The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 3, no. 7 (Apr. 5, 1974)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 9, 1976 called v.4, no. 27 but constitutes v.5, no. 1; issue for July 7, 1989 called v.18, no. 11 but constitutes v.18, no. 13.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44570954
lccn - sn 00229545
ocm44570954
System ID:
AA00014312:00477

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Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward


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Full Text
*eJewish floridian
Volume 12 NumberM
OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE
Fort Lauderdale, Florida Friday, October 14,1963 MMMM
Price 35 Cents
nesset set to elect Shamir Prime Minister
I Yitzhak Shamir is expected to win a vote of
infidence at this week's meeting of the
pesset in Jerusalem. Some observers believe
at Prime Minister Menachem Begin, who
s been in seclusion in his home for several
peks, may come to the Knesset to give the
[th of Prime Minister office to the 67-year-
I Shamir who will retain the post of Foreign
nister in the Cabinet.
lute last week Shamir informed the Knesset that he
Id formed a coalition and asked the lawmakers to
et Monday Oct. 10 for the vote of confidence in the
r government.
Under Israeli law, Shamir will become the Prime
Minister rf he wins the vote, formally replacing Begin,
who had been in power since 1977.
The coalition Shamir finally formed consists of his
own Herat Party plus smaller factions within the
ivnesset. The coalition, known as the Likud bloc, now
has 64 seats in the 120-member Knesset.
Shamir had tried to get the Labor Party to join in a
unity government. He failed to win the favor of op-
position leaders Shimon Peres and Yitzhak Rabin. Six
coalition members had urged Shamir to try again to win
Labor support, but he said that Labor wanted what
amounted to veto power over his Cabinet's actions.
Five of the six members of this group have said they
probably would vote for his coalition anyway.
To gain the allegiance of the Agudat Israel religious
party which holds four seats in the Knesset, Israeli
newspapers last week said that Shamir would support
passage of legislation pending on clerical matters.
Meanwhile Defense Minister Moshe Arena, con-
cerned by actions in Lebanon where reports indicated
that Gemayel's government was ready to scuttle the
Lebanon-Israeli agreement for Israel troops to with-
draw from the country, is reported ready to solidify
Israeli's line at the Awali River.
The scuttling of the Lebanon- Israeli agreement is one
of the demands of the Syrians who have delayed plans
for peace talks among the warring factions in the Shouf
mountains and other areas controlled by the Syrians.
Se* related story Page 9
foundation plans Tax Seminar
for professional estate planners
Young Leadership confronts
Jewish dilemmas Oct. 23
attorney Donald C. Lubick,
assistant secretary for
Policy in the U.S. Depart-
nt of Treasury, 1978-81, will
cuss "The Impact of Reagano-
nicson Private Philanthropy''
[m. Tuesday Nov. 1 Bahia Mar
Fort Lauderdale, at the
bual Tax Seminar for Profes-
I Estate Planners sponsored
the Foundation of Jewish
nthropies of the Jewish
eration of Greater Fort Lau-
(.ubick, associate and partner
i Washington-based law firm,
Donald Lubick, Esq.
maintains a law office in Fort
Lauderdale. A magna cum laude .
graduate of Harvard University,
he was a teaching fellow in law at
Harvard.
Sheldon Polish, partner in
charge of tax for the Palm Beach-
Fort Lauderdale office of Ernst &
Whinney, chairman of the Foun-
dation of Jewish Philanthropies,
will host the seminar.
Professional estate planners
may call the Foundation's direc-
tor, David Gottlieb, at the Feder-
ation office 748-8400 for further
information.
bw UJA dollars are spent
ilm-Aire volunteers visit Hebrew Day School and elderly programs
Members and those adults
who'd like to be members of
the Young Leadership of the
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale will confront
modern day dilemmas that face
American Jews at the season's
first meeting.
The breakfast meeting at 11:80
a.m. Sunday Oct. 23 in the new
offices of the Jewish Federation
of Greater Fort Lauderdale, 8368
W. Oakland Park Blvd., ia head-
lined "Jewish Involvement Thea-
tre with Sally Fox."
Sally Fox of Ohio State Uni-
versity, who has involved
audiences in thought provoking
discussions in scores of cities
throughout the United States,
portrays both serious and
humorous'characters in dilemma.
In small circles,, she has the
audience discuss and respond to
the problems of such subjects aa
cults, assimilation, intergenera-
tional communication in an
intimate way.
Abraham J. Gittelson, Federa-
tion's director of education, who
has been a participant in Sally
Fox's Jewish Involvement The-
atre in the past and who has had
some 30 years of professional ex-
perience in the world of Judaic
activity, says: "Hers is one of the
most unique programs I witness-
ed, universally successful in
stimulating each one of her audi-
ence to face problems in a most
rry>ningfiil manner "
Interested young adults, sin-
gles and married couples, are in-
vited to attend this breakfast
meeting. Call Lawrence M.
Schuval, Federation's director of
community planning, who is di-
recting the Young Leadership
program. Federation's number is
748-8400.
Federation's PM Network is
invited to this meeting.
The Kosher Nutrition Program, available to
those 60 and over through the supervision of the
Service Center for Senior Citizens of the Area
Agency on Aging, serves hot kosher meals at
lunch time five days a week, including providing
box lunches for those weekdays when Jewish or
other holidays intervene. In addition the elderly
come to the site, an hour or two before meal time
for socializing for many of them, the only
opportunity to take part in social and recreational
activities, and to have a meal in company with
others.
The Service Center for Senior Citizens requests
minimal contributions for the meals from Ihose
able to make such contributions
THE GATHERING PLACE for frail elderly is
similar to child day care centers, only, in this
instance, instead of parents bringing a child to this
day care center, adult children bring their elderly
parent or parents to spend the day under
supervision from morning through afternoon.
The Palm- Aireane joined the frail elderly and the
other participants in the Nutrition Program for
that day's meal.
During their visit, Palm-Aireana met Sandra
Friedland, who is the Federation's coordinator for
Elderly Program Services, and Marion Hunley,
who has supervised the activity of "The Gathering
Place'' ever since it was originated several years
ago.
Sandy Friedland told the Palm- Aire volunteers
Continued on Page &
eral members of Palm-Aires
uted Jewish Appeal campaign com-
pee of the Jewish Federation of
eater Fort Lauderdale last month
tad three facilities supported by the
A funds they and hundreds of other
unteers raise during the annual
Iteration campaigns.
["he group, led by their Palm-Aire
IA committee chairman, Irving
owsky, and co-chairman Mike
Jerman, attended* classes at the
brew Day School (HDS), a beneficiary
*>cy of the Federation, and two service
jrams provided by the Federation for
ply and frail elderly persona
et at the door of HDS, which has its
ooms in a building located on the 16-acre
nan Campus of the Jewish Community
er of Greater Fort Lauderdale (another
Iration beneficiary agency), by Fran
pnstein, the Day School's director, the Palm-
pns visited the pre-school program, involving
Void children, and then were observers in the
m classrooms, some located in other JCC
pings.
[these classrooms, the Day School has a fully-
dited program similar to public school
ula. only with the added emphasis of
language and Judaic learning "quality
tion. Merenstein said, "in Jewish atmos-
H818 EXCELLENT," declared Libowaky.
ment which was echoed by the others. He
the teaching staff, highly qualified, but
importantly," be said, "the children
to be learning, and at the asms time,
ng the learning pro cess "
Hna Sales even exclaimed that "I've been
nga thing or two."
Hjowing their day at school, the group visited
^?J^^ iSCiJliiSi Zn-Air-n. Tony Udnar, MUd~d Ack.rman, rtUrly, "Jk. Qatkinng W nowfocaUd^
^^nwJCC^uttuwTwnou^intt- ffij&SJ*, Edna Salt* and Irving Libow.ky t^ ^tfU^oftkaF^hn buddvnt at S368
ton building at 8368 W. Oakland Park ** 2^ of tht participants in tk* W. Oakland Park Btvd
S^^^XiS F^rTtion..uPPorUd day car. c^r for fro*
1 in the Lauderhifl Mall on Stats Rd. 7.


Page 2
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort La
uderdale
Friday, Octobau
Kasdan joins Riverside Memorial Chapel Staff
Alfred Golden, Executive Vice
President of Riverside Memorial
Chapels announces the asso-
ciation of Jack Kasdan with the
company. Mr. Kasdan has a
lengthy career in the funeral
industry and in communal work.
He was one of the founders of
Boulevard Funeral Homes in
New York and one of its leading
executives for many years.
Mr. Kasdan has been involved
in New York with Temple Beth
Emeth of Flatbush as its presi
dent and as president of its
Brotherhood. He is a past master
| a Masonic lodge and has
served in virtually every capacity
in such organizations as B nai
B'rith, Federation of Jewish
Philanthropies. Bonds for Israel
and the Knights of Pythias and
other benevolent groups.
In Florida Mr. Kasdan has
continued his activities, having
served as a councilman of Bay
Harbor Islands, chairman of
Federation and Israel Bond
drives. He is a member of Temple
Israel of Greater Miami and a
board member of the Fight for
Sight League of Hollywood.
Mr. Kasdan will serve as the
Community Consultant for the
Riverside Normandv
Miami Beach, Holly^
Tamarac chapels m
Mr. Golden stated thJ
welcomes the associatinn '
Kasdan, who is ^
familiar with the Jewish;
and tradaion of River^ "
has-been maintain*, fl
I
?
K
3
n
I
?
6
n
I
i
Ws not easy to be a Riverside.
Being the best at what you do is
never easy.
There can be no let-up of effort.
No compromising of high standards.
And no cutting of necessary service.
For nearly 70 years, we've tried hard
to be the best. It began with Charles Rosenthal,
Riverside's founder.
It continues today in the hands of
Carl Grossberg, Alfred Golden, Leo Hack,
Andrew Fier and a new generation of Jewish
management.
It is the kind of leadership which,
working closely with Orthodox, Conservative
and Reform Rabbis, actually helped set the
standards for Jewish funeral service.
They understood that being a Jewish
funeral director had to be more than just a
business.
They knew it was a very special calling
that demanded a total commitment to Jewish
tradition.
And the knowledge and resources to
provide funeral service that was truly Jewish.
That's why today, Riverside is the**
respected name in Jewish funeral service
the world.
Carl Grossberg, President
Alfred Golden, Executive Vice rWg*
Leo Hack, Vice President, Religious A Andrew Fier, Vice President
RIVERSIDE
The most respected name in Jewish fune .
service in the world, jgjgj
pomorinc Th GUARDIAN PLAN Prrrn*f F"^^^


^gg^j-963 The Jewish ^Pridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale______________________________________
fcndo Cabinet considers ways to aid UJA campaign
BftI m I "las.
Page 3
lEducating the Jewish commu-
V to the humanitarian needs
L have to be met in Israel and
[pthere in the world and get-
that community fully in-
I in support of meeting that
were two goals stressed
i the delegates of the Condo-
Cabinet of the Jewish
ation of Greater Fort Lau-
ilemet for the first time.
tanuel K Miller, Condomin-
Cabinet chairman, was
by Federation's 1984
[fed Jewish Appeal Campaign
lirman Joel Heinstein in
Wing the more than 30 dele-
last week at the Federa-
l's offices.
nstein called the North
ard areas condominium
nunities bright lights" in
A's fund-raising since their
nbutions in the past year
cnted 25 percent of the toal
Without that support,"
1 the UJA cannot be a
ililler stressed the importance
[leaking people aware of the
is through direct contact with
jspective donors He cited the
mple of the campaign in Deer-
jd's Century Village where vol-
kk are organized to visit at
i of the units in the many
dings in that community. He
I: "Although everyone may
}contribute, they can't use the
use that they didn't know
lUJA is about.''
! PURPOSE of the Condo
t, he said, is to get
ttr representation of the
h community involved in
ng the campaign. Toward
end. three groups were
k! putting delegates from
r-sued condominium com-
nities together to hold
to discuss their com-
1 Problems and benefit from
for better campaigning.
ICroup one, made up of repre-
TUtives from Aragon. Concord
P*-fypww Tree. Lauderhill
P'. Majestic Gardens. New-
Oakbrook. Sabal Palm,
bridge Gardens and Water
_ Gardens will meet at 10
f luesday Oct. 25 at the Fed-
necond group formed, which
"vt at 10 a.m. Monday
>tL C<)?slsts of representa-
'irom Bermuda Club, Castle
Nens, cypress Chase.
an Gardens. Lauderdale
^Lauderdale West. Lime
Oakland Estates. Omega.
Wand Ridge, Polynesian
*. Sands Point and Som-
\C^ ^"P' contn of
|^^8 Sunrise Ukes.
fcrTMar^ Area and
\* MnSTa"c.wiU meet at
'*ft\1-31- All meet-
ui belieia at tne reaer
W. Oakland Park
gg the free-wheeling dis-
L," 0|. ldeas to implement the
wgning. William Katzberg,
" chaired the Greater
EfwArea UJA committee
K0?a active M Fie-
JL*W. member, asked to
Ron?6 wC WM PrePrinK
r\". another erf his trips to
.
Samuel K. Miller addresses Condominium Cabinet
Israel.
He said that "this is a crisis
year for Israel, different from
previous ones." He said that the
emotional perception of the com-
munities here must be raised and
the commitment must be in-
creased, urging that the Cabinet
at first meeting.
delegates consider increasing
their volunteer personnel and
holding special gifts meetings in
their condo communities.
Miller, in concluding the meet-
ing, urged that "snowbirds" be
approached by campaign workers
for commitments to the local
campaign. He said that he
doesn't expect the same donation
that a part-time resident may
give to his so-called "home com-
munity," but since they live here
for a good part of the year and
probably avail themselves of
Robert E. Loup, UJA national chairman,
introduces Liberian President William K.
Doe at concluding dinner of UJA Inter-
mediate Cities Campaign Leadership
Seminar at Israel's Knesset in Jerusalem.
President Doe, whose nation had resumed
diplomatic relations with Israel just prior to
his state visit the second African country
to do so since the 1973 Yom Kippur War
was the first head of state other than an
American or Israeli President ever to address
a UJA group.
Inverrary has its Golf Classic;
3rd annual UJA event set Jan. 11
They extended an invitation to
all Inverrary residents for the
third Annual UJA Golf Classic
and Dinner, urging that in-
terested golfers mark the Jan. 11
date on their calendars. The
invitation is open to non-golfers,
since following the day's play of
golf, there will be cocktails and
dinner at the Inverrary main
clubhouse. Prizes will be awarded
to noteworthy golfers.
Kaplan also announced that
the Inverrary UJA campaign
committee has invited all the
volunteers who took part in rais-
ing funds during the 1983
campaign in that community to
attend a Recognition Day at 10
a.m. Oct. 31 in the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale offices at 8358 W.
Oakland Park Blvd.
Awards will be presented.
Refreshments will be served.
Federation's programs and ser-
vices at some time they should be
encouraged to be part of the local
UJA community.
He said the next meeting of the
full Cabinet will be at 10 a.m.
Monday Nov. 14 at the Federa-
tion office.
Hawaiian Gardens
UJA Leadership
begins plans for
1984 campaign
Lucille Stang, chairing the
Hawaiian Gardens 1984 United
Jewish Appeal campaign com-
mittee, announced that Jerome
Davidson and Kurt Ellenbogen
have joined the committee as co-
chairmen.
She said that the first Leader-
ship Cabinet meeting will be held
at 10 a.m. Wednesday Oct. 26 at
the new offices of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale. 8358 W. Oakland
Park Blvd.
The Leadership Cabinet will
plan the second annual UJA-
Federation breakfast to which
the residents of all the Hawaiian
Gardens phases will be invited.
This breakfast meeting will high-
light the community's effort and
commitment to the Federation's
1984 drive for funds to support
the humanitarian needs of Jews
in Israel and elsewhere in the
world, as well as supporting the
Federation's programs and ser-
vices in North Broward.
Samuel K. Miller, a Federation
vice president and chairman of
the new Condominium Cabinet of
community leaders, will join the
Leadership breakfast Oct. 26 and
relate experiences encountered
during his visit to Israel this past
spring.
Joseph Kaplan
Joseph Kaplan, chairman of
the Federation's Inverrary 1984
United Jewish Appeal campaign,
was joined by Selig Marko and
Mike Bloom, co-chairmen once
again of the 1984 Inverrary UJA
Golf Classic and Dinner, an-
nouncing that the 1984 event,
which drew 288 golfers in 1983,
will be held Wednesday Jan. 11
on both the East and West golf
courses of Inverrary Country
Club, Lauderhill.
ISRAEL $510.
plu "
2 WEEK VACATION ,~.s510.
Plus Air
5 Nights in TEL AVIV 2 Nights In TIBERIAS 6 Nights in JERUSALEM
includes: Hotel Aecom, 8 Days of Sightseeing, Twin Bedded Rooms.
fsreei Styh Kosher Buffet Breakfast Transfers A Porterage.
4 WEEK TOUR OF LEISURE s1022.
Ptui Alt
WTTH LATE DEPARTURES, LITTLE WALKING & SLOWER PACE
3 WEEKS IN NETANYA* 1 WEEK IN JERUSALEM
Tour Includes: Accommodation in First Class Hot*. Twin Bedded Rooms, 2 Kosher Maars Every Day.
8 Oeys of Sightseeing, Transfers A Porterage, Travelers insurance: Medics', Financial A Parsonal
,OPV*
-*JSi.

