue, rehabilitation and
resettlement of more than
three million men, women
and children, more than 1.8
million of them in Israel.
This has been accomplish-
ed through annual cam-
paigns in American Jewish
communities. The bulk of
these contributions is
received through allocations
to UJA from the campaigns
of Jewish Federations and
Welfare Funds in major
U.S. communities.
Each Federation in-
dependently decides the
percentage of its funds that
will In- allocated U> the UJA
for worldwide needs.
WOMEN'S DIVISli
Why Women's Division?
Esther Lerner, president of the
Women's Division of the Jewish
Federation, came across this arti-
cle and thought that it would clear
up a few questions from women
who are not sure what the
Women' Division is.
Women's Division is an
arm of the United Jewish
community operating its
own fund-raising campaign
and educational programm-
ing. That seems like such a
simple description, but, in
fact, we certainly have been
doing exactly that.
As we proceed with our cam-
paign, we often hear the question,
"Why should I make a pledge
separate and apart from my
husband'"
This seems to be a contradiction
to those who are so forceful in
seeking their rights in business, in
the professions, in the arts and in
the voting booths. These same
women should not try to abdicate
their responsibilities in this par-
ticular vital area of compassion
and humanity.
It is a moral responsibility that
Esther Leraer
we, as Jews, must assume simply
because we have no choice cer-
tainly not if we are concerned
with the Jewish survival of our
children and their children after
them. The justification for
Women's Division is the same as
for any other women's organisa-
tion. Women are a part of the

community, 1^
community.
In the traditional j-J
My husband mT" 9
mother claesJTj
her obligation i
Women. But as u Q
Her Own Right toT
fellow Jews. Infi-a
rather than her hishJl
dthe'-puAlw-bwS
on the wall, and vfcul
Israel and the poor.
The Women's Dmssj
modern expression of i
womanly involvement]
ter of evolution tod u
technique, not a newi
concept. We cannot i
fsct that through a .
volvement comes the<
the family, and oftam,
a profound influence oaL
band. This is why. whai
"Why a Women'i
respond in typical Jeriij
with another question:'
women not give oft__
their funds for Jewish i
I
IN ISRAEL
Through the Jewish Agency
An all-inclusive one-semester scholarship for a
student from a Development town.
TrNctst:SlfMfj

*T
THE WOMEN'S DIVISION Leadership
meeting at the Plantataion home of Susan
Canarxdc. Dr. Marilyn Segal, of tieNoZ
^nwersity Family Center^lidteda Uv7y
iTaTTS, "7** "Transmitting VahZ
M TJG2*J*+ ". P^ured Jo Ann
M Levy (standing), chairman of the commit-
tee, addressing the group ofS0womn\
tended the program. The next moms? I
is scheduled for Dee. 11 at the PlantatiMl
of Lisa Shulman. For further inform
about the Leadership Development Grtm
tact the Women's Division of the ln\
Federation at 7+8-8*00.
Hijackers' Purpose:
To Kill In Israel
Jewish Agency To Develop
Tourism To Aid in Galilee
In an exclusive to the New York
Times, Thomas Friedman
reported from Jerusalem that the
PLO hijacking of the Achilles
Lsuro was a mistake. The real
target was not the ship, but
civilians at the Israeli port of
Aahdod the ship's next stop.
Friedman is well-connected
with PLO and other Arab sources
from his Pulitxer Prise winning
stint ss the New York Times
bureau chief in Beirut. His report
was baaed on PLO documents
released in Cyprus, as well as on
other Arab sources, and on Israeli
sources. All sources, wrote Fried-
man, agreed on essentials.
The PLO hijackers intended to
ride as passengers on the Achilles
Lsuro to Aahdod. They had suc-
cessfully boarded the necessary
arms for their planned terrorist
killings upon disembarkation at
Aahdod. Their plan went awry
when their arms were discovered
on the Achilles Lauro. To defend
themselves, they hijacked the
ship, and then, to justify the hi
jacking, they demanded the
Israeli release of 50 Palestinian
terrorists, held in Israeli jails a
purely extemporaneous demand.
When word reached PLO head-
quarters that the plan had gone
awry, and in the aftermath of
world outcry, Arafat stepped in to
negotiate the hijackers release,
reported Friedman.
