The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 3, no. 7 (Apr. 5, 1974)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 9, 1976 called v.4, no. 27 but constitutes v.5, no. 1; issue for July 7, 1989 called v.18, no. 11 but constitutes v.18, no. 13.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44570954
lccn - sn 00229545
ocm44570954
System ID:
AA00014312:00463

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Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward


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Full Text
#Jewish Floridian
t-0,,^11- Number 44
OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE
Fort Lauderdale, Florida Friday, December 24, 1982
frKlShocnti
>rice 36 Cents
UJA Update
'83 UJA Inverrary Golf
Classic Will Aid Israel
Palestinian Leader Says PLO
Will Never Recognize Israel;
Says Reagan Initiative is a 'Zionist Plan'
Wednesday, morning, Jan. 12,
will be the date for some 288
golfers to tee off in the
prestigious second annual UJA
Inverrary Golf Classic.
Invitations have already been
sent out and openings are still
available.
Joseph Kaplan, Inverrary UJA
chairman along with Michael R.
Bloom and Selig Marko co-
chairmen of the Golf Classic have
announced that the biggest purse
vet will be the reward to the
UJA. The increase in the purse
could move the Classic to the top
of the money lists on behalf of
needy Jews in Israel and N.
Broward.
Two golf courses will be used
for the expected 288 players. The
East course will run a regular
PGA handicap scoring. The West
course will have a Callaway
handicap system of scoring. Each
course will be limited to 144
players.
Cocktails, hors d'oeuvres and
dinner will be served at the
Inverrary Country Club after the
tourney. Prizes will also be
awarded to the winners. The all
inclusive fee is $39 per person.
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS A Palestinian leader
said that the Palestine
Liberation Organization "will
never recognize Israel."
Ibrahim Suss, the PLO represen-
tative in Paris, said on French
television, "The priority for us is
the creation of a Palestinian
state. It is the state which will
then, later, decide whom it wishes
to recognize."
Addressing a mass rally, Suss
said the PLO's Central Council,
at its meeting in Damascus, had
"categorically rejected" Presi-
dent Reagan's Middle East peace
plan "because it is a Zionist plan
contrary to Palestinian and Arab
interests." (In Washington yes-
terday a State Department
spokesman insisted the PLO's
Central Council had not in fact
rejected the Reagan plan out-
right .V
The rally Suss addressed was
attended by more than 1.000 peo-
ple and was held to mark the in-
ternational "Day of Solidarity
with the Palestinian People."
Among those attending were rep-
resentatives of the Communist
Party and of Communist-oriented
Labor unions. The Socialist
Party was not represented.
Suss rejected an appeal by the
Communist dominated CGT
trade union for talks between the
PLO and certain Israeli demo-
cratic groups. "How can one talk
to us about Israeli democracy
when Palestinian blood in Beirut
is not yet dry? Such a suggestion
is a scandal." Suss declared.
(Meanwhile, at the United Na-
tions, the General Assembly
opened its debate on the question
of Palestine. Farouk Kaddoumi,
who is considered to be the PLO
"foreign secretary." reiterated
his organization's views that the
solution to the Palestinian
problem will not be found unless
an independent Palestinian state
is established. He also said that
Israel must withdraw from all
"occupied Palestinian and Arab
territories.")
News Capsules
Crisis Averted Over 'Who is a Jew'Issue
Israel
By David Landau
JERUSALEM The govern-
ment coalition leadersihp blocked
presentation of the "Who is a
Jew" amendment in the Knesset
recently, averting an immediate
crisis over the bitterly controver-
sial issue.
The amendment to the Law of
Return, sponsored by the Aguda
Israel Party, would have come up
for debate at the next Knesset
session. Instead, the Aguda was
persuaded to back off and a three-
man committee was set up to de-
cide when the amendment will be
submitted. The committee con-
sists of Premier Menachem
Begin, Avraham Shapiro *of the
Aguda and Haim Druckman of
the National Religious Party.
Shapiro told reporters that the
measure must be submitted be-
fore the Knesset retires for its
Passover recess next spring and
hinted strongly that if it was not.
the Aguda might quit Begin's
coalition. Likud MKs denied that
any such deadline was set.
The amendment would change
the Law of Return to define a Jew
as someone born of a Jewish
mother or converted according to
"halacha" religious law.
Halachic conversion is not speci-
fied in the law as it presently
stands. Its inclusion would deny
automatic Israeli citizenship to
any convert to Judaism con-
verted by a non-Orthodox rabbi.
The amendment is firmly op-
posed by the Reform and Con-
servative branches of Judaism in
the U.S. and elsewhere and by
many Israelis, including mem-
bers of Likud's Liberal Party
wing and virtually the entire
Labor Alignment. The Aguda
was accused of trying to take ad
vantage of the absence of many
Knesset opponents who are
currently on a trip to Brazil to
push the measure through parlia-
ment. The Aguda denied this.
It demanded that Begin live up
to his promises to do his best to
have the measure passed once it
reaches the Knesset. That was
one of several concessions to
Orthodox religion Begin made to
induce the Aguda to join his
government in the summer of
1981.
Aguda MK Menachem Porush
warned the other coalition part-
ners that "You might just wake
up one morning and find we have
zone Porush claimed the coali-
tion needed the Aguda to sur-
vive "not Rabbi Schindler and
the American Reform move-
ment"
He was referring to Rabbi
Alexander Schindler, president of
the Union of American Hebrew
Congregations and other Reform
ieadeVs who cabled Jerusalem
ZOA President Ivan J. Novick (right) welcomes U.S. Sen.
Alfonse M. D'Amato (R., N.Y.fat a ZOA Brandeis Award
Dinner honoring ZOA leader Jules RithoU of New York, where
the Senator said that it was inconceivable that the 1/.&. would
supply arms to Jordan.
urging the Knesset not to pass
the amendment.
MORE ATROCITIES?
Ma'ariv has reported that
1.200 Palestinians have disap-
peared from Beirut since the
Lebanese army took control of
the city. Ma'ariv quotes the Is-
raeli military as its source. How-
Continued on Page 9
Do We Have Any Other Choice?
By ISRAEL RESNIKOFF
Israel Resnikoff. co-chairman of Super Sunday
'S3, has been long active with Jewish Federation,
immunity and synagogue activities.
