The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 3, no. 7 (Apr. 5, 1974)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 9, 1976 called v.4, no. 27 but constitutes v.5, no. 1; issue for July 7, 1989 called v.18, no. 11 but constitutes v.18, no. 13.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44570954
lccn - sn 00229545
ocm44570954
System ID:
AA00014312:00482

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Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward


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Full Text
wJewish Florid lain
ghlOtt
12
_ Number 44
OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE
Fort Lsudordsls. Florida Friday, Dwte 23,1988 \
Price 36 Centa
irael denounces UN 'safe passage' for Arafat forces
Israel's UN Ambassador Yehuda Blum
junced the move by the United Nations to
,ve Greek ocean-going ferryboats fly the UN
i while taking Yasser Arafat and his be-
jered forces from Tripoli in Lebanon to
eria.
[The same day, the Israel gunboats off the
Dli shore pounded Arafat's PLO head-
rs around Tripoli with shells.
[rtot same day, two U.S. shipe find their guna at
1 SSi ESs -Lebanon. Aidfor the first tm* since
-Vietnam war deya,thebattleshipNew Jersey fired
j massive sheila at thoee baees.
[And in Waahinfton senior U.S. offJdala have denied
that they coordinated their air atrikea against the
Syria-supported positions in Lebanon with Israel
And in Jerusalem, Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir
told the Knesset that Israel has not made any military
commitments to the U.S. He flatly denied charges thai
he and Defense Minsiter Moehe Arena made any secret
agreements when meeting with President Reagan in
Waahington.
He declared that rumors to that effect are "erroneous
rumors and baseless interpretation."
In Kuwait, the U.S. Embassy waa bombed by explo-
sives in a truck driven by a man, believed to be an Iran-
ian, who was killed in the explosion. No U.S. personnel
were killed in this terroristic act. ,
U.S. Secretary of State George Shultz said that
international terror is increasing.
In the meantime. Shulti defended U.S.-Isreeli milit-
ary strategic cooperation, insisting it would haven
positive impact on bringing atabttity to IstSMSal
elsewhere in the region. He ssid: "I think that first of
all the security of larael is a very important element of
stability in the Middle East, insofar aa the U.S. ia con-
cerned .. .In the pieewtsftiiatk, what we have seen,
is a very substantial Soviet buildup in Syria, and that ia
skat7
Indicative of that fact ia a report in the newest.issue
of the magazine Aviation Wmk, highly regarded aa a
source on American. Soviet and other foreign^^7
developments. Aviation Week wrote that AboutMO
Soviets operating in the area of Syrian air defense
forces were UDed last summer (June 1962) during an
Israeli air raid."
[ebrew for every day life Dr. Colin, a Federation founder, died
^m e see
The Hebrew words spell out "Hebrew for every day life," the
Opening phrase of a textbook for the study of the language
aught in Federation-sponsored Ulpan classes.
'Hebrew is thousands of years old, yet as current as this
ek's Jewish Floridian," says Abraham J. Gittelson, Central
gency for Jewish Education director of education for the
llewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale, as he announced
he resumption of the Community Hebrew Ulpan program.
Ulpan (an institute for the
ntensive study of Hebrew) de-
ned to teach modern conversa-
tional Hebrew and the culture of
Israel will be held st the Jewish
ommunity Center, 6601 W.
unrise Blvd., Plantation, and at
femple Beth Israel, 200 S. Cen-
ry Blvd., Deerfield Beach.
At JCC, classes for beginners,
intermediate and advanced stu-
dents of Hebrew will be held on
Tuesday and Thursday mornings
from 9:30 to 11:30 am., and
Monday and Thursday evenings
from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. The even-
Ceatinoed on Page 2
Active in Jewish communal
and general community life in
Fort Lauderdale for more than a
quarter century, Dr. Alvin K.
Colin, a practicing dentist who
chaired UJA and Israel Bond
Dental Divisions in The Bronx
before coming to South Florida,
died Dec. 10.
Funeral services for the genial,
long-time Jewish activist, who
was a founder of the Jewish Fed-
eration of Greater Fort Lauder-
dale in 1968 and became its
founding vice president, were
held Dec. 12 at Temple Emsnu-El
where he had been a board mem-
ber from 1968 through 1966.
A board member also of the
Federation and several other org-
anizations, Dr. Colin had served
as chairman of Federation's
Or. Alvin L. CoHn
Chaplaincy Commission for
several years and chaired the
Chaplaincy's annual dinner Nov.
21 when the volunteer corps of
rabbis who visit and counsel hos-
pital patients were honored.
Among his other interests were
his work with his dental fratern-
ity, hia life membership in the
Zionist Organisation of America,
and hia service as a national
deputy judge advocate of the
Jewish War Veterans, as well as
Cub Scouts and Explorer Scouts,
and as president in 1962 of the
Fort Lauderdale Optimist Club.
Hs was honored by the Jewish
National Fund in 1976 when he
completed an 11-year tenure aa
JNF's North Broward Division;
Israel Bonds Organisation and
others.
kean Area UJA unit goes on Federation tour
I Bernard Packman, Phil
|ranoff. Harry Brody, Phil
nev, Walter Loewnherz and
phn Streng, chairman of the
prt Lauderdale Ocean Area
JA campaign, toured the He-
cw Day School (left), the
Kish Community Center
Piddle) and ended
Nutrition program (right) where
they were served the day's hot
meal by volunteer participants in
the program.
All this for these members of
the Ocesn Ares committee wss
part of a day's activity that
included a training program
about the "Case for UJA '84,"
the need for personal solicitation
for the crucial campaign to meet
humanitarian needs in Israel and
elsewhere.
The men, all of whom have
been generous supporters of the
annual UJA campaigns of the
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale, met with Fran
Merenstein, administrator of the
Hebrew Day School where more
than 200 children attend classes
from pre-kindergsrten level
through the 7th grade; with Phil
Cofman, executive director of the
Jewish Community Center where
programs are available for tiny
tots to senior adults; and with
Sandy Friedland, Federation's
director of Elderly Services.
Following their luncheon
sion. they went next door to The
Gathering Place to watch the
staff provide educational
stimulation for the frail elderly.
Idle) and ended up at the about the "Case for UJA '84." S^D.'vsXol where more Following their lunche.
sralion supported Kosher the need for persons! solicitstion Hebrew uay o*~
lans being completed for Jan. o babbatti
Ur.nt7 Tamarac citv councilman
The worker-training
was designed to assist this group
of volunteers with face-to-face
solicitations for UJA in the
Ocean Areas. In keeping with the
philosophy of having solicitors be
contributors, each of the men
made hia commitment for the
Coatinued on Page 3
Krantz. Tamarac city [Plans are rapidly being chairman of the C*y of
bmpleted for the United Tamarac UJA '84 campaign, met
pish Appeal Sabbath with Rabbi Kurt Stone to discuss
fograms to be part of the BrthTor^-sparUc.paUonmUJA
fcabbat services Jan. 6 and SabDh ,
UNor? Broward congreg. J^^fitffSfe'St
pons. The Jewish Federa- ,^11 have as special guests the two
T>n of Greater Fort Lauder- dosen psrticipsnts who'll be
le, spearheaded by Wil- leaving with Msrahs and Atan
sEdm1^8' !*&*" S^ ^^-^
pro member and chairman JJJJJ' He wflJ conduct a ttayt-
I the Greater Margate Area chnn rshahm wishing the groupa
UA campaign, and the safe and peaceful journey as ttaev
derations Chaplaincy tour the country in companyw*a
pmmission, is assisting ""'?
kgregations in developing ^i*l Beth Orr in Coral
f evening or morning educ- "*&>Donald R. G*ber
Fnal service to increase neB* ^hat the weekly Torah
;areness of the scope of portion for UJA Shabbat is Bo,
IJA and Federation ac
vities.
I At Temple
which includes the story of the 8th,
9thsndl0thEgyptumplsguesoJ
locusts, darkness and the death ot
At Temple Beth Torah in ^ first born. This section, hs ssid,
*rac, Sol Schulman, president rT^ twice each year, once in
we congregation and a Federa- ,. ,_ p._.
" hoard member, and Dsvid
CoathraedonPageS
SolSchulman
Rabbi Kurt Stone
David Krantz


Page 2
The Jewish Floridian of Oreater Fort Lauderdale
d*y. December
23. A
fa
1111
The Continuing Education-
Community Services Department
of Broward Community College
is offering a new concept entitled,
New Age Studies. New Age Stu-
dies are non-credit courses de-
signed for people who want to
broaden their horizons. There are
no grades, degrees, or pre-req-
uisites. Classes begin the week
of Jan. 9 and are held at BCC's
Central Campus, 3501 SW Davie
Rd.. Davie. For class information
call 475-6600. The New Age
classes include:
A Touch for Health class is of-
fered from 7 to 9:30 p.m. Thurs-
days, which discusses Western
and Oriental health techniques. A
Compulsive Eating Clinic is of-
fered from 7 to 9:30 p.m. Tues-
days and discusses the steps
towards a change in your diet and
outlook. A Natural Gourmet
Nutrition class is offered from 9
to 11 a.m. Mondays for a fee of
SI5, and discusses how to remove
calories to protect your health. A
course detailing how to enter the
horse industry is offered from 6
to 8:30 p.m. Mondays at $15 fee.
Other courses include micro-
computers, karate and self-def-
ense, special classes designed for
woman awareness.
Ulpan classes
begin Jan. 9
Continued from Page 1
ing classes begin Monday Jan. 9;
the morning classes Tuesday
Jan. 10. The sessions continue for
seven and a half weeks.
At Deerneld's Beth Israel,
classes for intermediate students
will be conducted Tuesday and
Thursday morning from 9:30 to
11:30, beginning Tuesday Jan.
10, and for advanced beginners
same hours on Wednesday and
Friday mornings btyinnmf
WednesdayJan.il. ,
Veteran Ulpan teachers who
have conducted highly popular
classes both in North Broward
and in Miami will serve aa in-
structors to prepare their students
"for every day life of Hebrew,"
The faculty includes Moshe Ezry,
Shoshana Specter, Sima Dobkin
and Tamar Ben Ami.
Gtttelson, noting the program
is coordinated by CAJE with
support from the Dept. of Educa-
tion and Culture of the World
Zionist Organization, said:
"Hebrew is the living language of
Jews throughout the world and
forms an indissoluble bond be-
tween Jewish communities on
every continent." Students dur-
ing previous Ulpan sessions have
become "dose-knit groups," he
added, "with a love for Hebrew
and a proficiency in speaking it."
In addition to studying the
language, the students will learn
the culture of Israel, will cele-
brate holidays, view Israeli films,
and matt with shlichim, emis-
saries from Israel who serve the
South Florida i
Helen Weisberg, administrator
of Federation's North Broward
Midraaha which coordinates the
Ulpan program, asks: "Why not
make Hebrew a part of your
life?" She said registration takes
place at the first class. Interested
persons may call her for further
information at the Federation of-
fice 748-8400.
Has Your
Address Changed?
Please print your NEW address below:
Name_____________________________________
Address.,
.Apt. No..
City.
Zip Code
Clip this
form and send to Jewish Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale, 8358 W. Oakland Park Blvd. Fort Lauderdale
FL 33321.
Send this form ALSO if your address is incorrect, or if
you're getting more than one Floridian delivered to your
own address.
j........MmmmmmmmmitmmmftmKmmmmmnwwmmmtf
ORIOLE GARDENS 2, one of the score and more communities
associated with the Greater Margate Area United Jewish Appeal of
the Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale, is the first of the
Oriole Gardens group to hold its fund-raiser for the 1964 UJA
campaign. Ben Bregman (far right), chairman, announced residents of
Oriole Gardens 2 are being invited to the Jan. 15 breakfast at the
Clubhouse. Pictured with him are Esther Rich, and Dora and Harry
Shiller who are the honorees for 1984, and Abe Silverstein. The
featured guest will be Danny Tadmore, Israeli army reserve officer.
BCC's New Age Studies begin Jan. 9
/
'
t
WOODMONT VOLUNTEERS, pictured above,
were presented with awards for their efforts in the
1983 United Jewish Appeal campaign. The
awards were presented at a recent campaign
breakfast at the Woodmont Country Club. UJA
co-chairmen Walter Bernstein, Lou Colker and
setting
1984
B
Moe Wittenberg are currently
mechanics for launching the
within the next week, all of the wlunt^tn
tending the breakfast will be active in this
camapign.
Lt Gen. Wiliard W. Scott, Jr. (left),
superintendent, U.S. Military Academy at
West Point, N.Y., officially welcomes
Chaplain Marc A. AbramowiU, first full-
time Jewish military chaplain at West Point
Looking on are Academy Chaplain Richuil
Camp (second from right! and Rabbi Dwiil
Lapp, director, JWB Commission on Jtuiu\\
Chaplaincy.
Demonstrators Demand U.S. Break
Diplomatic Relations With Syria
By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK (JTA) -
About 30 persons held a
demonstration and prayer
service for the American
Marines and other victims
of terrorist attacks in Leb-
anon outside the Syrian
Mission to the United Na-
tions here and demanded
that the U.S. break diplo-
matic ties with Syria.
The service was organized by
Americans for a Safe Israel, the
Hebrew Institute of Riverdale,
the Neighborhood Church of
Greenwich Village, and the
Student Struggle for Soviet
Jewry.
Peter Goldman, director of
Americans for a Safe Israel, who
urged the U.S. to sever relations
with Damascus, said Syria is res-
ponsible for the terrorist violence
in Lebanon.
HE CHARGED that the
Syrian government systemati-
cally murdered "thousands of
Christians and Moslem Lebanese
during Syria's seven year occu-
pation of Lebanon."
Rabbi Avraham Weiss, *M
ual leader of the Hebe
Institute of Riverdale. recittdt
kaddish in memory of
Marines and Israelis killed kit
recent terrorist attacks.
"We call upon all Americani*!
good will to do everything **jjjl
their power to confront ajl
defeat Syrian tyranny." he *l
A large menorah was lit durajl
the service in which many pa*
cipants wore prayer shawl*.
Share tk Vision
RhartMe Memorial Chapei. inc. FuatM^reeaa*
The most respected name in Jewish fanera! sfirvto
Wm in the world. '"\^j
Miami Beach/ Miami/ North Miami Beach
Hollywood/ Ft. Lauderdale (Tamarac
Dade: 531-1151/Broward: 523-58*$
West Palm Beach: 683-8676 ^
Alfred Golden, President
Leo Hack, V.P., ReHftoui'Advisor
William F. Saulson, Family Couairtant
Carl Grossberg
r'unsrIP,,"
Sooniorlnt the GUARDIAN PtAW*
Tradition. Irs what makes usje**