By GERALD S.NAGEL
UJA Watch Desk Editor
SFAI). larael Seeking to
build on nature's blessing of ma-
jestic mountains and the serene
W<*qriWkrr,sh* ktmrn
Settlement Department phuVto
develop Israels Upper GaEeeas
njor overseas vacation center.
..^'^Gourelick. the Agency's
Upper Gdilee SettlementdJec
tor. said in an interview m this an
cent aty with 60.000 current
EftJt** >0 to ,5 SLZ
based Moshanm could be initiated
>n the next five years "nrnwir
funds are available" "* *
we^L^T ? $l6 mU,,on *
we initiate two to three new act
Uemenu.y^..^ J
whose reg.on encomp...?.
U* border with Syria, well within
Israel s pre-,%7 borders. "FW
eachi additional $1-1.5 million, we
We could put $9 million more to
work within a year if we have It"
Gourelick said tourism's
oevelopment here would provide
JbjJor farm-reared youngsters
S?T w-^riM nxUla; diver-
whU"^'nortWn economy.
wt?^ wJ!!crei*n|y #>-*<*
EJLi "^ nortn ofHsifa;
J/North. down to less than
?*r,*nt counting the
heavdy-Jewiah cities of NaL
fd Acco; and encourage lanaeUs
Nearly all the 150 Galilee set,
*?*? M -
"*-iicy care, have a mi /
economic activity, but overS fe
economy of the JfoaAaim il
agricultural. ^""
The region's tourism i
include the Sea of GsBk* i
for boating and ^e*Ti
development, and trw*\
beautiful mountains ameM
hiking, climbing, P*C*J*J
horseback riding. Vef
tesnperstures are usualfri
warm and. Gourd*
"There is no rainfall from i
through Succot"
American Jews can help e .
blueprints into,t vsj
dreamland by conuibutmfj
Jewish Agency Setup
Department through^
Jewish Appeal/FeowstJ
paugn. the main "rW"
Agency funds, r*hsp
them will come her* '
inUme.aiidwillbeshkwsJI
udly, "I helped make tWn
come true."


Fridaj^November 15, 1985/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 9
CAMPAIGN '86 Federation/United Jewish Appeal
V
N'S DIVISION PLANTATION
COMMITTEE met recently at
\of Marcia Schwartz, Committee
to begin planning far the 1986
division campaign in the Planta-
anda area. Pictured at the meeting
\ng, left to right): Susan Canarick;
ttor; Anne Chernin, Women's Divi-
Marcia Schwartz, Plantation
Campaign Committee chairman; and Bar-
bara Wiener, Women's Division Campaign
chairman. Seated (left to right): Lois Polish,
Lisa Shulman, Marcia Steinfeld and Carole
Skolnik. Serving on the Committee but not pic-
tured are Karen Waxman and Sheila Grenitz.
Anyone interested in serving on the Plantar
tion Campaign Committee, contact the
Womena Division of the Jewish Federation at
7U8-8U00.
ate Division Leaders to Meet Nov. 18
Federation/United
ppeal leaders of the 22
him areas of Margate
their second city-wide
ftn Monday Nov. 18 at 10
Temple Beth Am. 7205
b Blvd Margate.
Dg the initial ground-
fcned at the last planning:
representatives from the
condominium areas will
their plans for their
eratiun C'JA functions.
i Katzberg. chairman of
Bter Margate Division of
ration C'JA campaign,
tunced that Sam Lezell
as co-chairman for the
m has also announced
William Katzberg
that he has prepared a 50-minute
slide show about Israel which may
C0NDO UPDATE
Woodlands Division
Gearing Up For UJA
The leadership of the Woodlands Division of the
1986 Jewish Federation/United Jewish Appeal
campaign have been meeting on a regular basis
with the Woodlands UJA Committee to map out
plans for the 1986 Federation/UJA campaign, ac-
cording to Dan Klein, Woodlands Division UJA
chairman:
Klein, along with Harold L. Oshry, Woodlands
Special Gifts chairman; Morris Small. Dinner
chairman and Sol Schulman, Dinner co-chairman,
have placed an added emphasis on the needs of
Israel this year.
"Our goal is to raise the dollars that will support
the social needs of Israel as well as the needs of our
local Jewish agencies here in Fort Lauderdale,"
Klein stated. "Now. more than ever, our help is
needed."