We are approaching the peak of the annual
United Jewish Appeal Campaign of the Jewish
federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale and the
b question is are we ready for it 10f course.
there can only be one answer.. resounding
"YES." Do we have any other choicer
For the past six months we have had our eyes
Klued to theTV, listening to reports. watchmg
Sdhoping that the big war in Lebanonwould
Jewish men are still dug in deep in the bunkersot
iZanon How long are these brave and courage-
each of us must ask ourselves is HOW CAN I
" Needes. for me to remind you that the State of
^n0ml^atUefreS. many factories are
SSSSSSS35--
ftSg anting"'that we American Jews doour
share when called upon.
widows, the orphans, the sick, the feeble, and the
elderly. When someone knocks on your door, or
someone calls you by phone, extend to this
volunteer a most cordial welcome and above all be
aracious with your contribution or pledge.
Realizing that our beleaguered State of Israel has
no other friends, it is incumbent upon us. it is our
sacred duty and obligation to increase our pledges
substantially over last year.
Perhaps, this is the year when all of us must
once again evaluate in our own minds and hearts
and ask ourselves. "Am 1 really doing my share?
Am I giving enough? Is this the year when 1, too,
will become a volunteer and knock on my neigh-
bor's doors and volunteer to do my share on SU-
PER SUNDAY?" Perhaps this is the year when
all of us will pledge to give up some luxury and
make our increase a substantial one, so that the
State of Israel can maintain and be able to carry
out its humanitarian needs.
Remember that our United Jewish Appeal!
dollars do not go into the war budget, but only to
maintain social programs for the sick, the nursing
homes, education, widows, orphans, resettlement
of new immigrants and so many other humanitar-
ian endeavours.
Helping the State of Israel assures them of our
solidarity, our friendship, that we do care, that we
realize their predicament is no fault of their own.
Give, contribute, pledge and feel good by doing
your share -NOW!!!!


Page 2
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
UJA Updates
UJA National 'Yachad'Mission To Bring
1,500 Young Americans to Israel in April
Friday, December 24. m
B
NEW YORK More
than 1,500 American Jews
between the ages of 25-40 will
visit Israel April 10-20, 1983, as
participants in "Yachad," the
United Jewish Appeal Young
Leadership Mission, David S.
Greene, Chairman of the UJA
National Young Leadership
Cabinet, and Nita Levy, Young
Women's Leadership Cabinet
Chairperson, have announced.
"Yachad" is the Hebrew word
meaning 'together,' Green and
Levy said in their announcement,
"and we look upon this Mission
as a time for young American
Jews to stand together with the
young Jews of Israel, an historic
opportunity to express their
solidarity with them.
"Together," they continued,
"Americans and Israelis will
share their pride in our history
and proclaim the readiness of the
next generation of Jewish leader-
ship to assume its place in the
long and proud continuity of
Jewish life as we celebrate the
thirty-fifth anniversary of the
Jewish State."
The joint announcement said
that this is the only National
Young Leadership mission UJA
is offering this year and that it is
being designed for those who
have never been to Israel before
or who have never been on a UJA
mission to the Jewish homeland.
The Yachad Mission itinerary
will begin on April 10 with
special Holocaust Day remem-
brance ceremonies at each of the
gateway airports throughout the
U.S. from which participants will
depart for Israel.
Highlights of the Mission
include a celebration of Israel's
thirty-fifth anniversary on April
18, Yom Haatzmaut, Israel Inde-
pendence Day; participation in
Israel's commemoration of the
Warsaw Ghetto uprising on April
19, and home hospitality with the
next generation of Israeli leader-
ship.
Also planned are a torchlight
ceremony atop Masada and in-
tensive Project Renewal pro-
gramming.
Further information on costs
and extensions in Israel and
Europe is available from the Fed-
eration office at 8350 W. Oakland
Park Blvd on by calling the Fed-
eration at 748-8200.
Shirley Katz, Jacob Kushner repres
iMfli
rat Gate Condominium.
Sabal Palm Names UJA Chairman
Fred Ten Brink of Sabal Palm residents of this condominium,
has once again undertaken the Named as co-chairman is Max
role of UJA chairman for the Cohnen. Both leaders have
(Left to right) Representing Oriole Oolf & Tennis 1 are Morris
Kushner, Carol Cummis, Mickey Danberg, David E. Brill and
Clarence HourviU.
planned to organize and spur the
residents of Sabal Palm to their
best year in the '83 Campaign.
Concord Village UJA Committee Plans Campaign
The Concord Village United
Jewish Appeal Committee went
into high gear with a meeting on
Monday. Dec. 20 at the Tamarac
Jewish Center to discuss the 1983
Campaign progress.
Chairman John Shabel ex-
pressed high expectations for this
year's achievements and comple-
mented the committee for their
, dedicated work on behalf of the
Campaign.
Guest speaker at the meeting
was Tamarac Councilman David
Krantz.
Sands Point Opens UJA Drive
Sands Points residents
completed their organizational
structure for the '83 United Jew-
ish Appeal-Israel Special Fund
Campaign.
Co-chairing the project are
Carolyn Feffer and Alfred Jesser
(Pictured here). The opening rally
has been set for Sunday, Jan. 9 at
10 a.m. at the Tamarac Jewish
Center where the guest speaker
will be comedian Eddie Schaffer
Additional entertainment will
feature the Sands Point Con-
doliers led by Ann Eisen with
Women 9s Division
Masada Luncheon
Plans are being made for the
Masada Division 11,000
minimum luncheon, to be held at
Freda Goldstein's home in Palm
Aire. Felice Sincoff, campaign
chairman of the Women's
Division, announced that Gladys
Daren and Anne Monarch will co-
chair this prestigious event. The'
date Monday, January 17.
The committee is being formed
and the ocassion will mark one of
the largest functions for
Women'8 Division.
Pauline Jaye at the piano.
The committee is made up of;
Joel Cohen and Sarah Goldstein,
hospitality chairmen; Murray
Hershkin, Harry Mednick,
Reuben Strashinsky, publicity
co-chairmen.
In addition, the committee is
composed of Morris and Anne
Borkler, Hy Camel, Rose Gale,
Julie and Sophie Golden, Ruth
Hershkin, Rose Keshlonsky,
Belle Kopf, and Jack Kotler.