.
FOR RESERVATIONS & INFORMATION ON THESE TOURS, OR OUR
OTHER ISRAELI TRIPS, CALL MIRIAM COLLECT AT
TRIANGLE TOURS- 931 -3031
18407 W. Dixie Highway* North Miami Beach
0'
ate*
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w*0*
..<


^-
Page 4
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
_Fridy.OctoWi
Orthodox Woman
She's Used to Tightrope
Between Today and Tradition
By MERRIE EISKNSTADT
Copyright Bmkimon JmM Thmm
Kyrtnt by Spttml Atmymm*
As a modern Orthodox woman,
Blu Greenberg is used to walking,
a tightrope between tradition and I
20th Century America, comfort-
able with paradoxes and dilem-
mas. These she readily describes
in her new book, "How to Run A
Traditional Jewish Household"
(Simon and Schuster, 1983)
which blends explanations of
rituals with personal anecdotes
about herself and her family, a
quality that gives this book a
very human resonance and
charm.
Perhaps Greenberg is working
backwards.
to touch the mezuzah affixed to
the doorpost. The mezuzah, in
this case a brass cylinder, con-
tains a parchment inscribed with
several sacred passages from the
Torah. There is one on every
doorpost in our house. In a brief
instant, J.J. has brought his
fingertips to the mezuzah and
then back to his lips to kiss. I
know his mind is on other things
right now, yet some part of his
soul is informed by the ancient
Biblical passage, "and these
words that I command you this
day shall be in your heart. and
you shall inscribe them on the
doorposts of your house ... "
(Deut. 6:4-7). Modem Orthodoxy
includes many things. But in
1982, it also includes gi-clad
mezuzah kissers."
Several years ago, the Ortho-
dox feminist tackled the sensitive
issue of women's status in
Orthodox Jewish life and urged
in her book, "On Women And
Judaism," that some feminist
principles be incorporated in
certain areas of Jewish law.
BUT THIS new book is a
straightforward account of the
virtues of an observant Jewish
life, a book that seeks to explain
to others the benefits of
Orthodoxy, rather than to
question or challenge the tradi-
tions. In her disarmingly open
style, Greenberg says that after
writing the book, "I wondered
where is the flaming feminist?"
The dichotomy between her
two books reflects Greenberg's
own inner struggle between ac-
cepting Halachah (traditional
Jewish law) and seeking to make
changes within the laws to im-
prove the status of women.
Yet for all of the seemingly in-
herent tension, Greenberg lives a
rich and fulfilled life, married to a
nationally known Orthodox
rabbi, Irving Greenberg, who is
executive director of the National
Jewish Resource Center in New
York, and mother of Gve teen-
agers.
TAKE, FOR example, this
brief passage near the beginning
of the book:
"As I write these words, my
sixteen-year old son has just en-
tered the dining room from the
kitchen. He asks for thirty dol-
lars to pay for his karate lessons
this month. What distinguishes
J.J. from his more traditional
(Orthodox) counterpart at this
moment is not the yellow-sashed
white gi he wears so handsomely
on his tall, slender frame (al-
though the other might consider
karate a form of avodah zonk,
idolatory). What distinguishes
J.J. from another sixteen-year-
old karate fan is not the finely
crocheted maroon kepak that
covers his head. No, at this mo-
ment, what is different about J.J.
is that as he walked through the
door separating kitchen and
dining room, eyes aglow with
thoughts of a coveted green belt
he will test for next month, his
hands automatically reached up
IN TONE and in content,
"How To Run a Traditional Jew-
ish Household" is written by
someone who treasures observant
Jewish life and wants to explain
observance to "the large segment
of American Jews who are
reopening questions of their own
Jewish identity, their Jewish
feelings or their ties to tradition.''
The book is also geared to the
ba'alei teshuva who are returning
to tradition and are in need of the
book's step-by-step descriptions
of managing a Jewish household.
Acknowledging the different
tone of her latest work, Green-
berg said she was glad to have
the chance to change gears. "It
gave me an opportunity to
broaden the picture" beyond her
earlier treatise on feminism and
Orthodoxy "and talk about what
a rich and wonderful life (tradi-
tional Judaism) is," she said.
"I THINK people have an im-
pression about traditional Jews,
that they take themselves very
seriously. That traditional
Jewish life is lockstep, that it's
very rigid ... I wanted to show
that you don't have to make
either-or choices. That it's not
lock-step. That you can be a
person of faith and observance
and have some humor in life and
some perspective."
Says Greenberg of "Modern
Orthodoxy": "One can live a dis-
tinctive life, one can eat, dress,
pray, marry, have sex, celebrate
rites of passage, raise children,
study, think, relate to others, and
mark holy time all in a special
way, yet still not find oneself
terribly at odds with contempo-
rary culture."
The book is organized into
three main sections, the first
examining "The Jewish Way" or
regular Jewish observances such
as Shabbat, kashrut, the laws of
family purity, dairy prayer and
other practices. The "Special
Stages of Life" section examines
various life cycle events as well as
thorny issues like abortion and
birth control.
THE LAST section on "Cele-
brating and Remembering" out-
lines the Jewish calendar and
Eradices for observing the
olidays.
Jemst Flcridiain
FREDK SHOCHET
EdHor and PuMlaftar
OF GREATER TORT LAUDERDALE
CfmdSltoormt
PuMlahad Waatdy MtcVSaptambar
aaaafoaiaga"
SacondCtaaal
SUZANNE SMOCMET
E.acutlva Editor
_ iivoooft MM-May. M-Waafcly baianoa of yaar
Paid at M*landa(a. Fia. U8W aW4
-> jtn Fiirtaiaa. P.O. a ti-am, nuwi. fl mioi
Advartii.no Suparvlaor Abraham B Halpam
Fort Laudardala Hollywood AdvartlaMa Of llca Am. Savlnaa 2900 Bido
MOOE Himnitali BmH Wad- Saw707-Q Hin6ill. Wa. MOOS FHona Hi om
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SoeSCfllPTION RATES 2 Yaar Minimum *7 SO (Local Araa 63 96 Annual) Jawiafi Fadaratlon of Oraatar Fort Laudardala
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uwmb mm, rraaioam lhi* s woniiw. uacuiiva uwacio-
Tha Fadaratlon and Mm now* otca of tna Jawiah Floridian of Oraatar Fort Laudardala ara locatad a
"6IW Oakland Park Blvd.. Fort Laudardala, FL 33321. Pnona (306) 74*64001
Now* adltor Man Lavlna
Friday. October 14,1983
Volume 12
7HESHVAN5744
Number 34
While Orthodox families could
use her book as a reference, it
appears primarily intended as
"outreach" for the curious.
Indeed, Greenberg was asked to
write the book by a Jewish editor
at Simon and Schuster who
instructed her, "Write a book
for a goy like me who wants to
know what it's all about." And
so, the book gives a very upbeat
pitch for observant Jewish life,
but avoids dogmatism.
"To me, this is the best life; it
is a great gift," Greenberg ex-
plains, "but does that mean I
should sit in judgment of
everybody else who lives a differ-
ent way? No, I' m not prepared to
judge."
GREENBERG added that in
writing the book she was mindful
of the classic dilemma of "how do
you fine tune outreach so as not
to judge everyone else. I think
there is some balance to find
there not to put everyone else
down.
"All you can do is to say one-
half of it, that you feel what
you're doing is the best way. I
guess you would call it soft-sell."
Greenberg says that in work-
ing on the book, she came to
realize how much of "a transition
woman" she is. "I live not only in
two worlds Orthodoxy and
modernity I live also in the
world of feminist values, which
sometimes do not sit well with
the former," she notes in the
preface of her book.
"It would have been much
easier for me to write this book
ten years ago, before feminism
challenged me to come out of so
many of my comfortable
parochial hiding places.
Nevertheless. I do want to tell
about Orthodoxy as it is, so in
most instances I describe how
something has always been done
StudyHei
What is over 4,000 years old, as
modern as tomorrow's newspaper (or
next week's Jewish Floridian of Greater
Fort Lauderdale)?
The Hebrew language!
Spoken by Abraham and his descendants in
ancient Israel, Hebrew has been revived in the
20th century to become once again, not only the
language of Israel, but the spoken tongue of
hundreds of thousands of Jews throughout the
entire world.
Now the Jewish Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale's Education Committee in
cooperation with its service constituent, the
Central Agency for Jewish Education, is offering
adults the opportunity to study Hebrew in the
modern easy-to-leam Ulpan conversational
approach. Ulpan classes are available at the
Jewish Community Center of Greater Fort
Lauderdale, also a constituent agency of the
Federation, and at Temple Beth Israel in
Deerfield Beach.
Classes for beginners, intermediates and ad-
SS?S,,udenU begin next week at the JCC,
6601 W. Sunrise Blvd.. Plantation. Evening
classes from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. begin Monday Oct.
17 with classes Monday and Thursday evenings.
Morning sessions begin 9:30 a.m. Tuesday Oct
18 with classes from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m.. Tuesday
and Thursday mornings.
At Beth Israel. 200 S. Century Blvd., classes
****?tnis W9lk *** sessions held each Tuesday
and Thursday morning from 9:30 to 11:30.
The classes, continuing in session for seven and
a half weeks, are conducted by highly-qualified
and trained Ulpan teachers who provide both the
knowledge of modern, conversational Hebrew and
the dynamic spirit of Israel.
Moahe, Ezry, Shoshana Spector and Yossi
YaUv, all veteran Ulpan teachers who have
achieved outstanding success, both in North
Broward and Greater Miami areas, will be the
BLU GREENBERG
in a traditional home, and in
some I add how it might be done
ncorporating new values for
women."
SHE ADDS that she also
learned not to apologize for mix-
ing the unmixable devotion
and humor, piety and irreverence,
spirituality and a bit of spoof,
faith and lapses, fidelity to
practice and backslliding in
intent Human beings live
with all kinds of contradictions
and inconsistencies, and the
perfect faith is no more free of
these than the perfect world view
of the ultimate in ideologies."
It is just this sense of reality
and humanity that gives the
book its flavor and makes it far
than just a "how-to" book on
Jewish rituals.
In the section on Shabbat, for
example, Greenberg goes
through the preparations, the
laws, the customs but most im-
portant the psychological bene-
fits of a true day of rest. Yet she
acknowledges that "there are
times on Friday night that my
best ideas come to me. I feel the
urge to take pen in hand and
write my magnum opus, but I am
not allowed to write. There ml
those weeks when I am just not|
in the mood for a big Fridij
night family dinner There h
been some Shabbat mominal
when it might have been mon>|
fun on the tennis court than al
shul, and there were some SatvJ
day afternoons when I hid trJ
miss what I was sure was taj
world's best auction.
"HAPPILY, the
moods are the exception .,
positive ones the rules," shec
tinues. "But more important i
the fact that I never hive
think about picking
choosing. I am committed tot
ditional Judaism. It has chc
me and I have chosen it back
The section on the laws indi
tionales for mikvah are pi
larly enlightening and U,
Greenberg notes that 'of all th-
laws that govern an Orthodox.
Jew's life, these are the mostl
private, the most secretive, indl
without contest, the most dtfl
ficult." She explains the ritmJ
involved in a woman's monthlyl
immersion as well as the prob-|
lems and benefits.
Finally, there is the bottom!
Continued on Page 8
instructors at JCC, with Tamar Ben Ami. who
has played a leading role in Ulpan classes in the
New York area, joining the staff for the evening
classes. At Deerfield's Temple Beth Israel, Simi
Dobkin is returning to conduct the classes forth,
second year.
The Ulpan program is under the direction of
Federation's CAJE and is co-sponsored and
supported by the Department of Hebrew
Language and Literature of the Department of
Education and Culture of the World Zionist
Organization, American Section.
The Ulpan teaching method, based on a
scientific approach to teaching language, is used
in Israel and throughout the world, to provide u
ability to understand and converse in the Hebre*
language as well as, for advanced classes. tortsJ
Hebrew newspapers and papers.
Adults with no background in Hebrew an
welcome in the beginners' classes which provide
an exciting atmosphere of immersion in Hebrew
from the very first lesson, according to Abrthio
J. Gittelson, Federation's CAJE director of
education, and coordinator of the Ulpan prognfi |
He said All types of student join the L'lpan
classes We have parents who want to keep up
with their children in religious school; adulU
intending to visit or live in Israel: indivioW*
wanting to study the Bible in Hebrew; those who
want to recapture the Hebrew they learned in
their youth, and all people who love Hebrew m
want to gain greater knowledge of the languiP
Additional supporters of the program are the
Aliyah Center in Miami and the American Zwc*
Federation.
Joining Gittelson in the conduct of the prograol
are Rabbi Norman Lipson of CAJE where he I
Adult Education director; Ben MUlstein. Ulp T
administrator, and Helen Weisberg, Federtn
North Broward Midrasha adnunistrator who
based at Federation's office. 8368 W. 0akln<>
Park Blvd. For further information call the
Federation office 748-8400.