[yrktoy.peceinbw23,1968
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 3
Eieritury Village UJA '84 campaign includes Pacesetter event Feb. 12
Mike Fiddleman, general
I JJman of the United Jewish
{S3 of Deerneld Beach, f
Lirtedto Joel Reinstein, general
firman of the UJA csanpaujn
If the Jewish Federation of
iGreater Fort Lauderdale.Century
IvOlage campaign will begin Jan.
Itt followed by a special "Thank
Ivnu" evening for Pacesetters
Sunday evening Feb. 12 at
luClub in Century Village East.
In a letter to their neighbors,
.lrving R. Friedman and Deer-
Lids Vice-Mayor Joseph
iTrtctenberg, Pacesetters chair-
called on each of them to
onie "a Pacesetter, a caring
anon." The wrote:
Reach out and touch some-
taiy ... a wounded soldier, a
in a day care center, an
jn, women and children in Ia-
Lel, hundreds right here in
hroward County, and many
[others throughout the world, who
lire desperately waiting to hear
| from you!
"Your generous gift through
the Pacesetters of UJA will reach
out and touch their lives, offer
them help and hope. Picking up
the phone won't reach them
but picking up a pen and writing
a check to UJA will!"
To be a Pacesetter for admis-
sion to the special "Thank You"
celebration, a commitment of at
least $100 per person or $200 per
couple is required to meet and
hear the Consul General of Israel,
Yehoshua Trigor, and "enjoy a
heartwarming production of
Jewish Soul Music."
The concert will be presented
by The Epstein Brothers, fifth
generation Klezmorim, an inter-
nationally famous group who
have been acclaimed for their
performances in Israel, the U.S.
and Europe. Friedman and
Tractenberg said there would be
"dancing in the aisles" when The
Epstein Brothers start perform-
ing.
Vice chairmen serving with the
Pacesetter chairmen, according
to Deerfield's UJA general chair-
Lauderdale West tops
previous UJA totals
Lauderdale.
Chairman Sidney Goldstein
and co-chairpeople Reba Gold-
stein, Louis Grolnic and Isaac
Horowitz expressed their
pleasure for the support
exhibited by those in attendance.
In addition, a contribution of
$1,800 was received from the
Lauderdale West Religious
Service Club chaired by Isadore
Krosser.
Bill Katzberg, Federation
board member, chairman of the
Greater Margate Area UJA, the
popular columnist of Jewish
Journal, spoke to the group
about the critical economic situa-
tion in Israel and how it has
Imid winter, also on the first day of affected the agencies which need
IPassover. U.S. contributions for the social
His comment, based on the rvice ihey XTlt.^li^
ISedro Bo Biblical verse: "When told the group that days ofgiyir,
|your children ask you, what is the a
(meaning of this service .?," he
will continue with "what to say
when your children ask about
UJA." Beth Orr's Cantor Nancy With the event taking place
Hausman will select music for the during Chanukah Week, Cantor
There is a resurging spirit
among North Broward's Jewish
communities that all-out support
must be given these days for the
people of Israel to help them meet
the humanitarian needs there and
those of the Jews elsewhere in the
I world.
Typical of this spirit was
[another 300-plus turnout at a
United Jewish Appeal fund-
raiser. This one at Lauderdale
West where a record commitment
of over $20,000 was reported at
the Dec. 4 annual event on behalf
of the 1984 UJA of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
UJA Shabbat Jan. 6
Continued from Page 1
Mike Fiddleman
man Mike Fiddleman, are
Bernard Berne, Max Dickstein,
Ben Grossman, Samuel K. Miller,
Herman Plavin, Martin Rosen,
Arthur Schofer, Leo Van
Blerkom.
Frances Nusbaum is joining
Friedman in the program plan-
ning with Cantor Morris Leven-
son in charge of publicity for the
event.
Fiddleman said that 460
volunteers will fan out through-
out Century Village to knock on
Irving R. Friedman
every door. He said: "The
urgency of the situation in Israel
and everywhere Jews reside make
i it imperative for everyone to con-
tribute. The goal for 1964 UJA
from Century Village ia
$260,000."
Beneficiaries of UJA include
the Joint Distribution Committee
which provides help to needy
Jews in 42 countries, including
Israel; the Jewish Agency in Is-
rael providing a myriad of social
services, including support for
Joseph Tractenberg
U.S. communities "twinned"
with Israel neighborhoods in
Project Renewal programs;
HIAS (Hebrew Immigrant Aid
Society), among many others.
And on the local level, a great
number of Federation programs
and services phis support for the
Jewish Community Center,
Jewish Family Service, Chap-
laincy Commission, Kosher Nu-
trition, Hebrew Day School, Ju-
daica High School, adult educa-
tion, aiTWW1g others.
Wynmoor has dual UJA brunches
$10 donation or even $25 for
UJA "are over, because this is a
crisis for the Jews and
funds are needed now."
more
| service relating to religious res-
| ponsibility and charity.
Rabbis at more than a dozen
[other congregations are being
lolled by Federation leaders to
lusist in completing their plans for
UJA Sabbath Jan. 6 and 7.
Moshe Levenson, a member of
Federation's Community Hala-
tions Committee, and chazzan at
Temple B'nai Shalom in Deerfield
Beach, chanted the holiday bles-
sings and led the group in
Chanukah songs.
Wynmoor Village in Coconut
Creek has a United Jewish Ap-
peal committee that is "fully org-
anized and is a going concern,"
according to publicity chairman
Bernard Axelrod, reporting on
the dual brunches scheduled for
the community.
Preparing for its two UJA
brunches in January two so
that the entire community of
Wynmoor can share in the care
they show for the people of Israel
the Committee has honorary
chairmen, Louis J Schneider and
Theodore (Ted) Yhomas serving
with general chairman Judge Leo
Brown who is ably assisted by
Anne Chester, secretary; Lewis
Chester, treasurer; Leo Arlin,
Brunch chairperson; Mildred
Yaphe, ticket committee chair-
person, and a committee in for-
mation that currently consists of
59 persons.
Wynmoor will honor Sol Press,
a distinguished educator, for his
inspiring leadership and dedica-
tion to Jewish values, at the Sun-
day 10 a.m. Jan. 22 and Jan. 28
Sol Press
brunches st the Holiday Inn,
3701 University Drive, Coral
Springs.
Doing double duty for the
Wynmoor community in bringing
to them the UJA message and
that of the services and programs
of the Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale will be
Abraham J. Gittelson. He is Fed-
eration's director of education
and associate director of the Cen-
tral Agency for Jewish Educa-
tion, who will speak with first
hand knowledge of Israel and of
the Federation programs.
Federation President Ed
Entin, Federation's UJA General
Chairman Joel Reinstein and Co-
chairman Brian Sherr, in a
printed message in the invitation
sent to the residents, stated:
"We want to thank everyone in
Wynmoor Village for their out-
standing cooperation to insure
the success of this UJA cam-
paign.
Every Village in Wynmoor has
a committee assigned to help
reach the anticipated goal of
$200,000 to be contributed to
UJA '84. Invitations have also
been extended, through Bill
Sadoff, to residents of the neigh-
boring community of The
Hammocks.
Sunrise Lakes Phase 2 raises record UJA amount
Over 300 people attended the
Sunrise Lakes Phase 2 United
Jewish Appeal breakfast, honor-
ing lly and Rae Palevsky for
their concern for Jews in need in
Israel and elsewhere in the world,
>nd raising about $8,600, more
than the total the Phase 2 com-
plex had contributed to the 1983
I UJA campaign.
Nat Pearlman, chairman of the
j Sunrise Lakes Phase 2 campaign
committee, expressed his delight
nd appreciation for the fine
turnout and the dollars pledged
{ date. He was assisted at the
breakfast meeting by his co-
chairmen, Philip Nelson and Ed
Tennenbaum, and Irving Per-
jker. president of the Phase 2
wn's Club; Anne Rogers, presi-
dent of the Singles Club, and Ann
[Bernstein, Women's Club presi-
Ocean Area UJA
Continued from Page 1
|*4 UJA drive. This brought an
increase for this group of 60.2
Pjfcent over their contribution to
the 1983 campaign.
Similar programs, including
tours of the agendas, programs
*nd services provided with funds
realized during Federations UJA
dnves, are planned for other
Jf8" throughout North
Broward.
Rae and Hy Palevsky, honorees
Pi Fffrat associate campaign
dlrStSoltiJI Jewish Federation
of^.terFortUuderd^g.v.
. moving speech ^thcjrUM
dollars are spent and hated the
tarn kosher nutrition sites, tne
SwUhCommunity Center, and
few of the worthyJ^^JJJJ
IJA dollars ars used for. WW>
fa* continued by jrta. "
Prominent in campaign: Irving Percher, Anne
Rogers, Phase 2 UJA Chairman Nat
Ann Bernstein, UJA Co-Chairmen Philip Nelson
and Ed Tennenbaum.
reel needs the money now more
than ever, and if Jews will not
help Jews, then who will.
Following bis talk, Pearlman
urged the entire Phase 2 commit-
tee to redouble their efforts tat
aping throughout the complex so
that every resident ia mads aware
of the needs and ths nacassity for
aiding Jews in Israel and else-
where in the world.
Artie Mayer directed the Sun-
dries Minstrelsires in a fins perfor-
mance for the packed house.