Completing the committee are;
Henry and Goldie Kronstadt,
Ruth Mednick. Freda Minde, Nat
Prentes, Ray and Betty
Rosenblatt. Sol and Bertha
Stillerman, Abe Tromberg and
Harold Vigdor.
Margate Community Sets
Pace for UJA Campaign
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FROM
Congregation Beth Hillel of
Margate was the setting of the
Margate city-wide United Jewish
Appeal (UJA) meeting held
recently.
The focus of the gathering was
to coordinate activities surround-
ing the "83 UJA Special Israel
Fund and to tentatively establish
the various programs of each of
the participating condominiums
and residential areas that will
help the Greater Fort Lauderdak
Jewish community reach its goal.
Activities ranging from break-
fasts, rallys. luncheons to more
encompassing affairs were the
subject of discussion and plann-
ing.
The members, representing
eight local and residential areas,
will meet with their respective
groups to complete their
programs.
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Iflidiy
December 24.1982
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdalt
Omega UJA Campaign Jumps into Action
Page3
I ferny Rosenberg end Abe Semelmacher, eo-
\umen of the Omega Condominium and Villas
[& United Jewish Appeal campaign have
\mmnctd plans for this years annual campaign.
i breakfast honoring the Omega religious service
lammittee will be held on Sunday, January 90,
\m at the main clubhouse. Tentative plans
\m United Jewish Appeal campaign, have
unounced plans for this year's annual campaign.
l/nm a tour of duty in southeastern Lebanon as
the featured speaker for that morning. The
Omega campaign is off to a good start with
$1,500, which was contributed to the Israel
Emergency Fund by the Omega Religious Service
Committee.
Pictured are Carl Naimon, Murray Rosenberg,
Abe Semelmacher, Max Finkelstein. Receiving
check from Jerry Kay is Joel Telles, assistant and
executive director of the Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale.
Palm Aire Cocktail Party
Features Abraham Gittelson
Palm Aire Cocktail Party
features Abraham Gittelson
Under the direction of the
Palm Aire UJA committee, a
cocktail party, on Tuesday, Dec.
28 at 4 p.m. in the Rec 10 Gezebo,
will feature Abraham Gittelson,
educational director for the Jew-
ish Federation, as the main
speaker.
A veteran and experienced
educator, Mr. Gittelson haa
addressed many groups in the
Broward condominiums and is a
familiar figure in Broward
County. He will speak of his most
recent trip in Lebanon and Israel.
His keen insight will afford his
listerners a comprehensive
update on activities in the Middle
East.
As a frequent visitor to Israel,
Gittelson numbers the citizens of
Israel, ranging from the academic
world to the early settlers of the
State of Israel to the members of
the Kibbutz movement, among
his friends and associates.
Norman Cohen, Iaaac Ein, Abe
Hersh. Joseph KranbarR. Tony
Ledner and Sid Zimmy who are
responsible for the program, felt
sure that the residents of Palm
Abraham Gittelson
Aire would gather in great
numbers to hear Mr. Gittelson
speak.
Date Correction
Residents of Waterbridge
condominium will have a
major breakfast rally on
Sunday, Feb. 6, not as
previously announced.
Assembly Hears Sen. Robert Kasten
On Rejecting Intolerance
Sen. Robert Kasten (R.-Wisc.)
Is currently serving as a U.S.
If resentative to the 37th session
lithe UN General Assembly. On
|*v. 23, Sen. Kasten spoke to his
lUow delegates on the subject of
"Elimination of All Forms of
lleligious Intolerance." Excerpts
|"his remarks follow:
"Mr. Chairman, last year,
lUlowing almost two decades of
Inosideration, study and discus-
Ian, the General Assembly
[opted the Declaration on the
IElimination of All Forms of
[tolerance and Discrimination
ion Religious or Belief.
"The Declaration prescribes
states take 'effective
j to prevent or eliminate [
mnation on the grounds of
pous or belief,' and that they
ike all efforts to enact or"
scind legislation where
asary to prohibit discri-
ation and to take all appro-
measures to combat in-
nnce."
"By adopting this Declaration,
wn nave noi solved the proDiem
|l religious intolerance. Many -
[ecific and glaring cases of
F religious intolerance and discri-
mination continue to exist.
Soviet Anti-Semitism
The world pioneer in the
Ijippression of religion, Mr.
jaiirman, is the Soviet Union.
Although Article 62 of the Soviet
I^W'tution guarantees freedom
l religion, and provides for the
l!?"atlon of *** nd "tats,
["* practice followed in the So-
m Union is best described in
[following quote from the
l*na of Stalin:
It, Lhe party CmDBOi *> neutral
*ard religion and it conducts
[t'-religun propaganda against
*m every religious prejudice.'
Religion is seen as preaching
Pjtranscendent view of man
*" the world which Soviet
?l**m reject, since this view
"innately opposed to their ef-
uiV0 make th individual
Ijnpletely subservient to the
l?f". There are also epecific
Jwhes and religions for
">Pe, the Catholic Church in
I kiwi" or the '"fcnuc Religion
1 noontral Asian Republics of
rl^SR that are seen as the
T"*" of a nationalist spirit
nicn works against Russian
I ^'nation.
ijjj* Jewish minority in the
*t Union experiences discri-
J"n and denial of basic
afnn rights not only on
religious grounds but on racial
and ethnic grounds as well.
Soviet Jaws who attempt to
teach their religion to young
people can be charged with crimi-
nal activity and sent to the
Gulag. Those who reproduce
religious writings may lose their
jobs and often face arrest as well.
Jewish parents, like Protestant
or Catholic or Orthodox parents,
may be deprived of their children
if the children receive religious
instruction outside the home.
In addition to these persecu-
tions, common to all who practice
a religion in the Soviet Union,
Jews are subject to a range of
discrimination and hostility
which is reserved especially for
them. State and party news-
papers and periodicals have
published an enormous volume of
anti-Semitic hate literature which
reworks the themes of The
Protocols of the Elders of Zion,
the anti-Semitic tract first
published in Russia in 1906. It
alleges a Jewish world conspiracy
and inspired the propaganda and
violence of the Black Hundreds in
Russia at the turn of the century
and later of the Nazis in Ger-
many.
From New East Report
BRITISH PRIME
MINISTER REFUSES TO
RECEIVE LEADING
PLO OFFICIAL
By Maurice Samuelson
LONDON The refusal by
Prime Minister Margaret
Thatcher to receive a leading
PLO official has caused the post-
ponement, for a second time, of a
visit to Britain by an Arab
League delegation led by King
Hassan of Morocco.