IV.
October U, 1983
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
omen's strategies conference takes place Oct. 19
Page 6
jLAmm conference on "Ef- Hugh Adams, president of Brow
'^"strategies (or Leader
ffJSjP" Wedne-day
P ,9 at Temple Emanu-El,
t W.Oakland Park Blvd.
(The conference is being spon-
2 bv the Women s Division of
ilewish Federation of Greater
Lauderdale and the Federa
:. North Broward Midrasha
Lute) of the Central Agency
"wish Education. Keynotmg
conference will be Dr. A.
ard Community College.
Miriam Kalett is chairing the
Conference. She said that person-
al strategies of performance in
relation to organizational needs
will be developed.
The conference will consist of
morning and afternoon workshop
sessions, which will include such
topics as: Stress Management for
Presidents; Time Management
and You; The Need for Volun-
teers; Assertiveness Training
and Communications Skills;
Setting Priorities; Effective
Fund Raising; Feminism and Ju-
daism; Public Relations, Promo-
tion, and Projection.
Instructing these workshops
will be a group of qualified
faculty members including:
Elaine T. Azen, president of
Azen and Associates, a Fort Lau-
derdale public relations firm. Her
firm handles real estate and
ih Orr's canned food drive
helps celebrate World Food Day
Social Awareness Com-
itee of Temple Beth Orr, in
i\ Springs, is sponsoring a
jed Food Drive ending Oct.
the date which has been de-
ated as World Food Day in
ter 150 countries throughout
world.
IThe American Jewish Joint
Ibtribution Committee (JDC)
I on the Jewish communities
[support World Food Day, and
[remind all people, that in this
and age. it is obscene for
Lyone to go hungry.
|rlenry Taub, JDC president,
d, There is no reason why the
world cannot make it
isible for all populations suf-
malnutrition and starva-
i to receive decent meals and
teach lose undernourished and
In undereducated peoples to
ovidefood for themselves."
Lupus Foundation
I meets Oct. 26
|Governor Bob Graham has de-
red the week of Oct. 16 to Oct.
as Lupus Awareness Week.
is a disease that affects
connective tissue of the
i body About 5,000 people
Junnually from this disease.
|At 8 p.m. Wednesday Oct. 26,
* Lupus Foundation will meet
[Parkway General Auditorium,
pth Miami Beach. Dr. Wayne
>ter will discuss "Lupus and
pSkin."
rfreshments will be served. A
Wion and answer period will
the led ure
For information aDout tne or
Nation, write Dade-Broward
Pus Foundation of Florida
\ Box 4131 Miami 33169 or
"Helen Klein of Plantation at
f|. or the publicity vice
B'dent. Rhncia Weinstein also
plantation at 4742280.
rport Exhibit
tracts 150,000
ONN-IJTAI- Anexhibi-
rascinating Israel" was
I w!" ,'slirnaled 150,000
H the 42 days it was on
Win the Frankfurt Airport,
**ng to the airport's visitors
"" The exhibition, the
lF,,lever Israeli presentation
2*' T Mm not only by
wgws but also by everv
"Petered to attend the
consumer goods fair
utional
isiht i Assoc,atin was re-
* for Pu"ng on the exhi-
Mexico's
rexy 'Pleased9
tCMCI7 ~ '^1 "
Pf Miguel de la Madrid
iFr^^ d ^adere of the Mexi-
7"ds of Hebrew Univer-
^Jerusaiem that he waa
Ilhedeci8'on by friends
'in i their mt">*tional
C" h next year. He
gpjsed^praiae for the work
^* University.
The Social Awareness Com-
mittee asks all city groups,
churches and organizations to
respond to the drive and to plan
canned food drives of their own.
"We would like to see World
Food Day celebrated nation-
wide." said Carol Katz and Janet
Oppenheimer, Canned Food
Drive organizers at Temple Beth
Orr. All canned foods will be dis-
tributed to the Haitian com-
munity in Broward County.
For information on the canned
food drive or World Food Day,
contact 752-5800 or 752-8478.
shelter industries among other
accounts.
Barbara Johnson, the senior
Development and Training Ad-
ministrator with the American
Express Company. Johnson has
also served as an assistant direc-
tor for economic education at
Florida Atlantic University, and
the University of Central Florida.
Shoni Labowitz, who is in
charge of the Central Network at
Broward Community College.
Sherwin H. Roeenstein, execu-
tive director of Jewish Family
Service of Broward County. Ros-
enstein has also been the execu-
tive director of Jewish Family
Service in Connecticut. He held
that post for 13 years.
Jan Salit, the director of the
Women's Division of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort Lau-
derdale for the past five years.
Barbara Shulman, a very
active volunteer for UJA. Shul-
man is the commentator for the
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County-sponsored TV program,
"Mosaic"
Dorothy Strudwick is the Life
Education Coordinator and Su-
pervisor for Family Service of
Broward County. Strudwick also
instructs in the field of social
work at Florida International
University.
Augusta Zimmerman is a
licensed clinical social worker
who counsels children and adults.
Zimmerman counsels clients at
the Jewish Family Service of
Broward County and supervises
the Enrichment Program.
Edward Entin, President of the
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale, will welcome
the participants to the confer-
ence.
Persons who have not previ-
ously registered for the all-day
conference, may be registered for
sessions at 9:30 a.m. Wednesday
Oct. 19 upon payment of the late
registration fee of $18. The con-
ference is scheduled to end at
about 3:15 p.m.
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<<**
Page 6
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdaie
Palm-Aireans on mini-Federation tour
Fri Sisterhood of Temple Beth Israel
Deerfield Beach
5 day Thenkeflivlng Vacation at Crown Hotel
November 23rd through November 27th
Complata package inc. tranap. to and from hotel
$156.00 p.p. dbl. occ. delicious Kosher food
* Oneg Shabbat Friday Night 3 Shabbos meals
* Entertainment & coffee & cake nightly
Call Henrietta 427-4459 or Etta 421-7255
Adele Wolman (left) takes notes as the Palm-
Aireans reviewed their "mini-tour" of Federation-
supported Hebrew Day School. Kosher Nutrition
Program and "The Gathering Place." With her
Continued from Page 1
that for many of the elderly who come to the
Kosher Nutrition programs, "It's a godsend
because it gives them companionship with others
of a similar background and age group. The
Federation's Chaplaincy Commission and the
Education Committee, in addition to the
socializing provided by other volunteers, provides
Shabbat and holiday services and educational
programs at the Kosher Nutrition sites and for the
frail elderly.''
Marion Hunley, noting that two licensed
qualified teachers in music and education are on
hand, had die group observe the frail elderly
working on arts and crafts projects. The elderly
here have varied activity from 9:30 to 2:30 p.m.
every weekday.
THE PALM-AIREANS were impressed with
the interest shown by Hunley's "Gathering
Place'' regulars with an average age of over 80,
including a 96-year-old gentleman.
For C harles Feingold. a retired doctor who is an
active committee leader in the Palm-Aire com-
munity, it was his first visit to these Federation-
supported facilities. He said "I never realized the
extent of Federation's funding So many of uc
think our commitment is solely to the people of
Israel. To fully understand, you have to see and
experience these programs.''
Noting that he is one of the UJA committee
arranging meetings within the Palm-Aire com-
munity, he added: "When I have my meetings
/seated) are Edna Salee, Mildred Ackerman, Tony
Ledner; (standing) Irving Libowsky, Ken Kent.
Mike Ackerman. Dr. Charles Feingold. Alex
Kutz.
now, I can tell them with some authority what I
experienced, not what I read or heard. People are
out throughout our county who need the service
Federation provides. Volunteers must help. I'm
glad I'm part of doing what's necessary.
Adele Wolman chimed in with similar com-
ment, adding that too many people feel that fund-
raising is the only aspect of Federation, adding:
"If more people could see whatour dollars do, we
would haw more volunteers. Everyone must
realize that we care, and we share.''
LIBOWSKY SAID that uV money Palm-Aire
raises freely for UJA is "really put to good use. In
the 1983 campaign, we raised $375,000. This year
our goal is $500,000 from the Palm-Aire com-
munity."
The Palm-Aire UJA's committee co-chairman.
Ackerman, reviewed some of the activities
planned to reach the goal. He said the Pacesetters'
luncheon will be held on Dec. 19: a major dinner
is planned for Jan. 22, and on Feb. 20. the Palm-
Aire UJA Golf Classic will be played at the
Pompano facility. He expressed encouragement
that Palm-Aireans will exceed the 1983 UJA
commitment.
Joining Ackerman. Libowsky. Feingold. Salee,
and Wolman on the trip were Alex Kutz, Palm-
Aire UJA Classic chairman: Tony Ledner.
Mildred Ackerman. and Kenneth Kent.
Federation campaign associate.
Mark A. Weinger. m.D.
ANNOUNCES THE OPENING OF HIS
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October 14.1983
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 7
Browsin'
Thru Broward
with Maggie
\\laxLevine
Lward's State Atty. Michael
'^s on the talk circuit He wM
weeks speaker at Coral
ines Area Democratic Club
Uine And speaking of the
the announced Presi-
candidates have been
by Washington-based
or paC to make presen-
,ns at what its sponsors hope
be an audience of 4,000
pie at 9 am. Friday Oct. 21 in
Sunrise Musical Theatre.
1 as Showdown at Sunrise,
scheduled three-hour
am comes the day before
Florida Mini-Demo Con-
niion in Hallandale takes its
aidential straw vote.
lYiddish Culture Club at
Lakes Phase I is
ring to begin its eighth year
activities. Joseph Goldhar
|t2-ST091 reports the first
Sing will be held at 10 a.m.
dnesdav Nov. 2 at Satellite
Susan (Stern) Reed of
utral Square. NY., is seeking
ereabouts information about
aunt, Julia Stern, formerly
to Walter Abramaon,
i re-married and believed to
[living in Hawaiian Gardens.
a anybody help?
iFlorida's new Consul General
hua Trigor. formerly based
I the Atlanta Israeli Consulate,
] expected to make his first
iblic talk in North Broward
this month or early
bvember at a Federation-
nmunitv Relations Committee
ting Shirley Wolfe of
Springs, librarian at the
|ianu headquarters of Central
Itncy for Jewish Education,
icussed great Jewish personali-
at this week's Hadassah's
Jpress Chase Hatikvah Chapter
sting. Dorothy KravRz,
aired Tamarac City's
[elcoming Committee's
letting acquainted'' meeting
ithnew residents at City Hall.
|Two Yiddish writers, Abram
*n and Mani Leib, will be the
pi point of a literary afternoon
Nay Oct. 16 sponsored by
uth Florida Yiddish Branch of
[orkmen's Circle at Aztec Hotel,
Miami Beach .
Feinstein of Inverrary
' been elected a board member
St John's Foundation, the
iyactivated not-for-profit
rporation to support St. John's
"sing and Rehabilitation
oter in Lauderdale Lakes as
as other programs and
puties for the elderly in
"d County Ben
at of Lauderdale Lakes is
went of Florida's Retired
Teachers Assn. which
at 1 p.m. Monday Oct. 17
rompano Beach Recreation
tM801NE6thSt.
fljjw Siegel, a part-time
ntation city consultant since
'May has been hired as the
1 full-time landscape ar
The 1979 U of Florida
ouate with a degree in land
I* architecture will supervise
dressing up" of the city's
** of 441 Brian Sherr,
^nairman of the 1964 UJA-
atron campaign, now on the
ership Mission to Israel, is
2 tn six Fort Lauderdale
* appointed to chair
utteaa of the Florida Bar's
Scf"ny' Prob*U "^ TnMt
^,9>WPBT 2, Mianui Public
ting Station, televises
Hitler's No. 1 Enemy: Buried
Alive. It's the story of Raoul
Wallenberg, the Swedish
diplomat stationed in Budapest,
Hungary, in 1944 who managed
to save the lives of over 100,000
Hungarian Jews. Imprisoned by
the Soviets sometime after World
War II, he is believed to be still
alive in a Soviet prison.
Donald V. Streeter, president
and chairman of Atlantic Federal
S&L, was the guest speaker at
the recent meeting of Tamarac's
B'nai B'rith Blue Star Lodge
with 300 members in at-
tendance Lillian Dubb, presi-
dent of Wynmoor's ORT chapter
will attend the Oct. 14-20 ORT
convention in Los Angeles .
Pine Island Ridge's B'nai B'rith
members and their wives were
entertained recently by the
Sunrise Minstrelaires, directed
by Arty Mayer. It was the sea-
son's first for the singers who
count among their awards one
from the Federation for their
efforts on behalf of the United
Jewish Appeal campaign.
Speaking of the sounds of
music, Shep Schoenfeld reports
the "original" Broward Har-
monica Group is scheduled to
perform at 2 p.m. Tuesday Oct.
25 at the Tamarac Branch Libra-
ry And Hadassah's Gilah
Inverrary Chapter will be en-
tertained by the former "Little
Rascals" harmonica virtuoso,
Lou Del v in, accompanied by
Fred Nee at the 12:30 p.m.
Wednesday Oct. 19 at Inverrary
Country Club.
Norm Schalberg, of Planta-
tion, former publicity director for
Ramat Shalom, handles group
ticket sales for Pugilistics
Promotions, promoters of
monthly professional boxing at
newly-refurbished War Memorial
Auditorium in Fort Lauderdale.
Special discount prices are avail-
able for groups. Call him at 473-
5323 Sixty college students
are taking part in Hillel's Leader-
ship Weekend Oct. 14-16 at the
Collande Hotel in Singer Is-
land .. Rabbi Elhot SkiddeU of
Plantation's Ramat Shalom
delivered invocations at the
conventions of Union Label and
Services Trades Dept. and the
Oct. 5 national AFL-CIO, both of
which were held at the Diplomat
in Hollywood.
Charlie Greene Howard Nu
Howard Neu, son of Temple
Beth Israel's Cantor Maurice
Nen, former mayor of North
Miami and currently president of
North Dade Bar Assn., has been
named managing partner of the
A venture Mall office of Auerbach
& Neufeld, attorneys at law .
Charlie Green, Plantation's very
active volunteer in many en-
deavors, was roasted and toasted
celebrating his 75th birthday last
month. Among the many kudos
he received was a UJA plaque
presented by Federation board
member Norman Oatrau.
Israel's President Chaim
Herzog wiD be one of the prin-
cipal speakers at the Nov. 16-20
52nd General Assembly of the
Council of Jewish Federations in
Atlanta, Ga. During his 10-day
stay in the U.S. he'll meet with
President Reagan at the White
House and may address the UN
General Assembly Area
rabbis are going to be consulted
by Plantation High School's
English teacher Ira Kinder when
he begins rehearsals for the 1983-
34 school play: Fiddler on the
Roof, scheduled for performances
the second week of next March.
Michael S. Gold has joined the
Fort Lauderdale Paine Webber
firm Fort Lauderdale's
Schneider, Htrachorn, Poole and
Masters accounting firm has
promoted Irving L. Goldstein,
CPA, to manager Public
Schools are closed today (Friday
Oct. 14) it's teacher-planning
day and next month the
teachers (and kids) will have long
weekend off: schools will be
closed Friday Nov. 11 in ob-
servance of Veterans Day.
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-credited to your tint order
Does your cracker goto pieces
when it meets cream cheese?
It's easy to imagine spreading
delicious cream cheese on something
besides a bagel.
But it's a lot harder to do.
Croissants crumble. Chips chip.
And it's terrible to see what hard
cream cheese can do to an
innocent piece of toast. Just tembte.
The Sficadabfe CreamChecse
K CERTIFIED KOSHER
Temp Tee whipped cream cheese
is whipped.
So it's smooth and creamy, and
very easy to spread.
Even on something as delicate as
a potato chip.
Temp Tee whipped cream cheese.
It's bigger than the bagel.
95b222 OOEhT.
Mr. Grow Kraft, Inc wffl reimburse
you for the face value of this coupon
plus 7C handling allowance provided
uou redeemed on your retaBI MM
5flthe named product!*! and that
upon request you agree to furnish
proof of purchase of sufficient prod
uctto cover all redemptions. Coupon
O Kraft. Inc. 1983
SAVEKXONTCMPTEE
WHIPPED CREAM CHEESE
IOC
b void where taxed, prohibited, or
restricted by law, and may not be
assigned or transferred by you Cash
value 1/20C Customer must pay
ippfcrabk tax. For redemption, mall
to Kraft, Inc. Dairy Group. PO. Box
1799. Clinton, Iowa 52734
0 4. M*4
1M300 22215ft


Pge8
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
*""*>. October]
Judaica High School has novel special events
Top photo of the country dance in the Jewish
Community Center gymnasium. In lower
photo, visible are Jodi Kalick. David Orbach.
Ian Berkowitz. Laurie Levine. Barry Frieser.
Over 200 students and their
teachers of the Jewish Federa
tionsponsored Judaica High
School celebrated the Sukkot
holiday last month with a hayride
and a country square dance.
Students from JHS northern
branch, where classes are held at
Temple Beth Am in Margate.
went on the hayride. Students
from the schools central branch,
where classes are held at the Jew-
ish Community Center in Planta-
tion, celebrated with an old-
fashioned country "boedown "
The events were designed to
allow the students a novel way of
enjoying the fall festival. Sharon
S Horowitz, principal of the
school, said special programming
is an integral part of the educa-
tional curriculum The schools
students. besides attending
classes, are involved in the spe-
cial events, plus producing a
newspaper and a yearbook, and
have a student council.
The school, sponsored by and
part of the Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale in co-
operation with the synagogues of
North Broward and the Central
Agency for Jewish Education
ICAJEI will offer a broad
spectrum of subjects. Included in
the school are courses in: Love.
Sex and Marriage. Five Megillot.
Early Prophets. Holocaust. Jew-
ish Roots in America. Jewish
Trouble Spots. Sociology of the
American Jewish Family and
Overview of Jewish History-
Many of the courses are credited
toward Confirmation in the res-
pective synagogues of the
participating students with 11th
and 12th graders eligible to take
courses for college credit.
ISRAEL
SUPER TOUR
14 DAYS
from MIAMI
for only $1497.00
TOUR INCLUDES
( A transportation from Miami a
a scheduled earner
' All transfers
' Extenarve sghrseeng as per
fanerar&
Israel breakfast & dinner daily
Accommodations first class &
deluxe hotels. Moshai and K4>
butt guest houses
And above al fully escorted
Am llmlmrmttUUa HaMoMi
ISRAEL
n* NWera CommOy That fa
MM YmmnOtd
CHOICE Of DEPARTUCE DATES
Ina MIAMI
t mm Hi !>!! it*]
Mara iHw, a. IW4
Mack It mn tkmtk I MM
Ma 14 nan Ha* tl lM
IS Mn OcMfcw t 1*M
TRANS OLYMPIA TOUKS
SHALOM TOURS
Mt VOLMGCSKU
Tightrope Between Today
and
Tradition
Ct--edfr-p^.4
line for the mitivah ot mikvah
in particular, but for all of the
mitz\ahs in general, as well
THAT IS, as she writes, for
an observant Jew, the law is
given Rather than reject it.
rather than merely adjust to .
we try to apply it to our lives in a
manner that sharpens our
identity refines our marriages
and strengthens our community
For Orthodox Jews. then, niddah
and mikvah are not outdated and
mystical rituals Instead, they
are symbols and rites that
connect us to holiness. Somehow
the laws were intended to make
us more human in the way we
construct our relationships and in
the way we satisfy our bask sex
drives, just as other laws are an
attempt to make us more special
in the way we eat. and the way we
work and rest Tokant hamish
pacha (the laws of family pumyi
is an integral part of the whole
scheme of things: k is part of the
larger picture of being an Ortho-
dox Jew
Blu Green berg has provided us
with a much-needed guide into
not only the mechanics of a tradi-
tional Jewish lifestyW. but also
the idea* and rewards as
well.
JCC names singles direct*
Sheryll Hirschberger. has been
named the director of Single
Adult programs at the Jewish
Community Center of Greater
Fort Lauderdale (JCCl.
Hirschberger received her MA
in Jewish Communal Service
from Brandeis University in
1982. She has been the director of
college activities at the Boston
office of the Union of American
Hebrew Congregations, and has
been an active worker with the
Boston Jewish Young Adult
Center
"I feel singles groups often fall
into trouble by creating a bar
scene type atmosphere, which
everyone claims to hate."
Hirschberger explains. "'Our em-
phasis is not only singles meeting
singles, it's also adults sharing
interests and activities."
As one of her first activities.
Hirschberger has planned a
"Second Best to None' weekend
for single adults, in conjunction
with singles from Dade and Palm
Beach Counties. The event,
termed "One Singular Sensa-
tion." is the First attempt at an
all-South Florida singles
weekend
From No\ 4 to 6, singles are
invited to spend a weekend at the
Jupiter Beach Hilton Four
workshops will be offered includ-
Sheryll Hirschberger
mg: "The Jo> ol Phvsical I
ness with Jo, Prouu-
Channel 12 s PM m "
Jewish. Single and Gu
with psychologist Dr Sa
Schulman. \ Timefar'u*
with Rabbi Steven Westman i
a special tenn> *nrkshop
addition there will be ]
dancing, a poolside oarbecue i
a 50s party For ir.:ormauoiit
Sheryll at the JC ( V_-6T0o
Hal Rackin starts
art show at JCC
Hal Rackin. Lauderhill. noted
painter, sculptor, art historian,
and photographer, will present a
slide show entitled. Jewish Con-
tributions to Art. from 10 to
noon starting Thursday Oct 20,
and continuing every Thursdav
through S'ov 17 The present*
tion will take place at the Jewish
Community Center. 6501 W.
Sunrise Blvd.. Plantation.
Rackin has conducted art
lectures at the JCC for three
years Many of the slides Rackin
will present are photos of
orunnal works in museums over
five continent* whichRacial
gathered for
The progran are title
Dura Kuropa S) nagogue'j
Place in V r.
Most V npresston*,]
Jewish Art Patr -age.
Paris Ghetto and Memoneu
the Shtetl. Kj.Mr colle
consists of over 4 -njes
The program i- bailable Ml
JCC members Contact
Hochman at >. 6700
registration d-ta..- The JCC i
beneficiary agenc) oftheJe
Federation of Greater Fa
Lauderdale
MlJLtkjL .

All Pubitccaom Rights Rett-.td
U/LeJ


,, October
14,1983
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 9
bdis seeking Lebanese-Syrian peace talks
, Syrians last week continued to put
les in the way of meaningful dialogue to
peace among the warring factions in
on-
-emed likely, however, that, with the
fire negotiated with the aid of Saudis
TS special Middle East envoy Robert
.'lane, that the Saudis may finally
in having the conference take place in
Saudi Arabia.
i Prime Minister-designate Yitzhak Shamir told
u Israel is worried about the strength of
influence in
the talks. He fears, according to an
teLMff Ministry spokesman, that it could cai
renewal of terrorists against us."
Defense Minister Moshe Arens was quoted, also, as
3u2Lu WM co,ncerned "bout the great numbers of
w, ? ST gTrrillas who *ere fighting with the Druze
in the Sbouf mountains. He said that if the PLO
fighters aren t removed, Israel would have to do it.
Druze leaders, led by Jumblatt, already have formed
a local administration in the Shouf mountains. Shiite
leaders, meanwhile, are threatening to set up their own
administrations in their area. These are moves that
Lebanon President Amin Gemayel fears because it
could lead to the partition of the country.
And back in Israel Shamir was struggling to keep his
majority coalition alive before calling on the Knesset
for the important vote to elect him prime minister.
Six maverick members of the Knesset last week
warned Shamir they would withhold support unless he
renewed efforts to form a government with the op-
position Labor Party.
Shamir, however, said that he had talked with op-
position leaders Shimon Peres and former Prime
Minister Rabin but, he said, they were asking what
amounted to "veto power" over any actions that the
Likud administration might take.
The four Liberal party members and parliamentarian
deputies Yigael Hurvitz and Mordecai BenPorat have
asked Shamir to try again and delay presenting his
Cabinet for a week. See related story Page One.
\o Assurances
Mubarak Mum on Egypt's Envoy to Israel
ByJTA Services
"5HINGT0N President
[Mubarak of Kgypt. during
two hours of meetings
|president Reagan in the
j House last Friday, failed
vide any assurances that
twill serid its Ambassador
i Israel any time soon, ac-
; to a senior Administra-
(ficial
I same time, the official.
efed reporters on Mub-
Ithird meeting with Reagan
;he Egyptian assumed the
K) nid Mubarak "em-
that the camp David
land the K^yptian-Israeli
I treaty are a pillar" of
i polk}
laid the U.S. has a
responsibility" toward
|ian Israeli relations
of the U S role in the
David accords and
that the U.S. has fre-
brokered steps be-
IIsrael and Egypt aimed at
(ring relations between the
entries
i Demands Freedom;
|Hi Was Kidnapped
IS Klaus Barbie, the
"butcher of Lyon," now
awaiting trial for crimes
ihumanity, has demanded
ase on grounds that he
) victim.
ding to his defense coun
lean Verges. Barbie was
by unidentified French
in Cayenne, French
. alter his expulsion from
i last February" and trans-
Mo France 1 was a kidnap
land request justice," the
rdeputy commander of the
in Lyon said.
has filed suit in Cay-
VMaUag the chief justice
' order an investigation
* circumstances of the
kidnapping and to dis-
identities of the agents
ar accomplices.
was sentenced to death
Ma by a French court
ratterWorldWarll.
F suit charges collusion
"he French and Bolivian
!. claiming that France
F"vu have no extradition
1'ne trench in fact unsuc-
"> ught Barbie's extra
|w years but the ex-Nazi
"der protection of the
*1 miliury regime which
thrown shortly before
Nazis Clash
*Hlon Site
- Anti-Nazi demon-
btled neo-Nazi activ-
tb town of Fallingbostel.
l!*i0y- Sunday. Police
, J* Pfrsons inJured. in-
**"" Policemen, and 40
lMt of those taken into
C\* anl-Natia who
> of paint and
'pee orders to disperse.
Iltti0ct7rred wnen a"ti"
rf"Pted to prevent the
th "''ring the hall
* right win* National
Democratic Party (NPDl is hold-
ing right-wing National Demo-
cratic Party (NPD) is holding its
national convention. The NPD is
considered neo-Nazi. Police re-
ported that the situation was
under control, and the convention
proceeded as planned.
A peaceful anti-Nazi demon-
stration was held, meanwhile, at
the site of the former Bergen-Bel-
sen concentration camp, organ
ized by the DGB. umbrella orga-
nization of West German trade
unions. Speakers called on the
Bundestag to ban all neo-Nazi
groups in the country. They de-
nounced the local authoritiees at
Fallingbostel for allowing the
NPD to hold its convention there.
Liberian Leader Assails
Zionism-Racism Charge
NEW YORK Liberian head
of state Samuel Doe declared that
to equate Zionism with racism
as the United Nations did in 1975
is to "desecrate" Israel's
struggle to achieve indepenence
and nationhood.
The Liberian Commander-in-
Chief made the assertion at a re-
ception in his honor given last
week at the headquarters of the
Anti-Defamation League of B'nai
B.'rith opposite United Nations
headquarters.
Doe. whose nation resumed
diplomatic relations with Israel
in August, said that despite the
severance of ties 10 years ago,
"we never lost sight of those
ideals which unite the Liberian
and the Jewish peoples." Conse-
quently in 1975, he said, "Liberia
opposed the resolution in the
United Nations which attempted
to equate Zionism with racism."
To attack Zionism in this fash-
ion, he went on to say, would be
to "desecrate" it and associate
Israel's struggle for nationhood
with a "criminal and inhumane
system of oppression."
Doe said that his decision to
restore diplomatic relations with
Israel was based on Liberia's
"commitment to the promotion
of international peace and securi-
ty, based on justice, equality and
human dignity."
Enter The Reischmann's.Margarine
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CRC director alerts
parents, youth about cults
BBYO announces membership drive
With the school year now
underway, Lawrence M. Schuval,
director, Community Relations
Committee of the Jewish Federa-
tion of Greater Fort Lauderdale,
has issued an alert to parent*
that there are many groups on
campus who will try "to influence
your children's thinking and be-
liefs." In local, middle, and high
schools, Youth for Christ, also
known as, Campus Life and The
Club, are holding programs
which never identify the group as
a Christian missionary
organization.
The purpose of these
programs, according to Schuval,
is to enlarge the membership of
their own local Christian youth
groups. Jewish children should
not attend these programs or
small Campus Life meetings. In
some cases, the group holds
meetings in school after school
hours not unlike other extra-
curricular activities. He said: "If
you are concerned about these
activities, contact the CRC at
748-8400, to voice your objec-
tions." As of last fall, all Broward
County Public Schools were noti-
fied that Campus Life-Youth For
Christ is not permitted to meet in
public schools.
On the college level, there are a
multitude of groups soliciting
students to become members of
their organization. Many of these
groups are cults and Christian
missionaries. They will approach
students at a time when they are
exceptionally vulnerable the
first" weeks on campus, when they
are lonely and in need of friend-
ship, during finals week, after
vacations, when the student is
facing a personal crisis the
breakup of a relationship, or
divorce in the family when the
student needs attention.
Schuval said that all college
youth should beware of groups
that recruit by guilt, or invita-
tions to weekend workshops. He
said: "Don't go away for week-
ends or longer with a stranger or
strange group unless you know
the name of the sponsoring orga-
nization, its ideas and beliefs,
what's going to happen at the
workshop, if you will be free and
able to leave at any time." When
people are vulnerable, they can
easily become involved with a
cult or missionary group.
The only way to defend your-
self, Schuval says, is to be aware
of them and the consequence of
joining: High school and college
age people are recruited each year
by intelligent, skilled, well
trained and manipulative cult
members.
If there are any questions, or
wish further information, contact
Schuval at the Federation office,
748-8400.
Bennett Lorman. assistant re-
gional director of B'nai B'rith
Youth Organization (BBYO).
based at the Jewish Community
Center of Greater Fort Lauder-
dale, and serving North Broward
and Boca Raton areas, announc-
ed that BBYO has named Lisa
Herman as assistant regional di-
rector for the Hollywood-South
Broward area. Both Lorman and
Berman are planning member-
ship drives for AZA and B'nai
B'rith Girls (BBG).
Lorman also reported that the
Tzahal Chapter of Aleph Zadik
Aleph (AZA) in Plantation had
its election of officers for the
1983-84 year. AZA is the boys
division of BBYO; the other divi-
sion is made up of B'nai B'rith
Girls. Lorman said the boys and
girls interested in joining the
Bennett Lorman
BBYO. noting that tk.
membership are fromiv
high school gradual^3t-i
callhimatthejccfel
581-0218. m*m
Joel Ronkin was elw.
(president) of TtaJJ"
Vice presidents are Rd i
Segaul, sgap. shanee '
ship; the secretary j, ru
Moshemaskir; treasur^
Segaul. gizbor; sergeant
L?1r Fe!dman' shS
Ken Bresky is the im
past president of the ChiW
BBYO is a member,
tamuy of agencies of tot u
Federation of Greater Fl
derdale.
Deerfield's JWV meets Oct. 20, Al Effrat speaker
Al Effrat, newly-appointed as-
sociate campaign director of the
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale and an accom-
plished public speaker, will speak
about the "American Jewish
Community: Its Present and Fu-
ture" at the 8:30 p.m. Thursday
Oct. 20 meeting of the Jewish
War Veterans Post and Auxiliary
of Deerfield Beach. The meeting
will be held in the social hall of
Deerfield's Temple Beth Israel.
Effrat's 15 years of service in
the Jewish communal field,
mixed with a stint as an actor
and a member of Actors' Equity,
qualify him well for this assign-
ment. Prior to joining the Fort
Lauderdale Federation, he was on
the staff of the Jewish Fa
of Waterbury. Conn.
years, the past three as,
director.
Sholom has golf outing
Temple Sholom is sponsoring
the annual "Nate Baum Memo-
rial Golf Outing," starting at 9
a.m. Thursday Oct. 27 at the
Palm-Aire Country Club. Abe
Rubenstein is chairing the event
which honors the Lau
Baum, and supports theSd
ship Fund of the Temple'si
Club. The entry fee of I
includes golf cart, lunch, i
chance for pri/tw
Ackerberg to speak
at AJC meeting
The Shad Polier Chapter of
North Broward, American Jew-
ish Congress (AJC), will hold its
first meeting of the season at 1
p.m. Tuesday Oct. 25 at Holiday
Inn, 441 and Commercial Blvd.,
Tamarac, with Alvera Ackerberg,
a member of the Leadership Mis-
sion to Israel of the Jewish Fed-
eration of Greater Fort Lauder-
dale, as the speaker.
Ackerberg, who is chairman of
the Federation's Project Renewal
Committee, will discuss Federa-
tion's participation with the Is-
raeli government in discussing
Fort Lauderdale s support for the
depressed neighborhoods of the
Israeli city of Kfar Saba. She will
also provide an update of the
Middle East situation, since she
and the others on the Leadership
Mission are meeting this week
with Israeli officials.
AJC notes that refreshments
will be served and invites its
members to bring friends for Al-
ver Ackerberg's slide talk of Fort
Lauderdale's "twin city" in Isra-
el.
THANKSGIVING
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L October 14.1983
Organizations
The Jewish Fbridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 11
FRIENDS OF
TARDED CHILDREN
Tamarac Chapter
l Tamarac Chapter of the
Lnf Retarded Children will
Cnoon Tuesday Oct. 25. in
[community Room of
id Federal. Tamarac.
uCheon and card party will
,Jfrom 1145 to 3:15 p.m.
L- Oct. 31 in the Peking
' Restaurant, 6455 W.
Brcial Blvd.. Tamarac
ion is W. For tickets call
hree dav. two night week-
fplanned for Nov. 24 to 26.
;er Island.
FREE SONS OF
ISRAEL
tort Lauderdale Lodge
I Fort Lauderdale Lodge of
pe Sons of Israel, will hold
[dinner and card party at 6
Thursday Oct. 27. at
Hall. Sunrise. Cost is
I per person Contact Etta
1 ninat 722-3194.
HADASSAH
IChiiPoniparjo Beach
Cannon. Hadassah
; Affairs Chairman, and a
itive member of the Jewish
ktion's Community Rela-
[Committee, will speak at
jod Thursday Oct. 27 meet-
I the Pompano Beach Chai
ter of Hadassah. The meet-
1 be held at the Pompano
Recreation Center,
no Beach.
ir.on. who recently attended
dassah National Conven-
[in Washington D.C., will
s highlights of the conven-
lis told by many national
ptemational speakers who
Refreshments will be
BETH ORR
Sisterhood
(nations are now being ac-
from vendors wanting
at the annual Beth Orr
I Holiday Bazaar which
Ibe held from 10 to 4 p.m.
y Nov. 20 at the Temple.
hone interested in being a
r. on a percentage basis,
net Levenslon at 753-4354.
merchandise is being ac-
i as donations.
fshments and lunch will
(available at the Bazaar.
AMERICAN
IMIZRACHI WOMEN
Maaada Chapter
|a meeting held this week.
pasada Chapter of American
kchi Women installed the
officers for 1984. They are
hist
t!
Great Food.
[Great Drinfes.
*t Gathering

'jeQaurant
)tsWwBW,j24-J}oo
l/*fi.1-M 95. from 5 0X4 OS
Olga Jaffe. president; Sarah
Harris. Maddy Schwartz. Rose
Bassman. vice presidents;
Florence Solomon, special funds
treasurer and financial secretary;
Toby Shabel. recording
secretary; Jeanne Frankel.
corresponding secretary; Jean
Alexenberg, social secretary;
Belle Hersch, honorary president.
BRANDEIS
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
The Fort Lauderdale-Pompano
Beach Chapter of Brandeis
University National Women's
Committee will have an October
27 weekend book sale, at the
Pompano Fashion Square.
The Chapter continues to seek,
donations of hard cover and
paperback books, records, and
magazines for the sale. For pick-
up information, call 748-6418 or
973-1557.
WOMEN'S AMERICAN ORT
Pompano Beach
The Pompano Beach Chapter
of Women's American ORT. last
week installed Anita Z. Axelrod
as president. Mrs. Milton
Nowick. regional chairman, did
the honors.
Others installed were vice pre-
sidents. Ceil Resnick. member-
ship; Anita Simon, special
projects. Estelle Kaplan, Donor
and Golden Circle; Sue Klein-
man, program; also Mynna
Lowe, treasurer; Frances Katz,
Gertrude Hoffman and Norma
Goldstein, secretaries; Marion
Dyen, parlamentarian and educa-
tion chairman.
Axelrod and Simon will attend
the National ORT Convention
Oct. 16-19, in Los Angeles.
BETH AM
Men'a Club
The Men's Club of Temple
Beth Am is having the first of a
series of professional shows at 8
p.m. Saturday Nov. 6. featuring
the Conti family. The second, on
Dec. 18, will present one of
Broadway's most successful
plays. Mr. Horowitz and Mrs.
Washington.
Donation is $4 and tickets can
be purchased by calling the
Temple office at 974-8650.
HADASSAH
Plantation
The L'Chayim-Plantation
Chapter of Hadassah, will meet
at 1 p.m. Tuesday Oct. 18, at
Deicke Auditorium, 5701 Cypress
Rd.. Plantation
The boutique will open at 11
a.m. A mini-luncheon will be
served at noon.
A luncheon and book review
will be held at noon Monday Oct.
24, at Deicke Auditorium,
Plantation. Ann Ackerman will
review Mistral's Daughter by
Judith Kranz. Donation is S5
For reservations call, 473-6349, or
473-6141.
BWAI B'RITH WOMEN
Margate
Robert Besser will discuss
"Guidelines for common medi-
cine usage and side effects," at
the noon Tuesday Oct. 18, meet
ing of B'nai B'rith Women,
Margate Chapter. The meeting
will be held at Temple Beth Am,
Margate-
Refreshments will be served.
Call Jeannette Chiet, 972-8744.
PIONEER
WOMENNAAMAT
Natany a Chapter
The Natanya Chapter of
Pioneer Women-Na'amat, will
hold a luncheon and card party at
noon Tuesday Oct. 18. at Congre-
gation Beth Hillel. Margate.
CIRCLE OF
YIDDISH CLUBS
The Circle of Yiddish Clubs
will meet at 2 p.m. Monday Oct.
17, at the Jewish Community
Center. 6501 W. Sunrise Blvd.,
Plantation.
Coordinator. Sunny Land-
sman, announced the appoint-
ment of Is Stemberg. of Lauder-
dale Oaks, as the new chairman.
New vice-chairman is Abe
Weiner, of Palm Springs.
Contact Is Sternberg. 485-
1699. for any information.
NCJW NORTH BROWARD
The North Broward Chapter of
the National Council of Jewish
Women will meet at 12:30 p.m.
Wednesday Oct. 19, in the audi-
torium of the Public Safety
Building of Lauderdale Lakes
City Hall. 4300 NW 36 St..
Lauderdale Lakes.
Ms. Cross, of the League of
Women Voters, will be the guest
speaker. Refreshments will be
served. Contact Lillie Sarowitz at
731-2527.
WORKMEN'S CIRCLE
Greater Lauderdale
The Greater Lauderdale
Branch of Workmen's Circle, will
meet at 1 p.m. Friday Oct. 28, at
the Lauderdale Lakes City Hall,
4300 NW 36 St.. Lauderdale
Lakes.
Basil Rand, a scholar and
lecturer, will discuss the life of
Theodore Herzl, and the Birth of
Zionism. Contact Israel Pinchuk
at 731-5545.
HADASSAH
Blyma
Blyma Margate Chapter of
Hadassah will meet at noon
Thursday Oct. 20. at Congrega-
tion Beth Hillel. Margate Shop-
ping Square. Jack Polinsky, well-
known raconteur, will speak
about "Jewish Pride." Husbands
and friends are invited.
Volunteers for Israel offers college credit
program for student volunteers
In response to Israel s con-
tinuing demand for emergency
manpower, Volunteers For Israel
has announced that students pre-
sently enrolled in American
colleges can now volunteer for
three months of work in Israel
without losing a semester of
credit at school.
Volunteers For Israel has
arranged a comprehensive 15-
credit program of academic
studies to be given in evening
hours, after the civilian-support-
work a volunteer performs in
military warehouses throughout
Israel. In addition to the vital
manpower a volunteer provides,
each month of volunteer service
allows an Israeli reservist to
return home to his job and his
family.
Volunteers For Israel has made
it possible for students to con-
tinue their education in Israel at
minimal cost. Tuition for a three-
month program of 15 credits, for
residents of New York state, is
$890, including roundtrip airfare,
room, board, and tours. For re-
sidents of other states, tuition is
offered at a comparably low cost.
Students are eligible for Federal
Pell Grants, state and local
college aid.
Extensive fieldwork is an
integral part of the program,
giving each student a share in the
life and the upbuilding of the
Jewish nation. Semesters are
scheduled to commence Feb. 1,
and June 4.
To become a Volunteer For Is-
rael and to apply for the credit
semester program, call (212) 608-
4848, or write Volunteers For Is-
rael. 40 Worth St.. Suite 710,
New York, N.Y. 10013.
Other applicants not interested
in college credit, may write or call
Ben Dinkes, at Jewish Com-
munity Center, 6501 W. Sunrise
Blvd.. Fort Lauderdale 33313, or
call 792-6700. Age limitation 18
to 65.
Rabbi Plotkin proposes Jewish
foster grandparent program
In his Yom Kippur Yizkor
sermon, Rabbi Paul Plotkin of
Temple Beth Am outlined a plan
to enlist the talents and love of
senior citizens, to act as foster
grandparents to children who
Foster Grandparents meet Oct. 14
The Foster Grandparent
Program will meet at 8:30 a.m.
Friday Oct. 14, in the Corps
Building of the Salvation Army,
90 SW 9 Ave.. Fort Lauderdale.
Jill Lechner, director of
Medicare Services of Health Care
of Broward.an HMO, will discuss
health maintenance organiza-
tions and how they function.
M.J. "Jodi" Moye. marketing
services representative in the
Marketing and Energy Con-
servation Department of Florida
Power and Light, will discuss,
"Cash for Conservation."
The Foster Grandparent
Program consists of a group of
volunteers, 60 years of age and
over, who serve children on a one
BCC offers New
Age Studies to
broaden horizens
The Continuing Education-
Community Services Department
of Broward Community College
is offering a new concept for the
New Age. New Age Studies are
non-credit courses for people of
all ages, who want to broaden
their horizons. There are no
grades, degrees, credits, or pre-
requisites.
Registration is taking place at
BCC's Central Campus, in Davie.
The term begins Monday Oct. 31
and concludes Friday Dec. 9.
Some of the courses being of-
fered include: yoga. golf, dance,
microcomputers, and language.
Anyone interested in register-
ing can do so by mail, by sending
a complete application and check
to BCC. Community Services.
3501 SW Davie Rd., Fort
Lauderdale, 33314. or registra-
tion can be completed in person.
Call 475-6600 for further in-
formation.
to-one basis in Broward public
schools and other county instal-
lations.
The service provides help not
only for children, but it affords a
meaningful outlet for senior
citizens who still want to be pro-
ductive "in our society," accord-
ing to Mary Crum (764-8204)
director of the program.
lack such attention. Although a
foster grandparent program
already exists in Fort Lauder-
dale, this one would be primarily
for people of the Jewish religion.
By volunteering, these grand-
parents will have made their
Yizkor prayers to their departed
ones meaningful, since they are
passing on to these children the
same knowledge which they have
received from their own parents
and grandparents. Rabbi Plotkin
will act as the "Shade hen"
(matchmaker) in this
arrangement.
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Page 12
Th* Jewish Floridian of OreaUr Port LaudtrdaU
FtMy, Qctob^
14.
Community Calendar
Compiled by Helen Steigman, Federation 748-8400.
THURSDAY. OCT. 13
vZl*f Jar?** M-t
rortUadcdale UJA Tama
H CoBuaktw: 10 a.m. Presen-
tation of volunteer awards. Tam-
arac Jewish Center.
?OA-Port Uuderdale DiatrleC:
In a Pf1- Ivan Novak, National
ZOA leader, speaks. Temple
Torah. Tamarac. ^^
ORT:
North Broward Regloa: 10
a.m. Board meeting. Council
Chambers, 4300 NW 36th St.,
Lauderdale Lakes.
Sunrise Village Chapter: 12:30
p.m. Meeting. Broward Federal,
3000 University Dr., Sunrise.
Temple Beth Israel, Sunrise:
Noon. Games.
Temple Beth Israel, Deerfleld
Beach-Sisterhood: Noon. Mem-
bership meeting. Kabbi Joseph
Langner speaks on the meaning
of "Sisterhood."
Temple Beth Orr-B A B Social
Club: 8:30 p.m. Meeting.
FRIDAY, OCT. 14
ORT Lauderdale Ridge Chapter:
Final day of rummage sale at
12th St. entrance of Lauderhill
Mall, Ste Rd. 7. Proceeds to
Bramson School, New York.
SATURDAY, OCT. 15
Temple Emanu-EI: Evening.
New Member Party. Donation
$9. Call 731-2310.
SUNDAY, OCT. 16
American Red Magen David for
Israel (ARMDI): 7:30 p.m. An-
nual professional variety show.
Sunrise Musical Theatre.
Temple Sha'aray Tsedek Men's
Club: 9 a.m. Meeting-
Temple Beth Israel, Sunrise,
Mea's Club: 10 a.m. Breakfast
meeting.
Temple Beth Israel of Deerfleld
Beach Brotherhood: 10 a.m.
Breakfast meeting. Dr. Sam
Brown, speaker.
Temple Beth Am Single* Club. 2
p.m. Temple members only. Or-
ganization meeting. Fran Zolten,
Marge Jedel, co-chairs.
ORT Lauderdale Ridge Chapter:
4:30 p.m. departure from
Hawaiian Gardens Phase 3 for
dinner and show, Miami Beach.
Temple Beth Torah: 6:45 p.m.
Games.
Temple Sha'aray Taedek: 7:30
p.m. Games.
Congregation Beth HUM of Mar
gate: 7:15 p.m. Games.
akbrook Village. 8 p.m. Duke
Daniels Show. $3.50. Clubhouse.
Call 722-0410.
MONDAY, OCT. 17
Brandeis University NWC:
Noon. Luncheon meeting. Inver-
rary Country Club.
HADASSAH:
Fort Lauderdale Tamar Chap-
ter: Noon. Esther Kern reports
on Hadassah's national con-
vention. Public Safety Building,
4300 NW 36th St., Lauderdale
Lakes.
Bat Ami Tamarac: Noon. Pre-
sentation of IMA and ABBA cer-
tificates honoring Eleanors and
Henry Jacolow. Sally Sherman
Variety Group entertains. Tama-
rac Jewish Center.
Aviva Oakland Estates Chap-
ter: Noon. Meeting. Oakland es-
tates Social Center.
Deerfleld Kadima Chapter:
Noon. Meeting. Temple Beth Is-
rael. Deerfield Beach.
TUESDAY, OCT. 18
Temple Emanu-EI Sisterhood:
11 a.m. Luncheon meeting.
Temple Beth Torah Sister-
hood: 11:45 a.m. Games. Lunch
served st nominal cost.
Hadassah-L'Caayim Plants
tion: 1 p.m. Meeting. Deicke
Auditorium, Plantation.
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 19
FOR JEWISH ORGANIZA-
TION MEMBERS: "Strategies
for Effective Leadership." All
dsy session, including lunch, at
Temple Emanu-EI, 3245 W. Oak
land Park Blvd. 9:30 a.m.-3:30
p.m. Sponsored by Woman's Di-
vision, Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale, and
North Broward Midrasha of
Central Agency for Jewish Edu-
cation. Call Federation 748-8400.
Hadasaah-Blyma Margate Chap
tar: Noon. Meeting. Congrega-
tion Beth Hillel, Margate.
Temple Beth Torah Sisterhood:
Noon. Annual luncheon enter
tainment.
THURSDAY, OCT. 20
ARMDI-Col. Marcua Chapter: 11
a.m. Meeting. Whiting Hall, 6767
NW 24th St.. Sunrise.
Temple Beth Israel, Sunrise:
Noon. Games.
Temple Beth Israel of Deerfleld
Beach Sisterhood: Noon. Lunch-
eon-card party at Temple.
Brandeis University NWC West
Broward Chapter: 1 p.m.,
Abraham J. Gittelson, associate
director CAJE, Federation edu-
cation director, guest speaker.
Sunrise Savings, 9001 W. Oak-
land Park Blvd., Sunrise.
B'nai B'rith-Alian Unit: 8 p.m.
American Savings' community
room at 8352 W. Oakland Park
Blvd.
B'nai B'rith Women Tamarac:
Noon. Meeting. Temple Beth
Torah, Tamarac.
FRIDAY, OCT. 21
Coral Springs CoaUtion of Jewish
Organixatbna: Weekend Our
Town Festival participation.
Mullins Park, Coral Springs.
SATURDAY, OCT. 22
Temple Beth Torah-Youag
Couples Club: 8:30 p.m. Dance.
ORT-Coral Springs Chapter: 8
p.m. Square Dance (Hoe-
down). Call 753-4731 or 763-
ORT Coral Springs Chapter: 8
p.m. Square dance (HOE-
DOWN). Call 753-4731 or 753-
5649 for tickets. The Township
Clubhouse, Coconut Creek.
Jewish Community Center: 8
p.m. Oct. 22 wine and cheese re-
ception for Art Show. 6501 W
Sunrise Blvd., Plantation.
SUNDAY, OCT. 23
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale Young Leader-
ship Program: 11:30 a.m.
Brunch. Speaker: Sally Fox.
Federation Boardroom.
Temple Beth Torah: 6:45 p.m.
Games.
Temple Sha'aray Tsedek: 7:30
p.m. Games.
Congregation Beth Hillel of Mar-
gate: 7:15 p.m. Games.
Folksinger receives honorary
life membership in Pioneer Women
Mary Trovers, of Peter, Paul and Mary, is awarded the
National Honorary Life Membership of Pioneer Women-
Na'amat for 1983-84 in recognition of her commitment to
freedom for Jews in Russia, Left to Right are Gloria Elbling,
national membership vice president; Phyllis Sutker, national
president; and Mary Trovers.
NEW YORK To inaugurate
National Membership Month of
Pioneer Women-Na'amat in
October, Mary Travers, of the
world-famous folksinging trio,
Peter, Paul and Mary, has been
presented with National Honor-
ary Life Membership.
"At this crucial hour, when
conditions in the USSR have de-
clined severely, Mary Travers
has raised her voice loudly
against the oppression of Russian
Jews," said Gloria Elbling,
national membership vice pre-
sident. "As we embark on our
1983-84 membership campaign,
we feel that Travers typifies the
kind of concerned, outspoken
woman who is part of our
organization."
The blond-haired, statuesque
Travers described to national
board members of Pioneer
Women-Na'amat her recent trip
to the Soviet Union: "For
Americans, there is a lot of
unreality about oppression. But
when I got to Russia, I found out
how quickly oppression affects
the spirit."
Travers urged American Jews
to visit the Soviet Union to show
support for refuseniks. "We
cannot allow them to be buried
alive," she said.
A lifelong human rights ac-
tivist, Travers suggested that
"protests in America must be
more creative perhaps, even,
with a touch of humor to keep
attention focused on the situation
of Russian Jews." Smiling
mischievously, she said: "The
Russian Jews would like to tweak
the nose of the system that is so
oppressive."
Freedom for Soviet Jews is a
major component of the social ac-
tion agenda of Pioneer Women-
Na'amat. Ida Nudel, a former
Prisoner of Conscience who has
repeatedly been denied permis-
sion to emigrate to Israel, has
been adopted for special at-
tention by the 500 clubs of
Pioneer Women-Na'amat.
In the United States. Pioneer
Women-Ns'amat also advocates
progressive social legislation for
women and children. Through
Na'amat, the largest women's
organization in Israel, Pioneer
Women-Na'amat supports day
care centers, women's clubs
vocational training, and a Center
for Problems of Family Violence
in Israel.
On the Bookshelf
Why Have Jews Been Hated
So Deeply for So Long?
ing for converts to jU(j
combatting anti-Semitam b
appropriate means and wo
for the universal adoDtio
Jewish moral values.
The clear implication of t]
relatively frail responses a]
this may well be a problea
which there is no solution !
an implication runs count*
the American myth which |
that every problem has a,
tion. The history of the
does not support this myth]
the suthors' feeble soli
suggest that this is but
many problems that
solved.
THERE ARE two inter
footnotes which deserve
tion. First, the term
Semitism" is properly jden
as inaccurate, since it doej"!
refer to all Semites. Ho
instead of taking the bold i_
recommending elimination oil
term, the authors simply i
the spelling to "antisemit
This usage has some notable!
vocatea, but it is far less powa
than the forceful term used I
quently in the book,
hatred."
The other question of stykl
one which we should all add
The authors point out that]
thoughtlessly use the i
extermination'' to describe i
the Nazis did to the Jews.'
word should be avoided bee
its use implies acceptance of]
Nazi description of Jews!
vermin to be exterminated.!
better term is "annihilation."
All in all, this is a tho
and easy-to-read piece of i
succeeds in presenting an i
table answer to the difficult c
tion of why Jew-hatred pens]
However, it fails in tellingj
what to do once we have the (
rect answer. Nevertheless,
book should be judged
matively for its success i
than for its failure. The su
lions for action occupy onl;
of fourteen chapters. The i
thirteen chapters vig
tackle a tough question
worthy of a wide readership.
Why the Jewa? The Reason for
Anti-Semitism. By Dennis
Prager and Joseph Telushkin.
New York: Simon and Schust-
er, 1983.238 Pp. $14.96.
By MORTON I. TEICHER
Jewish Floridian Book Editor
The question posed by these
two very able authors is one that
has often been asked by many
people in different times and in
various places. Why have the
Jews "been hated so deeply and
for so long?''
It is a question which has pro-
duced numerous answers, some
of which are glib and some
thoughtful. Prager and Telushkin
identify these common answers
"economic factors, the need
for scapegoats, ethnic hatred,
xenophobia, resentment of Jew-
ish affluence and professional
success, and religious bigotry."
But they quickly claim that these
are all insufficient and in-
adequate explanations for the
persistent and widespread hatred
of the Jews.
THE AUTHORS insist that
Jew-hatred is best understood as
a reaction to Judaism snd the
problems it creates for non-Jews.
These problems include Jewish
monotheism and the consequent
rejection of other gods; the Jew-
ish code of behavior which sets
forth laws that take precedence;
Jewish nationhood which has
survived even though the Jewish
state ceased to exist in the year
70 and was not reborn until 1948.
Three additional reasons for
Jew-hatred on the basis of Juda-
ism are cited: the Jewish obliga-
tion to improve the world; the
chosenness of the Jews; and the
higher quality of life among
Jews.
Judaism, assert the authors,
arouses hatred of Jews because it
threatens and challenges the
values and tenets of other people.
They offer a systematic demon-
stration of the validity of their
thesis by incisively examining
anti-Semitism in the ancient
world, during the Enlightenment
and among Leftists, Nazis, anti-
Zionists, Christians and Mus-
lims.
THEY PROVIDE s rapid fire
summary which effectively cap-
tures the highlights of a tragic
history, identifying a number of
notorious anti-Semites and re-
counting horrendous events. Be-
cause it is a hasty summary, the
recital omits many names and oc-
currences but more than enough
details are given to persuade the
reader that Prager and Telushkin
have advanced a convincing and
fundamental explanation of Jew-
hatred.
They are somewhat less per-
suasive in their prescription for
action based on their answer to
the question which they posed at
the outset of the book. Five re-
sponses are briefly considered:
assimilation, aliyah, proselvtiz-
OOEXCITIrlG PLACES
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0ctobrl4.1988
The Jewish Floridian of OrfaUr Port LaudtrdaU
Pa13
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Page 14
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Fridy.Octobu
Women's equal rights in the synagogue
Shoshannah Spector, author of
several books for children, now
living in Lauderlakes. calls her
recent experience, attending the
Simchat Torah service at Temple
Beth Israel in Sunrise. "Women's
equal rights in the synagogue."
Here she writes about it:
"This past Simchat Torah.
only a few days ago, sitting in
Temple Israel, I was shocked,
seeing for the first time women
carrying the Torah in the Torah
procession. Coming from an
Orthodox background, I had
never witnessed this before.
Then imagine my thrill when
Rabbi Philip Labowitz, who so
ably conducted the entire proces-
sion in prayer and song, called
my name and I too was privileged
to carry the Torah (all 19 pounds)
and to hold it next to my heart, to
see hands stretch out to touch it
and congregants kissing it so
joyfully.
"Is it not our greatest
treasure! Why should we, as
women not share this joy.
"Suddenly, I felt like Miriam
in the Bible, dancing and singing.
When Rabbi Labowitz again
called my name, inviting me to
come to the pulpit to close the
Holy Ark, I felt at the same time
proud and humble to be so
honored. His most gracious
invitation came as a surprise to
me.
"He said, 'Today we have as
our guest, celebrating Simchat
Torah with us, the well known
Hebrew educator and author of
children's books, Shoshannah
Spector.'
"I feel now that not only I but
all women are being honored and
recognized as equals in the House
of God."
Shoshannah Spector is
presently working on another
book. Her latest work, issued by
Shengold Publishers in New
York, complete with artist il-
lustrations, was The Miraculous
Rescue: Entebbe.
B'nai-B'not Mitzvah
TEMPLE BETH AM
Gina Glickman, daughter of
Sharon and Jeffrey Glickman of
Coral Springs, will become a Bat
Mitzvah at the 9 a.m. Saturday
Oct. 15 service at Temple Beth
Am. Margate.
TEMPLE BETH TORAH
Andrew Kesaler, son of Bar-
bara and Leonard Kessler of
North Lauderdale, will become a
Bar Mitzvah Saturday morning
Oct. 15 service at Temple Beth
Torah, Tamarac.
TEMPLE
SHA'ARAY TZEDEK
The Congregation of Temple
Sha'aray Tzedek, 4099 Pine Is-
land Rd., Sunrise, will have its
first Bar Mitzvah ceremony
during the Saturday morning
Oct. 15 service. The Bar Mitzvah
celebrant is Michael Brealaw. son
of Beryl arid Allen Brealaw of
Sunrise.
RAMAT SHALOM
Joshua Ruakin, son of Paula
and Howard Ruskin of Planta-
tion, will be called to the Torah as
a Bar Mitzvah during the Satur-
day morning Oct. 15 service at
Ramat Shalom in Plantation.
TEMPLE KOL AMI
Stephanie Gross, daughter of
Jewish-Owned Store Burns in Paris
PARIS (JTA) Anti-Semitic inscriptions
covered a Jewish-owned store which burned down in
Paris. Police said they found slogans such as "Death to
the Jews" on the charred walls of the clothing store.
Police experts said the fire, which gutted the building,
was the result of criminal arson.
Convicted Dutch War Criminal
'Retires' from Science Faculty
LOS ANGELES -
(JTA) Officiate of the
Simon Wiesenthal Center
announced that convicted
Dutch Nazi war criminal
Jacob Luitjens has pre-
maturely "retired" from
the University of British
Columbia science faculty.
The announcement came after
a phone conversation by
Wiesenthal Center officials with
Dr. Rober Scagel, bead of UBC's
botany department, where
Luitjens has served as an in-
structor for nearly 20 years.
Rabbi Marvin Hier, dean of the
Wiesenthal Center, which has
been actively pursuing tht
Luitjens case for the past six
months, said he was "pleased'
by the news. However, he added
the Center was still "disap
pointed that UBC's president, K
George Pedersen, had earlier
refused the Wiesenthal Center';
demand that Luitjens be fired.
-UBC WAS obviously more
interested in protecting a man
(Luitjens), convicted by a sister
democracy (Holland! than for his
crimes against humanity," Hier
said. He also said that the Center
is continuing discussions with
Dutch officials about this case to
press the Canadian government
to find a way to expel Luitjens
"so that he will pay his debt to
J society."
Scagel told the Wiesenthal
Center that "Luitjens' retirement
was his own personal decision."
He refused to elaborate on
whether or not Luitjens' unex-
pected decision was based on
pressure to have him resign his
< post because of public revelations
made by the Wiesenthal Center
six months ago about bis Nazi
past and his conviction by a
Dutch court in 1948 for crimes
against humanity.
Scagel also refused to offer any
comment on Luitjens' retirement,
other than to say, "It's between
me and my conscience." Then, in
a display of anger, he reportedly
told Wiesenthal Center officials,
"If you would just mind your
own business it would be batter
and I refuse to say anything more
about the matter!"
In the fall of 1981 the govern-
ment of Holland asked the Cana-
dian government for Luitjens'
extradition.
STATE OF
ISRAEL BONDS
BOUGHT AND SOLD
Invest in
Israel Securities
WE'RE SPECIALISTS IN
ISRAEL SECURITIES
*
TRANSACTIONS DAILY VIA TELEX
TO ISRAEL STOCK EXCHANGE
Leumi
an* laumi ie-i*r**i M
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Corporation Ton Free (8oo> 221-483e|
-a
TEMPLE EMANUEL
All Bar-Bat Mitzvah parents of
Gimel and Dated students at
Temple Emanu-El Religious
School will meet at 6:45 p.m.
Wednesday Oct. 26 with Emanu-
El's Rabbi Jeffrey Ballon.
The Temple is having Family
Worship service at 7:45 p.m.
Friday Oct. 21.
The Sisterhood is having its
Paid-up Membership luncheon
Tuesday Oct. 18 at the Temple
with Martha Golden displaying
costume jewelry brought back
from the Orient.
Beverly and Allan Gross of Plan-
tation, will be called to the Torah
on occasion of her Bat Mitzvah at
the Friday night Oct. 14 service
at Temple Kol Ami. Plantation.
The following morning the B'nai
Mitzvah ceremony will take place
at Kol Ami for Daniel Thaler, son
of Cindy and Larry Thaler of
Plantation, and Daniel Minkin,
son of Marsha and Barron Min-
kin, also of Plantation.
The Bat Mitzvah service of
Rachel Rubin, daughter of Judith
and Allan Rubin of Plantation,
will be held at Kol Ami during
the Friday Oct. 21 service.
The B'nai Mitzvah service of
Lori Richter, daughter of Marilyn
and Stanley Richter of Planta-
tion, and Daniel Mandell. son of
Paulette and Joel Mandell of
Plantation, will be held at Kol
Ami Saturday morning Oct. 22.
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL
Michael Blum, son of Miriam
and Dr. Marvin Blum of Coral
Springs, will become a Bar Mitz-
vah at the Saturday morning
Oct. 22 service at Temple Beth
Israel, Sunrise.
Earlier this month Temple
services included B'nai Mitzvah
ceremonies on Oct. 1 for Jaaon
Libhutz, son of Esther and Dr.
Howard Lifshutz of Fort Lauder-
dale, and on Oct. 8 for Matthew
Schreiber, son of Joan and Ste-
phen Schreiber of Lauderdale
Lakes.
WEST BRO WARD
The Bat Mitzvah ceremony of
Chandra Wood, daughter of Bar-
bara and Dr. Clifford Wood of
Plantation, will be part of the
10:30 a.m. Saturday Oct. 15
service at West Broward Jewish
Congregation, Plantation.
WE8TbrowaI)
Parent* of children k,
studying for Bar or B.tS
through next June hi *
invited to meet at We.,?r* '
Jewish Congregation P>
t 8 p.m. Tuesday OcuT11
The congregation's nj
"** 8 p.m. Mondial
AU members are invitL ,
tend. The congregatio^ *
sponsormg "Dancerci*,-
Jindy at 7 p.m. everywJ
day at the Temple. Mm 2
and children a weteL"01
charge is $6 per session
ORTHODOX
TEMPLE OREL B'NAI RAPHAEL i 7SS-78S41, Ml W Oakland Part Bh,
Lauderdale Lakea 3*818. Iwilm; Sunday through Thunday 8 am. Ipi
Friday ga m 7p m ; Saturday 8:48 am 7p.m
SYNAGOGUE OF INVEBBABY CHABAD (T4S-17T7). 7770 NW mo, j
Lincoln Park Weit. Sunrtae MS21 Service*: Sunday through Friday 14.1
7 SOp m ; Saturday 9a.m., 7:80 p.m. Study group*: Man, Sundays roUowk
aervicee: Woman, Tuesday*8 p.m. BafeM Ana Uehermai
YOUNG ISRAEL OP DEERPTELD BEACH (4211387). 1(
Blvd.. Deerfleld Beach 33441 Sarvtoaa: Sunday through Thursday Si*
5'30 p.m.; Friday 8 a.m.. 8 p.m.; Saturday 8:48 a.m.. 8:50 p m Caatwl
Ceaasea. PrulMmai: Mertoa Forgo**, Ssdaey ataauasesr. AaeaaataWeak.
YOUNG BSHAEL SYNAGOGUE OF HOLLYWOOD-PORT LAIDC ID All]
(968-7877), 3391 Stirling Rd.. Fort Lauderdale IMU. Service*: 1
through Friday 7 SO am and sundown; Saturday. 9a m.. lundown;
8a m.eundown Ra*tt Edward Devi*.
CONSERVATIVE
TEMPLE BETH AM (974-8*80). 7300 Royal Palm Blvd.. MargaU I___
Service*: Monday through Friday 8*0 a.m.. 5 p.m. Friday late mtyW
p.m.; Saturday a.m.. 6 p.m.: Sunday 8 am 8 p.m RabM Paal I
Rabbi Emeritus, Dr. 1 ill mi* G*M. fkaail bvkag Greeeaaaa.
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL (743-40*0). 7100 W. Oakland Park Blvd.
Mall Service*: Monday through Thursday 8 am.. p.m.; Friday I ill
5jjMn., 11 p.rri aturdayj :aa.ni., unset; Sunday 9 am., 8 p.m.
TEMPLE Mni BSRAEL OF .TEBF1F1l BEACB (4 70801. Mil
Century Blvd.. Deerfleld Beach 8*441 Bawami Sunday through Frkavtj
f^.1 *m- ******r**pm.:U*ir4Kr$:i$>jn..*aiilr
lighting time Baas* JeseeA Laagwae. Csaessar g**k*oi Ackonaaa.
TEMPLE BETH TORAH (Hl-TH*). MSI NW 87th St.. Tamarac I
*f*a Sunday through Friday 8:80 a.m., p.m. Late Friday swva.
P m Saturday 8 48 am 8 p m. Ba*M Esart F. Staaas, ~
JEMPIE ETIAI MOSBE (943-aM),UM SE 3rd St..
Ssrvieee: Friday 8 p m RaaM Merita A. Mas*.
TEMPLE SHA'ARAY TZEDEH (741-*SW>. 40M Pine
sunns* 888J1 Services: Sunday through Friday 8 a.m.,1p.m.
?rKl? 9m- "**** :* -. : pm "
MrC** MaftlTlaBaaal.
TEMPLE SHOLOM (943-6410). 183 SE 11th Ave Pompano Beach U.
anrkea: Monday through Friday 8:48 a.m Friday evening at 8. 8shr*)
-i*-J-'-----------in lf|i Ttinlii riiitriii-"-^
CONQBEOATfON BETH HILLEL OF MARGATE (tTa-RMOL T8i01_,
^? wM*5"UM0" '! ljadayt>u^ugfaFrtday8 lam IM
Late Friday aarvlos Ipm a^tuadaTi.etTaT.. : Mp.m
N.Ttey,
CONOBEOATION B'NAI ISRAEL OF CORAL BPHINOS (For RambHew
East resldenU). 7M-431I Servlesei Dally 8 80 am.. 8 80 p.m.: Saturday
am HerkDavaa.PreeMeaL
HEBREW CONOBEOATION OF LAUDBRHILL <7-***0>. 3048 NW u
Ave LaudarnlU IM1I Ssrvieeei Sunday through Friday 8:80 am H
Rm Saturday 8:46 am., sundown followed by study claw in Plrki At*
BeeN Israel Hal pent.
HEBBEW CONOBEOATION OF NOBTH LAUDEBDALE < 7S3-7BI or f-
37231 Service* at Ban yon Lake* Oondo, tSM Ballsy Rd.. Tamarac. FriaV'
8 p.m Saturday9a m Air
FtE BETH OBB (7S8-83S3). SSI Rlvsrsld* Dr.. Coral Sprtnp"*
*f*! unday 8 a.m.; Tuesday. Thursday 7:10 p.m.; Friday 9-*"
TEMPLE B'NAI SHALOM OF DCERFIELD BEACH (4M-M83). tardSI
Maiwmh Ouipel.. 3SMW HUlsaore Blvd., Deerfleld Baaeh, Friday* I
TEMPLE EMANUEL (781-3810), 8348 W. Oakland Park BHrd., I*"*"**
La*ss_Mil aorrlaae. Friday 8:11 p.m.; Saturday, only on he*H
2^rattoa of Bar-Bat Mitsvah BaMH Jeffrey BaUsa. Oaatw *+*
TEMPLE ROL AMI (473-19*8). 8300 Peters Rd. Plantation ***_**
f*rtday grig p.m.. Saturday 10:80a.m BaMd Hkillii I. Barr. Caaasraw"
LJBEBAWEWIM TEMPLE OF COCONUT CBEEB >*day night ssrvtce. twice monthly at Calvary Prsabytartan Chun*J
Coconut Creek Parkway BeMMBrweeS. TTanaaTl Tmp*saa>uiiel>^
WESTBBOWABD
PlanUUon
ealebrattoM
CONOBEOATION (7M-*M0), 7471NWJJJJj
'BtatBm i Saturday, only lor Btr-Bat kW-
BAMAT SHALOM I473-8SM). 11101 W. Broward Blvd., H****?.
I**l^rtd*7.':1' Pm- J*turday. only lor Bar-Bat alltrraa. HI

ii


.October 14.1963
The Jewish Fbridian of Greater Fort LauderdaU
Page 15
X the Mikvah
|#'s Not Just A Warm Water Pool;
we, A Ritual Act of Holiness Occurs
MIKVAH is not just an
I, pool of warm water, its
/must be live waters, that
nm a living source, such as
river, or ocean. The water
k in its natural state not
in by pumps and plum-
The ideal (and original)
would be an actual lake
jver Since it would be vir-
i impossible to gather such
amounts of fresh water
day for indoor mikvaot
|) the Rabbis allowed that
,i portion need be live waters
x rest may be tap drawn.
the tap-water portion is
xted to the live-water
, it is considered, by means
I'hil happens at the mikvah?
ary to uninformed asser-
example, "I can take a
it home"), the mikvah is
' bathing or cleansing. One
be perfectly clean before
the mikvah, which is
f there is a regular bathtub in
[very same chamber as the
ivih pool, or in a room ad-
I to it.
(first type of setup is called
mate", the second type is
"semiprivate" two or
individual bathing rooms
i onto a small vestibule that
I to the mikvah basin room,
the semiprivate clients
tin consecutive fashion.
I order to ensure maximum
for each semiprivate
, all doors are closed imme-
after entry or exit. It
feels like we're
; musical doors in going to
|from the mikvah room.
legal fiction, to be as one
5 water source.
Bstructing a kosher mikvah
pile complex, and certain
leering skills are needed. But
jn't have to reinvent the
Jewish law being as an-
as it is. there are many
j-made architectural and
pbing designs some dating
rback as the Talmud that
it relatively easy to con-
a mikvah today. Every
an city with a sizable
population has at least
nikvah.
I woman prepares herself for
I mikvah in a special way: she
ves anything that would
ute a barrier between the
ap.d her body all
U bandages, dentures,
wp, nail polish, and so forth.
! brushes her teeth; she clips
finger and toenails and
phes them in order to dislodge
particles of dirt beneath
iThe fingernail injunction
caused some women to
plain).
''IKE WOMEN of ancient
when long nails were a
f unkemptness, modern
* women pride them-
on long, beautiful nails,
fn argument has been
in the mikvah chamber
* length to which a woman
cut her fingernails. My
**. a great Talmudic
was once summoned to
van in Boro Park, to give
* rabbinic decision,
nikvah lady wanted the
cut and the "client" balked.
\^y authority they could
*P upon was my father -
'"awimidiitlihii
cod* Ha clamed the
and eased the mikvah
IluE* ** Bowinf bar in
^"PtattlMtMkwgw
1 perfectly clean.
1 made no difference.
.I*** perfecth/ legiti-
1,1,00 tor poet-Tahnudk
uthority to
Editor's Note: The Torah states
that sexual intercourse is
prohibited during the wife's
menses and the following seven
'clean' days. The entire period of
abstinence concludes with the
wife's visits to the mikvah (ritual
bath) for immersion.
AFTER A WOMAN has
prepared herself, she steps into a
bath that has been drawn for her.
She bathes for a few minutes,
washes herself, shampoos, and
then rinses off thoroughly with a
shower. She then combs her hair
free of knots, rinses her mouth
with a cup of water, wraps a large
white sheet around herself, and
presses a buzzer. The buzzer will
summon that unique and special
functionary in the Jewish com-
munity, the mikvah lady.
If the mikvah is not crowded
on a given evening, the mikvah
lady will come to the room imme-
diately after the buzzer sounds. If
it is crowded, one might have to
wait five or ten minutes, but
generally no longer than that,
except for that one evening every
few years whe the mikvah looks
as though it's giving away some-
thing free.
The immersion: Standing near
the mikvah basin, a woman will
remove her white sheet and the
mikvah lady will check to see if
she has any loose hairs on her
body and if she's clipped her
nails, simultaneously asking,
"Brushed your teeth? Rinsed
your mouth?"
THIS INSPECTION takes
fifteen seconds. The woman then
walks down four or five steps into
the mikvah pool, which is ap-
proximately five feet square and
filled with water four feet high.
Standing with legs spread
slijrhtly apart, her hands loose
and not touching the sides, she
immerses herself completely
underwater. Only the soles of her
feet touch the mikvah basin.
Immediately she rises.
If every bit of her body and
every strand of hair was below
the waterline, the mikvah lady,
who has been looking on all along
wUl pronounce the immersion (or
maybe the woman herself!
"kosher."
Standing shoulder height in
the water, the woman recites the
blessing on immersion:
Blessed are You, Lord our God,
Ruler of the universe. Who has
sanctified us with His com-
mandments and commanded us
concerning the immersion.
AFTER THE blessing she dips
completely underwater two more
times. The mikvah lady again
pronounces it "kosher." As the
woman comes up the steps, the
mikvah lady holds out the sheet
for her and slips it over her
shoulders. The mikvah lady then
subsidized by the community.
And no one was ever barred from
using a mikvah because of
inability to pay.
THAT PROCEDURE, in sum.
is what a traditional Jewish
woman does every month of her
married life, except for when she
is pregnant or reaches meno-
pause. Why does she go? How
does she feel about it?
To the first question, that
same old answer applies. It is a
mitzvah, a Biblical one at that.
God has commanded us to make
ourselves a holy people, and this
is one of the divine definitions of
kedusha, holiness. We accept the
commandment to observe
Taharat Hamishpachah as we
accept the whole yoke of mitzvot,
and that, for the most part, is
that. We do it, but that doesn't
mean we have to love it every
single month. It is all part of the
discipline of being an Orthodox
Jewish woman.
Or man, for that matter. For a
woman could not undertake
responsibility for niddah uni-
laterally. Without mutual
consent and responsibility, the
whole thing would be reduced to
a test of wills each month, a
contest in which all who win
would eventually lose. A man,
therefore, must not only agree,
but must be willing to assume
personal restraint.
EVEN WITH mutual consent
and responsibility, even with full
devotion and fidelity to Jewish
law, taharat hamishpachah turns
out to be a wicked regimen, one
that occasionally requires almost
Herculean efforts, especially in
this era of commercial sex
overkill. Contemporary men and
women are continually bombard-
ed with sex fantasy material.
Add to that the modern philo-
sophy that everything-one-
wants-one-may-have, and you
have a formidable opponent to
the laws of taharat hamish-
pachah. All of this is com-
pounded by the fact that we are
asked to resist suggestion and
seduction in what would or-
dinarily seem to be a most
legitimate arena relations be-
tween husband and wife.
Observing niddah is much
harder than keeping Shabbat or
kashrut; it is infinitely more
difficult than fasting on Tisha
B'Av, or asking forgiveness from
enemies on Yom Kippur. There is
hardly anything about being an
Orthodox Jewish woman that has
driven me to tears over the last
two decades, but cleaning for
Pesach is one and taharat
hamishpachah, the other.
And yet. somehow we all
manage. Niddah doesn't paralyze
us, nor kill off our normal ins-
tincts for joy and pleasure. We
take it in our stride, work around
it. adjust ourselves to its
demands, and then some. A
Despite my occasional
grumblings, and my more
frequent take-it-in-my-stride atti-
tude, this mitzvah brings out a
whole set of positive emotions in
me. One, which I'm sure is not
what tradition had in mind, is a
sense of personal accomplish-
ment.
We've made it, we've suc-
ceeded in meeting the test, I'm
quite proud of us. It's not a
superiority I feel over others; it is
a symbol to me that the human
mind and soul in fact, my
mind and soul, his mind and soul
have some mastery over our
human drives. Does that qualify
for holiness? I have no idea.
A SECOND impact on self is
one of connections. At the mik-
vah I have an awareness, mostly
unarticulated but ever present
of the millennia of Jewish women
who observed these laws before
me, women in every generation,
and in every continent across the
face of this earth, women to
whom I feel inextricably linked
because of our regular, private,
determined mikvah-going'habits.
Also, I believe the laws address
a human need; in fact, taharat
hamishpachah serves a whole
range of functions, each ap-
propriate to the ebb and flow of
an interpersonal relationship as it
unfolds through time. Which is
why I have suggested elsewhere
to the consternation of some in
the Orthodox community that
Jewish couples living toge-
ther as if in marriage, in a serious
sustained relationship, could also
learn much from the laws of
niddah and mikvah.
Taharat hamishpachah implies
that sex is a special part of
marriage, but only a part. Early
on, one learns that sex is not all
there is to love, that not every
newly wed spat can be settled in
bed, that for almost half a month
niddah requires of us to develop
other, more difficult, more
sophisticated modes of com-
munication. A couple in love who
observe niddah is forced to
discover new techniques to
express peaks of emotion; such a
couple more readily understands
the power of a glance, a word, a
thoughtful gesture.
MOREOVER, because of the
overall regulatory function of this
law, a larger message about
control quietly slips through
that sex is not something by
which we reward or punish,
control or manipulate the sexual
partner. If sex is regulated by a
force greater than the human
parties involved, then it is less
likely to be wielded, by men or
women, as a human lever of
power. Instead, it becomes a gift
to enjoy and to give pleasure
with, not to use.
While no one has documented
this, I suspect there is more
sustained and loving sex ovei the
course of marriage among
couples who observe these laws
and know they have to act
before the boom is lowered again
than among couples who do
not.
The laws have a positive sexual
function as well, not only
preventing abuse but promoting
pleasure. How? By retaining a
certain freshness to the sexual
relationship and by synchron-
izing the needs and desires of the
two partners, to the extent it is
possible to do so.
From 'How To Run A Traditional
Jewish Household,' copyright
1983 by Blu Greenberg. Reprint-
ed by permission of Simon and
Schuster.
not a tragedy. Certainly
thing a loving marriage could
withstand, and perhaps be
strengthened by.
HAVING MENTIONED all
the difficulties, let me tell the
leaves or. if it's a emiprivate, she tragedy7 a hardship maybe, but
returns the woman to her
bathing-dressing room, doses all
the doors, and goes on to the next
buzzer call.
The woman will drees, fix her
hair, sit under the dryer, paton
h#* makeup, and so forth. There
ar!iom.hthcta-mikvt'otU^ otbar half how theao Uw.fev.
H^veTfreelance heJidreeear and us to a certain level of holiness in
majucunatin regular attendance, ^r most privaU Uves, and how
T^ i. fa. for using the -** -
mikvah. It ranges anywhere from
four to fifteen dollars phis a Up.
although some communities
don't permit tipe. The he
depends on whether private or
semi-private facilities were used,
and on the location of the mb-
vah. Newer mikvah, fancier
neighborhood more expensive.
But the fee it not a rajHrtf. Even
the fifteen-dollar mtttva'ot are
In this room, the woman bathes herself completely before even
entering the mihvah itself.
modern condition. There
certain laws of the Torah. divine
b origin though they are, that
have undergone reinUcpretation
toward stringency, toward
leniency, toward trophy- For a
ritual as primitive and as difficult
aa the sax and blood taboo to be
maintained, it muat n>aboW
hold Inner meaning. And I
believe it does. On many levels.
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Personalized Nursing Car*
For Yotjr Special Need.
EXPERIENCED
LICENSED NURSES
lUtkkwa Cook /I*
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(306)432-4721
Reas
-&


Pg16
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderaale
Prid"y.Octobi
VANTAGE
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5 Mg. "Mr". 0.5 Mg. nicotine w. p ogam by FTC mm



Full Text
October 14.1963 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale___________________________________________ Pa**3
mdo Cabinet considers ways to aid UJA campaign
Educating the Jewish commu-
r to the humanitarian needs
t have to be met in Israel and
fcewhere in the world and get-
that community fully in-
volved in support of meeting that
were two goals stressed
then the delegates of the Condo-
nium Cabinet of the Jewish
federation of Greater Fort Lau-
dalemet for the first time.
Samuel K Miller, Condomin-
ium Cabinet chairman, was
ned by Federation's 1964
Suited Jewish Appeal Campaign
airman Joel Keinstein in
ting the more than 30 dele-
ties last week at the Federa-
ls offices.
I Reinstein called the North
ward area's condominium
nunities bright lights" in
JA's fund-raising since their
hbutions in the past year
ented 25 percent of the toal
d. "Without that support,"
i said, "the UJA cannot be a
Miller stressed the importance
[ making people aware of the
ids through direct contact with
spective donors. He cited the
imple of the campaign in Deer-
d's Century Village where vol-
wrs are organized to visit at
pch of the units in the many
" "ings in that community. He
"Although everyone may
t contribute, they can't use the
use that they didn't know
t UJA is about."
[THE PURPOSE of the Condo
binet, he said, is to get a
ater representation of the
h community involved in
"ling the campaign. Toward
end, three groups were
id putting delegates from
nilarsized condominium com-
funities together to hold
^ings to discuss their corn-
problems and benefit from
> for better campaigning.
.Group one, made up of repre-
rwatives from Aragon. Concord
juuge. Cypress Tree, Lauderhill
"'. Majestic Gardens, New-
rt, Oakbrook, Sabal Palm,
nebridge Gardens and Water
fnage Gardens will meet at 10
* Tuesday Oct. 26 at the Fed-
Wn.
|"Je second group formed, which
m*t at 10 a.m. Monday
L,V- cnats of representa-
m trom Bermuda Chib, Castle
rde.ns- Cypress Chase.
pwan Gardens, Lauderdale
F. Lauderdale West, Lime
C ?"kland Estates. Omega.
* 'sland Ridge. Polynesian
ena. Sands Point and Som-
IJk third group, consisting of
jw phases at Sunrise Lakes,
VJ f Tamarac.will meet at
wift^^t. 31. All meet-
8358 W. Oakland Park
L^ig the free-whseling dis-
own of ,deas to implement the
"Pining, William Katrberg,
has chaired the Greater
j^e Area UJA committee
,T* been Mtrve as a Federa-
ls8"1 member, asked to
Pjjnt-since he was preparing
''on another ot.bia tripsto
Samuel K. Miller addresses Condominium Cabinet at first meeting.
Israel.
He said that "this is a crisis
year for Israel, different from
previous ones." He said that the
emotional perception of the com-
munities here must be raised and
the commitment must be in-
creased, urging that the Cabinet
delegates consider increasing
their volunteer personnel and
holding special gifts meetings in
their condo communities.
Miller, in concluding the meet-
ing, urged that "snowbirds" be
approached by campaign workers
for commitments to the local
campaign. He said that he
doesn't expect the same donation
that a part-time resident may
give to his so-called "home com-
munity," but since they live here
for a good part of the year and
probably avail themselves of
Robert E. Loup, UJA national chairman,
introduces Liberian President William K.
Doe at concluding dinner of UJA Inter-
mediate Cities Campaign Leadership
Seminar at Israel's Knesset in Jerusalem.
President Doe, whose nation had resumed
diplomatic relations with Israel just prior to
his state visit the second African country
to do so since the 1973 Yom Kippur War
was the first head of state other than an
American or Israeli President ever to address
a UJA group.
Inverrary has its Golf Classic;
3rd annual UJA event set Jan. 11
They extended an invitation to
all Inverrary residents for the
third Annual UJA Golf Classic
and Dinner, urging that in-
terested golfers mark the Jan. 11
date on their calendars. The
invitation is open to non-golfers,
since following the day's play of
golf, there will be cocktails and
dinner at the Inverrary main
clubhouse. Prizes will be swarded
to noteworthy golfers.
Kaplan also announced that
the Inverrary UJA campaign
committee has invited all the
volunteers who took part in rais-
ing funds during the 1963
campaign in that community to
attend a Recognition Day at 10
a.m. Oct. 31 in the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale offices at 8358 W.
Oakland Park Blvd.
Awards will be presented.
Refreshments will be served.
Federation's programs and ser-
vices at some time they should be
encouraged to be part of the local
UJA community.
He said the next meeting of the
full Cabinet will be at 10 a.m.
Monday Nov. 14 at the Federa-
tion office.
Hawaiian Gardens
UJA Leadership
begins plans for
1984 campaign
Lucille Stang, chairing the
Hawaiian Gardens 1984 United
Jewish Appeal campaign com-
mittee, announced that Jerome
Davidson and Kurt Ellenbogen
have joined the committee as co-
chairmen.
She said that the first Leader-
ship Cabinet meeting will be held
at 10 a.m. Wednesday Oct. 26 at
the new offices of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale, 8358 W. Oakland
Park Blvd.
The Leadership Cabinet will
plan the second annual UJA-
Federation breakfast to which
the residents of all the Hawaiian
Gardens phases will be invited.
This breakfast meeting will high-
light the community's effort and
commitment to the Federation's
1964 drive for funds to support
the humanitarian needs of Jews
in Israel and elsewhere in the
world, as well as supporting the
Federation's programs and ser-
vices in North Broward.
Samuel K. Miller, a Federation
vice president and chairman of
the new Condominium Cabinet of
community leaders, will join the
Leadership breakfast Oct. 26 and
relate experiences encountered
during his visit to Israel this past
spring.
Joseph Kaplan
Joseph Kaplan, chairman of
the Federation's Inverrary 1984
United Jewish Appesl campaign.
was joined by Selig Marko and
Mike Bloom, co-chairmen once
again of the 1984 Inverrary UJA
Golf Clsssic and Dinner, an-
nouncing that the 1984 event,
which drew 288 golfers in 1983,
will be held Wednesdsy Jan. 11
on both the East and West golf
courses of Inverrary Country
Club, Lauderhill.
ISRAEL $5IO.
ptu*M<
2 WEEK VACATION ~s510.
MMAfe
S Nights In TEL AVIV 2 Nights In TIBERIAS t Nights in JERUSALEM
InchasK Hotel Accon, Deft of Sightseeing, Twin Bedded Rooms.
Israel Stym Koaner Buffet Bw**/ast Tnnstmrs I Portm^ge.
4 WEEK TOUR OF LEISURE M022. -
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3 WEEKS IN NET ANY A* 1 WEEK IN JERUSALEM
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TOR RESERVATIONS* INFORMATION ON THESE TOURS, OR OUR
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Page 2
The Jewish Flaridian of Greater Port Lauderdale
Kasdan joins
Alfred Golden, Executive Vice
President of Riverside Memorial
Chapels announces the asso-
ciation of Jack Kasdan with the
company. Mr. Kasdan has a
lengthy career in the funeral
industry and in communal work.
He was one of the founders of
Frid*y. October U
Memorial Chapel Staff
Boulevard Funeral Homes in
New York and one of its leading
executives for many years.
Mr. Kasdan has been involved
in New York with Temple Beth
Emeth of Flatbush as its presi-
dent and as president of its
Brotherhood. He is a past master
of a Masonic lodge and has
served in virtually every capacity
in such organizations as B'nai
B'rith, Federation of Jewish
Philanthropies. Bonds for Israel
and the Knights of Pythias and
other benevolent groups.
In Florida Mr. Kasdan has
continued hia activities, having
served as a councilman of Bay
Harbor Islands, chairman of
Federation and Israel Bond
drives. He is a member of Temple
Israel of Greater Miami and a
board member of the Fight for
Sight League of Hollywood.
Mr. Kasdan will serve as the
Community Consultant for the
Riverside Normandy iju _
Miami Beach. Houywd
Tamarac chapels. ^*
Mr. Golden stated that
wek^rneatbeassociMionrf.
Kasdan, who i. ao*1
Si tbtt,on i 5?3'
y^been niaintained
Ws not easy to be a Riverside.

L
Being the best at what yon do is
never easy.
There can be no let-up of effort
No compromising of high standards.
And no cutting of necessary service.
For nearly 70 years, we've tried hard
to be the best It began with Charles Rosen thai,
Riverside's founder.
It continues today in the hands of
Carl Grossberg, Alfred Golden, Leo Hack,
Andrew Fier and a new generation of Jewish
management
*
It is the kind of leadership which,
working closely with Orthodox, Conservative
and Reform Rabbis, actually helped set the
standards for Jewish funeral service.
They understood that being a Jewish
funeral director had to be more than just a
business.
They knew it was a very special calling
that demanded a total commitment to Jewish
tradition.
And the knowledge and resources to
provide funeral servicethat was truly Jewish.
That's why today, Riverside is the most
respected name in Jewish funeral service in
the world.
Carl Grossberg, President
Alfred Golden, Executive Vice President
Leo Hack, Vice President Religious Advisor
Andrew Fier, Vice President
RIVERSIDE
The most respected name in Jewish ronersi
service in the world. tfVflf'
TW GUAKDIAN PLAITS mamas*' *****^+


-October 14.1983
Organizations
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 11
FRIENDS OF
LpTARDED CHILDREN
I Tamarac Chapter
In* Tamarac Chapter of the
LTds of Retarded Children wdl
t H n"on Tuesday Oct. 25, in
Community Room of
-rd Federal. Tamarac.
^luncheon and card party will
VUfrom 11:45 to 3:15 p.m.
lay Oct. 31 in the Peking
6e Restaurant, 6455 W.
crcial Blvd., Tamarac.
-lion is $6. For tickets call
1-2497.
L three dav, two night week-
"j, planned for Nov. 24 to 26.
jr Island.
FREE SONS OF
ISRAEL
, Fort Lauderdale Lodge
llbe Fort Lauderdale Lodge of
I, Free Sons of Israel, will hold
m dinner and card party at 6
, Thursday Oct. 27. at
Biting Hall. Sunrise. Coat is
Hoper person. Contact Etta
fldstein at 722-3194.
HADASSAH
Chai-Pompano Beach
ilher Cannon, Hadassah
_. Affairs Chairman, and a
I active member of the Jewish
ition's Community Rela-
Committee, will apeak at
tnoon Thursday Oct. 27 meet-
I of the Pompano Beach Chai
er of Hadassah. The meet-
1 will be held at the Pompano
th Recreation Center,
npeno Beach.
non, who recently attended
> Hadassah National Conven-
t, in Washington D.C., will
us highlights of the conven-
d, is told by many national
international speakers who
ded. Refreshments will be
BETH ORR
Sisterhood
ervations are now being ac-
from vendors wanting
it the annual Beth Orr
trhood Holiday Bazaar which
i be held from 10 to 4 p.m.
day Nov. 20 at the Temple.
ayone interested in being a
or. on a percentage basis,
[Janet Uvenston at 753-4354.
pew merchandise is being ac-
1 as donations.
rfreshments and lunch will
beavailable at the Bazaar.
AMERICAN
M1ZRACHI WOMEN
Masada Chapter
n a meeting held this week,
(Masada Chapter of American
ichi Women installed the
officers for 1984. They are
hist
t!
Greatfbod.
Great Drinks.
Rat Gathering.
Jlc$aur&nH'^
^gggd-Spiritt&Sud.
5iswBvd.5J4.0O
|(w)J*< Mm Baa*
r* ** M6-2097
l* -Wia-as $S. from SM-tOS
Olga Jaffe. president; Sarah
Harria. Maddy Schwartz. Rose
Bassman, vice presidents;
Florence Solomon, special funds
treasurer and financial secretary;
Toby Shabel, recording
secretary; Jeanne Frankel.
corresponding secretary; Jean
Alexenberg, social secretary;
Belle Hersch, honorary president.
BRANDEIS
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
The Fort Lauderdale-Pompano
Beach Chapter of Brandeis
University National Women's
Committee will have an October
27 weekend book sale, at the
Pompano Fashion Square.
The Chapter continues to seek ,
donations of hard cover and
paperback books, records, and
magazines for the sale. For pick-
up information, call 748-6418 or
973-1557.
WOMEN'S AMERICAN ORT
Pompano Beach
The Pompano Beach Chapter
of Women's American ORT, last
week installed Anita Z. Axelrod
as president. Mrs. Milton
Nowick, regional chairman, did
the honors.
Others installed were vice pre-
sidents, Ceil Resnick, member-
ship; Anita Simon, special
projects; Estelle Kaplan, Donor
and Golden Circle; Sue Klein-
man, program; also Mynna
Lowe, treasurer; Frances Katz,
Gertrude Hoffman and Norma
Goldstein, secretaries; Marion
Dyen, parlamentarian and educa-
tion chairman.
Axelrod and Simon will attend
the National ORT Convention
Oct. 16-19, in Los Angeles.
BETH AM
Men's Club
The Men's Club of Temple
Beth Am is having the first of a
series of professional shows at 8
p.m. Saturday Nov. 6, featuring
the Conti family. The second, on
Dec. 18, will present one of
Broadway's moat successful
plays, Mr. Horowitz and Mrs.
Washington.
Donation is $4 and tickets can
be purchased by calling the
Temple office at 974-8650.
HADASSAH
Plantation
The LChayim-Plantation
Chapter of Hadassah, will meet
at 1 p.m. Tuesday Oct. 18, at
Deicke Auditorium, 5701 Cypress
Rd., Plantation.
The boutique will open at 11
a.m. A mini-luncheon will be
served at noon.
A luncheon and book review
wdl be held at noon Monday Oct.
24, at Deicke Auditorium,
Plantation. Ann Ackerman will
review Mistral's Daughter by
Judith Kranz. Donation is $5.
For reservations call, 473-6349. or
473-6141.
B*NAI B'RITH WOMEN
Margate
Robert Besser will discuss
"Guidelines for common medi-
cine usage and side effects," at
the noon Tuesday Oct. 18, meet-
ing of B'nai B'rith Women,
Margate Chapter. The meeting
will be held at Temple Beth Am,
Margate.
Refreshments will be served.
Call Jeannette Chk*. 972-8744.
PIONEER
WOMENNAAMAT
Natanya Chapter
The Natanya Chapter of
Pioneer Women-Na'amat, will
hold a luncheon and card party at
noon Tuesday Oct. 18. at Congr*
gation Beth HUM. Margate.
CIRCLE or
YIDDISH CLUBS
The Circle of Yiddith Clubs
wUl meet at 2 p.m. Monday Oct
17, at the Jewiah Community
Center, 6501 W. Sunrise Blvd..
Plantation.
Coordinator, Sunny Land-
sman, announced the appoint-
ment of Is Stern berg, of Lauder-
dale Oaks, as the new chairman.
New vice-chairman is Abe
Weiner, of Palm Springs.
Contact Is Steinberg, 485-
1699, for any information.
NCJW NORTH BROWARD
The North Broward Chapter of
the National CouncU of Jewiah
Women will meet at 12:30 p.m.
Wednesday Oct. 19, in the audi-
torium of the Public Safety
Building of Lauderdale Lakes
CityHaU, 4300 NW 36 St.,
Lauderdale Lakes.
Ma. Cross, of the League of
Women Voters, will be the guest
speaker. Refreshments will be
served. Contact Lillie Sarowitz at
731-2627.
WORKMEN'S CIRCLE
Greater Lauderdale
The Greater Lauderdals
Branch of Workmen's Circle, will
meet at 1 p.m. Friday Oct. 28, at
the Lauderdale Lakes City HaU,
4300 NW 36 St., Lauderdale
Lakes.
Basil Rand, a scholar and
lecturer, will discuss the life of
Theodore Herzl, and the Birth of
Zionism. Contact Israel Pinchuk
at 731 5545
HADASSAH
Blyma
Blyma Margate Chapter of
Hadassah will meet at noon
Thursday Oct. 20, at Congrega-
tion Beth Hillel, Margate Shop-
ping Square. Jack Polinsky, well-
known raconteur, wiU speak
about "Jewiah Pride." Husbands
and friends are invited.

Volunteers for Israel offers college credit
program for student volunteers
In response to Israels con-
tinuing demand for emergency
manpower, Volunteers For Israel
has announced that students pre-
sently enrolled in American
colleges can now volunteer for
three months of work in Israel
without losing a semester of
credit at school.
Volunteers For Israel has
arranged a comprehensive 15-
credit program of academic
studies to be given in evening
hours, after the civilian-support-
work a volunteer performs in
military warehouses throughout
Israel. In addition to the vital
manpower a volunteer provides,
each month of volunteer service
allows an Israeli reservist to
return home to his job and his
family.
Volunteers For Israel has made
it possible for students to con-
tinue their education in Israel at
minimal cost. Tuition for a three-
month program of 15 credits, for
residents of New York state, is
$890, including round trip airfare,
room, board, and tours. For re-
sidents of other states, tuition is
offered at a comparably low cost.
Students are eligible for Federal
PeU Grants, state and local
college aid
Extensive fieldwork is an
integral part of the program,
giving each student a share in the
life and the upbuilding of the
Jewish nation. Semesters are
scheduled to commence Feb. 1,
and June 4.
To become a Volunteer For Is-
rael and to apply for the credit
semester program, call (212) 608-
4848, or write Volunteers For Is-
rael. 40 Worth St., Suite 710,
New York. N.Y. 10013.
Other applicants not interested
in college credit, may write or call
Ben Dinkes, at Jewish Com-
munity Center. 6501 W. Sunrise
Blvd., Fort Lauderdale 33313, or
call 792-6700. Age limitation 18
to 65.
Rabbi Plotkin proposes Jewish
foster grandparent program
In his Yom Kippur Yizlcor
sermon, Rabbi Paul Plotkin of
Temple Beth Am outlined a plan
to enlist the talents and love of
senior citizens, to act as foster
grandparents to children who
Foster Grandparents meet Oct. 14
The Foster Grandparent
Program will meet at 8:30 a.m.
Friday Oct. 14, in the Corps
Building of the Salvation Army,
90 SW 9 Ave., Fort Lauderdale.
Jill Lechner, director of
Medicare Services of Health Care
of Broward.an HMO, will discuss
health maintenance organiza-
tions and how they function.
M.J. "Jodi" Moye, marketing
services representative in the
Marketing and Energy Con-
servation Department of Florida
Power and Light, will discuss,
"Cash for Conservation."
The Foster Grandparent
Program consists of a group of
volunteers, 60 years of age and
over, who serve children on a one-
BCC offers New
Age Studies to
broaden horizens
The Continuing Education-
Community Servicea Department
of Broward Community CoUege
is offering a new concept for the
New Age. New Age Studies are
non-credit courses for people of
all ages, who want to broaden
their horizons. There are no
grades, degrees, credits, or pre-
requisites.
Registration is taking place at
BCC's Central Campus, in Davis.
The term begins Monday Oct. 31
and concludes Friday Dec. 9.
Some of the courses being of-
fered include: yoga. golf, dance,
microcomputers, and language.
Anyone interested in register-
ing can do so by mail, by sending
a complete application and check
to BCC, Community Services,
3501 SW Dsvie Rd.. Fort
Lauderdale, 33314, or registra-
tion can be completed in person.
Call 475-6600 for further in-
formation.
to-one basis in Broward public
schools and other county instal-
lations.
The service provides help not
only for chUdren, but it affords a
meaningful outlet for senior
citizens who stul want to be pro-
ductive "in our society," accord-
ing to Mary Crum (764-8204)
director of the program.
lack such attention. Although a
foster grandparent program
already exists in Fort Lauder-
dale, this one would be primarily
for people of the Jewish religion.
By volunteering, these grand-
parents will have made their
Yizkor prayers to their departed
ones meaningful, since they are
passing on to these children the
same knowledge which they have
received from their own parents
and grandparents. Rabbi Plotkin
will act as the "Shadchen"
(matchmaker) in this
arrangement.
I. R. WEINRAUB & Co., Inc.
Insurance Agents
& Consultants
Insurance Exchange of the America's
245 Southeast First Street. Suite 319
Miami. Florida 33131 (305) 381-9877
MJ. (201)88M900N.Y. (212)864 Telex 642184
The sensible alternati1
MD Emergency Medical Center. Were the
sensible alternative to long, expensive
emergency mom visits, or waiting for an
appointment at a doctors office.
MD Emergency Center offers a full-time
licensed physician and staff, with complete
facilities for all minor emergencies, tests. X-rays,
physicals and minor illness. V*/ehe open from
8 a.m. to midnight, 365 days a year.
And no appointment is ever necessary.
Were here when you need us. We care. And
we can help.
MD
1658-1660 E. Oakland Park Blvd.
Telephone: 564-4300
A non-life-threatening emergency medical center.


rage 1U
lewist
iridian of Greater tort
Friday, Octob,, 14,
CRC director alerts
parents, youth about cults
BBYO announces membership drive
With the school year now
underway, Lawrence M. Schuval,
director, Community Relations
Committee of the Jewish Federa-
tion of Greater Fort Lauderdale,
has issued an alert to parent*
that there are many groups on
campus who will try "to influence
your children's thinking and be-
liefs." In local, middle, and high
schools, Youth for Christ, also
known as, Campus Life and The
Club, are holding programs
which never identify the group as
a Christian missionary
organization.
The purpose of these
programs, according to Schuval,
is to enlarge the membership of
their own local Christian youth
groups. Jewish children should
not attend these programs or
small Campus Life meetings. In
some cases, the group holds
meetings in school after school
hours not unlike other extra-
curricular activities. He said: "If
you are concerned about these
activities, contact the CRC at
748-8400, to voice your objec-
tions." As of last fall, all Broward
County Public Schools were noti-
fied that Campus Life-Youth For
Christ is not permitted to meet in
public schools.
On the college level, there are a
multitude of groups soliciting
students to become members of
their organization. Many of these
Ackerberg to speak
at AJCmeeting
The Shad Polier Chapter of
North Broward, American Jew-
ish Congress (AJC), will hold its
first meeting of the season at 1
p.m. Tuesday Oct. 25 at Holiday
Inn, 441 and Commercial Blvd.,
Tamarac, with Alvera Ackerberg,
a member of the Leadership Mis-
sion to Israel of the Jewish Fed-
eration of Greater Fort Lauder-
dale, as the speaker.
Ackerberg, who is chairman of
the Federation's Project Renewal
Committee, will discuss Federa-
tion's participation with the Is-
raeli government in discussing
Fort Lauderdale's support for the
depressed neighborhoods of the
Israeli city of Kfar Saba. She will
also provide an update of the
Middle East situation, since she
and the others on the Leadership
Mission are meeting this week
with Israeli officials.
AJC notes that refreshments
will be served and invites its
members to bring friends for Al-
ver Ackerberg's slide talk of Fort
Lauderdale's "twin city" in Isra-
el.
THANKSGIVING
AT THE NEW
n GUtt i
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4 DAYS/3 NIGHTS
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89
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2 GUtt Kosher meal* o-tfy
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groups are cults and Christian'
missionaries. They will approach
students at a time when they are
exceptionally vulnerable the
first weeks on campus, when they
are lonely and in need of friend-
ship, during finals week, after
vacations, when the student is
facing a personal crisis the
breakup of a relationship, or
divorce in the family when the
student needs attention.
Schuval said that all college
youth should beware of groups
that recruit by guilt, or invita-
tions to weekend workshops. He
said: "Don't go away for week-
ends or longer with a stranger or
strange group unless you know
the name of the sponsoring orga-
nization, its ideas and beliefs,
what's going to happen at the
workshop, if you will be free and
able to leave at any time." When
people are vulnerable, they can
easily become involved with a
cult or missionary group.
The qftly way to defend your-
self, Schuval says, is to be aware
of there and the consequence of
joining: High school and college
age people are recruited each year
by intelligent, skilled, well
trained and manipulative cult
m<
Bennett Lorman, assistant re-
gional director of B'nai B'rith
Youth Organization (BBYO),
based at the Jewish Community
Center of Greater Fo-t Lauder-
dale, and serving North Broward
and Boca Raton areas, announc-
ed that BBYO has named Lisa
Berman as assistant regional di-
rector for the Hollywood-South
Broward area. Both Lorman and
Berman are planning member-
ship drives for AZA and B'nai
B'rith Girls (BBG).
Lorman also reported that the
Tzahal Chapter of Ateph Zadik
Aleph (AZA) in Plantation had
its election of officers for the
1983-84 year. AZA is the boys
division of BBYO; the other divi-
sion is made up of B'nai B'rith
Girls. Lorman said the boys and
girls interested in joining the
Bennett Lorman
BBYP-t that the >,)
membership are from IjC1
high school graduation Ve*/
call him at the JCC 792-67i.
5810218.
Joel Ronkin was elected m
(president) of Tzahal Chu
Vice presidents are Ed Gu
s'gan, programming, and J
Segaul, s'gan shanee, mem
ship; the secretary is rj,
Moshe, maskir; treasurer Jin
Segaul, gizbor; sergeant-at-.
is Seth Feldman, shotare
Ken Bresky is the imme
pest president of the Chapter.
BBYO is a member of
family of agencies of the Je
Federation of Greater For ]
derdale.
Deerfield's JWV meets Oct. 20, Al Effrat speaker
If there are any questions, or
wish farther information, contact
Schuval at the Federation office,
748-8400.
Al Effrat, newly-appointed as-
sociate campaign director of the
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale and an accom-
plished public speaker, will speak
about the "American Jewish
Community: Its Present and Fu-
ture" at the 8:30 p.m. Thursday
Oct. 20 meeting of the Jewish
War Veterans Post and Auxiliary
of Deerfield Beach. The meeting
will be held in the social hall of
Deerfield's Temple Beth Israel.
Effrat s 15 years of service in
the Jewish communal field.
mixed with a stint as an actor
and a member of Actors' Equity,
qualify him well for this assign-
ment. Prior to joining the Fort
Lauderdale Federation, he was on
the staff of the Jewish Feuen
of Waterbury, Conn, for
years, the past three as ex
director.
Sholom has golf outing
Temple Sholom is sponsoring
the annual "Nate Baum Memo-
rial Golf Outing," starting at 9
a.m. Thursday Oct. 27 at the
Palm-Aire Country Club. Abe
Rubenstein is chairing the event
which honors the late
Baum, and supports the Sdu.
ship Fund of the Temple's Ma,
Club. The entry fee of $271
includes golf cart, lunch,
chance for prizes.
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