Pag4

Th* Jewish Floridian ofGnafr Fort Lmudtrdtlt
Friday, DtwiUr a
When will they stop
calling Arafat a 'moderate?'
The Palestine Liberation Organization
took instant "credit" for the tragic bus-
bombing in Jerusalem last week that
claimed the lives of five people and injured
46 others. It is not necessary to recall for
the Jewish community that the PLO and
Yasir Arafat are terrorists.
It should not, similarly, be necessary to
remind the world of that fact, especially not
the United States and its European allies,
among them France and presumably
Greece, who early last week announced
they would help Arafat leave Tripoli with
some 4,000 of his PLO terrorist henchmen,
thus escaping a second time the bitter
meaning of total defeat in Lebanon.
Apparently, it is necessary. After all, the
United Nations has been dead set on
permitting Arafat to fly the UN flag in
celebration of his safe exit from Tripoli.
As the Israelis say, and we agree, this is
inconceivable. The bus-bombers are the
same PLO who killed all those Marines in
their Beirut compound on Oct. 23 and
whose Iranian sympathizers attacked the
U.S. Embassy in Kuwait on Monday.
When will Western nations and their
leaders give up protecting the terrorists
and their terrorism that daily concern them
more and more as a matter of mere sur-
vival?
When will they stop calling Arafat a
"moderate"? The time to answer the
question is now.
Shultz Heard Arab Anger
Over Accord With Israel
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) U.S.
Secretary of State George
Shultz ran into a hail of
opposition and complaints
during his first trip to the
Arab world since Israel's
Prime Minister Yitzhak
Shamir'8 recent visit to
Washington.
Both Tunisia and Morocco
complained about the Israeli-
American plan for strategic co-
operation but Shultz told
reporters, "I was surprised that
anyone could be surprised.
Everyone should know by now
that there is, and there will be a
strong relationship with Israel."
THE SECRETARY of State
conferred in Rabat with
Morocco's King Hassan II in
what the Moroccan press agency
said was "an atmosphere of
anxiety."
Shultz met in Tunis with Pres-
ident Habib Bourguiba and
members of the Tunisian govern-
ment. Both Tunis and Morocco
are traditionally American allies
and are known for their moderate
attitudes in the Middle East
conflict. According to reporters
accompanying him, Shultz
seemed taken aback by the
strong local opposition.
With the Moroccan and Tunis-
ian leaden Shultz stressed time
and again that the need for closer
political and military relationship
between America and Israel was
needed because of the un-
precedented Soviet infiltration
in the area and Soviet influence in
Syria.
The Tunisian Press said that
one of Bourguiba's aides
retorted: "If the moderate Arab
states are forced to choose be-
tween the Soviet Union on the
one hand, and Israel on the other,
most of us would opt for Com-
munism."
The American delegation later
said it had remained firm and
that it believes the American
position should be better ex-
plained to the Arab states to
make them realize that Wash-
ington's policy is for the good of
all nations in the Mideast.
Share the Vision
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Quotation Marks Make Different
Friday. December 28.1963
Volume 12
17TEVETHI744
Number 44
WHEN THE press refers to
the new strategic cooperation
agreement between the United
State* and Israel, it puts quota-
tion marks around the phrase so
that it reads this way: "strategic
cooperation" agreement.
It does not matter whether the
reference is in a wire service
story, a column with a by-line
affixed to it, or an editorial; the
result is the same. And so, ap-
parently, is the intent.
THE QUOTATION marks
suggest that "strategic co-
operation" means something dif-
ferent from what it says. Take for
example, White House Counsel
Ed Meese's remark about hungry
people that "they go to soup
kitchens because the food is
free."
If I were to write that Meese's
comment was really well-
intended, many readers might be
rightly inclined to take me to
task in what I suspect would be
some pretty abusive letters.
But if I were to write that
Meese's comment was really
"well-intended," readers on the
other hand would more likely be
inclined to ask themselves:
"Now, I wonder what he means
by that?" Or else: "Of course, he
surely believes just the opposite:
he's just being sarcastic.''
80 IT IS with the quotation
marks around "strategic co-
operation" agreement. These
pesky little bits of punctuation
suggest a whole new ball game.
For example: "The United
State* isn't really so stupid as to
enter into such an agreement
with the Israelis. It must be
presidential election politics. You
know, the Jewish vote."
Or else: "It's the price we're
being forced to pay to wring some
concessions out of the Israelis
before the Syrians can be ex-
pected to be reasonable about
getting out of Lebanon."
The variations are infinite, but
it all come? to the same thing.
The strategic cooperation
agri-fineni is really a "strategic
cooperation agreement, which is
to say that it is nothing of the
kind. Rather, it is a cosmetic
arrangement to soothe the
Israelis, but it signifies nothing.
IN THE best sense, the quota-
tion marks most accurately
reflect the mood of the American
people today. From Grenada to
Beirut, they want no military
involvement in a struggle they
hardly conceive of as being their
own.
For all the nuclear missile-rat-
tling both in Washington and in
the Kremlin these days,
Americans are not as easily
influenced as they once were, by
the fear of Communism. Or as the
Reagan Administration would
still like them to be.
Does this suggest that the
President and all his men are
serious about their strategic co-
operation agreement with Israel,
while the press is not that it is
a "strategic cooperation" agree-
ment for the press only?
My own hunch is that, at least
in this case, more than a few of
the Administration and the press
see eye-to-eye, but only the press
for the moment feels free to say
annexation of the Golan Heights
in December, 1961.
The second was actually signed
less than a year later, but almost
immediately scrapped by the
U.S. when Israel marched into
Lebanon. In both instances, there
was widely-felt relief among
Americans when nothing came of
either MOU.
Secretary of Defense Caspar
Weinberger could not, himself,
have been more reluctant when
he signed the second memo-
randum in 1982, and he also felt
relieved when the Israelis gave
the United State* an excuse to
abrogate it following the laun
chingof their Operation Peace for
So that today, as 1963 comes
to a close, the only U.S. defense
against the agreement are
quotation marks which recognize
its reality but suggest it is a
fiction. It is easy to understand
the American resistance to new
entanglements that can lead to
war a resistance that Vietnam
so out loud, even if elliptically.
TWICE BEFORE, after all,
there were strong movements in
the direction of what was then
called a Memorandum of Under-
standing for strategic co-
operation. The first such move
was squelched after Israel's
has so ovbiously wrought.
BETTER, some Americai s
feel, to mask their frenzisd
rejection of the agreement in t he
high stakes of cornering, say a
Cabbage Patch doll. Of kidnap-
ping one. Of paying megabucks
to buy one. Of clothing one in
mink and diamonds. Such things
as these help minimize the
anguish of a nation's foreign
policy seemingly gone awry.
But if Americans are frenzied
about the agreement, so too are
many Israelis, who see in it a
commitment to play a mercenary
role in the U.S. confrontation
with the Soviet Union in the
Middle East, which they find
dangerous and even humiliating.
What is more, that nation s
leadership, including Premier
Yitzhak Shamir and even Def-
ense Minister Moshe Arens, see
in the agreement a far different
set of principles than does the
U.S. State Department or the
Pentagon.
For them, the agreement in-
volves an American unmasking
of its alliance with Israel so that,
for the sake of Arab friendship, it
doesn't mean one thing, say, on
Monday and quite another on
Tuesday. For them, it is a redef-
inition of U.S. aid to Israel. For
them, it suggests an American
willingness to help Israel come to
grips with its dangerous econ-
omic decline.
THESE ARE very different
commitments, indeed, from Pres-
ident Reagan's perception of the
same package, whose aim ie fa,
join Israel's strategicTaLS
and Israel's military miiacaTto.
confrontation with his own vi*k
of the Middle East, indeedofS
world, where the main onm*.!
the Soviet Union. *"*"**
In just this vision, the Israeli.
are ii,.clearly cW accord w*h
Mr. Reagan than most Am
cans are themselves, who sin
inclined, like so many European
who object to our deployment 2
new nuclear missiles there to
think of the Presidents sad truth
about the Soviets as somethinr
of a delusion.
This is an important distinc-
tion. Otherwise, the reservatiaej
on both side of the agreement are
indeed strong enough to justify
the quotation marks.
, One solution to the dilemma
might be to refer to the Prat-
ident's view of the "sad truth"
about the Soviets as a "delu-
sion." This would give it leu of i
sense of urgent reality. At wont,
perhaps, an exaggeration. So
that the strategic cooperation
agreement becomes a "strategic
cooperation" agreement with
clearer meaning in the sense that
both are fantasies, and there it
nothing really to worry about -
not about the Russians u i
threat or the Israelis as a genuine
rather than merely a rhetorical
Ally
ANOTHER SOLUTION
advocates that the United States
should quit the multinational
force, just like the Europeans are
threatening to do, and withdraw
from Lebanon entirely, leaving it
to its multitude of warring fac-
tions and brutalities. This would
lead to a* facto partition of Leb-
anon among Syria. Israel and a
struggling Lebanese government
in the restricted region of Beirut.
In that case, we could call it
"partition" rather than partition
After all. partition has never
really solved anything anywhere
not in Korea. Vietnam, Ireland
or Germany. Let alone in Israel
itself. But maybe "partition"
would work in the sense that it
might bring the Lebanese fac-
tions together, who could thai
muster enough strength to ask all
foreigners to leave.
Quotation marks clearly work
such bonders that the "strategic
cooperation" agreement can
finally be expected to cease being
an embarrassment to all parties
involved. And. at least in the
United States, it would free a lot
of poopk', by way of forgetting it,
to join thi' frvn/ied search for the
elusive Cabbage Patch doll more
wholeheartedly than ever.
PRINCESS JULIANA of the Nethertandi discussed the eg?"}
of Jews in Europe with Dr. Daniel Thurst, executive vice Pnm"^JL
B'nai Brith International (left), and Philip Lax, chairman on
International Council of B'nai B'rith. following the presents****
B'nai B'rith's International Humanitarian Award, to Pcf"J**Z>
at the Netherlands consul-general'$ of/Ice in New York. ^jgJJJJ
honored,
her people,
nation
for her -dedication and commitment to bettering the sv"\
ne. her excsUsnt leadership, and her devoted service to m


Friday, December 23,1963
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Pagef
=1 Personal solicitation planned by Women's Division
Dora Roth, Israeli government
emissary assigned to aid United
Jewish Appeal campaigns (pic-
tured second from right) spelled
out the "Case for 1984" for
women who met at the home of
Barbara Goldstein in the Wood-
lands to volunteer their services
as' personal solicitors in their
community. This was the first of
a series of worker training meet-
ings planned by the Women's
Division of the Jewish Federation
of Greater Fort Lauderdale.
Setting the example they hope
they set for those they will solicit
in the Woodlands, the women
pledged a total increase of 33
percent over their contribution to
the 1963 Women's Division UJA
campaign, according to Felice
Sincoff (extreme right), Women's
Division president.
At the extreme left is Gladys
Daren who is chairing the Wood-
lands Women's Division cam-
paign.
Others pictured at the training
session included Ethel Holman,
Roz Entin, Esther Lerner,
Charlotte Padek who is heading
the Women's Division $500-
minimum-commitment-unit now
planning the special showing of
"The Precious Legacy," Harriet
Seminer, Ruth Eppy, Gladys
Less, Claire Oehry, Shirley
Grossman, Mildred Etfenbein.
Assisting President Sincoff as
co-chairs of the Women's Divi-
sion campaign are Lee Dreiling,
Dee Hahn and Esther Lerner.
Early reservations advised for Inverrary UJA Golf
Early reservation is advised for
the Third Annual Inverrary
United Jewish Appeal Golf Clas-
sic and dinner Wednesday Jan.
11 on the East and West Courses
at the Inverrary Country Club.
This advisory was issued by
Joseph Kaplan, Inverrary s UJA
campaign committee chairman,
and the leaders of the golf classic
committee, who noted that the
Classic has been sold out to its
limit of 288 Inverrary golfers at
each of the two previous events.
The dinner will be offered the
same evening at the Inverrary
Country Club along with an open
bar and hors d'oeuvres with the
cost set at S41 per golfer, which
covers the entire day of golf, the
cocktail hour, dinner and golf
prizes.
Full details are available from
Kaplan 485-0590 and Mike
Bloom. Golf Classic chairman
484-6698: and golf co-chairmen
Selig Marko 465-7033. and Mon-
roe Adler 739-5917.
They announced reservation
card and check should be mailed
to the Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale, 8358
W. Oakland Park Blvd.. Fort
Lauderdale 33321.
Mike Bloom announced com-
pletion of the full 1984 Inverrary
UJA Golf Classic Committee:
International Village David
Block, Phil Rayman, Arthur
Roth.
16th Hole Julius Abramson,
Irving Levine, Nat MarkowiU,
George Wyman.
SIDNEY KA1LTON con-
touts the tradition of chairing
'v Polynesian Gardens United
Jturish Appeal committee as he
* done for several years. In
"jot capacity, he announced that
'A Plantation community's an-
"w* fundraiser for the 1964 UJA
* of the Jewish Federation of
Greater Port Lauderdale will be
Aa once again in the Samuel
toref HaU of the Jewish dm-
"""uty Center, Sunday evening
* 22, with Eddie Schaffer a*
featured guest.
kmetery Desecrated
PARIS (JTA) The Jew-
h cemetery of Biecheim. near
^Mbourg, was desecrated re-
cently.
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL
Presents Its Annual
CANTORIAL
CONCERT
Cantor MesheTaube
Pittsburgh, Pa.
CANTORIAL
OPERATIC
Cantor Saul Melsels
Miami, Fla.
formerly
Cleveland, Ohio
Cantor Maurice Neu
Temple Beth Israel
YIDDISH
ISRAELI
Sunday, January 8,1984
fcOOp.m.
Tickets Available At
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL
7100 Weat Oakland Park Blvd., Ft. Lauderdale, Fl 33313
Phone:742-4040
Donation:
$7.50
Reserved
Donation:
$4.00
General Admit.
Executive Course Louis
Blester, Col. Rah)h Scharfman,
William Seiden.
Greens Phase I Al Bloom-
berg, Al Priedlander, Jack Kertz,
Jack Kleban, Sid Kleinman, Abe
Singer, Harold Slater.
Greens Phase 2 Bob Green,
Victor Gruman, Larry Herbst,
Joe Rudolph, Ben Strassner.
Lea VitUi Sam Davidson,
Murray Feiner, Charles Hill, Paul
Rouslin, Dr. Ben Solomon, Harry
Sunness.
Environs Jack Alvin,
Charles G rabel, Lou Kogan,
Martin Rosen, Rooert Taylor.
Country Club Morria Berell,
Mickey Harris, Ed Horwitz, Sol
Mehlman, Bernard Oolie, Rabbi
Emanuel Schenk.
Garden Lakes Saul Gelman,
Dr. Harry Weil, Art Westrich.
Hills Ed Rabat, Mike
Salomone.
OMEGA UJA CO-CHAIRMEN: Jerry Kaye, Abe
Semelmacher and Murray Rosenberg, at a meeting with
building captains for the Plantation community's 1984
United Jewish Appeal campaign, announced exciting
plans for the drive, including a Jan. 29 breakfast at
Omega's recently refurbished clubhouse which had been
devastated by fire last year. Noted entertainer Eddie
Schaffer will be featured guest at the breakfast.
Tel Aviv University names
Lester Entin to Governors Board
Jack Cummings, the chairman
of the Board of Governors of Tel
Aviv University, announced the
appointment of Lester M. Entin
to the Board. Entin and his wife
Sally, of Boca Raton and Verona,
N.J., are long time supporters of
Tel Aviv University and its
School of Education. Moat re-
cently the Entins established
a fund for the research, advance-
ment and education of hearing
impaired and disadvantaged
youth.
Cummings said it is a privilege
for the University to have on its
Board a person such as Lester

Entin who has served as a com-
munity leader in so many aspects
of Jewish life. Lester Entin is the
brother of Edmund Entin, pres-
ident of the Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale.
Sally and Lester Entin are also
among the founding members of
the Boca Raton Chapter of
American Friends of Tel Aviv
University which recently estab-
lished an office at 2200 North
Federal Highway in Boca Raton.
Anyone wanting further informa-
tion about Tel Aviv University
should call Lauren Azoulai at
392-9186.
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Phone: (212) 345-0050



Pa*6
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
|fri*y. Dacembw 23 igJ
Midrasha Lecture Series opens Jan. 8
with Author Dennis Prager speaking
The fourth annual Federation
sponsored Midrasha lecture
series "Contemporary Issues of
Jewish Life" will open on Jan. 8
at Temple Beth Am, Margate at
8 p.m. with noted author and lec-
turer Dennis Prager.
Sponsor tickets for the series
at $30 per couple or series tickets
at $10 per person for members of
constituent organizations are still
available.
Tickets to individual lectures
of the series will be available at
the door: $4 for members and $6
for others.
Dennis Prager, former director
of the Brandeis-Bardin Institute
in southern California, is an in-
ternationally recognized writer
and speaker on contemporary so-
ciety and on Judaism. Articles
about him or by him have been
published in nearly every major
American and Israeli newspaper.
He has lectured in 40 states,
throughout Canada, in Israel,
Australia, and Korea. He has
spoken on Christian-Jewish rela-
tions at the Vatican and has lec-
tured at virtually every major
American university, including
Harvard, Yale, Stamford, UCLA
and Berkeley.
Prager is author with Joseph
Telushkin of The Nine Questions
People Ask About Judaism,
hailed by many critics as the
finest contemporary introduction
to Judaism. The book, which has
sold over 40.000 copies in hard
cover, was described by Herman
Dennis Prager
Wouk as "the intelligent skep-
tic's guide to Judaism." His most
recent book, Why the Jews: The
Reason For the World's Greatest
Hatred, will be the topic of his
lecture. He is presently working
on a book on the sexual
revolution and feminism.
His formal education includes
undergraduate work in political
Kience at Brooklyn College and
the University of Leeds, England
and graduate work as a Fellow at
Columbia University's School of
International Affairs and Rus-
sian Institute.
The Contemporary Issues of
Jewish Life lecture series is spon-
sored by the North Broward
Midrasha of the Central Agency
for Jewish Education of the
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale along with
Temples Beth Am, Beth Israel,
Beth Orr, Beth Torah, Sha'aray
Tzedek Emanu-El, Sholom, Beth
Israel of Deerfield Beach; Ramat
Shalom Synagogue, Hebrew
Congregation of Lauderhill,
Liberal Jewish Temple of Coco-
nut Creek, the Jewish Commu-
nity Center, Florida State B'nai
B'rith, Southeastern Region
United Synagogue of America
and Omega Condominium.
Tickets are available at each of
these institutions.
The lecture series will continue
at other Temples, Monday Feb.
6, Rabbi Benjamin Kreitman, ex-
ecutive director of United Syna-
gogue of America, will speak at
Temple Beth Israel, Sunrise.
Monday Feb. 20 Arthur D.
Chotin, deputy executive director
and general counsel, AIPAC, will
speak at Ramat Shalom Syna-
gogue, Plantation.
The final lecture of the series
will have Rabbi Immanuel Jak-
obowitz, Chief Rabbi of United
Hebrew Congregations of the
British Commonwealth of Na-
tions, as the speaker Tuesday
March 8 at Temple Beth Torah in
Tamarac. All lectures begin
promptly at 8 p.m. For further
information call Jewish Federa-
tion of Greater Fort Lauderdale
748-8400.
Winter semester of Midrasha classes begins Jan. 9
The winter semester of the
North Broward Midrasha of the
Central Agency for Jewish
Education of the Jewish Federa-
tion of Greater Fort Lauderdale
will begin the week of Jan. 9 at
several of the sponsoring and
participating institutions.
The sponsors include Temples
Beth Am of Margate, Beth Israel
of Sunrise, Beth Israel of Deer-
field Beach, Beth Orr of Coral
Springs, Beth Torah of Tamarac,
Emanu-El of Lauderdale Lakes,
Sholom of Pompano Beach,
Sha'aray Tzedek of Sunrise;
Ramat Shalom Congregation of
Yeshiva U. forums
Following up on the Dec. 4
initial seminar of the second an-
nual "Issues of Our Times,"
Florida Friends of Yeshiva
University have scheduled three
additional forums, each to begin
at 8 p.m. at the Konover Renais-
sance Hotel at 5445 Collins Ave.
Rabbi Saul Berman, chairman
of Jewish Studies at Stern Col-
lege for Women of Yeshiva Uni-
versity, will discuss "Jewish
Prospectives: Nuclear Weapons"
Jan.2.
Monroe Price, dean of Yesh-
iva's Cardozo School of Law, will
be the speaker at the Feb. 6 sem-
inar discussing "The First
Amendment and New Tech-
nology."
The concluding forum, March
5, will be concerned with an
"Overview of American-Israeli
Relations" by Julius Berman,
president of the Union of Or-
thodox Jewish Congregations of
American and chairman of the
Conference of Presidents of
Major American Jewish Or-
ganizations.
Information about the seminar
and Yeshiva'a Florida
Friends is available from Lor-
raine Donin at the Miami Beach
office 538-5558.
Financial planning
seminar Jan. 17
A free educational forum ad-
dressing the disciplines of fi-
nancial planning, investment ad-
vising, and law will be held at
10:30 a.m. Jan. 17 at the Wood
mont Country Club, Tamarac.
The seminar will be conducted
by Marvin Herman and Robert
Sherman, financial consultants
with Thomson-McKinnon Secur-
ities of Lauderhill; Georgene
Gore, tax attorney and partner in
the law firm of Sanders, Curtis,
Ginestra and Gore; and Jerome
Adler, senior vice president of
Petro-Lewis Corp.
Continental breakfast will be
served with a luncheon at 12:30,
therefore reservations are re-
quired. Call Cheri Heindd at 486
2040.
JCC
tf:
mbj> Le Browse
the
JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
THRIFT SHOP
4314 North State Road 7 (441)
NCGuGuf
FURNITURE HOUSEWARES
BRIC-A-BRAC CLOTHING
Your contribution I* Tex Deductible!
More Income lOfLs Browse-More Support for XX
caN Rrva 792-6700 for pick up A Information
%
J Plantation; Hebrew Congrega-
tion of Lauderhill; Liberal Jewish
Temple of Coconut Creek, Jewish
Community Center of Greater
Fort Lauderdale in Plantation,
Florida State B'nai B'rith,
Southeastern Region United
Synagogue of America.
Classes and courses, con-
tinuing for seven weeks begin-
ning Monday Jan. 9, will be held
at the Jewish Federation, 8358
W. Oakland Park Blvd., at 9
a.m., Written out of History;
at Ramat Shalom, 7:15 p.m.. In-
troduction to the Prayer Book.
Tuesdays, beginning Jan. 10:
at Beth Israel, Sunrise, 10 a.m..
Sweep of Jewish History; 11
a.m., Exploration of Human
Potential; 7 p.m., Hebrew for
Advanced Beginners; 8 p.m..
Beginners Hebrew; also at 8
p.m., Sweep of Jewish History
Wednesdays, beginning Jan
11: At Temple Sholom, 7 p.m
Basic Hebrew; At Temple Bel
Am, 7:30 p.m.. To Be a Jew; 8:3'
p.m., Hebrew for Beginners.
Thursdays, beginning Jan. 12
At Sha'aray Tzedek, 10 am ,
Great Persoralities of Jewis
History; at Beth Torah, 7:3< j
&nv, Hebrew for Advanced
eginners; also at 7:30, a class
for Hebrew for Beginners; and at
4:30 p.m.. The Joys of Yiddish;
at Beth Am, 2 p.m., Hebrew for
Beginners.
Fees for the above courses are
16 per course with a maiimum of
120 for members of participating
institutions. 120 par course with
maximum of 140 for non-
members. A minimum of lOstud-
enta is required to sustain any
course. All checks are made
payable to CAJE.
Modern Hebrew Utpan will be
offered at the Jewish Community
Center two days a week, two
hours a day, seven and a half
weeks, at a fee of S37. Beginning,
intermediate and advanced
classes will be offered aa re-
quested for a minimum of 12
students. Courses will be offered
Tuesday and Thursdays 9:90
11:30 a.m. and Mondays and
Thursdays 7 30-9:30 p.m.
For further information call
Jewish Federation 748-8400.
JCC lists Gourmet Cooking classes
plus a variety of other program
The Jewish Community Center
of Greater Fort Lauderdale, 6501
W. Sunrise Blvd., Plantation, of-
fers a wide spectrum of activities
for people of all ages. For infor-
mation regarding any events, call
the JCC at 792-6700.
The JCC is offering two new
classes next month: Gourmet
Cooking with Joyce Strickland
will feature Greek Cuaine 9:30 to
11 am. Wednesday Jan. 4. Fee
for each session is $15. "Color
Myself Beautiful" is the name
given to a series of six classes
offered beginning Jan. 9. In-
structed by Beverly Tucker, the
classes meet from 9:30 to 11 a.m.
Thursdays and will discuss self-
confidence, make-up, and ward-
robe planning. Fee is S60 for the
six classes.
With school holidays this
month, JCC's winter dsy camps
are open for children kindergar-
ten age to grade 5, and for
Tweens. For the younger set, be-
ginning the week of Dec. 26, ac-
tivities include a trip to the Mu-
seum of Science, a trip to Chuck
E. Cheese, a treasure hunt, an
Israeli-feat with dancing and
singing, a magic show, and a
bowling trip. Fee daily is $12.
The Winter Tween program
consists of trips to Mark Twain
Riverboat Arcade. Castle Park,
the beach. Planet Ocean, ice
skating, rollerskating, and an
indoor swim at the JCC in North
Miami Beach. Fee is $12.50 daily.
For the young adults, director
Sheryll Hirschberger has organ-
ized "The People Connection," an
opportunity for Jewish singles to
connect with adults of similar
backgrounds via professionally
prepared surveys, and email
group orientation. Members and
non-members are welcome to
become involved in "The People
Connection."
For the senior adult, a schedule
of trips has been preo,
StartfogonJ.9thesSSi
travel to Epcot andDkS
World on Jan. 18 to MetS^
on Feb. 8 a visit to the Burt W
nolds Dinner Theater > wZ
P*"* fcwM>-28 to iu5
1, sndcfoamg out with a tri^
see The Precious Legacy" atti,
Bass Museum in Miami Ban*!!
March. 7. ""
The JCC's annual Las Vet*
Night has been slated for Sato i
day Feb. 4 in Soref Hall. Vim
will be an open bar and refresh.
ments. Fee is $10 for cent*
members, $12.50 for non-nm.
ban.
DAVID AND JEAN
COLKER of Compass Isle, Fort
Lauderdale, were among the
Founders of the Miami Jewish
Home and Hospital for the Aged
in attendance at the Founders
first anniversary dinner dance at
the Doral Starlight Roof. The
Founders pledged additional
sums that, according to incoming
president Sidney Olson, wSl
enable the home to receive a
$400,000 challenge grant for
construction of a new 200-bed
building.
Conservative Synagogue
In South Broward
SEEKS QUALIFIED AND EXPERIENCED
ADMINISTRATOR
Must Possess Ability in Budgeting and
PURCHASING
IMMEDIATE FULL TIME OPENING
SALARY NEGOTIABLE
Mail Complete Resume in Confidence, Box CS c/o
Jewish FloridUn, P.O. Box 012973. Miami, Fla. 33101
STATE OF
ISRAEL BONDS
BOUGHT AND SOLD
Invest in
Israel Securities

WERE SPECIALISTS IN
ISRAEL SECURITIES

TRANSACTIONS DAILY VIA TELEX
TO ISRAEL STOCK EXCHANGE
Leumi
NASO
lanbLeMMW-M"**"
18 Eaat 48th Street
- New YoVk.N.Y. 10017
teCUfittoS (212) 759-1310 .
Toll Frae (800) 221483


IV, December 23,1963
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lander dale
Page 7
Someone pays the price..
until you pay your pledge.
Please Send Your Check Tbday.
Skate tkeVism
GIMETOUFe
1984 United Jewish Appeal
Joel Reinstein, General Chairman Brian Sherr, Co-Chairman
Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale
8358 W. Oakland Park Blvd., Fort Lauderdale 33321
748-8400
Edmund Entln, Prtaldont *" Qottllab, Executive Director
Prepared by he national United Jewish Appeal as a Jewish lifeline partnership service for American Jewish communities.

J*'


Friday, December
23,11
CHANUKAH AT MALLS:
Typical of the festivities cele-
brating Chanukah at the Lakes
Mall in Lauderdale Lakes and at
the Lauderhill Mall were these
scenes pictured at the Lakes
Mall. Far left Cantor Sol Cohen
of Lauderhill lights and chants
the blessings over the holiday
candles; Rabbi Israel Hal pern of
Hebrew Congregation of Lauder-
hill speaks; host for the after-
noon Jack Salz beams as L'Lakes
Mayor Gereffi speaks; County
Commissioner Howard Craft
stands between Lillian and Louis
Baltzer, respective festival chair-
men of Lauderhill s B'nai B'rith
Lodge and B'nai B'rith Women's
Chapter who chaired the pro-
gram ; and some of the members
of the Jewish Community Center
Chorale, directed by Home
Berger Photos by Brooks Edler
of Fotoport, Lakes Mall.
The Balitzers also arranged the
Lauderhill Mall party hosted by
Lauderhill City Councilman Ben
Dantzker with Cantor Phillip
Erstling lighting and chanting
c-^
'\
\ \K
" #
the blessings accompanied by a
male octet from the Lauderhill
Community Center Chorale. The
Chorale, conducted by Sylvia
Sugarman, sang several num-
bers, with solo performances by
Sol Gruber and Ruth Maltz.
Mayor Eugene Cipolloni headed a
group of council members and
other city officials in attendance.
Both Mall celebrations, at-
tended by several hundred people
in each instance, were made
possible with the cooperation of
the Mall Managements and the
Merchants Associations.
WEEK OP CHANUKAH FESTIVITIES
at the Federation-supported Kosher Nutrition
programs was climaxed by visits [left] from
two dozen children from the Nursery School
of Temple Beth Orr in Coral Springs who sang
and then mingled with the elderly. And
[right] David Wallach of Coral Springs was
the center of attention as members of
Bonaventure Chapter of Women's League for
Israel sang "Happy Birthday" to him. The
women. Toots Sacks, Myrtle Gilson, Bebe
Gould, Lill Mandell, Charlotte Goldstein,
Chapter president, and Annette Kay
presented a program of Yiddish songs, and
then distributed gifts to all the participants of
the Kosher Nutrition program as well as the
frail elderly at "The Gathering Place."
Outrage Continues Over
UN Flags for Arafat
JERUSALEM (JTA)
- Israel has again con-
5 DAYS
THE
winomiu
HOTEl
JERUWUEiTt

demned the United Na-
tions' decision to provide
safe conduct for PLO leader
Yasir Arafat and his men to
leave the embattled city of
Tripoli under a UN flag and
said it would not give a
guarantee of safe passage
to the terrorists.
Asked if Israel would prevent
Arafat and his 4.000 men from
leaving. Cabinet Secretary Dan
Meridor told reporters, "Israel is
not going to answer that ques-
tion." Speaking after a Cabinet
meeting. Meridor said Greece had
asked for security guarantees for
its ships evacuating the Palestin-
ians, but Israel would not provide
such guarantees.
THE ISRAELI government
last week asked UN Secretary
General Javier Perez de Cuellar
to cancel any arrangement that
may have been made to give
Arafat and his man safe conduct
from Tripoli under the UN Bag.
Premier Yitzhak Shamir said
"it is inconceivable" that the UN
"should provide the terrorist!
with any sssistsnce or fc^flftitt
whatsoever" in light of the "hor-
rendous crime perpetrated by
Arafat's terrorists" in Jerusalem
last Tuesday.
Four people were killed, and 36
were injured in a bus bomb blast.
Claims of responsibility for the
tragedy emanated from both the
faction supporting Arafat and
PLO dissidents who have been
battling Arafat loyalists in
northern Lebanon. Shortly after
the disaster.
KO-TOURS
MC presents
at the newest, most exciting and ckversfed
esort hotel In Southern floriaa.
I^BC Gtatt KosIkk
National KcHhnjtri 914-352-4448
3 rssst* Cooked Qatt tosher MeatoDoay
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Enjoy your Passover hohooy vocation r\ a tiooShorxjl olmoaphere
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For forth* ntormstoon and rsts*. without ObfegsMn.
212-726-4800 Out-of-town cat ooasct or contact your toe* travel saerN


December 23,1983
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
federation delegation plans to attend 1983 ORT
,ational Young Leadership Conference Yearbook published
delegation of young adults
dZ Jewish Federation of
JTFort Lauderdale wul at-
the 4th annual Young
^p Conference MarchU-
the Washington
(DC)
I at
Lored by the United Jew-
Apptal Young Leadership
is the three-day confer-
Z expected to attract 3 000
L, Jewish leaders from
Zi the country. The Confer-
based on "Linking Des-
wall focus on the critical
issues facing world Jewry today.
Participants will examine rela-
tionships between the United
States and Israel and assess the
significant problems which chal-
lenge them as present and future
leaders of America and world
Jewry.
Since 1984 is a Presidential
election year, major Presidential
candidates are expected to attend
and address the open sessions.
The participants will receive
briefings on domestic and foreign
affairs by high-ranking members
North Broward ORT gave Chanukah gifts
to Aviva Manor; raised funds at movie
,, North Broward Region of
Lens American ORT, as part
their Community Project,
d by Jeanette. Corb, col-
a a large number of gifts
n the Region's 30 chapters
1 distributed them to the res-
bts of Aviva Nursing Home,
t Lauderdale, as part of the
nukah celebration.
In addition, the Region
Insored a theatre party where
bra Streisand's, Yentl was
iwn to a capacity audience of
at the Coral Springs Movie
ttre. Proceeds from the sold-
out event will go towards ORT's
School Building Project, supply-
ing funds for already existing
schools, and establishing new
ones. ORT's 21 chapters particip-
ated in the special movie prem-
iere, which was chaired by Gerri
Rosenthal.
of the White House staff, and
State Dept., members of Con-
gress, and top representatives of
the State of Israel.
The three previous conferences
have featured such guest speak-
ers as the President and Vice
President of the United States,
U.S. Attorney General, Israel's
Ambassador to the United
States, and Congressmen and
Senators from both major
parties.
According to Conference co-
chairmen Brenda Krieger of
Washington and Michael Adler
of Miami, "over 100 recruiters are
working hard to bring together
top young Jewish leaders from
every state in the Union for this
important election year event..
Lawrence M. Schuval, director
of Young Leadership of the Jew-
ish Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale, is coordinating the
arrangements for the local part-
icipants who will be attending the
Conference. He has information
concerning registration and hotel
spaces. He can be contacted at
the Federation office 748-8400.
The 1983 ORT Yearbook, just
published, is being distributed to
Jewish organizations and leaders
throughout the U.S.
It provides a comprehensive,
country-by-country report of
ORT's global operations which
serve some 112,000 Jewish
students throughout the world,
78,000 in Israel alone.
The lead article, "ORT faces
the 21st Century," highlights the
plans for new ORT schools in
Israel and in Los Angeles, and
the development of new
programs throughout the ORT
world, including sophisticated
courses at the Bramson ORT
Technical Institute in New York
City, and at the Jewish High
school of South Florida in North
Miami Beach, which receives
support from the Jewish Federa-
tion of Greater Fort Lauderdale
United Jewish Appeal.
In its report titled "Funding
the Program," the Yearbook
notes that the American Jewish
Joint Distribution Committee
(JDC), also a global agency with
programs in many countries,
granted ORT 4,660,000 in 1983.
JDC receives support out of
income of the United Jewish
Appeal campaigns conducted by
Jewish Federations around the
country.
| PIONEER WOMEN
^'AMAT'S secretary general
I Israel, Mas ha Lubelsky holds
% Ethiopian child in a Na'amat
py care center in Itraei In the
*nt issue of "Pioneer Wo-
n," problems and achieve-
Mi of the Ethiopian commu-
Jty in Israel an highlighted,
fting that Ethiopian Jews
\just to Israeli society faster
w most because of their fer-
M religious Zionism and a
"'. a language much similar to
sir own native tongue.
go ExcrrtiG places..
US*****.
PLAN MING A TRIP
pravti with National Council of
I Jewish Women. For new 1984
[Brochure describing serv
wtional tours to ISRAEL, with
I Mentions to EGYPT, ROME.
I LONDON, MADRID, and SWIT-
ZERLAND: Highlights In
IIR0PE- CHINA. THE ORIENT,
I225AT br,N. SPAIN, ITALY,
ICOSTA RICA, and' CANADIAN
I ROCKIES.
$169
(lOwKh ~_------------
? Call
|**| Harsh
473-6772
or
Qerl Levin
4*4-29*4
Wreath, Tree & Bell Cake....
Assorted ft
Dinner Rolls.......................12
Gourmet Fruit Cake...............'2~ *29
Pffeffernusse...........................* *118
Danish Tea Cookies A ,3M
Danish Tea Cookies SJ **'
Miniature Danish....................~ ****
Haasr:.........................~ 3-
Pecan Pie...............................Vff*W Prices Eftoctlw
mmuZlni* .........WM0sesasw1*i**19ll.
l"nC0 ^^Hbttisy Pica
8-inch 10-inch
8-inch 10-inch
Apple Crumb....... **
Peach................... *W
Pumpkin ....*........ 16*
Egg Custard......... '1-89
Pecan................... ^
Sweet Potato....... 1M
3.99
2.99
3.59
4.99
Apple.................... *IJ
Cherry.................. 2.79
Blueberry............. *2.49
Lemon Meringue. *1.89
Mince Meat.......... 1.99
Coconut Custard. '1.89
!

I


rageiu
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
F"d*y. December 2a
Browsin'
Thru Broward
with Maggie
It's little more than a week
away: 1984 And just like the
Jewish year 5744 it's a Leap
Year Unlike the common
calendar which has a lean vaar
every four years, by adding one
day to February, the Jewish
calendar is lunisolar (combining
cycles of the moon and the sun)
and so the Jewish leap years add
'a full month in each of seven
years in a 19-year-cycle ... So in
5744 the extra month, Adar II,
begins March 5 Don't look
now, but that means Rosh
Hashana, 5745, begins Sept. 27,
unlike the 5744 New Year which
began last Sept. 8.
So here are other calendar hap-
penings: Milton Herman of Palm-
Aire will celebrate the 50th an-
niversary of his Bar Mitzvah by
chanting the Haftorah Jan 21 at
Temple Sholom, Pompano .
And this month Lou Blinderman
of Davie is celebrating his 70th
birthday in Orlando where his
two children live. The Blinder
mans will be joined by grand-
children and friends .
Incidentally, the Bermans and
the Blindermans are former Al-
lentown, Pa., residents and
they'll be joining other Allenton-
ians at a reunion Feb. 4 being
arranged by Rath Lieb of Palm
Aire.
Sarah Canter reports Sunrise
Jewish Center Sisterhood will
have a two-day bazaar-rummage
sale Jan. 10 and 11 at Temple
Shaaray Tzedek, 4099 Pine
Island Rd., Sunrise Ben
Diakas, regional coordinator for
Volunteers for Israel program,
with two others, who, like
himself, wan unpaid civilian
workers with the Israeli army,
can be heard discussing their
experiences from 7 to 8 p.m.
Monday Dec. 26 on WGBS Radio
. Sidney Bartote, Ram
blewood East UJA chairman,
was re-elected president of
Democratic Club of Coral Springs
. Jack Mogson was elected
president of Temple Beth Am.
Only 56 Jews were permitted
to leave the Soviet Union in
November the lowest figure in
nearly 20 years ... In the
summer of 1977 the Israeli Shekel
(then 10 Lint) was worth one
U.S. dollar. Now it is worth ONE
CENT because Israel's currency
has depreciated 99 percent
relative to the dollar John
Kayston, after 48 years with the
news organization, is retiring as
executive editor of Jewish Tele-
graphic Agency (JTA). His
successor is Mark Seal, former
director of Jewish Frontier
publication.
Silver crowns and embroidered
covers that were on Torah scrolls
rescued from Czechoslovakia vil-
lages are included among the 360
artifacts in The Precious Legacy,
the exhibit which opens Jan. 24
at the Bass Museum of Art in
Miami Beach Two of those
Czechoslovakian Torah scrolls,
salvaged from Nazi ravages and
re-located in the Westminster
Synagogue in London, found new
homes in Plantation: at the
Jewish Community Center Assn.
for the Deaf, and at West
Broward Jewish Congregation.
Alfred Golden, president of
Riverside Memorial Chapels of
Florida, member of three South
Florida Federations' boards, was
elected national vice chairman of
the Council of Jewish Federa-
tions Large City Budgeting Con-
The Coral Springs B'nai B'rith
Unit, consisting of men and wo-
men, is sponsoring a Sunday
evening Jan. 1 dinner with enter-
tainment at the Holiday Inn in
Coral Springs.
Bruce Syrop said the dinner is
scheduled to begin at 8 p.m., with
a cosh bar available. Cost for the
evening is $30 per couple. Bruce
Syrop can be reached at 781-4400
during the day or at 753-2591 in
the evening for additional in-
formation and reservation.
AIPAC releases U.S.-Israel
medical cooperation study
The American Israel Public
Affairs Committee (AIPAC) has
just released a study which
details the critical shortages in
hospital facilities, medical
personnel and evacuation aircraft
that the U.S. armed forces will
face in the event of a Middle
East-Persian Gulf conflict.
Although the study, entitled
Israeli Medical Support for the
U.S. Armed Forces, is not con-
cerned primarily with Lebanon,
the brutal bombing of the Marine
Max Levine
fere nee. And here's a salute to
another dedicated volunteer:
Rose Vollovick of Hawaiian Gar-
dens who is at the Federation
bright and early every Tuesday
morning and sometimes oftener
to help the staff for a good
portion of the day. Rep. Dan
Mica's office announced Dec. 28
public hearing on Medicare at
Boca Raton, City Hall conducted
by U.S. House Select Committee
on Aging.
Shcryt Keller, chairman of the
"Hi-Way Hold-Up Campaign''
during the Juvenile Diabetes
Week is seeking volunteers for
the Broward County Sunday
Feb. 5 day of soliciting motorists
at intersections for contributions.
Funds benefit Diabetes Research
Institute at University of Miami
School of Medicine. Interested?
Call the DRI Foundation at 888-
3437. David Epner analyzed
handwriting samples at the Dec.
19 meeting of Temple Emanu-el's
Jewish Professionals Group .
Dr. Thomas Cavendish, general
manager of Gold Coast Opera
Theatre, spoke about musk
appreciation at the Dec. 19
meeting of Chai Chapter of
Women's League for Israel.
OOPS! Did we have a boo-boo
in the Dec. 9 column! Moe
Wittenberg of Woodmont who
became a great-grandparent
recently is married to Mirinni 8.
WkUnberg. Inadvertently an
incorrect name slipped into the
column. Our apologies. And
hen's another blooper: It's Molly
Schneider, not Molly Schwartz,
that JCC's LeBrowas wonts to
hear from. So Moiy Sr hails or,
wherever you an, call Rhra at the
Jewish Community Center 792-
6700.
Ethel Kraaa received the IMA
(Hebrew for Mother) award at
Bat-Ami-Tamarac Chapter of
Hadassah Dec. 19 celebration of
Henrietta Scold's birthday. A
7.12 acre parcel of land near
Forest Hill Blvd. at Sugar Maple
Dr. in Coral Springs was sold to
David Friedman of Lauderhill. as
trustee. Iris Shear has been
named sales director at Villas at
the Gate, a 93-unit condo com-
munity in the Woodlands area. .
Lilly and Jerome Davidson of
Hawaiian Gardens an new
grandparents with the birth of
Elisabeth Ana Repaneek,
daughter of Carole and Frank
Repreaeek. Jerry is co-chairman
of Hawaiian Gardens Rally for
Israel and co-chain the com-
munity's first Initial Gifts event.
Jan. 1 dinner for
Springs BB Unit
WECARE AT JCC received another check from the Bermuda Club
community to bring the five-year-total of contributions to $13,000.
Julius Gersten, the community's fund-raising chairman, is pictured
making the newest presentation to Rovi Faber (far right), WECARE's
founding chairman. With her is Audrey Millsaps who received a
portion of the donation on behalf of the HRS Standards Review
Committee for Children's Shelters and the liaison for children'$
shelters in Broward County. With Gersten are Marcus Fox, president
of Bermuda Club's Men's Club and Ida Strom, president of the
community's Women's Club. In the background is Phil Cofman,
ICCs executive director.
'Florida Friends9 organized
for Cardozo School of Law
Announcing the formation of
Florida Friends of the Benjamin
N. Cardozo School of Law, a col-
lege affiliated with Yeshiva
University, Dr. Norman Lamm,
president of the University locat-
ed in New York, said that
Maurice Berkowitz, Fort Lauder-
dale attorney, has been appointed
chairman of the group.
Dr. Lamm, noting the law
school's enrollment increase in
seven yean to more than 900
since its original enrollment of
300 men and women, said the na-
tion's first law school under Jew-
ish auspices was inspired in 1976
by "the centrality of law in the
Jewish tradition."
Berkowitz, who has served as
vice chairman-commissioner of
the Port Everglades and is a past
vice president of the Florida
Assn. of B'nai B'rith Lodges,
said: "The Cardozo-Florida con-
nection is a thriving one, with
more than a dozen Cardozo
alumni already practicing law in
Florida and a substantial number
of Floridian currently enrolled in
the law school. We plan to bring
the benefits of Cardozo School of
Law closer to the community
A try. Maurice Berkowitz
through a series of informative
seminars and other related
programs."
Yeshiva University, now in its
97th year, is America's oldest
and largest university under
Jewish auspices. Lorraine Donin
at the University's Southeastern
Region development head-
quarters, 2301 Collins Ave., Suite
M 25, Miami Beach (538-5658),
has more information for those
interested.
barracks there had
the nature of the prehhaT
The study reveals that
services currently could
no more than half the nM
theat!L S* that *uid
required for a large-scale ens.
in the Gulf. There would al*i
desperate shortages of Hy,
medical and support persoj]
man the faculties andashoJTo
in the number of medical
cuation aircraft needed fort
porting casualties.
According to AIPAC,
the armed services have i
number of programs undenmj
deal with these problems, "it,
be at least the end of the deq
before enough of the deployi
facilities and evacuation
will be ready."
The study then
alternatives interim soluth
Existing facilities in Europe i_
several thousand miles awn]
requiring a large but unavaiUlJ
aeromedical evacuation capacto]
and involving long and poof*
harmful delays in provid
proper treatment. The
states of the region are __
able nor willing to provide I
necessary assistance, given tharj
own severe shortages of i
hospital capacity.
Israel is the one state of I
region with a large, modail
hospital system and it has. n|
several occasions, indicated .
willingness to help. Accordingu|
the AIPAC study, by combinia,
its own existing capability *u|
prepositioned American "fok
hospitals," Israel could proviel
some 4,000 beds and the train*!
personnel to go with them -I
tripling the available medial |
capacity of American forcei i
the Middle East.
Such medical cooperiuaj
would help deter conflict
demonstrating America's
ness to defend its interests. Bui
deterrence should fail, the i
concludes, "these ar
will help ensure that eve
possible will be done to prouaj
the lives of American soldiers."
The American Israel
Affairs Committee is the oaN
American organization regisuraj
to lobby Congress on legislaua]
affecting Israel. AIPAC is s|
ported by private donations frosl
more than 48,000 members.
Israeli Medical Suport fcr tatl
VS. Anaed Forces is part of el
ongoing series of "AIPM>
Papen" analyzing various
pects of the U.S.Israel laUttl
ship, including several areaitl
U.S.-Israel strategic cooperates!
For more information, write a
call the American Israel rm
Affairs Committee, 444 Cj**
St.. N.W., Suit* 41>..*"*]
ington, D.C. 20001, (2021
2256.
DISABLED VETERANS
were treated to a Chanukah party
the Miami VA Hospital by
"m*** of Pompano Beach
JWV pott and Auxiliary. The
lighting and blessing of candles
were conducted by VA Hospital
Chaplain Rabbi Alan Mervice
(nght). Post Adjutant Max
Krasner {left) supervised the
distribution of Chanukah gelt at
the conclusion of the party.
Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale
extends an open invitation to the community for
FAMILY MISSION TO ISRAEL
JULY 15-25
Call the Federation: 748-8400
or mail this coupon
Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale
8358 W. Oakland Park Blvd.
Fort Lauderdale FL 33321
Please send me information about the July 15-26 Family
Mission to Israel.
NsmsL
.Apt No
Address.


December 23,1988
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 11
J
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^SjSuhnortSmofGnat^FortLaudtrdmlt
FH'fry.Dgwnbgal
Community Calendar
Compiled by Lori
ftMU 748-6400.
FRIDAY DEC. 23
WLl-Timmc Chapter: 9 a.m.
Cake Sale. Broward Federal,
McNab Rd. and University Dr.
721-8932.
SATURDAY DEC. 24
Oakbrook Village: 7:30 p.m. and
Sunday Dec. 25. Performance of a
mock marriage enacted authen-
tically. David Raymond, en-
tertains Refreshments. Tickets
$6,722-0031.
SUNDAY DEC. 26
Teaaple Beth Torah: 6:45 p.m.
Games.
Temple Sha'aray Taedek: 7:15
p.m. Games.
Women's Club of Castle, Under-
bill: Dec. 25-29. Week of fun for
visitors including swimming
races, track and field events, and
magic and puppet shows.
JCC Cottage Age SfcagJea: 8:30
p.m. Winter Wonderland Party.
Co-sponsors are the JCC's of Fort
Lauderdale and South Broward.
B'nai B'rith and Hillel D.J.,
Dancing, and refreshments. $2
for JCC members, S3 for non-
members. 792-6700 or 921-6611.
MONDAY DEC. 26
Israel Numismatic Society of
Broward: 8 p.m. Meeting. Brow-
ard Federal, Inverness Plata.
Temple Beth Israel of Sunrise,
Men's Club: 8 p.m. Meeting.
WLI-Tamarar Chapter: 11:30
a.m. Meeting. Italian-American
Club, 7300 McNab Rd., Tamarac.
Deborah Lauderhll Chapter:
Noon. Installation of officers.
Film presented by Arlene Trister,
coordinator of the Florida
Region.
B'nai B'rith Womea DasrfieU
Beach Chapter: 12:30 p.m.
Meeting. BBYO will present
program.
TUESDAY DEC. 27
Temple Beth Torah, Sisterhood:
11:46 am. flames Lunch at
nominal cost.
WLI-Margate Chapter: 1:30p.m.
Meeting. Speaker: Ruth Sperber,
regional director. Catharine
Young Library, Margate.
HAD ASS AH:
North Lauderdale Chm Chap-
ter: 1 p.m. Meeting honoring life
members. Refreshments. North
Lauderdale City Hall.
Maastda Margate Chapter:
12:30 p.m. Birthday celebration
for Henrietta Szold. Temple Beth
Am, Margate.
Somerset Shoshaaa Chapter:
Noon. Meeting. Somerset Phase I
Clubhouse.
Rayna Tamarac Chapter: 1
p.m. Meeting. Annual Educatior
Day with 'Jewish Awareness* as
theme. Speaker: Cantor Nancy
Hausman of Temple Beth Orr.
Temple Beth Torah. Tamarac.
PIONEER WOMEN
NA'AMAT:
Wyamoor Chapter: 11 s.m
Meeting. Fran Schor will discuss
nutrition. Mini-lunch. Coconut
Creek Community Center. 900
NW 43 Ave .Coconut Creak.
Dshra Chm: Noon. Masting
Lauderdale Lakes City
Hall Based Drive: 9 am. to 2
p.m. Bloodmobiie located in
parking lot of Woodmoa* Conn
try Chm
Chm St: 7 If pan New Year
ter.smfl
it
i p
Cindy Charge 96
Temple Bath Orr:
Games.
Wi
North
Meeting. Speaker:
Greenberg. Coconut
reation Center.
JWV Ladies Aaisamj No. 739:
Noon. Meeting. Broward Federal.
3000 N. University Dr., Sunrise.
Community Room.
0T1 iiliisJili Waal
7:4* p-
Noon.
Dr. Irving
Creak lac-
Noon. Meeting. Mini-lunch
Deicke Auditorium, Plantation.
472-6332.
B'nai B'rith Women-Leoah
Council: 12:30 p.m. Meeting.
Multi-purpose building, Planta-
tion Central Park.
Temple Beth Torah, Sisterhood:
12:30 p.m. Meeting. Jack Fish-
man, Yiddish humorist will en-
tertain. At Temple.
THURSDAY DEC. 29
Temple Beth Israel of sunrise:
Noon. Games.
Blood Drive: 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Community Room of Broward
Federal. 5518 W. Oakland Park
Blvd.. Lauderhill. 722-6174.
FRIDAY DEC. 30
Pioneer Women Na'amat-Negev
Chapter: 12 hour cruise on Sea
Escape. 426-1941 or 427-9339.
JWV Deerfield Beach: Dec. 30 to
Jan. 1. One day cruise to Free-
port with overnight stay. 421-
2064 or 427-6168.
B'nai Brith Women-Coconut
Creak Chapter: Dec. 30 to Jan. 1.
New Year's bash including stop
at Burt Reynolds Dinner The-
ater, cruise on Sandinavian Sun,
and tour of Hutchinson Island.
972-3613 or 972-1163.
SATURDAY DEC. 31
Temple Beth Israel of Deerfield
Bench, Sisterhood: 8 p.m. to 1
a.m. New Year's Eve party. Do-
nation $12. Temple Social Hall.
B'nai B'rith Women-Deerfield
Wife-abuser aidel
through ffcfiqJ
' The Jewish Family Service of Broward County
stituent agency of the Jewish Federation of Greater
Lauderdale, has prepared a series of articles based on the!
of counseling and casework conducted by its staff.
Beach Chapter: 3-day trip to Cy- professional social workers. Since all personal service offered!
press Busch Gardens. 426-1629. tne JFS is on a highly-confidential basis, the articles ,
Temple Beth Israel of Sunrise, Dy caseworkers, eliminate names and specific information
could identify the person or persons aided by JFS.
Men's Chm: 9 p.m. New Year's
Eve party. Dinner and entertain-
ment. 741-4257 or 741-2579.
Temple Beth Torah, Sisterhood:
New Year's Eve party. Dinner
and dancing. 721-6293 or 722-
2023.
SUNDAY JAN. 1
NEW YEAR'S DAY
MONDAYJAN. 2
HsnsssshUaderdale Tamer
Chapter: 10 am. Board Meeting.
Broward Federal, 5518 W. Oak-
land Park Blvd.. Lauderhill.
B'nai B'rith seeks
blood donors
North Broward Council of
B'nai B'rith, and individual
lodges and chapters, in coopera-
tion with others, sponsor blood
drives conducted by the South
Florida Blood Service.
In the Woodmont area of
Tamarac, Harry Lichtiger. com-
munity service chairman of the
Woodmont B'nai B'rith Lodge,
said B'nai B'rith Women,
Hadassah. ORT and the Wood-
mont Country Club are cooperat-
ing in enlisting donors for the
donations to be taken from 9 to 2
&m. Tuesday Dec 27 at the
loodmobile which will be parked
on the Club's grounds.
Morris Sher is the blood coord-
inator for the North Broward
Council's donations to be made at
the Broward Federal Community
Room, 5518 W. Oakland Park
Blvd., Lauderhill, from 9:30 to 3
p.m. Thursday Dec. 29.
In both instances South Flo-
rida Blood Service provides the
technicians and equipment, plus
a free mini-physical, before the
blood donation is made, a proced-
ure Sher said that takes only six
to 10 minutes. He is arranging
convenient times for blood
donors. Call him at 722-6174.
Israeli emissaries explain duties
Five regional thkchim (emis-
saries from Israel) were the fea-
tured speakers at the Dec. 18
meeting of the South Florida
Chug (circle of friends) st the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion. Chug is a branch of NAAM
(North American Aliyah Move-
ment) and is sponsored by the Is-
rael Aliyah Center to provide
practical guidance for those
interested in Israeli lifestyles.
The speakers, who explained
their diverse responsibilities and
duties in the U.S.. were:
Zvika Halevi. emissary to
the Reform Movement; Diane
Hirsch, regional coordinator for
University Service Department;
At local libraries
The Broward County Library
System is offering a number of
programs to the public, free of
charge. Among them are the fol-
lowing:
At Tamarac Branch, 8601 W.
McNab Rd, Tamarac.
During the month of Decem-
ber, casual conversations in Yid-
French and Spanish will be
For times and dates call
722-0710.
At 7 pm. Thursday Dec. 29,
Basal team will discuss the future
of Israel Although the lecture is
free, tickets are required. Call
7220710
Mati Marcus, emissary to B'nai
Akiva youth groups; Allan Mil-
stein, emissary for aliyah; and
Gilad Shafran, community emis-
sary for the Jewish Federation,
Jewish Latin American groups,
and campuses.
For information about the
Chug call the Israel Aliyah Cen-
ter at 573-2556 or the Chug chair-
men at 653-2470.
Mr. S. called JFS for marital
counseling. He stated that he and
his wife have been having
problems for the last six months.
Presently his wife is staying with
her friend because she is afraid to
stay alone with him. He con-
tinued by savins that the last
fight they had ended up in
physical violence. He wanted an
appointment for both, she was
willing to come into therapy with
him.
Both Mr. and Mrs. S. appeared
on time for their appointment.
Mrs. S. was wearing sunglasses
and refused to take them off
because of her black eye. Mr. S.
spoke first. He stated that he
does have a problem. He loses his
temper and becomes so angry
that he begins to hit his wife.
When I asked what kinds of
things make him that angry, he
had difficulty getting more
specific. He said that usually it
does not matter what it is, if he
has had a rotten day he will take
it out on his wife. If she cooks
peas and he wants carrots he
could become explosive.
She confirmed this by nodding
her head. He stated he feels
horrible about what happens but
does not feel in control. His
father used to hit his mother and
the kids, so when he begins to feel
pressured he does the same thing.
Mrs. S. continued by saying
that they have been married fora
year but they went out together
for about two years before the
marriage. The hitting was
something new. It did not L
when they were dating. SheJ
hurt and confused and was,
sure if she was doing j __
to cause his anger. Sheahoi
that she wants the relit__
work but is afraid to movel
in.
As therapy continued, Mr. L
was seen individually and y,,]
and Mrs. S. were also seen
together, Mr. S. began tor
that his behavior was learraoi
he could learn other ways to
express his anger. He could;
hit a pillow, leave the housei
he felt explosive or talk out \
anger. We practiced this in
therapy both in his individual I
sessions and his marital i
After about two months o( |
therapy Mrs. S. moved backs
the house. She decided that i
would take a chance. She also ]
learned that if her husband
became very angry she also I
options. She could leave the
house and go to a friend's I
She did not have to stick i
and try and resolve the proh
at that time. Although both)
and Mrs. S. were at the \
stage of therapy, they wereb
motivated clients. They \
to learn how to relate to each
other without the violence. J
that needed to be explored in
therapy besides communii
skills were: family origin on!
sides, environmental stress* |
and ones feelings of self i
t
*
\
5*
*\ JCC
JFS maintains three offices in Broward County. Pe
seeking JFS aid may call or write to the office nearest to I
In Central Broward 3500 N. State Rd. 7, Suit*:
Lauderdale Lakes 33319. Phone 735-3394. This office is ops]
to 5 every weekday and remains open until 9 p.m. on
days.
Northern edge of Broward 100 W. Hiiisboro Bl
Suite 214, Deerfield Beach 33441. Phone 427-8508. Thisofl
also open 9 to 5 every weekday with hours extended to 9 pm^
Mondays.
In South Broward, JFS office is at 4517 Hollywood Bh
Hollywood 33021. Phone 966-0956. This office is also open r
9 to 5 every weekday, plus remaining open until 9 pjn.
Thursday.
>
3621 NW 43 Awe.. Lauderdale
Two poppet plays, Peter Rab-
bit and Holiday Friends, wil bs
presented for children ages three
through 10 at 10 am. and 2 p.m.
Tuesday Dec. 27.
At
Dr.
6810 Park
At 2 pm. Wednesday Dae. 28,
the Gold Coast Mime Company
will present a circus show.
Studky speaks Jan. 18
to Inverrary Hadassah
Inverrary-Gilah Hadassah
Chapter will have Barbara Stud-
ley. WNWS Radio talk show host,
as guest speaker at an 11:30 a.m.
Wadaaaday Jan. 18 meeting at
the Inverrary Country Club,
Lauderhill Studley. a staunch
advocate of support for Israel's
efforts to achieve peace in the
Middle East, wil provide an up-
date on the situation for members
and guests of the Chapter.
Bather Solomon is r*h.g
reservations at 63 par parson
with check to be mailed to her at
6200 NW 44th St.. Apt. 312,
Lauderhill 33319.
VOLUNTEERS WANTED!
for
L Browse
THE JfWISH COIMMyiUWITY CBiTEt
THRIFTSHOP
Hours to Suit
for
SELLING! MERCHANDISING!
groat working conditions
c,n fl/va r2-tJt>
tk


Dec-n|*rM163
Tht Jewish Floridian ofOnaUr Fort LauderdaU
13
I

Spend a little.
GetEilaf.
When you fly H AI to Israel this winter, you can get
more for your money. In fact, you can get Eilat.
$Just $90* more gets you round trip air fere from
^^^ ^^^ Tel Avtv to the beautiful
M ^M ^ Red Sea resort-Eilat.
MM \\ You 11 spend 3 nights at the
I fabulous Hotel Neptune
' or Laromme. Well also
include two sumptuous
Israeli breakfasts and a
FOR 3 NI0Ml3 AND choice of two lunches or
AID cadc CDAM two dinners at your hotel.
, ^itact And. ifyou love the water.
TEL AVIV TO EILAT. Hat has a lot to offer.
You can wind-surf, watersW, or don a pair of flippers and
snorkel. Best of all, wade into our emerald-green waters
for a quick dip. then tan on our beach.
This special package is only available on a Sunday
departure from Tel Aviv, and should be booked when
you book your round trip flight to Israel on H AL
So call your travel agent now, or call us toll-free
(1-800-223-6700). because only E AI can give you Eilat
for so little.
st*"^
* *i

I
'* *
.
0
e


(

"*
i+immm m*Vt* <**
L


-
MtWndian of Greater Fort LauderdaU
Fridy. December a
''
B'nai-B'not Mitxvah
TEMPLE KOL AMI
Neal Falk, son of Marianne and
Bennett Falk of Plantation, will
become a Bar Mitzvah celebrant
at the Friday night Doc. 23 serv-
ice at Temple Kol Ami, Planta-
tion.
The B'not Mitzvah of Can
Sander, daughter of Arlene and
J. Martin Sandier of Sunrise, and
Stad Summer*, daughter of
Beatty and Mark Summers of
Plantation, will take place at th
Saturday morning Dec. 24 serv
ice at Kol Ami.
Joshua Gordon, son of Rons
Gordon of Plantation, will be
called to the Torah in honor of his
Bar Mitzvah at the Saturday
morning Dec. 31 service at Kol
Ami.
TEMPLE BETH TORAH
The Bat Mitzvah of Shari
Spin, daughter of Peggy and
Harry Spira of Sunrise, will take
place at the Friday night Dec. 23
service at Temple Beth Torah,
Tamarac.
The following morning at the
Dec. 24 service, the B'nai Mitz-
vah celebration of Eric Goldman,
son of Heraha and Lee Goldman
of Coral Springs, and Adam
Lisbii. son of Ilene and
Robert Lieberman of Lauderhill,
will be held at Beth Torah.
Howard HeUman. son of Bar-
bara and Michael of Coral
Springs, will be called to the
Torah in honor of his Bar Mitz-
vah at the Saturday morning
Dec. 31 service at Beth Torah.
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL
Erin Fineberg, daughter of Es-
telle and Libo Fineberg of Plan-
tation, will celebrate her Bat
Mitzvah at the Friday night Dec.
23 service at Temple Beth Israel.
Sunrise.
The Bar Mitzvah of Greg Stel-
lar, son of Elaine and Eric Stoller
of Plantation, will take place at
the Saturday morning Dec. 24
service at Beth Israel.
TEMPLE BETH AM
The Bat Mitzvah celebration of
Lisa Segal, daughter of Dina and
Steven Sagal of Coral Springs,
will take place at the Friday eve-
ning Dec. 23 service at Temple
Beth Am, Margate.
The B'nai Mitzvah of Darren
and Alysea Schnagel, son and
daughter of Lynda and Martin
Schnagel of Coral Springs, will be
celebrated at the Saturday morn-
ing Dec. 24 service at Beth Am.
Nicole Mandeil, daughter of
Ronnie and Allan Martin Man-
dell of Coral Springs, will become
a Bat Mitzvah celebrant at the
Saturday morning Dec. 31 serv-
ice at Beth Am.
TEMPLE BETH ORR
The B'nai Mitzvah of Michael
Brown, son of Ronna and Richard
Brown of Coral Springs, and
Jaaon Frybergh, son of Ellen and
Philip Frybergh of Coral Springs,
took place at the Saturday morn-
ing Dec. 17 service at Temple
Beth Orr, Coral Springs.
HEBREW CONGREGATION
OF LAUDERHILL
Donn Andrew Simmons, son of
Dr. and Mrs. Leonard Simrr ons
of Fairmont, W. Va. and grand-
son of Mr. and Mrs. Sol Cohen of
Lauderhill, and Mr. and Mrs.
Harry Simmons of Tamarac, will
become a Bar Mitzvah celebrant
at the Saturday morning Dec. 24
service at the Hebrew Congrega-
tion of Lauderhill.
WEST BROWARD
JEWISH CONGREGATION
Cora RiboUky, daughter of
Patricia Ribotaky of Plantation,
will become a Bat Mitzvah cele-
brant at the Saturday morning
Dec. 24 service at West Broward
Jewish Congregation, Plantation.
Holocaust Survivors present Omni Shoi
The Holocaust Survivors of
South Florida have planned a
gala three-hour All-Star show at
2 p.m. Sunday Feb. 26 at the
Omni Auditorium on the North
Campus of Broward Community
College, 1000 Coconut Creek
Blvd.. Pompano Beach.
Appearing will be Sterling and
Lloyd, comedy team; Harry Bee,
harmonica player; Danny Tad-
more, comedian; Dario
singer; Vince Perrone, viptj
Rachel Goodman, soprano-
Lydia King, soprano.
Donations are $9.50 $7m
and $5. For ticket inform'
call Omni Auditorium at
2249, or the following coma
members: Rachal Rybak i
7208, Miriam Fridman 974.ji
or Sally Kelman at 972-7026
ISRAEL HISTADRUT and
members of Retires Club of Flori-
da honored the Club's president,
Murray Bernstein of Hawaiian
Gardens, Dec. 15 at the Inverrary
Country Club, by presenting him
with Histadrut's "City of Jeru-
salem Award," and establishing
a room in his name in one of Isra-
el's Kupat Holim health facilities.
Presentations were made by Da-
vid Silverbush, chairman of
Israel Histadrut Councils of
South Florida, and Irving
Gordon, Southeast Regional
director of the organuadtion
based on Miami Beach.
Now we have
two locations
to serve Jewish families
in the Palm Beaches
441 BOCA RATON Turnpate / Glades Road /
# #1-95 HtHsbofo I
Sample |
1_ I
Our chapel on Okeechobee Blvd serves famises
in Weal Palm Beach Lake Worth. Singer Island,
and other communities
Our chapel on Slat* Road 7 serves fam*es in
Boca Raton Oelray. Pompano. Margate, and
other communities
The spirit of personal service that began with the Weinstein Brothers in Chicago
at the tum of the century has come a long way. both in duration and distance.
Our two beautiful chapels in this area are continuing the tradition established so
long ago, so far away, for Jewish families in Palm Beach and
north Broward counties
Some things don't change
Memorial Chapels
West Palm Beach
5411 Okeechobee Btvd.
689-8700
Boca Raton/Pompano/Margate
7500 N State Road Seven
427-8500
Caaaleliiatini Tim
Friday, Dec. 23-5:19 p.i
Friday, Dec. 30 -5:25pi
vatiyx
COM
TEMPLE BETH AM (874-8*90). TEW Royal Palm Blvd., tUrgsU MbJ
Service*: Monday through Friday 8:80 a.m.. p.m. Friday 1U Mrvktll
p.m.: Saturday a.m.. 6 p.m.: Sunday 8 a.m.. 8 p.m. RabM PmI Mat]
Rabbi Emeritus. Dr. Satosa OaM. Casts* InMg Onaaaaaa.
TEMVLF. BETH ISRAEL (742-4040). 7100 W. Oakland Park Blvd.,
33313 Service*: Monday through Thursday li.m.. 8:30 pm ; Fr1dyl tali
p.m.. 8 p.m.: Saturday 8:46 a.m.; Sunday t a.m.. 6:30 p m KabM PMs>Ll|
labowlts. Cantor Maurice Nee.
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL OP DEERFUXO BEACH {421 TOO), 300 tl
Century Blvd., Deerfleld Beach 3*441 Service*: Sunday throughFriday l:l|
a.m., 6 p.m. Friday late service 8 pm .; Saturday 8:48 am .and it casts]
lighting time. RabM Jeaepa I aagaar, Call I r gbaMsl Ackermaa.
TEMPLE BETH TORAH (721-7880). tioi NW 87th St Tamsrsc 1*3.1
Service*: Sunday through Friday 8:10 a.m.. 8 p.m. Late Friday lental)
p m Saturdays 48a m..Bp m RabM Rait F. Sesae. Caator Heary Beam.
TEMPLE B'NAI MORHE (843 63801.1434 SE 3rd St Pompano Beach MM j
Services: Friday 8 p.m. RabM Marria A. Mm*.
TEMPLE SHA'ARAY TZEDER (7414MB)>. 40M Pin* Island M. I
Sunns* 3SM1. Services: Sunday through Friday 8 a.m 8 p m .LaUMMI
service 8 pm: Saturday 8:46 a.m.. 8: Mp.m. Center Jack Marches!
TEMPLE HHOLOM (6424410). 112 8E 11th Ave Pompano Beach I
Services: Monday through Friday 8:46 a.m. and 8 pm Friday venini nil
Saturday and Sunday 8 a.m. RabM Samuel April. Cantor JarohReaier.
CONGREGATION
Blvd.. Mari-ata MOM. laiilaaai
Late Friday service 8 p.m. Saturday
OP MARGATE (87440801. 76tt*Unsal
Sunday through Friday 8 lB.m INial
ay. I4i.ni., 6:80pm Betel Rssj
CONGREGATION B'NAI ISRAEL OP CORAL SFRINQB (For RamhlnM
East resldenU). 7M4816 Issilsss: Dally 8:M a.m.. I:M p.m.; SaturMi]
am. Hsrb Davis, Pmldssil
HEBREW CONGREGATION OP LAUDERHMA (TM4M0), 3081 NW JRJ
Avs Laudsrhlll SMU. arMaisi Sunday through Friday IN s.m.,14
p.m., Saturday 1:44 am..
NORTH LAITDERDALE HEBREW CONGREGATION (722 7383 or7M-l7M j
srvteas at Banyon Lakes Condo Clubhouas. 6060 Ballsy Rd.. Tumi
Friday at 6 pm Saturday a.m. Air
Ol
TEMPLE OREL B'NAI RAPHAEL (TH-7M4). 4M1 H OaklandPsitsM.1
Lauderdale Lakes 31413 Sarrtsss: Sunday through Thursday 8 a.av.isa.1
Friday 6 a.m. 6p.m.. Saturday 6:Ma.m.,6p.m.
SYNAOOOLE OP INVERRART CHARAD (748-1777). 7770 NW ?* .
Lincoln Park Wast. Sunrise 33121 Services: Sunday through rrtday ita-l
7 30pm ; Saturday 6am 7: Mp.m. Study groups: Man. Sundayi 8*H j
services; Women, Tuesdays8 p.m.
YOUNG ISRAEL OP DEERPTELD BEACH (411-1387). 1880 W HUkka*|
Blvd.. Deerfleld Beach 88441 Service*: Sunday through Thursday laaj
6:30 p.m.; Friday 8 a.m., 8 p.m.: Saturday 8 48a.m., 6:30 p m <**]
Chasem-P llln i Msstsa Pe*-seeas, BMssayaMmar.AatsAaaiwa*.
YOUNG MRAEL SYNAGOGUE OP BHMXTWOOD-PORT LAl'BMBJjJ/l
(6M-78T7). MM Stirling Rd.. Pert Laudsrdals SMU. lanrkssi MM
undoes: BS*S
through Friday 7: Mam
8a m sundown
; Saturday. 8a.m.. suratown: I
CONGREGATION MMDAL DAVID 173*46481. 8676 W Melts
Tamarac Service* Daily 8 a.m.; mlnch* 6 p.m. RabM OkeM'
OsagragaMsa aeoetde**: Hertnaa Fists can r.
wmoomvruMKmonwr ^^(
RAMAT SHALOM (4TS48B0). UM1 W. Broward Bled.. P*"*0"
ai Friday 8 16 pm Saturday. M a^>
kBWMSjR,
IH ORB (Tta-tMl). MM ttMeeMO^Os^fgj\S^
****: Sunday 6:80 a.m.; Tissaday. ^^SL^l'msmsT
Saturday 10 a m RabM DesaaM R. Oetwar. OaaAsr Naaey lasusrns-.
TEMPLE R-N AI SHALOM OP DEERFIELD REACH <**^tM
Menorah ChapeU. MM W. HWaboro Blvd.. Deerfleld Beach, Fries/
laav HFWR.Ca.Mr M.rrtsLevtseee- ~\
TEMPLE MANUEL . MM W. OaAM^PerklBlvd Lasjl|
Labs. SMU Service. Friday 8:18 pm ; *$?'c*b6>WBs|
celebration of Bar-BM Mttsveh BabM Jeffrey Hi
^ KOL AMI (471-18*8). HNB r^^St^S^Y'mSfa
Friday 8 16 p.m., Saturday MM am ataBM HM
067 COCONUT
Friday night asrviees twice
Coeoaut Creek Parkway "
AareaB Dsee.
kOORVT CHHRH (WlMM^jjS
cnums^Hmtn^^^Sa
6: IS .av: aWfBir. fr m mr^



December 23.1963
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 15
AMONG BONDS HONOREES at the
Sunrise Lakes 1 "Night in Israel"
mgram were [holding Scrolls of Honor]
fv Kipnis and Dr. Seymour Rosen.
>ictured with them are Jack Rosenberg,
those I Bonds Committee chairman;
State Rep. Peter Deutsch; Nat Goldman,
Phase I Bonds co-chairman, and far
right. State Sen. James Scott. Others
receiving Scroll of Honor were Dr. Leon
Fellman, Rose Lipsky, Bernard Strauss,
Mark Weisman.
iale of new $250 Israel Certificate urged
Avraham Sharir, Israel's Min-
Her of Tourism, urged leaders of
ore than
40 American Jewish
organizations "to undertake the
responsibility of bridging the gap
between Israel and American
Jewry" by promoting the sale of
the new $250 State of Israel Cer-
tificate among their members.
Speaking at a reception spon-
mbassy official meets Bonds New Leadership ^^^SfSS^S
the Certificate has the potential
[Yossef Levy, assistant econ-
nk minister to North America
jith the Israel Embassy in
Washington, was the guest
juker at a meeting of the New
iadership of the North Broward
[reel Bonds Organization. Also
__ent was Ronald Krongold,
itional chairman of the Bonds
ew Leadership.
I Both men spoke about the
blems in Israel and the need
Bond purchases to assist the
onomic development of the
luntry. Both emphasized the
need for encouraging young
adults to become involved in the
Bond organization.
The meeting was held at the
home of'Kuth and Dr. Uri Elias
where a fashion show of designs
by internationally-known dress
designer Moustaki were modeled.
The evening's activity was co-
ordinated by New Leadership
chairpeople Suzanne and Joe
Berkovits. Susan and Bernard
Canarick. Ilene and Steven
Hersh.
to encourage visits to Israel by a
large segment "of more than
three and one-half million Ameri-
can Jews including one and
one-half million who are affiliated
with synagogues and Jewish or-
ganizations who have never
set foot on Israeli soil."
He said that the new Certifi-
cate provides the opportunity "to
double Jewish tourism from the
United States in the very near fu-
ture," noting that the percentage
of Jews among tourists to Israel
had decreased from 70 percent in
1950 to only 38 percent in 1983,
and that over the last 10 years,
the number of non-Jewish tour-
ists had increased at a rate that
was more than double that of
Jewish tourists.
"What will berime of the Jew-
ish people and their ties to Israel
if this gap continues to widen?"
he asked.
Brig. Gen. (Res.) Yehudah Ha-
levy. President and Chief Execu-
tive Officer of the Israel Bond
Organization, stated that the
meeting had been called "to plan
ways of bringing a greater sense
of identification with Israel by
millions of American Jews. The
$250 Israel Certificate is designed
to strengthen the identity of the
Jews of the United States with
Israel through visits to Israel.
By Fran Rasumny Barrett, J.D.
Q. / was in Toronto this summer
attending a funeral Unfortun-
ately, I oho got sick and was
rushed to a nearby hospital on an
emergency. When I sent the
doctor's bills to Medicare, they
rejected it, and I am wondering
how I can get these bills reim-
bursed?
P. S., Fort Lauderdale
A. Medicare does not generally
pay for care in a foreign hospital,
however they do make three ex-
ceptions. If you fit into one of
these categories, you may be able
to get reimbursed. They are:
1) You are in the U.S. when an
emergency occurs and a
Canadian or Mexican hospital is
closer to your home than the
nearest U.S. hospital which can
provide the emergency services
you need.
2) You live in the U.S. and a
Canadian or Mexican hospital is
closer to your home than the
nearest U.S. hospital which can
provide the care you need, re-
gardless whether or not an
emergency exists.
3) You are in Canada traveling
by the most direct route to or
from Alaska and another state
and an emergency occurs which
requires that you be admitted to
a Canadian hospital. (This provi-
sion does not apply if you are va-
cationing in Canada).
These are the circumstances in
which Medicare can help pay for
care in a qualified Canadian or
Mexican hospital.
Q. My wife had been in the hospi-
tal for three weeks. She haa to
pay the $304 deductible. Now she
has to go back in the hospital. It
has been 62 days since she has
been out of the hospital. Does she
have to pay the $304 again?
B.C., Hollywood
A. Unfortunately, your wife will
have to pay another $304 deduc-
tible because she has been out of
a facility for more than 60 days.
(This is when new benefit
period begins). Had ah* been
admitted back to the hospital be-
fore the 60th day, then she would
not have to pay another deduc-
tible. You should check with her
physician the next time she needs
to be hospitalized and find out if
she can enter before the 60th day.
year and has not seen a doctor.
Now he has an appointment for
Dec. 26. If he meets the deduc-
tible of $75 will it cover for next
year.
G. K., Deerileld Beech
A. Medicare used to carry over the
deductible if it was met in the last
three months of the year. How-
ever, that practice has been dis-
continued. If it is not emergency,
I would say that your husband
should try for an appointment
after the 1st of next year.
This column is a service of the
Jewish Family Service of Brow-
ard County, a beneficiary agency
of the Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale. Ques-
tions or problems concerning
Medicare, supplemental in-
surance or HMO's should be
directed to anyone ofJFS three
offices: 735-3394 in Lauderdale
Lakes; 427-8608 in Deerfield
Beach; 966-0956 in Hollywood.
AMIT WOMEN is the new
name for American Mizrachi
Women and the organization also
has a new national president:
Frieda C. Kufeld of Great Neck,
N. Y., who began her involvement
in the organization at an early
age, and served, at one time, m*
national president of Junior Miz-
rachi.
|0RT Honorary President
Dead at Age 71
[NEWARK (JTA) -
aneral services were held
for Sidney Leiwant,
^norary president and un-
ite past president of
American ORT Federa-
at Temple Snarey
^fUo-Israel in South
He died Dec. 5 at
'age of 71.
in Austria, Leiwant waa
"Kht to the United States as a
1 by hia parents and spent his
stive years in Connecticut.
graduated from the Univer-
| Alabama in 1934. He sub-
tly settled in Verona, N.J.
"want waa active in all
of Jewish communal life.
l.w" active in the American
[federation for more than a
e where he also served aa
President of its central
He also served on the ex-
Mve committee of the World
Union, to which he was a
delegate.
Leiwant was a member of the
National Cabinet of the United
Jewish Appeal, a trustee ofthe
United Israel Appeal, former
chairman of Councd of Jewh
rederationa Large City
Hudgeting Conference, member
of the Board and *ut,vf^mh
mittee of the Amencat^ewh
Joint Distribution ^mm.,tt*e:
ind a member of the Boardlead
executive committee of HIA
Introducing
the
(fJMeiio&h
'Lot'Exchange
Tidgram
0 0 00 O 0 a
fiTAs^tfonofMetxop^
New Jersey; president of the
Jew*Community FederatK,nof
Metrowest (formerly Metropob-
^ New Jersey); ^"^l^T
ni tho UJA of Metrowest.
CdUelb7r of The Ja*
N?w. and the K^njUjjMCom-
munity Relation. Committee^
He was also president of Tem-
ple brad of the Orange. -
Maptewood.
and
South Florida's most prestigious all-Jewish
cemetery invites you to investigate and COMPARE:
Bring us the deed to your cemetery pro-
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It for credit on new property at Menorah
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'**-*>
Page 16
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdaie
Pnd-y. Decent
23,
You've got what It takes.
:'.
Share the spirit.
Share the refreshment.
T


Full Text
w. December 23,1983
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
>age!
federation delegation plans to attend 1983 ORT
tional Young Leadership Conference Yearbook published
ia
, delegation of young adults
t thl. Jewish Federation of
taTFort Uuderdale will at-
* the 4th annual Young
brship Conference Marchill-
ij the Washington (DC)
^nsored by the United Jew-
Appeal Young Leadership
J% the three-day confer-
"-expected to attract 3.000
a- Jewish leaders from
nd the country. The Confer
based on "Linking Des-
ss will focus on the critical
issues facing world Jewry today.
Participants will examine rela-
tionships between the United
States and Israel and assess the
significant problems which chal-
lenge them as present and future
leaders of America and world
Jewry.
Since 1984 ia a Presidential
election year, major Presidential
candidates are expected to attend
and address the open sessions.
The participants will receive
briefings on domestic and foreign
affairs by high-ranking members
I North Broward ORT gave Chanukah gifts
to A viva Manor; raised funds at movie
> North Broward Region of
Len's American ORT, as part
their Community Project,
d by Jeanette. Corb, col-
. a large number of gifts
the Region's 30 chapters
1 distributed them to the res-
nts of Aviva Nursing Home,
Lauderdale, as part of the
nukah celebration.
In addition, the Region
fmsored a theatre party where
bra Streisand's, Yentl was
iwn to a capacity audience of
at the Coral Springs Movie
atre. Proceeds from the sold-
out event will go towards ORT's
School Building Project, supply-
ing funds for already existing
schools, and establishing new
ones. ORT's 21 chapters particip-
ated in the special movie prem-
iere, which was chaired by Gerri
Rosenthal.
of the White House staff, and
State Dept., members of Con-
gress, and top representatives of
the State of Israel.
The three previous conferences
have featured such guest speak-
ers as the President and Vice
President of the United States,
U.S. Attorney General, Israel's
Ambassador to the United
States, and Congressmen and
Senators from both major
parties.
According to Conference co-
chairmen Brenda Krieger of
Washington and Michael Adler
of Miami, "over 100 recruiters are
working hard to bring together
top young Jewish leaders from
every state in the Union for this
important election year event..
Lawrence M. Schuval, director
of Young Leadership of the Jew-
ish Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale, is coordinating the
arrangements for the local part-
icipants who will be attending the
Conference. He has information
concerning registration and hotel
spaces. He can be contacted at
the Federation office 748-8400.
The 1983 ORT Yearbook, just
published, is being distributed to
Jewish organizations and leaders
throughout the U.S.
It provides a comprehensive,
country-by-country report of
ORT's global operations which
serve some 112,000 Jewish
students throughout the world,
78,000 in Israel alone.
The lead article. "ORT faces
the 21st Century," highlights the
plans for new ORT schools in
Israel and in Los Angeles, and
the development of new
programs throughout the ORT
world, including sophisticated
courses at the Bramson ORT
Technical Institute in New York
City, and at the Jewish High
school of South Florida in North
Miami Beach, which receives
support from the Jewish Federa-
tion of Greater Fort Lauderdale
United Jewish Appeal.
In its report titled "Funding
the Program," the Yearbook
notes that the American Jewish
Joint Distribution Committee
(JDC), also a global agency with
programs in many countries,
granted ORT $4,660,000 in 1983.
JDC receives support out of
income of the United Jewish
Appeal campaigns conducted by
Jewish Federations around the
country.
PIONEER WOMEN
fiA'AMATS secretary general
Israel, Mas ha Lubelsky holds
Ethiopian child in a Na'amat
ay care center in Israel. In the
cent issue of "Pioneer Wo-
w," problems and achieve-
its of the Ethiopian commit-
!"> in Israel are highlighted,
otaff that Ethiopian Jews
ijust to Israeli society faster
most because of their fer-
tnt religious Zionism and a
^nater facility in learning He-
tw, a language much similar to
urown native tongue.
GO EXOTIflG PLACES...
'*a*sS
N AN XING A TRIP
Travel with National Council of
**"*h Woman. For new 19S4
Brochure describing aon-
Wionai tours to ISRAEL, with
xtsnaions to EGYPT, ROME,
WNDON, MADRID, and SWIT-
ZERLAND. Highlights In
EUROPE, CHINA, THE ORIENT,
GREAT BRITAIN, SPAIN, ITALY.
COSTA RICA, and'CANADIAN
ROCKIES.
Csll or
EUfel Hsrsh Qsri Lsvtn
473-6772 4S4-2M4
Pumpkin Pie
$169
Oinch
(KHndi
Wreath, Tree A Bell Cake
Assorted
Dinner Rolls 12
aacn*3M
89*
Gourmet Fruit Cake...............'Sf $2"
Pfeffemusse...........................* $118
Danish Tea Cookies...............a $329
Danish Tea Cookies...............S $29
Miniature Danish $3"
nnwr.........................^ *-----
Pecan Pie...............................*** W Me* Effect!*
Mince Pie ............................. $1" P*-W 1W. tfcn 24ft 1983.
........."""""Holiday Mes
8-inch 10-inch
App!c Crumb....... 4.89
Pead................... *
Pumpkin.............. 4.69
Egg Custard......... 4.89
Pecan................... *2-79
Sweet Potato....... 1.89
3.99
2.99
3.59
4.99
Apple.................... 4.89
Cherry.................. "2.79
Blueberry............. 2.49
Lemon Meringue. '1.89
Mince Meat.......... 4.99
Coconut Custard. 4.89
I


-gtr.
CHANUKAH AT MALLS:
Typical of the festivities cele-
brating Chanukah at the Lakes
Mall in Lauderdale Lakes and at
the Lauderhill Mall were these
scenes pictured at the Lakes
Mall. Far left Cantor Sol Cohen
of Lauderhill lights and chants
the blessings over the holiday
candles; Rabbi Israel Hal pern of
Hebrew Congregation of Lauder-
hill speaks; host for the after-
noon Jack Salz beams as L'Lakes
Mayor Gereffi speaks; County
Commissioner Howard Craft
stands between Lillian and Louis
Baltzer, respective festival chair-
men of Lauderhill s B'nai B'rith
Lodge and B'nai B'rith Women's
Chapter who chaired the pro-
gram; and some of the members
of the Jewish Community Center
Chorale, directed by Holhe
Berger Photos by Brooks Edler
of Fotoport. Lakes Mall.
The BaliUers also arranged the
Lauderhill Mall party hosted by
Lauderhill City Councilman Ben
Dantzker with Cantor Phillip
Erstling lighting and chanting
k

:}
'I i
the blessings accompanied by a
male octet from the Lauderhill
Community Center Chorale. The
Chorale, conducted by Sylvia
Sugarman. sang several num-
bers, with solo performances by
Sol Gruber and Ruth Maltz.
Mayor Eugene CipoUoni beaded a
group of council members and
other city officials in attendance.
Both Mall celebrations, at-
tended by several hundred people
in each instance, were made
possible with the cooperation of
the Mall Managements and the
Merchants Associations.

WEEK OF CHANUKAH FESTIVITIES
at the Federation-supported Kosher Nutrition
programs was climaxed by visits [left] from
two dozen children from the Nursery School
of Temple Beth Orr in Coral Springs who sang
and then mingled with the elderly. And
[right] David Wallach of Coral Springs was
the center of attention as members of
Bonaventure Chapter of Women's League for
Israel sang "Happy Birthday" to him. The
women, Toots Sachs, Myrtle Gilson, Bebe
Gould, LiU MandelU Charlotte Goldstein,
Chapter president, and Annette Kay
presented a program of Yiddish songs, and
then distributed gifts to all the participants of
the Kosher Nutrition program as well as the
frail elderly at "The Gathering Place."
Outrage Continues Over
UN Flags for Arafat
JERUSALEM
Israel has
demned the United Na-
tions' decision to provide
safe conduct for PLO leader
Yasir Arafat and his men to
leave the embattled city of
Tripoli under a UN flag and
said it would not give a
guarantee of safe passage
to the terrorists.
Asked if Israel would prevent
Arafat and his 4.000 men from
leaving. Cabinet Secretary Dan
Meridor told reporters. Israel is
not going to answer that ques-
tion Speaking after a Cabinet
meeting, Meridor said Greece had
asked for security guarantees for
its ships evacuating the Palestin-
ians, but Israel would not provide
such guarantees.
THE ISRAELI government
last weak aaked UN Secretary
General Javier Perez de CueUar
to cancel any arrangement that
may have been made to give
Arafat and his man amis rmdwt
from Tripoli under the UN flag
Premier Yitzhak Shamir said
"it is inconceivable" that the UN
should provide the terrorists
with any assistance or ****tfrf
whatsoever" in light of the "hor-
rendous crime perpetrated by
Arafat's terrorists" in Jerusalem
last Tuesday.
Four people were killed, and 36
were injured in a bus bomb blast
Claims of responsibility for the
tragedy emanated from both the
ijctkm supporting Arafat and
PLO dissidents who have been
bsttling Arafat loyalists in
northern Lebanon. Shortly after
the disaster.
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