The king was expected here
with the seven-member commit-
tee set up by the Fez Arab sum-
mit in September to explain the
summit's peace plan to the five
permanent members of the
United Nations Security Council.
The delegation has already
seen President Reagan in Wash-
ington and was originally
scheduled here at the beginning
of November.
'Now I can begin to understand the passengers.' (Mike in
Yediot Achronot.' Courtesy WZPS, Jerusalem.)
General Assembly Condemns Israel
UNITED NATIONS (JTA)
The General Assembly
overwhelmingly adopted a resol-
ution condemning Israel for its
alleged cooperation with South
Africa, especially in the military
and nuclear areas. The vote was
113-18 with 10 abstentions.
The resolution, adopted as part
of a series of resolutions dealing
with apartheid, demanded that
Israel sever all ties with South
Africa, in particular, its "nuclear
and military"' cooperation. It also
urged all member-states to
pressure Israel to cut its relation-
ships with South Africa.
ertificates
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Page 4
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdaie
-.

Friday, December 2
eJewisH Floridian
SS1SEK, ^ggg.
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F" lauderdaie Hollywood Advertising Oltice Am Savings 2S00 Bldg
zsoo E Hanandale Beach Bi.d Sun* 707 G Hallandale. Fla 33009 Phone 454 0466
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Member JTA. Sevan Afta. WNS. NEA. AJPA anrfFPA
....i,i!l.',h Flo"0l,n N' Guarantee Kaahrulh ol Merchandise Advertised
SUBSCRIPTION RATES 2 Yea, Minimum 7 50 (Local A,.. 95 Annual, or by membership
Jewish Federalion o( Greater Forl Lauderdaie
The Federation.,* the news oll.ce ol lh Jaw.ah Floridian o. Graataf Fort Lauderdaie are localed a.
8360 W Oakland Park Bl.d Fort Lauderdaie. Fl 33321 Phone (305) 748-6200
Readers Write
'Tis The Season To Be Jewish
Friday, December 24,1982
Volume 11
8TEVETH5743
Number 44
A Deserved Tribute
Political leaders are often judged by
the way their opposition talks about them.
In the case of Miami's Kenneth Myers,
even those who on occasion did not agree
with him when he was a Florida State
Senator serving in the Legislature in
Tallahassee rarely if ever spoke of him in
terms other than laudatory.
It is a mark of the esteem in which
Sen. Myers was held that when he decided
not to run again, there was a general feeling
of disappointment, not only in the elec-
torate, but among his colleagues as well,
both from the north and the south of the
state, who recognized and admired the high
quality of his performance.
Now, Sen. Myers' former constituents
in South Florida have honored him by the
establishment of the Kenneth M. Myers
Bayside Park in Coconut Grove. They have
thus done more than feel regret that he is
no longer serving us in the State Senate;
they have expressed their gratitude for his
enlightened leadership in Tallahassee while
he was there.
This sort of living monument to a
distinguished community leader too often
comes toward the end of one's creative
years. But Sen. Myers again defies the
stereotypes. He is still a young man with
an enviable reputation for past per-
formance and who holds out every promise
of continued active service in the future.
The son of a pioneer Miami family at the
head of which stand distinguished national
and community leaders in their own right,
Stanley and Martha Myers, he demon-
strates that the apple has not fallen far
from the tree.
The Kenneth M. Myers Bayside Park
frames all of these things into a happy
portrait of dedicated service and a grateful
Miami's reaction to it.
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
In the season to be jolly, headlines, crudely
worded, abound in the press: "Jew Protests
Christmas," "Jews Oppose Holiday Pageants."
A Jewish lady writes a letter to the editor
protesting against prayers in public places which
refer to the Christian trinity. And national
American Jewish organizations, not to be out-
done, protests to the U.S. Post Office about a new
stamp which reproduces a 15th century painting
depicting the madonna and child, claiming that
this violates the First Amendment guarantee of
separation of church and state. The headline
reads, "Jews Protest Yule Stamp."
As the famous rabbi in the famous story said
to the famous rebbetzin, "You, too, are right."
Everybody is right when it comes to Christmas
Jews and Christians. It is true that the public
schools should not be a place where sectarian
religious practices are foisted upon unsuspecting
children. Certainly, Jewish children should not
have to squirm through Christmas pageants and
plays and carols singing about silent nights and
the kings born to Israel. Neither Christmas nor,
lehavdil, Chanukah belong in the public schools;
neither Easter nor, lehavdil, Pesach; neither Lent
nor Sefirah, neither Good Friday nir, lehavdil,
Yom Kippur. These belong in churches and
synagogues, not in the schools.
But though I sympathize with the plight of
Jewish children during the Yule season, and
though I am a bit uncomfortable at hearing public
prayers addressing a son of god, and though the
madonna and child on my mail does not appeal to
my religious sensitivities, I must confess that I
cannot get too exercised over these things. For I
realize that I live not in a democracy where my
voice is equal to that of all others; I know that I
live in a free Christian land. I am grateful that it
is free and that it permits me the free expression
of my faith. But that it is predominately
Christian I fully recognize. And though
theoretically some of the manifestations of the
dominant culture are technically in violation of
the Constitution and of good taste, the fact is that
Christianity is so deeply a part of American life
and so hopelessly bound up in emotion that Jews
would, in my view, be better advised to utilize
their energies not in a futile battle against these
abuses but in much more constructive ways- to
begin raising our children in such a way that far
from troubling them, the December season and all
that goes with it strengthens them as Jews.
This reason is an opportunity for Jewish
parents and children to re-examine who they are
and why they are what they are. It is an op-
portunity to develop Jewish backbone, and
personal spiritual strength.
As one who attended public schools, I know
the difficulties this period poses for Jewish
children. But it can be counter-acted not
simply bo over-emphasizing Chanukah beyond its
proportions but by re-affirming one's
Jewishness twelve months a year. The chances
are that a literate, committed, knowledgeable Jew
will not panic at the sight of a Yule stamp, at the
sound of carols, or even at holiday pageants in
schools.
Let us be grateful that we Jews, a mere 3
percent of the population, enjoy full freedom to
practice our faith. Instead of over-reacting to
Christmas and such, we ought to look within
ourselves and inquire about the extended and
depth of our own Jewishness. In this way we
might transform a difficult season into a
meaningful life.
'This the season to be Jewish .
A Realistic Jew
WJCongress in Jerusalem
Immigration Commitments Sought
By DAVID LANDAU
And GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Leon Dulzin has called
for the establishment of a
new movement of mag-
shimim (fulfillment) to en-
list Jews throughout the
world who will put Zionism
into practice by signing a
commitment to immigrate
to Israel.
Dulzin, chairman of the World
Zionist Organization and Jewish
Agency Executives, stressed
aliya as a Jewish commitment in
his keynote address at the 30th
World Zionist Congress in Jeru-
salem's Binyanei Ha'ooma con-
vention center. The huge hall was
packed with some 2.000 dele-
gates, invited guests and ob-
servers while another 2,000
watched and heard the proceed
igns via closed circuit television
in another hall.
DULZIN SAID his goal was to
establish a new. comprehensive
pioneer movement to guide Jew-
ish youth the world over with the
ultimate aim of aliya. He placed
special emphasis on youth, as-
serting that there are presently
thousands of young Jews who
want to immigrate to Israel. The
movement should encompass
tens of thousands, he declared.
The WZO chairman also said
that the Zionist movement
should now concentrate its ef-
forts on the Jewish academic
world. Until now, he said, it has
been focused on the Jewish busi-
ness community which was es-
sential in the early days of the
Jewish State because of its vast
economic needs. "Now is the time
to approach another segment of
the Jewish community, a seg-
ment whose influence has in-
creased considerably,'' Dulzin
said.
"We refer to some million
Jews, students, teachers, re-
searchers and professors who we
have to reach and make them join
the Zionist and Jewish fram.
work." Dulxin said The old
framework! > vp
ment are outdated and no longer
reflect reality and the needs of
the movement, he maintained.
DULZIN DESCRIBED the
"new Jew" as one no longer per-
secuted and enjoying a variety of
life options. "Zionism can and
must serve as an anchor to the
Jews rocked by the ocean of the
many choices which they face,"
he said.
He said he viewed the Zionist
movement as two concentric cir-
cles, a broad outer one and an in-
ner one. It is in the inner circle
that one can find those Zionists
who should sign the pledge to im-
migrate to Israel, he said. "We
shall not force anyone to do so,
but at the same time we shall not
free Zionists from the personal
duty of confronting the question
of a'.iya," he declared.
In response to Dulzin s call,
the Congress delegates rose in a
demonstration of solidarity with
Soviet Jewry, the refusenik.s.
"Prisoners of Zion" and the
"hundreds of thousands awaiting
aliya." He declared: "We must
not fail. We shall not rest until we
succeed in bringi.-^? to Israel
.-very Jew from Russia, Syria,
Ethiopia and all other lands of
oppression."
THE WZO chairman discussed
"Project Renewal, "the partner-
ship between Israel and Ameri-
can Jewry aimed at eliminating
poverty neighborhoods in Israel.
He referred to the Zionist move-
ment's role in helping increase
the Jewish population in Galilee
and developing that region. He
also discussed plans for the re-
organization of the Zionist move-
ment to enable every Zionist
organization to be represented, to
compete in fairness and to exert
influence within the framework of
the larger Zionist movement.
Dulzin stressed the need for
unity in Israel and the continued
dialogue between Israel and dia-
spora Jewry. "I pray we shall be
a unified nation, the People of the
Book, a cultural, moral nation of
which all Jews will be proud and
to which they will want to come.
never to leave again.'' he said.
Dulzin's speech was expected
to be the basis of the general de-
bate" to be held during the Con-
gress which ends on Dec. 18. As
the festive opening session got
underway, with greetings- de-
livered by President Yitzhak
Navon of Israel, the inevitable
lx>hind-the-scenes struggle was
being waged between the various
Zionist parties over executive
posit ions and portfolios.
Hardship Fund Applications
The Conference on Jewish
Material Claims has asked all re-
settlement and communal service
organizations to note that the
filing deadline-for applications to
the Claims Conference Hardship
Fund is December 31. 1982. The
Conference seeks assistance in
identifying eligible claimants and
encourages them to apply.
The Hardship Fund was estab-
lished primarily for Jewish
victims of Nazi persecution who
emigrated from Eastern
European countries after 1965.
Because they resided in Iron
Curtain countries, most of these
people did not have the opport-
unity to file claims under the
German Indemnification Law.
In xome cases applications
be accepted from
who
resided in countries outside
Eastern Europe prior to
December 31, 1965. but who did
not file timely claims under the
(ierman Indemnification Law.
The Hardship Fund distributes
money made available by tne
German Federal Government
The Claims Conference is respon-
sible for the administration oune
Fund. Payments are limited w
5.000 deutsche marks (aPPJ0*''
mately $2.5001 per P*n !"J"
far more than 100 mujon
deutsche marks have been paw w
eligible claimants.
If there are individuals in yg
community who may be eugj"
for payments, have them *n
to: Claim. Conference Hard.JP
Fund. Room 1355. 15 EMtjjJ
Street. New York. N.Y.1OO10 f*
an application.


Tav. December 24,1962
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 5
Communication Skills
filling in Background
Security Pact 'Close' With Lebanon JfEZ0^lHeU~Image
NEWYORK- (JTA)-
Israers Defense Minister
Ariel Sharon said here that
lsrael is "dose to" a
security arrangement with
Lebanon and seeks a
normalization of relations
with that country as the
first step toward a full-
fledged peace treaty.
He warned that Israel w*a un-
alterably opposed to any linkage
between progress toward a peace
treaty with Lebanon and conces-
sions by Israel on the West Bank
and Gaza Strip. He contended
that President Reagan's "plan"
for the West Bank would "rein-
stitute the Lebanese model" that
existed before June, 1982 when
Israel launched its "Peace for
Galilee" campaign.
SHARON MADE his remarks
in the course of a 90-minute
dosed meeting with representa-
tives of the Conference of Presi-
dents of Major American Jewish
Organizations attended by some
100 persons. The meeting was
chaired by Yehuda- Hellman,
executive vice chairman of the
Conference, in the absence of ita
chairman, Julius Berman, who is
in Israel.
The contents of Sharon's
speech and his replies to ques-1
tions were reported to the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency by a source
who was present at the meeting.
According to the source, Sharon
intimated that the negotiations
for security arrangements with
I*banon were direct. He did not
say where or at what level they
were being conducted.
He stressed, however, that
security arrangements can come
about only through direct nego-
tiations so that the signatories
can be held accountable for
carrying out the terms.
ACCORDING to the source.
Sharon said the security arrange-
ments "we are close to" would
contain the following terms:
No Arab army will again be
allowed into Lebanese territory.
Any other foreign forces
such as peace-keeping troops
must be from countries which
recognize Israel.
Lebanon will not permit the
military or political presence of
any terrorist group on its soil.
No artillery, rocket-
launchers or surface-to-air mis-
siles will be permitted in the 45-
">" kilometer zone bordering on
Israel.
Israeli warning stations will
be operated in that zone until a
formal peace treaty is signed.
Gen. Sharon
Sharon warned that unless
President Amin Gemayel of
Lebanon signs a peace treaty
with Israel he will be the "Presi-
dent of the Presidential Palace
but not of the country." He
meant, apparently, that Lebanon
would degenerate into warring
factions as was the situation be-
fore the Israeli campaign.
BUT SHARON insisted that
Israel was not putting pressure
on Lebanon. "Nothing in our de-
mands go beyond the normal
security needs of both countries,
he said. "There is nothing to be
ashamed of that we want to have
a peace treaty with our neigh-
bors, nothing to be ashamed of
that we want to negotiate direct-
ly in our capital and in their
apital."
Sharon disclosed, according to
the source, that as of Nov. 15,
1982, Israel formally opened its
border with Lebanon with normal
customs and passport controls
and that thousands of Lebanese
have crossed into Israel for busi-
ness or as tourists. He did not
say where the border post is lo-
cated.
He claimed that commercial
normalization has already begun.
He said $20 million worth of
goods has already entered Leba-
non from Israel, half of it being
Israeli exports and the rest Leba-
nese imports from other countries
transhipped via Israeli ports-
Sharon said Lebanese importers
prefer to use Haifa to their own
ports.
WITH RESPECT to Reagan's
plan, which called for Palestinian
control of the West Bank in asso-
ciation with Jordan, Sharonis
view, as conveyed to the JTA,
was that it would invite the same
chaos that prevailed in Lebanon
before June, 1982. According to
Sharon, without Israeli forces in
control of internal and external
security in the territory, any
demilitarized zone associated
with Jordan would be open to in-
filtration by Arab armies and ter-
rorists.
Sharon said that between
January 1,1965 and June 5.1982,
terrorists operating from Leba-
non caused over 7,000 casualties:
1.392 dead and 6.239 wounded.
He said Israel had good relations
with the Lebanese in south Leba-
non long before June, 1982.
He said these were not only the
Christians who would not exist
today were it not for Israel's pro-
tection but Moslems, mainly
Shi'ites, who also suffered from
the Palestine Liberation Or-
ganization. He said the Shi'ites
often prevented the PLO from
operating against Israel from
their villages.
SHARON SAID he could not
comment on the commission of
inquiry in Israel currently in-
vestigating the massacres in the
Shatila and Sabre refugee camps
in west Beirut last September be-
cause the matter is still sub
judice. However, he declared, "I
believe in Israeli justice."
He said that 479 persons were
killed in the Shatila camp of
whom 118 were Lebanese, includ-
ing 98 men, eight women and 12
children: 328 Palestinians, in-
cluding 313 men, seven women
and eight children: seven
Syrians: two Algerians: three
Pakistanis: and 21 Iranians all
of them male.
Sharon said those figures came
from the Lebanese Red Cross, the
International Red Cross, the
Lebanese civilian defense, relief
organizations and the relatives of
victims.
Sharon arrived in New York
after visiting Honduras where he
conferred with government offi-
cials. According to JTA's infor-
mant he received a "warm wel-
come" and his statements drew a
"positive response."

V
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tj
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Mr
*.
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fflpOTW
IBHBB^i steaks a seafood
The Perfect Setting for Special
Birthdays and Anniversaries.
Facilities Available for Group and
Organization Luncheons and Dinners.
2900 N.E. 12th Terrace, Fort Lauderdale
Broward 565-2929 Dade 940-2922 Boca368-SW
Mrs. M. called Jewish Family
Service for her husband, 35 year
old Phil. She explained that her
husband was interested in seek-
ing counseling in order to cope
more effectively with his parents,
and in order to improve his self-
esteem. Mrs. M. joined her
husband for his first session and
then suggested he be seen alone.
Mrs. M's eagerness to be at the
first session and her assertive-
ness at the session seemed to
highlight one of the problems her
husband had. that of expressing
himself. He agreed that he tended
to be overly passive, taking less
chances of rejection. The
therapist suggested that perhaps
this lack of assertion was some-
thing Mr. M. would like to work
on and Mr. M. agreed to do this.
Mrs. M. agreed to attend future
sessions inorder to help and
support her husband. At this
point, the idea that Mrs. M.
would have to accomodate her
husband by changing her
behavior was addressed. She
agreed that she would have to
change by allowing her husband
to express himself to her, and in
ways she had not previously
considered.
In sessions, Mr. M. was en-
couraged to relate directly to the
therapist and to his wife. This
was difficult for him and equally
difficult for his wife to allow him
to do. They practiced communi-
cations skills both in the office
and in the home. Mr. M. was
assigned the task of writing down
ways he felt he could improve his
professional and personal rela-
tionships. Next, he was asked to
try a few of these ideas by ex-
pressing them to the appropriate
people. There were several
failures and several successes,
but his confidence in being able
to express himself increased mea-
sureabry, building his successes.
After relating the familial
problems he experienced with his
parents, Mr. M re-examined his
role in the relationships. He dis-
Jewish Family Services UFSf
of Broward County offers coun-
seling to individuals and families
in a wide variety of problems.
Case histories published here
nhow how some problems are re-
solved. Since all relationships
with its clients are confidential,
names and identifying characters
have been changed.
cussed how he would like things
to l>e. talked over his alternatives
and then attempted some.
Mr. M. still attends sessions.
He feels better about himself and
his ability to recognize and state
his needs and desires to others.
His relationship with his mother
and father have improved signi-
ficantly, but more goals have
been set.
Yiddish Musical
Comedy at BCC
The Southern Region of the
Workmen's Circle is pleased to
announce an outstanding thea-
trical event coming to Bailey
Concert Hall at Broward Com-
munity College. Mary Soreanu,
the "superstar" of Yiddish
Theater, will appear in The
Showgirl, a Yiddish musical
comedy with English narration.
This show comes directly from
New York's Town Hall Theater
and has a large cast of singers
and dancers. Showtime is
Sunday, Jan. 16 at 2 p.m .and 8
p.m. For tickets please call Bailey
Hall, 475-6884 or Minerva and
Hy Kaplan, 733-3790.

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Sf


Page 6
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, December 24 \<&2

Citations Highlight 33rd National Jewish Book Awards
By DAVID M.SZONYI,
Amoc. direction of
Radus Instit.
The Torah: A Modern Com-
mentary
NEW YORK, N.Y. For the
first time in the history of the
National Jewish Book Awards,
two path-breaking works were
awarded special citations of achi-
evement: the new, three-volume
Jewish Publication Society
translation of the Bible, and the
Union of American Hebrew Con-
gregations' The Torah: A
Modern Commentary. Each work
has been over 15 years in the
making.
Jewish Books
juub in Review
A
? ?
A_A
is a service of the IWB lewish Book Council,
IS East 26th St., New York, N.Y. 10010
In presenting the special
citations at the 33rd annual
awards ceremony, at New York's
Central Synagogue Community
House Dr. Robert Gordis noted
that "All of Jewish literature
may in some sense be described
as a commentary on the Bible."
The Bible was perhaps the first
book translated (from Hebrew to
Greek, in part to benefit the one
million Jews of Alexandria, in
250 BCE). Its translations into
Aramaic, and later into German
by Moses Mendelssohn, respec-
| tively marked the dawns of the
Behind the Headlines
Peace Now Leader Says American Jewish and
Israel Public Opinion Divided Over Israel's Policy
By GO Sedan
JERUSALEM American
Jewish public opinion is divided
on policies of the Israel govern-
ment in the same way that Israeli
public opinion is divided on the
same issue, Tzaly Reshef, 29,
chief spokesman of the Peace
Now movement, and one of its
founders, told the Jewish Tele-
graphic Agency.
Reshef returned from a two-
week visit to 10 American cities,
in which he presented the views
of his movement, and tried to
boost the activities of American
Friends of Peace Now which sup-
ports the Israeli dovish organiza-
tion. Reshef noted, though, one
major difference between Ameri-
can Jewry and Israeli public
opinion.
"Whereas we have no problems
expressing our criticism of the
government. American Jews
have difficulty expressing it," he
said. Although Reshef is well
aware that American Jews do not
wish to interfere in the internal
issues of Israel, one of his efforts
during the tour was to convince
them to speak out.
"First I tried to convince them
of the positions of Peace Now.
Then I told them that those who
agree with us, but still keep
quiet, harm the state of Israel,"
Reshef said.
NEW U.S. PLAN FOR
LEBANESE TALKS:
CHILLY RECEPTION
FROM ISRAEL
ROME U.S. special envoy
Philip Habib will return to the
Middle East in the next few days
with a new proposal to break the
deadlock over negotiations to get
foreign troops out of Lebanon,
U.S. officials said Sunday.
According to officials traveling
with Secretary of State George
Shultz through Western Europe,
the plan calls for Habib and en-
voy Morris Draper to shuttle be-
tween Jerusalem and Beirut in-
stead of bringing the Israelis and
Lebanese together for face-to-face
Barry University
M.A. IN JEWISH STUDIES
Spring Semester 6:30 9:30 P.M.
Jan. 10-May 5,1983
Wed. "Ethics of the Fathers"
Rabbi Max Lipschitz
Thurs. "Holocaust"
Rabbi Dr. Simcha Freedman
Admissions Office: 11300 N.E. 2nd Ave
758-3392 Miami Shores, FL 33161
Name
Address
City____
State.
-Z'P-
Phone: Home,
Bus.
negotiations.
Israel immediately served no-
tice, however, that it would insist
on direct talks before withdraw-
ing its estimated 30,000 troops
from Lebanon. There are also
about 40,000 Syrian troops and
up to 10,000 Palestinian fighters
in the country but their departure
hinges on the Lebanese-Israeli
negotiations.
A senior official in Jerusalem
said the Jewish state would not
object to Habib and Draper
working out a timetable for the
withdrawal of Israeli, Syrian and
Palestinian troops through in-
direct shuttle diplomacy.
But the withdrawal plan could
not be implemented until Israeli
and Lebanese negotiators this
time meeting face-to-face
reach agreement on establishing
a 27-mile, artillery-free buffer
zone in south Lebanon, the offi-
cial said.
From U.P.I.
REPRESENTATIVE OF
FOUR BLACK AFRICAN
COUNTRIES HOPEFUL
ABOUT RESTORING
RELATIONS WITH ISRAEL
By Tamar Levy
GENEVA Gideon Patt, Is-
rael's Minister of Industry and
Trade, who was here attending
the GATT (General Agreement
on Tariffs and Trade) ministerial
conference, met with delegates of
four Black African countries
which have no diplomatic rela-
tions with Israel.
He told the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency after his meetings that
the delegates told him they hoped
Israel will strengthen its com-
mercial and industrial ties with
their countries. Patt said they
hinted that the trade contacts
might very well hasten the re-
sumption of diplomatic relations
with Israel and expressed hope
that Israel would provide their
| countries with its commercial,
trade and industrial know-how.
Patt said he told the delegates
that the failure of the recent Or-
ganization of African' Unity
(OAU) conference in Tripoli
demonstrated the gap existing
between the interests of the
.Arabs and the Black African na-
tions.
r
ISRAEL
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medieval and modern periods in
Jewish history, Gordis observed.
The JPS translation into modern
American English, and the
UAHC Commentary, he added,
signify a new stage in the
religious and literary life of this
country's Jewish community.
JWB is the network of and
central service agency for some
275 Jewish Community Centers,
YM & YWH As and camps in the
U.S. and Canada serving more
than one million Jews.
It serves the entire North
American Jewish community in
informal Jewish education and
Jewish culture through the rWR
Lecture Bureau, Jewish Ivffi
Service, "'o
Bureau,
JWB
Council, JWB
Book
i^-WSMs
Jewish
Jewish
Jewish
Israel.
JWB is also the U.S. govern
ment-accredited agency fo7se
mg the religious, Jewish educa-
tional and recreational needs of
Jewish mihtary personnel, the*
;^osnP^sspita,iMdp't^
JWB is supported by Federa-
SSL- the< n UJA"lWSi
Campaign of Greater New York
and Jewish Community Center*
andYM&YWHAs. ""
'Show Stoppers9 Presenting
Full Scale Production
The Sunrise III Show Stoppers
are presenting eight per-
formances of "THAT'S LIFE," a
full production musical play, with
original music and lyrics. The
melodies and lyrics are composed
by Bess Levy and sung and
danced to by a cast of 48. Book
and production by director
Lillian Kirschenberg, choreogra-
phy by Dave Schavrein. Scenery,
costumes and stage effects are
the work of other members of the
SHOWSTOPPERS.
Three performances on Dec. 18,
19 and 26 at 8 p.m. are staged for
residents and guests of Sunrise
Lakes and neighboring com.
munities. Everyone is welcome
and there are good seats still
available for all performances.
Cost $5. Tickets for these dates
can be purchased at the Club-
house Lobby, Sunrise Lakes
Phase III, 9361 Sunrise Lakes
Blvd., Sunrise, Tuesdays to
Fridays 9 a.m.-noon For
directions or information phone
741-4550 or 741-4912 during the
above hours.
Additional performances will
be presented on Jan. 2,15,16 and
23.
n
D
O
n
5
MIAMI BEACH
THEATRE OF THE
PERFORMING ARTS
1700 WASHINGTON AVENUE
2 PERFORMANCES ONLY
SATURDAY, DEC. 25, 8:30 P.M.
SUNDAY, DEC. 26, 7:30 P.M.
PRICES: $9.00 $11.00 $13.00
TICKETS AVAILABLE AT
ARIE KADURI AGENCY, INC.
16125 N.E. 18th AVE N MB 33162
THEATRE BOX OFFICE: 673-7302
JORDAN MARSH ALL SUPERTIX AGENCIES
FOR INFORMATION RESERVATIONS AND
GROUP RATES Call: 949 0212 kii~
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Wssm
pec.ober24.1982
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdal
Page 7
JEWISH
COMMUNITY
CENTER
OF GREATER
FORT LAUDERDALE, INC
.Community Center is a beneficiary agency of the Jewish
, 0f Greater Fort Lauderdale.
f
m
Shown above is the proud family of Josephine
Wolf at the recent dedication of the JCCs Early
Childhood facilities in memory of Abner A. Wolf.
Kneeling (left to right) Harvey and Lynn
{CARE office at the JCC hat been a beehive of activities.
iHanukah holiday. Children't gifts, hand knitted lap robes,
in for nursing home residents were being donated and volun-
rived daily to wrap them. Efforts were made to reach in-
ilued children with holiday gifts, and the elderly in nursing
\i\ih items to make daily life more comfortable. (Left to right!
iMiller, Lou Gold. Sandra Friedland, WECARE Coordinator,
itta Gade.
To Hold Parenting Workshop
byou sometimes wonder why
(chose to have children? Do
[children sometimes act in
that make you wonder? Do
dw how to truly enjoy your
of us have occasional
as with children. Does
mean that we are bad
ITKfAMILY JACOBS
^OCEANFRONT
BOARDWALK
25th A COLLINS
\UAMI BEACH, FLA. 33139
KOSHER o,.*.mt...
PASSOVER
10 Days* 11 Nites
March 27
to April 6
3 Meals Daily
'625. Per Person
Dbl.Occ.
CALL 1-538-5721
parents or have not done a good
job of parenting?
Get together with other
parents to discuss your successes
and failures, share your
problems, discover solutions.
Your concerns are not unique!
Learn how others have dealt with
similar situations!
Don't sit home and brood
alone!
Come and join our Parent
Support Workshop.
"Parent And Children
Together" (P.A.C.T.) based upon
Children The Challenge, by
Rudolf Dreikurs.
Thursdays 7:30 p.m. 9:30
p.m.
Begins: January 13,1983. Fee:
S40 single. $30 couple (plus cost
of text for 4 sessions).
Instructor: Barbara Alterman,
B.A. Elementary Education,
M.A., Sociology and Urban
Affairs. K-3 teacher, parenting
specialist Family Education
Association (part of the Alfred
Adler Institute) in Chicago.
Every Saturday and Sunday the fabu-
lous "Fun Ships". Camlvale. Festh/ale.
Mend' Gras and Tropteale depart from
Miami and Lot Angeles tor exotic ports. Vir-
tually everything's included tor one low
P"0 of your cruise: eight meals and snacks
a day... a fun gambling casino... live enter-
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ar*i dozens of shipboard cictlvittes You get
^ue no land vacation can match!
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Kopelowitz, Paul and Jordana Breitner. Middle:
Jill and Brian Kopelowitz. Bach: Josephine,
Hanley and June Wolf, Susan Breitner, Betty and
Joseph Kopelowitz.
An-nell
Hotel
Strictly
Kosher
Members of the Omega Religious Service Club present a check for
annual donation to the JCCs Executive Director. These are monies
.collected at Yiskor services. (Left to right) Murray Rosenberg, Mac
Finkelstein, Phil Cofman, AbeSemelmacher, Jerry Kaye.
3 Full Course Meals Daily
Mashglach S Synagogue
on Premises
TV Live Show-Movies
Special Diets Served
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Near an good shopping
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(305)672-5800


Indian of Greater fort.
rue
Friday. December:
Organizational News
Contributors to community calendar, synagogue and organi-
zational news, are urged to be sure that material sent to the
Floridian is submitted at leant three weeks before your meeting
date or event. This will guarantee publication in proper time.
HADASSAH
Lawrence M. Schuval, Director
of Community Relations of the
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale, will speak on
cults and missionary movements
in Rroward County at the Dec. 28
noon meeting of the Rayus Tarn-
arac Chapter. The meeting will be
held in the auditorium of the new
building of the Tamarac Jewish
Center.
North Lauderdale's Chai
Chapter members will hear a
book review by Rose Sher Weiss
on "Just Because They're Jew-
ish" at their 1 p.m. meeting on
Tuesday, Dec. 28. The meeting
will be at the North Lauderdale
City Hall.
The Oakland Estates Chora-
leers, a 40 voice chorus, will en-
tertain the Maaada Margate
Chapter on Tuesday, