The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 3, no. 7 (Apr. 5, 1974)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 9, 1976 called v.4, no. 27 but constitutes v.5, no. 1; issue for July 7, 1989 called v.18, no. 11 but constitutes v.18, no. 13.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44570954
lccn - sn 00229545
ocm44570954
System ID:
AA00014312:00479

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Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward


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Full Text
wjems.
OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE
Volume
12-Number 38
Fort Lauderdale, Florida Friday, November 11,1968
'.FndShoch*
Price 36 Cents
Magical Mission*provided thrilling experiences
knita Perlman beam* as Kfar Saba's children welcome Mission.
|Car bomb explosion, killing Israelis,
sends bombers attacking Syrians, PLO
Joel Reinstein
planting.
leads
"It was a magical mis-
sion," said Ed Entin, presi-
dent of the Jewish Feder-
ation of Greater Fort Laud-
erdale.
"On this Mission, we be-
came a family. We shared
the vision together as one
family," said Joel Rein-
stein, Federation's execu-
tive vice president and
general chairman of the
Federation's 1984 United
Jewish Appeal and Project
Renewal Fund.
For Brian Sherr, co-
chairman of the UJA cam-
paign, it was a nostalgic
reminder of family of
almost a century ago. He
and 22 others on Federa-
tion's October Leadership
Mission to Israel stood on
the ground of an old
partially-destroyed
synagogue in the Jewish
Quarter of the Old City in
Jerusalem built by his
ancestors.
It was there his forbears,
Continued on Page 8
The Precious Legacy' opens1
for Women's Division event]
Follow ing a car bomb explosion Friday morning Nov. 4 at an Israeli
barracks in Tyre killing and wounding almost a hundred Israelis and
Lebanese. Israel fighter bombers hammered at Syrian posts east of
Beirut At press time, there were no reports of Syrian planes challeng-
ing the Israeli fighters.
Authorities feared a new escalation of fighting in Lebanon, as the
Israelis also struck at PLO forces in the Bekaa Valley who are being
supported by the Syrians. And in northern Lebanon, PLO forces op-
posed to Yasser Arafat, aided by Syrians, struck at Arafat's remain-
ing stronghold in the war-torn Country.
The eight years of civil war in
Lebanon remains unchanged as
nine different political and milit-
ary factions continued their
meetings in Geneva seeking a
*ay to restore Lebanon's
sovereignty The only consensus
reached after several days of del-
iberation was a resolution to
"freeze" the May 17 agreement
Lebanon bad reached with Israel
permitting the Israelis to have
patrol facilities when, as and if
the Syrians move out of the
Bekaa Valley when the Israelis
bring their troops home.
Meanwhile in Washington,
President Reagan named former
Defense Secretary Donald
Rumsfeld as his new Middle East
troubleshooter. Admitting he has
no solution for the region's
problems, he told reporters, "It is
worth our best efforts." He re-
places Robert McFarlane who
was named Oct. 17 as the White
House national security adviser.
Rumsfeld, following meetings
with other Administration offi-
cials involved in the Mideast si-
tuation, will oversee U.S. efforts
to bolster the government in
Lebanon, try to accelerate with-
drawal of Syrian, Israeli and
Palestinian Liberation Organiza-
tion forces, and try to negotiate
peace between Israel and the
Arab world.
A private akowing of "The Precious Legacy: Ji
Tim-- (from the Czechoslovak State Collection" sad
a champagne buffet supper will be held at the Bees
MuseunVSunday Jan. 29 at 6:30 p.m., sponsoredi by the
Women's Division of the Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale.
Fence Sincoff, Women's Division president, named
Charlotte Padak chairman of the special event that ia
being held just four days after the historic exhibit opens at
the Museum. Mrs. Padek wttl have Bather Lamer and
Dee Hahn aa co-chairmen.
The Women's Division, hi cooperation with the Bass
Museum, ia asking lor 60 patrons to donate 1100, in
addition to their 1984 contributions, to pay lor this special
private showing.
Reservations are being limited to those making a
commitment of at laaaTUoO to the Women's Divkuon
1984 United Jewish Appeal Campaign. Special bus
transportation wil be utuimsd.________________________
forward
Morris Kraus will have a
birthday on Nov. 26.
For Morris, it will be just
another in a long line of
birthdays because he was
bom in 1886 in a small town
in Russia.
Small though he is, he became
the man of the family at ths pra-
ams age of sight years when his
'ther died. He Warned the art of
tailoring and began to earn
money to heap support his
mother, four brothers and two
"stars.
By ths time Morris Kraus was
, he migrated to the United
St*^, settled in the Brownsville
"tton of Brooklyn, later moved
to Manhattan where his tailoring
"was recognized in the New
ork i garment district.
The days of working on men's
oxhing have long gone, now
widowed and living with a
widowed daughter-in-law, Morris
Kraus on the eve of his 97th
birthday enjoys a leisurely Ufa of
pending several days a weak
with other really-senior adults at
the Jewish Federation-supported
"The Gathering Place" and the
Kosher Nutrition Center in the
Federation building at 8368 W.
Oakland Park Blvd.
Father of three surviving
children, grandfather of eight,
great-grand-father of 11, Morris
enjoys children. "A grandson in
St. Louis brought my newest
great-grandson of six months to
visit with me last month. What
joy he brought to my life."
birthday
Recalling the visit, too, bat
month of five-year-olds from
Hebrew Day School's kinder-
garten class, Morris said: "See-
ing children happy is my greatest
joy in Ufa. I have lived a full life
Continued ea Page 8
Morris Kraus
Morris with George Mednick, Nutrition van driver, and Mt


PM2
The Jewish Fbridian of Greater Fort Lmuderdale
Friday, November n
Chanukah-Freedom Festival set for Coral Springs Park Dec. 4
A Maccabean runner, carrying
a flaming torch, at about sunset
Sunday Dec. 4 will enter Mullins
Park at 10000 NW 29th St.. Coral
Springs, hand it to Rabbi Donald
R. Gerber of Temple Beth Orr to
light the five candles of the
Chanukiah (the festival menorah)
for that evening of the eight-day
festival of religious freedom. The
first candle is lit the evening of
Nov. 30.
And thus will the Chanukah-
Festival of Freedom "83 of the
Coral Springs Coalition of Jewish
Organizations come to a glowing
end.
The Festival, complete with
Israeli, Jewish and Yiddish
entertainment on the Park's
snowmobile, will begin at 3 p.m.
and continue until the Mac-
cabean torch runner shows up.
Coral Springs City Commis-
sioner Jim Gordon will be master
of ceremonies for the showmobile
entertainment. Around the park
and inside the park's Community
Center, there will be game
booths, displays of Jewish art
and artifacts, a special showing
of children's art.
Co-chairing the Coalition's
Festival plans are Janet Oppen-
heimer. Harriet Herzog and
Elaine Kernzer. They are being
Ktod by Carol Freedom
Carol Katr who aT?L
donations of Jewish arT
"tl,,cLt Pertinent to i
Chanukah festival. n(, J1
commemorative journal t
issued at the time. For deuL
Freedman 766-1448, Carol
752-8478, Oppenheimer752'
or Herzog 752-5288.
What it takes to be a Riverside.
e
It takes years.
Nearly 70 years of building a name
people trust
It takes a special kind of leadership that
originated with Charles Rosenthal, Riverside's
founder.
And which continues today, in the hands
of Carl Grossberg, Alfred Golden, Leo Hack,
Andrew Fier and a new generation of Jewish
management
It is this leadership which, in coopera-
tion with Orthodox, Conservative and Reform
Rabbis, actually helped set the standards for
Jewish funeral services.
And it is this leadership that has
dedicated Riverside to maintaining the high
standards demanded by Jewish tradition.
That's why, at Riverside, people
continue to find the dedication and the
resources which are necessary to provide
service that is truly Jewish.
And that's why today, Riverside is the
most respected name in Jewish funeral servic*
in the world.
Carl Grossberg, President
Alfred Golden, Executive Vke President
Leo Hack, Vice President Baligious Advi*'
Andrew Fier, Vice President
RIVERSIDE
The most respected name in Jewish runerw
service in the world. jQO


.November 11,
1963
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort LauderdaU
Page 3
oodlands honors Harold Oshry Dec 15
^United Jewih Appeal
mien, announced that
SI Oshry, Woodlands
lt with long wwort"
rr.nrf Project Renewal, will be
* t the Woodumd.
Sty's dinner meeting
X V 15 8t the Wo*
, Country Club.
Lt, a cum laude graduste of
,(S College and a capUin
th the 9th Air Force in Europe,
-..nv vears served on the
XsU, L. jL Executive
JdoftheUJA-Federation.He
Jit honoree of its Inaugural
I and was chairman of the
jununity's Project Renewal for
-put five years.
Ion Oct. 2. Harold participated
I the dedication of the Hatdcvah
Immunity Center in Tel Aviv,
yTwith $1,500,000 raised by
. South Shore Project Renewal
anpaign And hia UJA activitv
ntinued during October and
month as he served as
Harold L. Oshry
general chairman of the Oct. 19
Queens County Industrial
Division's UJA-Federation
luncheon; and completed his Pro-
ject Renewal leadership at the
South Shore's Nov. 5 Inaugural
Ball.
On Nov. 29 he will chair the
UJA-Federation Allied Trans-
portation Industries Dinner at
the Pierre Hotel in New York
City.
Since 1960 Oshry and his wife,
Claire, have resided in Hewlett
Harbor, L. I., during which time
he served a term as president of
the Hewlett-East Rockaway
Jewish Community Centre. A be-
liever in "daring greatly," Harold
Oshry has found time to share hia
life with Claire and their three
children as well as a host of
friends, and continued involve-
ment in religious, charitable, and
business groups and associations
for many years.
Oshry joins David Miller and
Manny Lax in gaining recogni-
tion as honoree at Woodlands
UJA dinner meetings. Miller was
honored in 1982 and Lax was the
honoree at the 1983 Woodlands
UJA dinner.
(oung Leadership off to great start
ties of Seven" pictifred watching Sally
assume the role of a troub'ted Jewish
youth in one
discussion.
of her improvisations for
Braving torrential Sunday
npour Oct. 23, over 50 young
nd women experienced an
knoon of Jewish Involvement
Wire with Sally Fox, a doctor-
[candidate at Berkeley's Uni-
Tity of California.
It was the first meeting of the
^S* Young Leadership pro-
n of the Jewish Federation of
ter Fort LauderdaU. So
husiastic was the turnout for
> eventful afternoon and the
[[posed series of meetings that,
ke previous years, because of
increased numbers parti-
ting, instead of meetings at
fioua homes, all sessions will
I new either at the Federation
[* where this first meeting
I* Place, or at the Jewish Com-
ply Center.
Mv and J,.ff Faine. Sue and
Ben Reiter and Elise and Bob
Dolgow are co-chairing this
year's program which is open to
all young couples and singles in
the Greater Fort Lauderdale
Jewish community under the age
of 45.
False announced that widely-
acclaimed author and genealogist
Arthur Kurzweil, who has traced
the descent of Jewish families,
will be the speaker at Tuesday
Nov. 29 meeting. Faine also
alerted the group to upcoming
Young Leadership Mission to
Washington set for next March.
Typical of her involvement
with her audiences, Sally Fox had
the group separated into circles
of seven people, telling them they
represented top leadership of
Jewish family service agencies
from around the country. They
were presented with problems
presented by clients who needed
help.
Acting the roles of an old
woman wishing to commit
suicide; a boy seeking to join a
Chabad House; and a French girl
wishing to hide her Judaism be-
cause of anti-Semitism in France,
and other roles, Sally Fox urged
her listeners to solve these
dilemmas. The realistic dialogue
that ensued as the groups dealt
with the problems of each of the
clients proved to be a stimulating
experience.
Interested young adults may
call Larry Schuval, Federation's
director of community planning,
for attendance at the Nov. 29
meeting. Federation number is
748-8400.
'omen's PMNetwork resumes Nov. 21
fcworIeCnd y8W of th# PM exciting evening forum will
wk a provocative and begin at 7:30 p.m. Monday Nov. 21 at the Jewish Federation of
u ... i i_ o i un*k Greater Fort Lauderdale. 8368
-Id 8 public library notes Jewish Book Montn w Oakland Park Blvd.
display of Jewish books,
"nag Jewish Book Month, is
prominently exhibited all
'month of November at the
*y White Library on Hills-
0uh Blvd. in Deerfield
Alan Becker
operating in the first such
"ent exhibition with Eileen
. Percy WhiU Library's
librarian, were Deerfiald'a
1* Beth Israel and the Deer-
J-hapter of the American
> Congress. Chairing the
Ware Irving R, Friedman, re-
wing the Temple, and Dr.
' wown. honorary president
* Congress chapter.
,J* of Jewish Book Month
" on, Henry Levy, former
relations director for
nationally and for the
Agency in Israel, will
1 2 p.m. Monday Nov. 28
at the Library. He is a former
editor of the Philadelphia Jewish
Exponent, and author of The Day
the Hills Shouted for Joy.
TEMPLE SHOLOM
Commemorating Jewish Book
Month, which continues through
Nov. 30. Esther K. Cannon of the
Federation's Community Rela-
tions Committee, has rrne
for a display of books of Jewish
interest in the lobby of Temple
Sholom. Pompsno Beach, me
display, highlighted by a Jewish
Book Month poster, is sn exten-
sion of the Temples own extra-
ordinary collection of.UjMtuie
available in the Temple s library
Mrs. Cannon to also rnjkinj
arrangements with Edward
Bellamy of PW"". *JjJ
Library for a comparable display
of Jewish interest books.
Martin Lipnack
Attys. Becker, Lipnack named
to lead Washington Mission
Two lawyers, prominent in
North Browsrd legal, civic and
communal circles, have been
named co-chairmen for one of the
most important events on the
1983-84 calendar of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Lawyer.
Attys. Alan Becker and Martin
Lipnack have been named to lead
a group of professionals and
business people on a Mission to
Washington. The Mission, Jan.
25-26, is designed to provide s
greater understanding of the
vital role American Jewish
leadership plays in the Nation's
Capital.
In making the appointments,
Edmund Entin, Federation pres-
ident, said both Becker and Lip-
nack, members of the Federa-
tion's Board of Directors, are
ideal leaders for the group to
meet with members of Congress
as well as representatives of the
Administration, the State Dept.
and the Pentagon.
Meetings will be arranged by
staff members of the Council of
Jewish Federation Washington
Action Office and by the Amer-
ican Israel Public Affairs Com-
mittee (AIPAC), the authorized
lobbying agency on behalf of
Americana m support of Israel in
Washington.
Members of Broward's Con-
gressional delegations to the
Senate and to the House of Re-
presentatives sre being invited to
meet with the Washington Mis-
sion group in the Florida House
in the Nation's Capital. Florida is
believed to be one of the few
states, if not the only one, with a
facility available to Floridians for
small meetings, for getting in-
formation about the city, and for
keeping in touch with activities
in and around Congress.
The planned itinerary, accord-
ing to Co-chairmen Becker and
Lipnack, is designed to give the
Mission participants s greater
understanding of the relationship
of Jewish leadership to all
segments of the Federal govern-
ment vis-a-vis Israel and its se-
curity, as well as other matters of
interest to American Jews in na-
tional legislation.
Inquiries about the two-day
Jan. 25-26 Washington Mission
may be directed to Mark Silver-
man, at the Jewish Federation
office 748-8400.
,
JCC
H:
Le Browse
the
JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
THRIFT SHOP
4314 North Slate Road 7 (441)
Needed!
FURNITURE HOUSEWARES
BRIC-A-BRAC CLOTHING
your contribution Is Tax Deductible!
Mora Income for La Browse Mora Support for JCC
call Rrva 792-6700 for pick up & In format ton
%
JCC
Carol Steingard has been
named chairman of the PM Net-
work, which is sponsored by the
Federation's Women Division.
Her co-chairman is Selms Telles.
They announced the opening
speaker of the sense of sessions
on s variety of topics will be
Abraham Gittelson, Federation's
director of education and Central
Agency For Jewish Education
North Broward education di-
rector.
He is expected to stimulate
interesting discussion as ha
delineates "The Changing Role of
the Jewish Women."
Iris Steinberg, assistant di-
rector of the Women's Division at
the Federation 784-8400, is
taking reservations for the Nov.
21 opening session of PM Net-
Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale
extends on open invitation to the community for
FAMILY MISSION TO ISRAEL
JULY 15-25
Call the Federation: 748-8400
or mall this coupon
Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale
8358 W. Oakland Park Blvd.
Fort Lauderdale FL 33321
Please send me information about the July 16-26 Family
Mission to Israel
Name.
_^AptNa_
Zip Code___


4
The Jewish Ftoridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday. Nov^mbg,,
^Jewish flcridiom
UZANNC SMOCMET
Eaactrtrw EdrKM*
(rfyMr.
ai,n.ati*i
Or StEATBt FOOT LAUDBtDALI
WOK.8MOCH6T .-_^
EdWQfBdPMM^y______ O^*o**
AMtfllllWllhliMMajaliiiilii through MM May. M
Plant: 120 NC h St.. MM. FI^MlSTttoo. 1KWWS08 ^^
!UlBSr!Z2Z?Z^?^,l!i'?nl?V(M*ru*<* "Tehran. Ad^tMd
SUBSCIPnON RATES_Tfaar NMmum $7 50 (Loci ArM 13 96 Annual) or by rrwnMrmp
c-____r_ JaXan Paaaralton of Qraatar Fort LaudardaH
Edmund Entln. PraaManl L^^ s (jon^ Exacutlva Director
Th Fadarattoriand ttta iwn ohlca o( ttw jmni FlorMlan of Greater Fort LauoanJaM are located M
*WW Oakland Park Blvd. Fort LaudarrJala, FL 33321 Phona (305) 74SS400.
Nwi adltor Max Uvtna
Friday, November 11,1983
Volume 12
5 KISLEV 6744
Number 38
Israeli economic crisis
hurts JDC, Jewish Agency
The United Jewish Appeal national headquarters in
New York City, in close touch with the agencies in Israel
supported by UJA dollars, reported this week that the
Israeli economic crisis is having an immediate impact on
the Jewish Agency and on Joint Distribution Committee
(JDC) programs and services and the people in Israel they
benefit.
As in past national crises, "UJA Watch Desk" editor Gerald S.
Nage 1 reported, those least able to bear the burden are paying highest
price in human terms. Any move toward economic recovery could
cause initial drop in living standard among those aided by UJA
dollars.
While the Jewish Agency in Israel may benefit in short term, the
release notes, because income is in dollars and expenditures are in
shekels, the longer term outlook is bleak. Since July, the Agency's
cash flow is declining. The cost of debt service will erase any benefits
from initial effects of shekel devaluation. By December, temporary
gains will have been neutralized when prices are likely to rise sharply.
In addition Government welfare-spending cuts of hundreds of
millions would put more pressure on the Agency and JDC to fill the
gaps. Agency and JDC officials said cuts could block plans to add 13
more neighborhoods to the Project Renewal program, and phase out
Agency support for 15 others this year; with more cuts for higher
education and rising tuition rates, more students are expected to turn
to the Agency for help.
Further subsidy reductions, they report, will force up prices of
milk, eggs.poultry. weakening demand.and strapping farmers for in-
come. For that reason, new settlements are expected to be delayed,
complicating long-range plans for national self-sufficiency in food
production. Fears are expressed that plans may have to be scaled
down or scrapped for day care centers for 46,000 children, services for
elderly, family planning, juvenile deliquency, community centers.
UJA reported that cash collection of pledges is S33 million behind
1983 campaign at this point last year. It's urgent, officials said that
maximum commitments should be obtained for the 1984 campaign,
and that cash outstanding from regular campaigns. Israel Special
Fund and Project Renewal should be collected now.
Soviet Officers and Wives Visit
Tiberias, Gaze at Splendor
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Nine Soviet army officers
visited Tiberias last Friday
during a brief visit to at-
tend a United Nations
ceremony of the presenta-
tion of awards and medals
to members of the UN Dis-
engagement Observer
Force (UNDOF) on the
Golan Heights.
I hi- ceremony was held at
UMXJF headquarters. Special
permission was given to the Rus-
sian officers five of them were
accompanied by their wives to
visit Israel. The Russian officers,
in resplendent dress uniforms
with medals, were greeted at the
Kuneilra checkpoint by Israeli
liaison officers who took them on
a (our arranged in advance by a
Soviet officer and his wife who
had paid a planning visit last
month.
UNDOF members on the Is-
raeli side of the UNDOF line are
drawn only from countries
maintaining diplomatic relations
with Israel. But UNDOF on the
Syrian side of the border include
members from Soviet bloc and
other nations whose countries
have no diplomatic ties with
Israel.
The tour included a visit to
Kilihut/. Mahanayim where their
kibliuU guide remarked they
could at last see "real pure Com-
munism in action." The guide
said the Russians were especially
interested to know what hap-
pened to the money earned by the
kihhuljj farm and industries The
visitors asked especially to visit
the children s quarters, wliere the
youngsters showed special inter-
est in the gilt swords carried by
three Soviet officers.
The Russian officers and their
wives then visited the Tiberias
"hypershuk a mammoth
supermarket where they ex-
pressed amazement at the mass
and variety of foodstuffs and
other goods on display, and the
crowds shopping there.
H the stamp could speak
The following is a sermon prepared by Rabbi
Albert N. Troy of Pompano Beach prior to his
retirement last month as the part-time spiritual
leader of Temple Sha'aray Tzedek since 1978. During
his leadership, the membership more than doubled as
the congregation moved from its storefront Sunrise
Jewish Center location into the recently-completed
Temple structure at 4099 Pine Island Rd.
Previously, Rabbi Troy, graduate of Yeshiva
University, ordained at the Jewish Institute of
Religion, received the degree of Doctor of Divinity in
1975 from Jewish Theological Seminary. He plans to
relax for time, but, continue to write on a variety of
subjects. This message is a tribute in honor of
Veterans' Dav, Nov. 11:
The sages of our people, in their wisdom, have
taught that there is no individual who is so all-
knowing that he cannot learn from others.
Furthermore, they tell us that everyone has
something to teach us. Ben Zoma, one of our
great teachers, said, "Who is wise he who
learns from every man." A Hassidic rabbi once
remarked:
"Everything can teach us something, and not
merely everything that God has created. What
man has made has also something to teach us."
"What can we learn from a train?" one Hassid
asked dubiously.
"That because of one second, you can miss
everything."
"And from the telegraph?"
"That every word is counted and charged for."
"And the telephone?"
"That what we say here is heard there."
Commonplace things all of them we see
them so frequently, and yet what vital lessons
and messages they convey to us.
I would like to add another item to the three
that were discussed above. It, too, is a com-
monplace thing, and is token for granted. I refer
to the postage stamp. Who will deny the
tremendous cultural and aesthetic values that
inhere in most stamps? One could expatiate at
great length about the fascinating stories, the
historical events, the exciting march of progress
of which the little stamp could speak if it were
able to talk.
DO YOU KNOW what else the stamp could
teach in order to make our lives more fulfilled and
victorious? It would say. 'I stick to my job until
it is done." Isn't that true? The stamp has a job
to do to bring an article to its destination.
However adverse the circumstances, and
regardless of the conditions that accompanied its
Rabbi Albert N. Troy
mission, it persevered until it successfully
fulfilled its responsibility. How many of us have
yet to master this quality individuals who
accept responsibilities, but, alas, who fail to
"stick to the job until it is done"
The stamp has yet another message to impress
upon us. If the stamp could speak, it would say,
" I never give up when I am licked, 1 only hold on
tighter." The pressures and the emergencies that
crop up from time to time on the stamp's journey
to its destination, must be frustrating and
demoralizing.
Snowstorms, thunder and lightning intervene
to delay its progress. Only a tenacity of purpose
and a firm determination not to yield to defeat or
failure.enable it to triumph. How each of us needs
to learn this It sson!
PERHAPS the greatest challenge that con-
fronts us in life is to be able to pick up the broken
pieces of our lives after defeat and failure, and
with faith and courage, to make something
worthy and beautiful and productive of our lives.
What an achievement to be able to say, "I never
give up when I am licked, I only hold on tighter."
And finally, the stamp would say, "1 represent
my country." The stamp portrays values which
are noble, just and true. It conveys symbols of
America at its highest and its best. We, too,
represent America. Let us be noble and worthy
representatives.
This is the season of the year when we pause to
pay tribute to our country's veterans countless
numbers of whom heroically died for America. Let
each of us resolve to live for our country by
strengthening through our lives the ideals
which are so essential a part of the great
American dream.
May the stamp be a constant reminder of these
valuable lessons, and may they have a beneficent
influence in cur lives.
M% R^TenZ^H """""** S**. Washington. Before some 350 guest, oM
Fahrenkopf Jr. at a reception for Rosenne in
J.
in
the U.S. invasion of Grenada.
Rosenne 'Congratulates' U.S. for Grenada
lotay Thar* you
"K Uuly Nrwk
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) Israeli Ambassa-
dor Meir Rosenne indicated
support last week for the
United States' invasion of
Grenada, although he did
not specifically mention the
military operation.
"I would like to congrat-
ulate the United States of
America for the courage
and the determination with
which this country fights
against subversion^gab*
Communism, wwj\.
said to several hundrf
persons attending a rewF
tion in his honor PJJJS
by the Republican Nation*
Committee at the Sherato0-)
Carl ton Hotel.


Ln>y,NoVlbw'11' 1888
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Pge6
A Volunteer for Israel recounts his experience
LnvmosALrr
In May. I volunteered to help
1.1* bov serving in the Army of
K Harold and Edna Blinchi-
Lff of Lauderdale Lakes joined
Lot and we were given ticket* to
LpartAug-H-
(EDITOR'S NOTE: With a
I mix-up 'n 'srael through lan-
ruage problems, and probably
ljjth the usual foul-upa that can
loccur. Irving, unwilling to wait
I for a scheduled ride to the Army
[base at Ze'elim outside of Beer
Isheva. where he was assigned,
Itook a taxi- Instead of Ze'elim, he
Iwound up at a camp at Baliah.)
Arriving at the camp, I waa
lauigned to a room at Barrack
1195. I walked in and said: "Hi
Emm" to the seven men there.
[They looked at me, but didn't
linswer. I saw an empty bunk and
threw my suitcase on it. "Is this
[my bunk?" The young man
from me nodded and
Dted to the bunk. Then in
ily accented English, he
"My name is Roland.'' With
they all started to apeak to
sin French.
e I was the lone American
, seven Frenchmen who
n't speak English, and me
I don't speak a word of
tch. Talk of Tower of Babel. I
. learned that there were 33
rich men and women stationed
t, all Volunteers for Israel.
three days there I waa
ttting along famously with
em. As they ranged in ages
on 15 to about 22, they soon
we calling me grandpere,
tndfather to you. This was
nanent base, showers in the
acks. two small "shekams"
...j and one real big one. They
lid cold beer, soda and ice cream.
Tay-Sachs luncheon
National Tay-Sachs and
Diseases Association is
onaoring an 11 a.m. Wednes-
Nov. 16 luncheon and art
at Gibby's Restaurant,
Lauderdale. Guest speakers
elude: Rabbi Donald Gerber of
temple Beth Orr, Coral Springs;
fine Mackta, vice president lor
er development, a past
sident of the association; and
Paul Tocci, director of the
iical Laboratory for Child
velopment, Mailman Center,
Aiami.
Proceeds will go to the Mail-
i Center for Genetic Research.
are available by calling
Parol Katz at 752-8478.

ONGFEST at a Jewish Com
y Center in Cleveland is the
Pfoto of JWB CircU fell
_** featuring "Jewish
"*" its them*. The
'xpbrtt the experiences
""a girta hat,* at frur Jew-
i2mt*u*al camps conducted
I didn't appreciate these luxuries
atthatime.
I drew three complete new
uniforms including a pair of GI
shoes that really fit. After two
days, my fellow Temple Emanu-
El members, Harold and Edna
stumbled over me. They said,
"Where have you been? They're
going crazy trying to find you.
Nobody knows where you are."
No trouble, situation normal for
any army. The next morning, I
had to turn in my uniforms and a
oar came to take me to Ze'elim
where I was originally supposed
to go.
HOW CAN I DESCRIBE
Ze'elim? Hot, dusty and miles
from anywhere. It's a desert
outpost, a tank holding area for
reservists. It consisted of six
barracks, a mesa hall, numerous
warehouses, and hundreds of
tanks and armored troop carriers.
They took me to the volunteer
barracks which really waa a half
barrack: four rooms, three of
which were occupied. One was
empty with four bunks but no
one using them. I said, "I'll take
that room." But it has no doors, I
was told. "I'm not shy," I said,
not knowing that across the hall,
a room was occupied by my
friends, husband and wife.
At 8 a.m. I went to work and I
mean workl It was hard but as
much as I griped, I was happy
that I did it. It makes me wear
my pin with pride. I did it, in heat
in the high nineties in the blazing
sun. I pitched tents, camouflaged
tanks, worked in the fuel depot,
filled duffle bags, unloaded
trucks. I used to stagger to my
bunk at 8 p.m. and sleep till 6
a.m. the next day.
But it was worth it. I met the
Israeli people, not people you
meet on the guided tours but the
plain every day, hardworking
man The soldiers, "God bless
them," are the sloppiest, undis-
ciplined army I've experienced,
but aa one of their officers ex-
plained to me, Israeli soldiers
haven't time for spit and polish.
They are not taught to be robots
but fighters and every man is
-jipable of being a leader. He also
said, "Here an officer doesn't any
Charge,' in the IDF (Israel
Defense Force), the officers say
Follow Me "
If only we could bottle their
courage to bring back to stiffen
the backs of some of our wishy-
washy neighbors who are afraid
to commit themaelvea to
anything. Israelis may seem
cocky and aggressive but then
again, how many of you have
fought in more than one war, if
any. But when you get paat that
veneer, they are warm, friendly
and hospitable.
When we met Israelis, and told
them what we were doing, we
immediately became family.
They opened their arms, hearts
and homes to us, shared
whatever they had with ua.
It hi a bittersweet experience
staying with different soldiers'
families on weekends. When they
set the "shabbos" table, I knew
that they were using a week's
food supply to make me happy,
Lou Small of Lot Angeles pictured with Irving Satit (center)
and Harold Blinchikoff in front of an Israeli tank they worked
on as Volunteers for Israel.
and all their neighbors came in
during the evening. Everyone
brought something, home made
cake, fruit, pudding, etc. It
wasn't much but it came from the
heart.
The first question usually was
when are you moving to Israel?
They couldn't believe that we
paid our own way to Israel to
work for the Army for no pay. We
explained we were doing it to free
some reservist from serving in
the Army. Of course, there is the
humorous side to anything, the
bua trips in an army bus, no air
conditioning, no shocks, no
springs, and to arrive at some
destination and find no one
speaks any language except
Hobrew or Arabic.
One of the most impressive
events of my service came when
we, all 180 of us, assembled at
night in front of the West Wall
for a candlelight swearing-in
ceremony. Just standing in front
of the Wall is a feeling of awe,
coupled with people from all over
the world who volunteered to
help Israel. In our group which
consisted of 12 men and women,
we had six countries represented
Canada, Venezuela, Libya,
France, South Africa and good
old USA. It truly is a worldwide
joining of hands to assist the
people of Israel.
Finally!
Rich, real cream cheese taste
with only half the fat!
And it's Kosher, too!

It's true! New Light Philadelphia Brand cream cheese proof chMSa
product gives you just half the fat and V* the calories-of regular cream cheeee!
And you gat plenty of the ft*, rich cream cheese flavor you love. Better aba.
new Light "Praty" has no artificial ingredtonts and Is certified Kosher.
Enjoy new Light "Phiy" in al the ways you use regular cream cheese.
It's from one of the most trusted names in Jewish tomes. Philao*lpra Brand.
America's cream cheese experts.
K Certified Kosher
KiAkv.


Page 6
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdaie
Friday, November
. II
UJA Campaign Leadership attends training seminar
Humor, too, was evident at training seminar. Joel Reinstein (left) is standing at head table. At right. Federation President
A pediatrician from Norwalk.
Conn., so imbued with the spirit
and the vision of Israels surviv-
al, came to Fort Lauderdaie Sun-
day morning Oct. 30 to impart
some of his ideas on seeking fair
share commitment to the United
Jewish Appeal.
Dr. Norman Weinberger, shed-
ding his coat and rolling up his
sleeves, got right down to busi-
ness with the 50-some members
of the Campaign Cabinet of the
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdaie. headed by Joel
Reinstein. general chairman of
the 1984 Federation-UJA and
Project Renewal drive, and co-
chairman Brian Sherr.
Dr. Weinberger's talk, his
having participants play the roles
of solicitor and solicitee. and
showing videotapes of making
solicitations, was preceded and
heightened by an inspirational
review of the Leadership Mission
to Israel. This was reported by
Ed Entin. Federation's president,
calling the Mission "a magical
one'' for its many emotional
peaks, particularly when the
schoolkids of Kfar Saba. Federa-
tion's twinned Project Renewal
city, with musical recorders
greeted the group. "Believe me.
there wasn't a dry eye among
us. he said.
opened the sm
Confidence in seeking funds was a keynote of Dr. Non
Weinberger's presentation.
Brian Sherr listens intently to Dora Roth's remarks.
Also taking part in the presen-
tation was Dora Roth, Warsaw-
born survivor of the Holocaust,
now an Israeli, who will be
spending time in South Florida to
aid Federation in their solicita-
tions and fund-raising events.
She was 11 when, the the rest of
STATE OF
ISRAEL BONDS
BOUGHT AND SOLD
Invest In
Israel Securities
WKRK SPECIALISTS IN
ISKAKI. SECURITIES
**
l< WSACTIONS DAILY VIA TELEX
I'll ISRAEL STOCK EXCHANGE
A SuOfdxr ir <> tan* lfm> -!<< M
the family gone, she was impris-
oned in one of the worst of exter-
mination camps. After liberation
and two years of recovery from
gunshot wounds at the American
Jewish Joint Distribution Com-
mittee hospital in Italy, she
credits UJA dollars "contributed
by you and other American Jews
with my survival. I have the cre-
dentials to ask support for Isra-
el's existence."
Dr. Weinberger urged the lead-
ers to have confidence in their
message of the need for Israel's
aid when they make their person-
al calls for contributions. "We as
Jews have the right to go to
others. This is not charity. Israel
was a vision. It remains a vision
of a brighter future, though it's
been tarnished by war and
crises."
Not sine* Noah's time ha*
something so tiny mad* it so big.
Leu mi
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Securities (212)759-1310
Corporation Toll Free (800) 221 4838|
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ll s Tetley s tiny little tea leaves They've been making it big m
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are packed with tiny kttle tea leaves. Because tiny is tastier'
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TETLEY. TEA -ft. i. <""


Lfcv. November 11,1963
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 7
Browsin'
Thru Broward
with Maggie
Max Levine
I Temple Sha'aray Tzedek is
viewing rabbinic applicants
the full-time position to
. Rabbi Albert N. Troy
, retired last month Fran
iett, law school graduate who
time out to have a baby
gently, reports she's thinned
n some and eager to resume
riling her column about
edicare for the Jewish Family
Irvice. Look for her answers to
ledicare Droblems in the Nov. 26
Joe of The Jewish Floridian of
liter Fort Lauderdale.
| Rabbi Elliot SldddeU of
nution's Reconstructkmist
nat Shalom spells out, in
.ent issue of the congre-
ftion s Tekiah (The Voice) why
it Shalom doesn't use the
difier of "Temple." Says he:
I Hebrew there are many terms
synagogue: bet knesset (place
[assembly), bet midrash (place
study), bet t'fiUah (place of
lyer) "At Ramat Shalom we
to fulfill all of these reoles,"
[adds, "so we refer to ourselves
nply as Ramat Shalom. If a
difier is needed, we prefer
legation, synagogue or even.
Immunity Shirley Wolfe
Coral Springs, librarian at
riami's Central Agency for Jew-
Education, is the first re-
iewer in the Jewish Book Re-
series at Broward libraries.
reviews Paul Cowan's An
phan in History 1 p.m.
londay Nov. 14 at Tamarac
anch.
I Of much interests: "What's
' in Medicare" is the topic for
icussion next Tuesday Nov. 16
10 am at the Broward Com-
Nuty College's North Campus.
conut Creek Blvd., Building
Room 103. It is part of the
nior Enrichment Experiences
pEEl, a program of lectures on a
nety 0f subjects Tuesdays and
Sundays at 10 a.m. and 1
M... Sy Sugar's 80-piece
uderhill Senior Pops Sym-
ony, after opening its concert
at week at Lauderhill Commun-
|y Center, goes to BCC's Omni
V 2 p.m. Sunday Nov. 13
pncert.
| JWB Jewish Media Service
Mike Burstya. star of the
num show, hosting the
nukah Candle unto Candle
>gram to be sent by satellite to
"We TV stations around the
ntry for prime time airing
ledneaday Nov. 30 the first
Pt of the religious freedom
"vjl Broward Congress-
Larry Smith took part in
30-31 seminar on "AJtsr-
"* Forma of Conflict Reeohi-
t Harvard's John F.
dy School of Government.
dees included chief exscu-
officers of American corpora-
' Ramat Shalom has its
collection of foodstufs
pired by World Hanger Day
""al this Sunday (Nov. 13)
JO to noon. Collection will
rewarded to those in need.
pBC-a foreign correepondent.
"Barnard, featured almost
Mly with his reports on the
* 'ituation on the NBC
*V News programs an
.by Tom Brekaw. is the
HuS* ^MnJ- Sehwerts
l^ySprmga.lnargate...
"* Oardena Phase 8
i honored Free* Stela as
J** of the Year" at Oct.
[*ur In addition to his kxei
their only son, Howard, of Belle-
more, Long Island Lesson for
the last Monday Nov. 7 Piper
High School's senior classes was
"Culta." Teacher for the day:
Larry Schuval, director of
Federation's Community
Relations Committee.
That was Leon Rifkin not
Rivkin pictured in Oct. 28
Floridian with Wynmoor B'nai
B'rith members entertaining at
Federation-supported Kosher
Nutrition program Atty.
Gary Blake, who had been asso-
ciated with Fort Lauderdale law
firm of Lavender and Shafran,
has opened his own law practice
at 3046 N. Federal Highway .. .
Jay Markowiu, Florida State
Assn. B'nai B'rith convention
chairman, is alerting all lodges to
the dates of the 1964 convention:
Msy 6-7 st Miami Beach's
Deauville Hotel.
Ceil M. Grose, listed as cha-
plain of the City of Sunrise,
reports that Rabbi Phillip A.
Labowitz of Sunrise's Temple
Beth Israel received a standing
ovation following his remarks at
the opening of the State's Demo-
cratic National Convention
dinner meeting recently at the
Diplomat Hotel. Chiding this
column for its one sentence report
about it, says she: "Doesn't our
Rabbi deserve more than a few
lines of info on this?" Friends
of Sunny Friedman of Castle
Gardens wish her complete
recovery as she recuperates after
long illness.
Richard Peritz, host of the
Shalom TV programs aired Sun-
days on Channels 51 and 12, is
presenting Ed Entin, Federation
president, and Leslie S. Gottleib,
Federation's executive director,
in an update of Israeli affairs and
Federation's programs and ser-
vices funded by the United Jew-
ish Appeal. The show can be seen
on Ch. 12 this Sunday Nov. 13 at
10 a.m. Broward's United
Wav holds its annual meeting at
8 a.m. Thursday Nov. 17 st Pier
66 American Mizrachi
Women, which has chapters
locally, is changing its name to
AMIT (Americans for Israel and
Truth). The acronym finds its
source in the Hebrew word, Ernet
(truth and steadfastness)
U.S. REP. LARRY SMITH (D-Hollywood) (right) is pictured
presenting a letter sighed by 87 Congressmen urging Egypt's
President Hosni Mubarak (left) to return Egypt's ambassador
to Israel Also pictured are House Majority Leader Jim Wright
and Egypt's Ambassador to the U.S., Dr. AshrafA. OhorbaL
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#


The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort LauderdaU
Friday, November 11, iggj
Page 8__________________ _________________ The Jewish Floridian of Greater rortLMuu*>~~ -------/. "^mpw il m.
Federation's Leadership demonstrated its solidarity with the peopi
Continued from Page 1
including a rabbinic great-great-
great-grandfather and his family,
driven out of Russia by Cossack
pogroms at the turn of the
century, settled in Salad in
northern Palestine, and then later
were forced out of that historic
city by Arab marauders. The
family re-settled in Jerusalem
where they buih a synagogue in
the shadow, almost, of the
Western Wall.
The 23-me.iber Federation
Leadership Mission participants
went from there to the Western
Wall to complete their first day of
what Entin terms "a magical
mission," a phrase that was
echoed by others in the group.
As Irving Libowsky, general
chairman of the Palm-Aire UJA
Committee, put it: "One of the
great impressions of this Mission
was how it brought our group
closer together. Truly we were
one, sharing the vision of a great
country."
Before the group got to
Jerusalem, they were greeted at
the city's outskirts by a group of
singing children from Modi'in,
birthplace of the Maccabeans, for
the welcoming shehecheyanu and
tree-planting ceremony.
Felice Sincoff, president ot
Federation's Women's Division,
said: "People shouldn't think
that a Mission is a relaxing
vacation. It's a lot of hard work,
but worthwhile. Everyone is
striving for the same goal. We
work as one."
During their seven days of fact-
finding on how their UJA dollars
are spent in Israel, the Mission
participants went from early
morning to late in the evening,
covering Israel from northern tier
of Galilee to the Negev and
Masada.
They were guests at an Aliya
Youth Village: visited the
Morris Kraus
celebrates 97th
birthday Nov. 26
Continued from Page 1
with many joyful moments."
Morris Kraus, who livee at
Cypress Tree Condominium in
Lauderhill, is picked up by the
Federation van for- its trips to
"The Gathering Place,'' finds his
favorite leather chair, talks about
politics of the day with others,
plays a game or two of gin
rummy, and then joins the others
at the Kosher Nutrition Program
for the hot kosher meal served to
the participants ot both pro-
grams.
"I play rummy for no money,"
said Morris, chuckling thai it's
strictly a fun pastime
Marion Hunley, director of
"The Gathering Place," says that
Morris is a kind and considerate
We enjoy having him with
When not at The Gathering
Place, Morris has neighbors who
take him to Temple Beth Israel in
Sunrise for Friday night services
and Saturday mornings to
Hebrew Congregation of Lauder-
hill. On nice weekends, Morris
spends some time at the Cypress
Tree pool, and, in celebration of
his birthday, he's going with
some members of the Lauderhill
Hebrew Congregation on a
Thanksgiving weekend trip to
Miami Beach.
His daughter-in-law, his days
of socializing and lunching at the
Gathering Place, and the plea-
sure of meeting with people are
what give Morris Kraus great
pleasure as he looks forward
rather than reflects on the past,
to another in the long string of
birthdays.
wondrous Beit Hatefutsot (Jew-
ish Museum of the Diaspora on
the Tel Aviv University cam-
pus}; met Menachem Savidor,
Speaker ot Israel's Knesset, for a
briefing on Israel's economic
situation; toured a Paratrooper
Training Base; had home
hospitality with Kibbutr
families; enjoyed Shabbat dinner
with Lt. Col. Ariel Brown, chief
cantor of the Israel Defense
Forces; said Kaddish at Yad
Vashem .the Memorial to the Six
Million Holocaust Martyrs; rode
the cable car to the top of
Masada; learned how Israel
provided a new settlement on
Negev for families re-located
from Yamit, the city on the Sinai
Peninsula that Israel gave back
to Egypt as part of the price for
peace with that country; and
then the great highlight for the
"first timers" and, particularly,
for those who'd been there before,
the reception they got in one of
the distressed neighborhoods of
Federation's "sister city" of Kfar
Saba.
Alvera Ackerberg, Federa-
tion's Project Renewal chairman,
who heads the committee seeking
funds over and above regular
commitments to "the UJ/
campaign to raise Federation
SI .3 million share of the plan
improving the quality of life at
Kfar Saba. recalled the moments
just before the bus carrying
Federation's "family." arrived at
the neighborhood community
center.
Music," she said, "was the
first sound we heard as we neared
the neighborhood's Center.
Immediately 1 knew what was in
store for the first-timers in our
group. We entered the building
and saw the most beautiful sight:
our Kfar Saba children lining the
semi-circular staircase dressed in
white shirts and dark skirts or
trousers, proudly playing their
chatil instruments (recorders,
much like a flute) in our honor."
She continued: "What a wel-
come! After kissing and shaking
hands with their leader and the
youngsters who never missed
a musical beat I looked around
and saw not one dry eye. Every
single member of our group was
crying with tears of joy and
pride. The feeling of true warmth
and fellowship deepens within me
each time I visit."
And from one making first
John and Selma Streng and Esther Lerner bath with tome ofhrattA
potential future leaden at Kfar Saba.
Mission to Israel came this
comment from Esther Lerner. co-
chairman of Federation's
Women's Division UJA cam-
paign: "Israel is a kaleidoscope
of color, sights, sounds and
smells. It was magic. We went as
friends. We came back as family.
The enthusiasm of those who
have been to Israel several times
was contagious and I loved every
moment of it, tired though I wu
when the Mission ended."
She and others were saddened
at the military cemetery when
tombstones recorded the ages ct
18- and 19-year-old soldm
buried alongside generals of the
Israel Defense Forces. Many of
the tombstones noted birthplaces


Mnvemberll, 1968
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 9
ffcraeland "twinned'city of Kfar Saba on 'MagicalMission'
Ltd from countries around
r,mide who traveled with
li week told them as they
their respects at the
l-v "When you go back
[w ask for just a little more
UA tell them you stood at
";es 0f young men who
ILjr all and not just a little
Ibr Israel's survival."
23 members of the
L eight of whom were on
[first Mission
were briefed
us aspects of the crises
'Israel. Their mentor was
Diniu. former Israeli
dor to the U.S. He
following the Saturday
A Havdalah service and
Jit Jerusalem Hilton Hotel
flDF's Chief Cantor Brown
| joining the group.
noted that the group
at a time when the
got a new Prime
Yitzhak Shamir; when
ekel was devalued by 23
nt; and when Israel's
te minster was forced to
because of the country's
_. woes. "But," he said,
|spirit of the people remains
1 as they, too, share the
for a brighter, more
1 future.
biker of the Knesset
ichem Savidor, speaking to
Federation leadership in the
Hall of the Parliament
said: "It is important
I we Jews show solidarity
> at the moment the State
ingered from within and
at Together we Jews are
neficiaries of a great past
ustees of a common enter -
[ We expect Jews all over the
to be partners, in this
prise. May you continue to
I to your responsibilites."
I the Leadership was equal
responsibilities as they
i their commitments to the
campaign. Their total
i represented a 100 percent
\x over their contributions
19811 campaign. In ad-
|i, substantial amounts were
for Federation's Project
Ml. All had noted with
I plaques on facilities such as
Hay tare center, the com-
ly center, and others at Kfar
1 readme. Made possible in
ber^hip with residents of
paba and the Federations of
per Fort Lauderdale, Boca
land Orlando, Florida."
Federations of South
>ty 11Vn-a Itaton in Palm
p County) and Orlando are
with the Jewish Federa-
|of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Kfar Saba Project Renewal
(injunction with the Israel
nnient. the Jewish Agency
pel. and Jewry from other
'tries through Karen
Much has bean ac-
HBhed in the two years that
Lauderdale has been
d" with Kfar Saba.
this Mission group, in its
ending caucus in Israel,
its pert. Though they
from different parts of
Broward. they became
I family and they included
\ of Woodlands. Reinstein of
tn. Sherr of Fort Lauder-
aincoff of Woodlands.
erg of Inverrary. Lerner of
[Ocean Mile, Ubowsky of
fjc. Anita Perlman of
*una and John Streng of
t*y and Norman Ostrau of
". Charlotte Pedek of
"iture DanW Cantor.
' Wetaky, both of Tamarac;
* uvenston of Bonaven-
Florence Straus of
wy. Merrill Cohen of Jaca-
Harbara Wiener of Bona-
Janet and Harold
also from Bonaven
""Panying the fact-finding
were Mark Silverman.
i campaign director of the
w. and Jan Salit.
rf the Woman's Division.
Leadership Mission is briefed on this new Negev I settlement created for Yamit families displaced from
the Sinai when it was given to Egypt.
Entin with lieutenant in charge of Base.
Simulated parachute jumping at Paratrooper Training Bate
Five soldiers buried here were together in tank destroyed in battle.
Brian Sherr stands at portal of Synagogue built by hie ancestor*.
Irving Ubowtky. Amy Ottrau. Esther Lerner pictured with children
at Youth AUyah Village.
Felice Sincoff meets two of "her" Kfar Saba hids


Page 10
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday. Noypber]
PaJm-Aire honors scores
of 1983 UJA volunteers
Irving Libowsky, Ethel KuU
A record group of Paim-Aire
volunteers in the 1983 Federa-
tion-United Jewish Appeal drive
in the Pompano Beach commun-
ity received awards and recogni-
tion for their outstanding efforts.
Representative of the more than
100 who received awards was
Ethel Kutz, chairperson of Palm-
Aire's Condo 12, receiving the
award from Irving Libowsky,
Palm-Aires general chairman, at
the Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale board room.
Libowsky and Palm-A ire Fed-
eration UJA co-chairman. Mike
Ackerman, unveiled plans for the
1984 campaign and received as-
surances of cooperation in the
new drive.
Included among those getting
awards were the following:
Condo 1 Harry Sacks.
George Winters, Art Korotkin,
Irving Kaplan, Leon Schwartz,
Mrs. A. Blau, Leon Siegel, Aaron
Rolnick.
Condo 2 Charles Ruben,
Bernard Alpers, Myer Baker,
Matt Cooper, Morris Gurwich,
Dr. Abraham Halpern. Harold
Jacoby, Herbert Kahan,
Seymour Male, Harry Malter,
Jack Sandals. Julian Sharlet.
Morris Soldinger, Abraham
Speiaer, David Wilson. Lee
Krinsky, Harry Treu, Raymond
Farber, Jack Flatow, Henry
Levine, Simon Yespy.
Condo 3 Sam Schwartz,
Abraham Weitzman, Dr. Garaon
Rosenblum, David Tomkin, Ben
Traub, Frank Mervis. Joseph
Fink, Joseph Lederfine, Joseph
Spiegelman, Dr. Alvin Schles-
inger. Jack Storti, Harry Spodak,
Harry Diamon.
Condo 4 Joe Kranberg,
Samuel Kutikoff, Milton Ber-
man, Dr. Dan Schwartz, Irving
Baker, Abel Greenberg, Eli
Davis. Jack Rosen, Carl Get-
tleman, Jack Strauss, Rudolph
Scherock, Tony Ledner, Moeeis
Spar. Sidney Wolf, Abe Hersh,
Adele Wolman, Paul Sahl,
Samuel Simonoff.
Condo 5 Ben Taub, Morris
Neft, Alfred Segal, Ben Garaon,
Howard Frey, Mel Ross; Condo 6
Paul Alpern. Dr. Charles Fein-
gold, Oscar Zweig. Sy Roberta,
Leon Hamick; Condo 7 Maury
Lam berg.
Condo 9 Milton Trupin, Sid
Ascher, Irving Ackerman, Joa
Goldberg. Dr. Earl Weiner,
Joshua Weiner, Nat Sobel, Aba
Alloy; Condo 10 Martin Cain,
Morris Contract, Marvin
Shaman, Sol Uman. Ben Ellis;
Condo 12 Ethel KuU; Condo
52- Marvin Siagal.
Cantonal Concert Nov. 20
at Deerheld's Beth Israel
Ackerman
Silver
Cantor Abraham Lubin of
Congregation Radfei Zedek of
Chicago and Lois Silver of
Broadway stage and television
will join Cantor 8habtai
Ackerman of Dearfield's Temple
Bath Israel in the Taaaple's
fourth annual Cantonal Concert
at 7:80 p.m. Sunday Nov. 20 at
the Temple, 200 S. Century
Blvd.. juat outside Century
Village in Dearfield Beach.
Jack Baras. pktniet, wall-
Lubin
known in New York musical
circles, will be the acrwmpaniet
for all three artists.
Cantor Ackerman, under
w hose direction the concert be-
ing preeented, said the program
will include selections from opera,
Broadway musicals, liturgical
and Jewish music.
Reservations for the Nov. 20
concert may be made at the Tem-
ple office 421-7060.

-Ji
UMBRELLA FOR SUNSHINE Hoping to
have clear weather for their annual Inverrary
UJA Golf Classic, several members of Inverrary's
Jewish Federation-United Jewish Appeal Golf
Classic committee held up the umbrella over
themselves and the golf balls on the table. The
group is part of the total committee planning the
% -
Wednesday Jan. 11 tournament, and dinner thati
follows, at the Inverrary Country Club's East and
West golf courses.
Pictured are Morris R. Bloom, Joe KaplmJ
Selig Marko (seated); Edwin Rabat, Kenneti
Kent, Art Westrich, Joe Rudolph, Ben Strassns I
Other committee members include Sid Kleinmu
and Monroe Adler.
HAWAIIAN GARDENS UJA LEADERS met last month to comph
preparations for their part in the Jewish Federation-United Jewii
Appeal 1984 campaign. At the head table as they discussed plans fort
breakfast for residents of all Phases of the Hawaiian Gardens conrl
munity to be held Jan. 8 at Temple Beth Israel, Sunrise, were LueiM
Stang [center], chairman of the community's committee, with hercA
chairmen Julius Mines, Kurt Ellenbogen, and Jerome Davidson. Atl
right is Samuel K. Miller, chairman of Federation's Condominiun
Cabinet, who lauded the efforts of the volunteers in making Hawam\
Gardens an important factor in UJA commitment.
Share the Vision
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over 90 cities.
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(Broward & Palm Beach Counties)
Mrs. Ellssa Qrynspan,
(305)302-7067
(Dade County) Mrs. Sadye Canzer,
009 672-76M


November 11.1963
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
11
>li official believes Syria ordered Beirut massacre
I
At the head table at CRCs meeting: Ed Entin,
president of Jewish Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale; Consul General Trigor; Irving R.
Friedman, CRC chairman. Part of the crowd that heard
Trigor is pictured.
Knowing past history and the aims of
ria," Miami-based Israeli Consul General
(hoshua Trigor, making his first public ap-
Urance in North Broward, told an audience
175 persons, that "I would not be surprised
[the Syrians gave orders to Iranians, who, it
(believed, are responsible for the destruction
(Marine barracks in Beirut."
flhe barracks were destroyed in the explosion of a ton
dynamite on a truck driven by a suicidal fanatic into
[compound, killing 230 some Marines, and another
rk dointf ihe same at quarters occupied by French
m of the multi national peacekeeping forces in
Lebanon.
Trigor, who succeeded Consul General Joel Arnon
last month at the post overseeing Israeli interests in
Florida and Puerto Rico, had previously served for two
years at the Consulate in Atlanta.
The Israeli official was the guest speaker at the Oct.
26 meeting of the Community Relations Committee of
the Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale at
the Federation building, 8358 W. Oakland Park Blvd.
He blamed Syria as the underlying force in
preventing peace in the Middle East, declaring that
Syria wants to force Israel troops out of Lebanon,
without moving its own troops out. If this were to
happen, Syria would take over all of Lebanon. "A
Syrian victory," Trigor said, "would be a Soviet vic-
tory "
Urging that the U.S. *nd other peacekeeping forces
remain in Lebanon, he pointed out that Lebanon.made
an official request for the peacekeepers and the U.S>. is
acting in accordance with its own beet interests m the
country."
Referring to the Beirut massacre, Trigor said Israel
offered all help possible to the U.S. in providing
hospital and medical facilities for the Marines, but the
US followed its military procedures of bringing its
wounded to its own military hospitals.
Irving R. Friedman, CRC chairman, moderated a
questionand-answer period during which Trigor said a
key to peace could be the re-establishment of the Camp
David talks with Saudi Arabia joining in those talks.
Schiff speaks at Nov. 21 Chaplaincy Commission dinner /-
i Dr. AK m Colin, chairman of
Chaplaincy Commission of
Jewish Federation of Greater
A Lauderdale, announced that
bbi Solomon Schiff, director of
Greater Miami Jewish
'radon's Community
plaincy Service, will be the
ker at the annual dinner
Ming honoring eight Rabbis
have volunteered their
vices in the programs and
vices offered the Jewish
nmunity in North Broward.
The dinner, arranged by
ilaincy's director, Rabbi
Wbert H Schwartz, will take
pee at (> p.hi. Monday Nov. 21
the Tower Suite Restaurant,
netree Dr., Miami Beach.
Alfred Golden, a long-time
ember of the Chaplaincy Com-
lission, will be the toastmaster
hen the volunteer Rabbinic
dainty Corps is honored: Dr.
>lomon (Jeld, rabbi emeritus of
Temple Heth Am, Margate;
[Joseph l.angner of Deerfield's
nple Heth Israel; David J.
rtatzner of Congregation Beth
pjillel of Margate; Elliot Skiddell
Ramat Shalom, Plantation;
fort F. stone, Temple Beth
Rabbi Solomon Schiff
Torah. Tamarac; Nathan H.
Friedman of Lauderhill, Mor-
decai Brill of Inverrary, David
W. Gordon of Sunrise.
The dinner's guest speaker,
Rabbi Schiff, who received life
tenure in the Rabbinical Assn. of
Greater Miami which he has
*
served as executive vice
president since 1964, is a member
of the executive committee of the
national Rabbinic Cabinet of the
United Jewish Appeal and a
member of the national Speaker's
Bureau.
World War H
exhibit at Museum
An exhibition of 73 original
World War II posters entitled,
"Posters for Victory" opens this
week at the Fort Lauderdale His-
torical Museum, 219 SW 2 Ave.,
Fort Lauderdale, until Jan. 15.
The posters are on loan from the
Smithsonian Institution
Traveling Exhibition Service. In
conjunction with the exhibit of
posters, activities which took
place in Fort Lauderdale during
World War II will be highlighted
in displays entitled, "Fort Lau-
derdale at War."
"Fort Lauderdale at War" com-
plements the two-dimensional
posters by displaying objects and
memorabilia from World War II,
including uniforms, photographs,
and highlights of the Naval Air
Station and the Service Men's
Center, in Fort Lauderdale.
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Committees
Established
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Elie Wiesel, chairman of the U.S.
Holocaust Memorial Council, has
announced the establishment of
two new committees. The Second
Generation Advisory Committee,
which will serve as a conduit for
input from children of survivor*
into the work of the Council, is
chaired by Menachem Rosensaft.
The Committee on anti-
Semitism, which will deal with
the alarming rise of anti-Semi-
tism and will recommend to
Wiesel ways in which the Council
can combat this resurgence, is
chaired by Council member
KalmanSultanik.
Has Your
Address Changed?
Please print your NEW address below:
Address*.
\pt.No..
City.
Zip Coda.
Cup this
form and send to Jewish Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale, 8358 W. Oakland Park Blvd. Fort Lauderdale
FL 33321.
Send this form ALSO if your address is incorrect, or if
you're setting more than one Floridian delivered to your
own address.


Page 12
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Community Calendar
Compiled by Lori Raymond.
Federation 748-8400
THURSDAY NOV. 10
Temple Beth Israel. Sunrise:
Noon. Games.
Temple Beth Israel. Deerfield
Beach. Sisterhood: Noon. Mem-
bership meeting.
HADASSAH:
Orah Chapter: Noon. Lunch-
eon Meeting. Entertainment:
Broward Harmonica Group. Nob
Hill Recreation Center.
Kadimah Chapter; Dearfiekl
Beach: Nov. 10-13. Beau Rivage
Spa. ^
OUT:
Tamarac Chapter: 11 a.m.
Meeting. Italian American Club.
Tamarac.
Sunrise Village Chapter: 12:30
p.m. Meeting. Broward Federal,
3000 University Dr., Sunrise.
Temple Beth Orr B 4 B Social
Club: 8:30 p.m. Meeting El Al
film.
Pompano Interfaith: 10 a.m.
Meeting. "Getting To Know
You" with a Catholic priest,
Protestant Minister, and Jewish
rabbi speaking. Lutheran
Church. Pompano. Call 782-5352.
SATURDAY NOV. 12
American Teehaion Society:
Reception and Dinner. Diplomat
Hotel, Hollywood. Call 752-2256.
Temple Beth Am, Men's Crab:
7:30 p.m. Monte Carlo Night.
Donation $5. Tickets sold at door
of the Temple Social Hall, Mar-
gate.
PIONEER WOMEN
NA'AMAT:
Debra Club: Nov. 12-15 Week-
end Plus. Regency Spa, Bal Har-
bour. Call 735-8677.
Ayaaot Club: Garage Sale.
Call 491-7894.
SUNDAY NOV. 13
Temple Beth Torah: 6:46 p.m.
Games.
Temple Beth Israel, Deerfield
Beach, Sisterhood: Night in
Israel.
Temple Shaaray Tsedek: 7:30
p.m. Games.
Temple Kol Ami. Brotherhood: 9
a.m. Don Samuels, Broward
County School Board, speaker.
Pioneer Women Na'amat-Negev
Chapter: Four-day-vacation.
Lido Spa. Call 421-0823.
Deborah Heart Foundation-San-
rise Chapter: Noon. Luncheon.
Justins, Sunrise. Call 742-4479.
State of Israel: 10 a.m. Temple
Beth Israel, Deerfield Beach.
Temple Sholom Men's Club: 10
a.m. "Living in China Today" by
Robert Bank. Donation $2.50.
Hadasash-North Lauderdale
Chapter: "Hello Hadassah Sun-
day." Volunteer telephone
squads. Call 726-2094.
Anti-Defamation League: An-
nual Cocktail Party Wood-
lands- 4 p.m.
Temple Beth Am. Singles Club: 2
p.m. Meeting. Temple Social
Hall, Margate.
Probus Club-Margate: 10:30 am.
fund and membership-raising
Brunch. Speaker: Marcia Beach.
Woodmont Country Club. Tama-
rac.
Donor luncheon. Woodmont
Country Club. Call 971-3332.
Wynmoor Chapter: 11 am.
Meeting. Update on Middle East.
Coconut Creek Recreation Cen-
ter.
Women's Crab of Castle Lander
hill: Noon. Lanie Gould enter-
tains. Castle Recreation Center.
WLI-Woodlands Chapter: 10
am. Meeting. Home of Anne
Paul. Film. Call 731-2996.
American Mizrachi Women-
Golds Meir Chapter: Noon.
Lunchson. Temnle Beth Israel.
Deerfield Beach.
Temple Emana-EI: 7 p.m.
Games.
TUESDAY NOV. 15
Northwest Focal Point Senior
Center: 7 to 10 p.m. Seventh An-
niversary Party. 5160 Park Dr.,
Margate. Call Rose 973-0300 for
reservations.
Lauderdale West Chapter: Study
Group. Deiclte Auditorium. Call
472-6332.
Royal Plantation Chapter: 1:30
p.m. Membership tea. Bonaven-
tura Town Center.
Temple Kol Ami: Book Pair. 7-8
Gm.
adaesab LChayim Plantation
Chapter: 11 am. Meeting. Mini-
lunch. Deicke Auditorium.
B'aai B'rith Pompano Lodge:
Meeting. Palm-Aire Country
Club, East Dining Room 551 So.
Pompano Pkwy., Pompano
Beach.
Pioneer Women -Na'amat-
Tamara Chapter: Noon. Meeting.
Water Bridge Recreational Cen-
ter. Sunrise.
WLI Coconut Creek Chapter:
11:30 a.m. Luncheon and Card
Party. Inverrary Country Club.
Donation 812. Call Anne 972-
9750 or Rita 975-8340 for reserva-
tions.
Temple Beth Torah. Sisterhood:
11:45 a.m. Games. Lunch at
nominal cost.
MONDAY NOV. 14
HADASSAH:
Bat Ami Tamarac Chapter:
Thanksgiving Weekend. Crown
Hotel. Miami Beach. Call 722-
4277.
Fort Lauderdale Tamar Chap-
ter: Noon. Paid-up luncheon.
Public Safety Building, 4300 NW
36 St.. Lauderdale Lakes.
PlsntstionYschad Chapter:
Noon. Meeting. Dorothy Colin
entertains. Mini-lunch. Deicke
Auditorium. Call 587-5886.
West Broward Jewish Congrega-
tion. Sisterhood: 8 p.m. Hanuka
Bazaar. Synagogue, 7473 NW 4
St.. Plantation.
B'nai B'rith Women-Cypress
Chase Chapter: 1 p.m. Masting.
Public Safety Building, Lauder-
dale Lakes.
ORT:
North Broward Region: Noon.
WEDNESDAY NOV. 16
Temple Beth Israel, Saariat: 7
p.m. Games.
West Broward Jewish Caagrags-
tioa: 7 p.m. Dancercize with
Cindy. Charge 86.
Temple Kol A mi: Book Fair 7:30-
9:30 p.m.
BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY
NWC:
Fort Lauderdale-Pompano
Beach Chapter: 11:30 am.
Lunchson. Yesterday's. Call 781-
4492.
West Broward Chapter: Noon.
Lunch and Museum Tour. Call
791-7506.
ORT Cedar Ridge Chapter: 10:30
am. Call Sylvia at 753-9188.
HADASSAH:
Pompano Beach Chai Chapter:
Noon, Paid-up membership
luncheon. Fashion Show. Call
781-0566 or 941-1294 for reserva-
tions.
LChayim Plantation Chapter:
Noon. Luncheon. Lauderdale
West Clubhouse.
Golds Meir Chapter: 12:30
p.m. Meeting. Palm-Aire Social
Center. Speaker: Rose Matzkin,
former Hadassah national presi-
dent. Mini-lunch.
City of Hope-Coral Gate Chap
tor: Noon. Meeting. Speaker:
Fran Schorr, nutritionist. Italian-
American Club, Tamarac.
Sunrise Jewish Center. Sister
hood: 11 am. Meeting. Speaker:
Sunny Landsman.
WLI-Bonaventare Chapter:
11:30 am. Speaker Augusts
Zimmerman of Jewish Family
Service. Mini-luncheon. Bone-
venture Town Center.
Temple Emanu-El, Mea'a Club: 6
p.m. Dinner end card party. 86.
Call 733-4920 or 742-6688.
THURSDAY NOV. 17
Temple Beth Israel of Deerfield
Bosch, Sisterhood: Paid-up
membership tea. Call 428-1171.
Temple Beth Israel, Suariee.
Noon. Games.
Temple Sholom Sisterhood: Paid-
up luncheon. Veronica and Peter
entertain. Temple Social Hall.
Pompano.
Temole Kol And: Book Fair.
4:30-6:30 p.m.
ORT North Broward Region: 10
am. Board Meeting. Lauderdale
Lakes City Hall.
Pioneer Women Na'amat Ayaaot
Crab: 7:30 p.m. Wine and Cheese
Party. Film Call 491-8040.
B'NAI B'RITH WOMEN:
Bermuda Crab Chapter: Noon-
Meeting. Bermuda Clubhouse.
Golds Meir Chapter: Noon.
Meeting. Nob HOI Recreation
Center, Sunrise. Mini-lunch.
B'NAI B'RITH:
Inverrary Lodge: 8 p.m.
Meeting. Speaker: Edward Turn-
aroff. Temple Beth Israel. Sun-
rise.
Lauderdale Lakes Lodge: 7:30
p.m. Meeting. Speaker: Martin
Lipnack, attorney. Lauderdale
Lakes City Hall, 4300 NW 36 St.,
Lauderdale Lakes.
Woodmont Lodge: 7:30 p.m.
New Membership Night. Guest:
Billy Breen. Woodmont Country
Club.
Posnpaao Lodge: 8 p.m.
Meeting. Guest: Dorothy Rubin
of Broward Jewish Journal.
Palm-Aire Country Club, East
Dining Room, 551 So. Pompano
Pkwy., Pompano Beach.
Brandeis University NWC West
Broward Chapter: 1 p.m.
Meeting. Guest speaker: Abra-
ham J. Gittelson, director of Cen-
tral Agency for Jewish Education
of the Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale. Sunrise
Savings, 9001 W. Oakland Pk.
Blvd.
JWV:
Deerfield Beach Post and Aax-
liary: 7 p.m. Meeting. Speaker:
Harry Chitwood, FPL coordina-
tor, Temple Beth Israel, Deerfield
Beach.
Pompano Post and Auxiliary:
7:30 p.m. Meeting. JWV Hall.
4301 Federal Hwy., Pompano
Beach.
United Way of Broward Comity:
8 am. Breakfast. Pier 66, Fort
Lauderdale. Call John Huerta at
467-2766.
ARMDI-Col. David Marcos
Chapter: 11 a.m. Meeting.
Whiting Hall, 6767 NW 24 St..
Sunrise.
Hadasseh-Cyprsee Chase Chap
tar: 11:30 a.m. Luncheon and
Card Party. Duff's Restaurant,
6501 W. Commercial Blvd., Tam-
arac Donation 65. Call 735-8047.
Free Sons of Israel-Fort lender-
dale Lodge: 7:30 p.m. Meeting.
Whiting Hall, Sunrise.
West Broward Jewish Congraga-
tioa, Men'a Club: 8 p.m.
Meeting. At the temple.
FRIDAY NOV. 18
Temple Beth Am, Men's Club:
Nov. 18-21. Weekend. Regency
Hotel. Bal Harbour. $250 per
couple. Call 972-5156, 974-6224.
974-8650.
Workmen's Circle-Greater Lau-
derdale Branch: 7:30 p.m.
Hanuka Program. Lauderdale
Lakes City Hall.
B'NAI B'NAI WOMEN:
Hope Chapter: Noon. Meeting.
Deicke Auditorium, 5701 Cypress
Rd., Plantation
Lauderdale Chapter: Noon.
Meeting. Speaker: Jerry Layton.
Castle Recreation Center, 4780
NW22Ct.,LauderhuI.
WLI: 9:30 a.m. Florida Regional
Executive Board Meeting. Fed-
eration Building, 8368 W. Oak
land Park Blvd.. Sunrise.
SATURDAY NOV. 19
West Broward Jewish Congrega-
tion: 8 pm. Art Auction. Dona-
tion 82.
Temple Kol Ami, Sisterhood:
7:46 p.m. Art Auction. For ticket
information, call 472-1988.
Cincinnati Crab of South Florida:
Dinner and Dancing. 812.60 per
person. Anthony's Restaurant,
1970 South Ocean Dr., Hallan
dale. Call 762-1714, 428-1687, or
498-2424.
SUNDAY NOV. 20
Temple Beth Torah: 6:46 pm.
Games.
Temple Beth Israel ef DserfMd
Beach: 7 pm. Cantorial Concert.
B'nai B'rith Foundation: Honor
Club Breakfast. Guest:
Grossman. Pier 68 Hotel. Fort
LaodordaU. Call 764-1628.
Temple Beth Orr, Sisterhood: 10
a.m.-4 p.m. Holiday Bazaar.
Temple Beth Am: 4 p.m. Holiday
Bazaar. Call 752-4959.
Temple Kol Ami: Book Fair. 10
a.m.-l p.m. Holiday Bazaar. 9
am.-4 p.m.
Wynmoor Dance Troupe: 2 p.m.
Omni Auditorium, BCC Campus,
Coconut Creek. Tickets 83, 84.
Call 973-0300.
Temole Shaaray Tsedeh, Men'a
At!
<*": a-m. Brmkha
Noimnation of Officer,
Temple. ""
larael Boads-CastW
am. Breakfast. (^mncZ?
and Ruth DantakerwOU?
ored.C^rtfeGirdm,r *
Tempi. Beth Tore.,
1J am. to 4 pm. Bu^
Merchandise. ^^
Temple Beth Israel
Shrterhood: 8 p.m. S
bamStudley.WNWSradi
Subject: Middle East C&
Temnle for tickets at 742
of
Best selling Jewish Books
WASHINGTON Bssedona
sampling of Jewish bookstores in
cities across the United States,
The B'nai B'rith International
Jewish Monthly has selected in
its November issue the following
as best-selling books of Jewish
interest. They are listed
alphabetically by title.
HARDCOVER
The Cannibal Galaxy, Cynthia
Ozick. Knopf. $11.95. A middle-
aged French Jew, principal of a
Jewish day school in the Amer-
ican Midwest, searches for a
prodigy.
Ethical Wills. Edited and
annotated by Jack Riemer and
Nathaniel Stampfer. Schocken.
$17.95. A collection of wills from
medieval to modern times.
How to Run a Traditional Jewish
Household. Blu Greenberg.
Simon and Schuster. $19.95.
Useful reference for the beginner
or experienced practioner of
traditional Jewish life.
None is Too Many. Irving Abella
and Harold T roper. Random
House. $17.95. Indictment of the
Canadian government's im-
migration policies during World
War II.
The Penitent. Isaac Bashevis
Singer. Farrar. Straus and
Giroux. $13.95. A concentration
camp survivor, disillusioned by
bia own American Jewish I
comes a believin Jew.
PAPERBACK
Eight Great Hebrew
Novels. Edited by Alan
and Gershon Shaked Me
$9.96. A collection of wo
leading Israeli writers from I
AgnontoA. B. Yehoshw
Gates to the New City. U.
Howard Schwartz. Avon II
Anthology of Jewish literati
On Being a Jewish Ft,
Edited by Susannah He
Schocken. $9.95. Anthotorfl
Jewish feminist literature.
Operation Action Rtxut fij
the Holocaust. Wilham R. L
Frederick Ungar Publishing]
$9.96. Smuggling Jewish
gees by boat from Europjl
Palestine.
Rabbis and Wives. Chain Gn
Vintage. $5.95. Three noveL
village life in pre-World Wl
Lithuania.
Two new books expected io|
well are A Place of
describing the struggle of I
women to find their Je
spirituality, by Khoda Sh
Kieser; and The Other Side oj\
Wall, three novellas by
temporary Israeli author Na
Shaham.
Libraries offer free programs
The Broward County Library
System is offering, a number of
programs to the public, free of
charge. Among them are the
following:
At Tamarac Library. 8601 W.
McNab Rd.. Tamarac:
Gerald Kuchinsky will lecture
on condominium law from 7 to
8:30 p.m. Monday Nov. 14.
At 1:30 p.m. Thursday Nov.
17, Gail Godwin's book, "A
Mother and Two Daughters will
be discussed.
At Catherine Young Branch,
5810 Park Dr.. Margate:
A captioned version of Fiddler
on the Roof will be shown for the
hearing impaired at 1:30 p.m.
Monday Nov. 14.
From 10 a.m. to noon, Tuesday
Nov. 15. Jane Burmaster will
demonstrate the cool rise method
of breed baking. Participants
must pre register
John Hutchcroft. music in-
structor at Florida Atlantic Uni-
versity, will discuss music and
the American people from 1:30 to
2:30 p.m. Friday Nov. 18.
At East Regional Branch, 1300
E. Sunrise Blvd., Fort
Lauderdale:
A puppet play festival will be
held for children at 10:30 am
Monday Nov. 14 in celebration of
Children's Book Week.
A small business workshop,
sponsored by Chapter 17 of
SCORE will be offered from 9
am. to 4 p.m. Friday Nov. 18.
Reservations are required Call
527-7263 or 766-6600.
At Lamisrdali Lakes Branch,
3621 NW 43 Ave.. Lauderdale
At Sunrise Branch. 6600 So
Strip, Sunrise:
Dr. Roger Sabastier, 6:30p
Monday Nov. 14, will
how to stay healthy
Attorney Herbert Goldfekl^
discuss what every Florida l
ident should know about wis|
2 p.m. Friday Nov. 18.
At North Lauderdale
6601 Blvd. of Champions, N
Lauderdale:
Attorney Goldfeld
wilN at 2 p.m. Thursday No\
At Weat Regional Branch,
W. Broward Blvd.. Plantation:!
Richard Kaplan, attorney.
discuss estate planning at 2 [
Tuesday Nov. 16.
From 10 a.m. to noon We
day Nov. 16, Bill Hayneswuld
cuss South Florida sun
hydrology.
Children's record produo
Stephen Star, at 10 a.m. tr\
Nov. 18. will discuss how ma.
affect* children.
TV
O
*
Dout Bs Chicken About
Chicken," a discussion of nutri-
tion tips and recipes for the
preparation of chicken, will bs
Peoted by Cathi Koete at 2
P-m. Tuesday Nov. 16.


November 1MW3
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Pug* 13
CELEBRATES 59 YEARS OF
LOWER PRICES,EXPEDIENCE & INTEGRITY
'^\ THAT SAVE YOU MONEY

Uteri
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Mouituaranu.
155SR12
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wet
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RADIAL WWTEWALL
r
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WE SERVICE NATIONAL ACCOUNTS


*
Page 14
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
frid-y. November
".1J
SPECIAL DELIVERY TO ISRAEL -
Henrietta Kalish, president of Deerfield Beach-
Century Village's Temple Beth Israel Sisterhood,
presents to Paul and Lola Quitman the group's
checks of $600 each to be given to Israeli institu-
tions and agencies. The Quitmans left last week
for assignment by Volunteers for Israel for a 21-
day stint of volunteer service at an Israel Army
base.
Joining President Kalish for the presentation
were Sisterhood officers and members: Etta
Feltquate. Helen Goldfarb, Bea Horowitz, Esthyr
Rosenbhim, Sybil Hecker, Yetta Rosenberg, Bea
Horowitz, Prances Levy.
Also on hand to wish the Quitmans safe
journey and commending them for joining the
Volunteers for Israel were Beth Israel's President
Rev. Saul Kirschenbaum, Rabbi Joseph Langner,
Cantor Shabtai Ackerman, and Ben Dinkes of
Wynmoor Village, Coconut Creek, South Florida
coordinator for the Volunteers for Israel program
a program that enables those accepted to get a
subsidized low airfare from El Al Airlines for the
trip, plus living accommodations at the base to
which the volunteer is assigned, and, usually,
home hospitality for Shabbat.
Soviet Bar Mitzvah twinning at Temple Shalom
Karmi Elbert, 13-year-old son
of Mr. and Mrs. Lev Elbert, re-
fuseniks" in the Ukraine, will be-
come a Bar Mitzvah in absentia
when Adam Wayne Ehrlich, son
of Carol and Ronald Ehrlich, be-
comes the 12th Bar Mitzvah cele-
brant at Temple Sholom in Pom-
pano Beach to twin his religious
service with Karmi.
The ceremony will take place
during the Saturday morning
Nov. 19 service at the Pompano
Beach synagogue.
The Elbert family, refused per-
mission to leave when they ap-
plied in 1976, has been harassed
by the Soviet authorities since
then at various times, with their
chances for emigration further
reduced by recurring false
charges of illegal activities.
At tomorrow (Sept. 12) morn-
ing's service at Temple Sholom,
Raven Shaffman, grandson of
Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Shaffman,
is twinning his Bar Mitzvah cere-
mony with Gennadi Lukach of
Kiev. In both instances, certifi-
cates of the proxy ceremony's
designation will be sent to the
boys in the Soviet Union.
Adam Ehrlich
B'nai-B'not Mitzvah
TEMPLE EM ANU El
Wendy Woodrow, daughter of
Alma and Willard Woodrow of
Plantation, celebrated her Bat
Mitzvah at the Saturday morn-
ing Nov. 5 service at Temple
Emanu-El, Lauderdale Lakes.
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL
The Bar Mitzvah service of
Jason Morey, son of Sharon and
Alan Morey of Lauderhill, will be
held at the Saturday morning
Nov. 11 service at Temple Beth
Israel, Sunrise.
Stephen Kramer, son of Ronnie
and Donald Kramer of Sunrise,
becomes a Bar Mitzvah celebrant
Saturday Nov. 19 at Beth Israel.
TEMPLE BETH TORAH
Rachael Marks, daughter of
Anna and Harvey Marks of Tam-
arac, will celebrate her Bat Mitz-
vah at the Friday evening Nov.
11 service at Temple Beth Torah,
Tamarac.
The Bar Mitzvah service of
Alan Kantrowitz. son of Gloria
and Steven Kantrowitz of Sun-
rise, will be held at the Saturday
morning Nov. 19 service at Beth
Torah.
TEMPLE
SHA'ARAY TZEDEK
Jordan Small, on of Shauna
and Robert Small of Plantation,
grandson ol Murray Evans of
Sunrise, will be called to the
Torah in honor of his Bar Mitz-
vah during the Saturday morning
Nov. 19 service, at Temple
Sha'aray Tzedek. Sunrise.
TEMPLE BETH AM
The Bar Mitzvah of Daran
Schneider, son of Faye and Mar-
tin Schneider, will take place at
the Saturday morning Nov. 12
service at the Congregation Beth
Am, Margate.
Scott Meyer, son of Terry and
Irwin Meyer will celebrate his
Bar Mitzvah at the Saturday
morning Nov. 19 service at Beth
Am.
TEMPLE KOL AMI
The B not Mitzvah of Kimber
ly Jay son, daughter of Sally and
Robert Jayson of Plantation and
Holly Iglehart. daughter of Ruby
and William Iglehart of Sunrise,
will take place at the Friday
night Nov. 18 service at Temple
Kol Ami, Plantation.
Jonathan Bomser, son of
Myrna and Steven Bomser of
Plantation, and David Metz, son
of Nita and Leonard Metz of
Plantation will celebrate their
B'nai Mitzvah at the Saturday
morning Nov. 19 service at Kol
Ami.
RAMAT SHALOM
Julie Cogan, daughter of
Janice and Oscar Cogan of Plan-
tation, celebrated her Bat Mitz-
vah at the Saturday morning
Nov. 5 service at Ramat Shalom,
Plantation.
The Bat Mitzvah service of
Jennifer Grossman, daughter of
Elaine Grossman of Plantation,
will be held at the Saturday
morning Nov. 12 service at
Ramat Shalom.
Jill Braunstein, daughter of
Susan and Milton Braunstein of
Plantation, becomes a Bat Miz-
vah celebrant at the Saturday
Nov. 19 service at Ramat
Shalom.
WEST BROWARD '
JEWISH CONGREGATION
Debra Roeenthal, daughter of
Diane and Aaron Rosenthal of
Plantation, will celebrate her Bat
Mitzvah at the Saturday morn-
ing Nov. 12 service at West
Broward Jewish Congregation,
Plantation.
Readers Write
Columnist's View on FBI
Shocks Her 'Considerably
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
It was with considerable shock
that I encountered Leo Mindlin's
recent article in The Jewish Flori-
dian. "Look Who's Calling
Whom Paranoid," on the compil-
ing of information on Albert
Einstein by the FBI.
To believe that the compiling
of information condemns the U.S.
government in the same way that
the Russian government is to be
condemned for the shooting down
of a passenger jet with 269 people
aboard surpases my belief.
Einstein's freedom was not
impinged upon. In the Soviet
Union, men like Einstein
Sakharov, Solzhenitsyn,
Mandelstam have been
isolated, placed in prison camps
and condemned to torture and
death because they wrote poems,
gova
articles or made statements
did not meet with the favor of
authorities. w
How can Mindlin equau
actions of a branch of the B0
ment. the FBI, which gat
information and whose fii-
now open to public scrutiny
the actions of the Soviet gov
ment which has sent million
people to imprisonment,
slave labor and under
regime tens of millions of
have died?
FLORENCES.
Deerfield Bcacfa, |
EDITOR'S NOTE Just to'l
the record straight, then ant
three branches of American i
ernment, and the FBI is nott
of them. And last we
Alexandre Solzhenitsyn t..
Maine in splendid seclusion.
OBTHODOX
TEMPLE OREL B'NAI RAPHAEL (7U-7S84), 4M1 W Oakland ParkBM.1
Lauderdale Lakes 8881 a Servtoee: Sunday through Thursday 8 am (pal
Friday 8 a.m.,7 p.m.; Saturday 8 48 a.m., 7 p.m.
SYNAGOGUE OP INVEBBABT OHABAD (746-1777). 7770 NW Mth gj
Lincoln Park West. Sunrln SUM. enrlaaai Sunday Utfouf h Friday I iJ
7: SO p.m.; Saturday a.m.. 7:10 p.m. Study troupe Men. Sunday. fbUosM
services, Women.TueadayiSp.m.RafeM Area Ltofeerntaa.
YOUNG ISRAEL OF DEERFIELD REACH (01-1M7). 1880 W. HUkeeal
Blvd., Deerfield Beach SS441 Servtoee: Sunday through Thuredey I ta.1
5:80 p m ; Friday 8 am., 8 p.m.; Saturday 8:48 a.m., ( 80 p m Castor Ml
YOUNG BRAIL SYNAOOOUE OP ROLLYWOODFORT LAIDEEDAU
(M6-7877). SMI Stirling Rd., Port Lauderdale IM13 Servlcee: Uaekf
through Friday 7:SO a.m., and sundown; Saturday, ta m.,iundown;kaan
a.m.. sundown. RafeM EeNeargDa vie.
CONSERVATIVE
TEMPLE BETH AM (M4-S6S0), TSM Royal Palm Blvd., Margate I
Samoa*: Monday through Friday 6 SO a.re., S p.m Friday late i
p.m.. Saturday t a.m.. S p.m.; Sunday a.m., 6 p.m.
Rabbi E merltua. Dr. SeJeaaaa OeM. Coaler srrtag Ore*
SaTPe^STS amAKL <*). WO* W. Oakland Park Blvd. Sunn. I
f sT*"-? M?Td'y me*Thuradeyga.m..l:p.m ; Friday I aal
?", p"l: *twy am Sunday a.m.. IS p.m RafeM PaBfJ
aaesnn, Caar MasBtoe Nee.
TEMPLE BETH MRAEL OP DEEBFDELD BEACH (4&-TM0). HI l]
Century Blvd.. Deerfield Beach (SMI. fcrlSMi Sunday through Friday r.l
a.m.. 6 p.m. Friday late sendee g p.m.; Saturday 1:44 a m.. and at easd*
MaajasgU --"^ TTT|>laeaa*i.teaRsMsaM*i Snsanaaa
TEMPLE BETH TORAH (711-7660). UM NW iTUi St.. Tamarac MS 1
SarvtoM: Sunday through Friday I to a.m.. S p.m. LaU Friday serrtol
im gaaaraayS:*! 'rm BaaM Beat P Stoi ffelsi Bearj tiBrr f
TEMPLE B'NAI MOBHE (S4S-U60) .1464 HE krd M.. Pompano Beach MS
Servtoee: Friday p.m. ~
TEMPLE SHA'ARAY TZEDEK (741-SM6). 40* Pine Islaad Ri.
sunrise ami Servtoee: Sunday through Friday S am., I p-m ; LateFrhM]
service 8 p.m ; Saturday 8 48 am : 16 p.m. Caator Jack Marches!.
Jack Marcsaat.
TEMPLE SHOLOM (S434410). 1U SE nth Ave Pompano Beach MR j
Servlcee: Monday through Friday 646 a.m. Friday evening at I eaturaM I
and Sunday ( a. m BaaM Sesaael April. CkuHer Ji
OONOREOATMN BETH HILLEL OP MARGATE (ST4-RN0). 7H0Barg*
ST*'i2!n*m trTtoI aundaythrouaRFiMa^llam.-Mf*1
LatoPiidayaervloslpmSaturoay l:tti.m.,l:Mam ReMs Da*
Mafctaar. Cater Sga| QMMR,
CONGREGATtON B'NAI ISRAEL OP CORAL SPRINGS (For RemNewcel
East resident.!. 7H-4R16. Servtoee: Dally 1:60 a.m.. B: p.m.. Saturday!
am HerbDavte. PreeMaal
HEBREW CONGREGATION OP LAUDEBHJLL (TM-SM0). SMI NW 4
Ave.. LauderhUl SHU. Servtoee: Sunday through Friday 8 SJe,
p.m.; Saturday 8 48 a.m.,
RafeM Isrsal Halpera.
HEBREW CONGREGATION OP NORTH LAUDERDALE (726-7*1 or T*
HU). Service, at Ban yon Lakes Condo #040 Bailey Rd Tamarac. FrMay*
p.m.; Saturdays am. AlStora.-*-
TEMPLE BETH OBB (7M-UU). Mil Riverside Dr.. Coral SprtM'^-
Sarvtoas: Sunday 1:80 a.m.; Tuesday, Thuraday 7:16 p.m.; Friday I* |
Saturday 10 am. Ssbbl DaaaMR. Oerfeer. Caator Naacy Haasmaa.
TEMPLE B'NAI SHALOM OP DEERFIELD BEACH (43*-28831 *****
Manorah Chapels. MM W. HUlatoro Bred.. Deerfield Baach. Friday IP*
RafeM Nasaaa R Flea, Oaator Marris Levtoeaa.
TEMPLE EM ANU EL (Tii-isioi. aaea w n.ki*nd Park Blvd Lauder**
Lakes IMu Bar
celebration of Bar-Bat Mltsvah.
- (Tai-HSO), SMS W. Oakland Park Blvd.. LauJ^J
ii Friday 111 p.m.; Saturday, only on ho"*^
M Mltavah. RafeM Jeffrey Baltoa, Oaator Jeri**
TEMPLE KOL AMI (471-ISM). O00 Petara U., Plantotton_*^i
rrtdayi 18 p.m.. Saturday 10 SO am RafeM Shefetoa 1. Barr, Osafsra^
LBRRAL JEWISH TEMPLE OF COCONUT CREEK W^}*!?*
SSy-V* mry%e" tw moataly at Calvary Praefeytarten Ow^J
Oboonut Creak Parkway. BafeSaRtisaaS. TTansat Tf""*"-a1M**^
CONOREOATRWI (ftMm A |
PlanUtton
oatoferai
l: 16 pm
RBtlUNSIBUlllRJIIHnT
(sTS-SfU). USM W
16 p m
SSMn


November 11
1963
The Jewish Florldian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 15

^L FOUNDATIONS IN SOUTH FLORIDA
J ifj third annual Leadership Weekend recently at
kpr Island in Palm Beach. Rabbi Mark Kram
Xured left), HUM staff member, conducted Hav-
fa/i service on the beach. Among the 15 local-area
dents in attendance were those pictured right:
Mi Bashan. Eli Jolan, Elaine Preissman, David
\ndon and Debbie Becker.
Also participating were Susan Weiner of Florida
ntic University; Shira Coffman. Broward Com-
munity College, North Campus; Gary Cossin, Sheridan
Vocational Center; Rich Gollin, FAlf.
HUM staff members Nancy Horowitz Tobin and
Lynn Hoffman organized the retreat which included a
series of workshops designed to develop student
leadership for the campus communities. Other ac-
tivities were scheduled, including a creative Friday
night service conducted by Rabbi Kram and Laurie
Naturman, with a traditional Shabbat morning service
conducted by Lyn Light Geller. Naturman and Geller
are also Hillel staffers.
Dianne Stahl, vice president of Hilleis board and
leader of Hillel's Israel Dance troupe, led a dance
program in the hotel following the oceanfront Havdalah
service.
Hillel is one of the several educational agencies, pro-
grams and services receiving funding from the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale United Jewish
Appeal.

\
Bonds honoring the Dantzkers
Bonds Scroll of Honor.
Mrs. Dantzker, president of
Hadassah's Armon Chapter, is a
member of B'nai B'rith Women,
and the Sisterhood of the Hebrew
Congregation of Lauderhill.
AT CENTURY VILLAGE
Cantor Shabtai Ackerman of
Deerfield's Temple Beth Israel
and his wife, Dora, were the hon-
orees at last Sunday's (Nov. 6)
State of Israel Bonds breakfast
at Temple Beth Israel. George
Patraka chaired the meeting with
Herbert Lyon as co-chairman.
The Stale of Israel Bonds 35th
Anniversary Award was
presented to the Ackermans by
Abe Rosenblatt, general chair-
man for Century Village State of
Israel Bonds campaign commit-
tee, and his co-chairman, Ben
Grossman. Guest speaker was
Kddie Schaffer, noted homorist.
Sidney and Sandy Ivler will be
the honored guests at Century
Village*s third Bond breakfast
Sunday morning Nov. 13 at
Temple Beth Israel.
LAUDERDALE OAKS
Maurice and Annette Vernick
will be honored at the Nov. 16
Night in Israel Bonds event in
the Lauderdale Oaks Social Hall.
Louis Silvers is chairmah with
Meyer Stein, honorary chairman.
Co-chairmen are Max Richman,
Joe Bobbins, Hy Seidman.
Speaker will be Emil Cohen.
TEMPLE BETH ORR
Rose and Sy Domnitch will re-
ceive the Israel Bonds 35th Anni-
versary Award at the Night in
Israel Dec. 3 at Temple Beth Orr,
Coral Springs, with Jerry Gleekel
as the guest speaker.
fh and Ben Dantzker
uth Dantzker and her hus-
d. Lauderhill Councilman Ben
llzker. treasurer of the City
|ncil. will Im! honored with the
ntation of the State of Israel
I Organization's Generations
ird at a continental breakfast
ing of the Castle Gardens
pmunity at 10 a.m. Sunday
20 at the condominium's
bhouse.
Julius Schnapper chairs the
Itle Gardens Bonds commit -
| *i!h Jack Salz and Sol Nixon
co-chairmen. They lauded
htzker for city leadership and
pmunal activity, noting that
l the recipient of the Golden
I* Award from the Jewish Na-
tal Fund of which he is a vice
Hent, the Jewish Federation
Mm service award, and
Jewish Chaplain Helped
arch for Bomb Victims
W YORK (JTA) Capt. Arnold Resnicoff, the
* chaplain with the U.S. Sixth Fleet in Lebanese
ers. asssisted in the search for and identification of
Marines killed or missing in Beirut as a result of the
jost bombing of American and French military
"quarters, the JWB told they Jewish Telegraphic
A JWB SPOKESMAN said Resnicoff had gone ashore
'P dig through the rubble of the marine headquarters.
*ts from U.S. and French sources said at least 220
ies and sailors and 60 French paratroopers had been
u the bombing.
ir* is no estimate available of the number of Jewish
es in the 1,200-man U.S. contingent of the
'"national force in Beirut. It is not yet known whether
Jewish servicemen were among the Marines who
kUled. The only known Jewish casualty in an earlier
,r>st attack on the Marines was Sgt. Allan Soifert, 26,
'shua, N.H., who was killed by a sniper on Oct. 14
driving his jeep through a Moslem section of south
icecuee
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"Whatfs the best way to
vacation in Israel?
Have a friend get you
airfare, a hotel and a car
for only *839-w

Get a complimentary
Avis Rent A Car.
"You know who your friends are.
"El Al, the Airline of Israel.
"Right now we've got the best
vacation going to Israel..
"For one price gjf^l
you can take our ^
'Sunsation vacation
round-trip from the
U.S. to Ben Gurion
Airport in Israel.
"We're the only
airline that flies 747s
to Israel nonstop,
you know. And no
one else can claim all their ftxxl is kosher.
"You'll stay at a superior hotel in Tel Aviv or Jerusalem for six days and five nights.
"Or if you want, add $100 to the package price and stay at the deluxe King David
Hotel in Jerusalem, a city filled with history and beauty and charming people.
"Or you can stay at the deluxe Dan Hotelin Tel Aviv
my hometown and as friendly and modern a city as
you could want.
"There's also a complimentary Avis Rent A Car so you
can drive all over Israel for five days.
"Only a friend like El Al could do it all from as
little as $839.
"And who knows? I might be the one to fly you there.
"So call your travel agent or El Al
Stay 6 days/5 nights. at 1-800-223-6700."
For complete lour details, call or write Sunsation Six Tour Desk:
El Al Israel Airlines. 8S0 Third Avenue. New York. NY 10022
NjHK-
AikJrcv.
C*v
Stale
Zip
Price per person/double occupancy effective November IS, 1983 u> February
29,1984 Offer not valid from 12/15/83 to 1/5/84 One Avis car per double
room; gas, mileage, and insurance charges not Included If named hotels
unavailable, comparable accommodations will he substituted
Package price baaed on New York-'fcl Aviv round-trip only For prices from
your area, contact your travel agent ;>r El AJ
Come to Israel.
Come fly with friends.
The Airline of Israel.


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