O Briefly
MAJOR GIFTS DIVISION
UJA Workshop Oct. 27
featured Elton Kerness, stan-
ding, former executive vice
president of the United Jewish
Appeal. Among the key leaders
attending were, left, Brian J.
Sherr, Federation president
and Daniel Cantor, chairman.
Major Gifts Worker Training.
Sam Lezell
be used at special gifts and other
group functions.
Builders and Allied Trades
Division Meets Nov. 18
The Builders and Allied Trades Division of the 1986 Jewish
Federation United Jewish Appeal campaign will kick off the cam-
paign with a planning and organizational meeting on Monday,
Nov. 18 at the Oriole Homes Conference Room. Co-Chairing the
Division are Mark Levy and Richard Finkelstein.
Being Jewish In America ...
lerdale West
pierdale West communi-
"f of the 1986 Jewish
United Jewish Appeal
hill hold its Evening for
Sunday Dec. 15 at 8 p.m.
[Lauderdale West
k Chairing the Lauder-
f Area UJA campaign is
^*tein with Leon Ap-
Mdstein, Louis Grolnic
I Horowitz serving as co-
|A8a side note, at the
[DV services conducted
nerdale West residents,
I 86 Federation/UJA
One People,
One Destiny
Excerpts From Charles Silberman's
Book 'Jews in America.'
Lime Bay
Chairman Eugene Popkin and Mrs. Popkin to host Special Gifts
event for 1986 UJA Campaign, at their Lime Bay Home The
event will be on Dec. 12 at 7:30 p.m Jan Sal.t. Assistant Ex-
ecutive Director will be the speaker. The minimum is $100.
WHAT'S HAPPENING
fBER
Ij* Woodmont Awards. Kickoff
F;9 a.m. Woodmont Country Club.
fBER
*7?U8ineM Executive Network
5^730 p.m. Marina Bay.
L Su^l?8e Lak^ IV UJA Breakfast
u*n. Clubhouse.
1^. f Women's Division Executive
Board Meeting. 9:30 a.m. At Federation.
Dec 12 Community Relations Committee
(CRC) Meeting. 7:30 p.m. At Federation;
Lime BTspecial Gifte Event. 7:30 p.m.
Home of Eugene Popkin.
Dec 14 Major Gifts Dinner. $10,000
minimum. Marriott Harbour Beach.
For information call 748-8400.
. .. Jewishness no longer is a
significant handicap in running
for any office except that of presi-
dent and, perhaps, vice-president.
Although fear of anti-Semitism
makes it unlikely that a Jew could
gain the Republican or
Democratic presidential nomina-
tion in the near future, some
younger politicians believe that
that barrier too will fall .
... Some critics of American
Jewish life dismiss the growth in
observance of Chanukah and
Passover as a trivialization. Many
of those who light Chanukah
candles, they point out, do not
recite (or know) the blessings that
are supposed to accompany the
ceremony, and many a Passover
seder is little more than a par-
ticularly warm family dinner par-
ty at which matzoh-ball soup is
served and a prayer or two
recited .. The observations are
true enough; they also happen to
be beside the point, for they
reflect a profound misunderstan-
ding of the nature of the change
that has occurred ... Despite the
frequent forecasts of Judaism's
imminent demise, secular Jews
are turning to religious rituals to
affirm their Jewish identity .. .
... The question ... is not
whether American Jews are
observant according to some ab-
solute scale; it is whether an inex-
orable erosion is going on,
whereby each generation is less
observant than the preceding one,
as straight line theory would lead
one to expect. The answer is that
it is not. True enough, there had
been a generation-by-generation
decline in observance of certain
rituals as second- and third-
generation Jews struggle to shed
their image of being an alien,
unassimilable group, but now that
American Jews are accepted as
fully American, that erosion is s
thing of the past... the
generation-to-generation decline
in observance came to an end
some 20 years ago.
... For all their affluence and
achievements, Jews are not (or
not yet) part of the middle-and
upper-class social world to which
the majority of Republican leaders
belong. In most cities
"five-o'clock shadow," as it is call-
ed, still governs social relations
between Jews and Gentiles;
however much they may mix dur-
ing the working day, Jews and
Gentiles generally go their
separate ways when the workday
is over. And ... even when Jews
are admitted to once restricted
clubs, they continue to socialise
with other Jews.


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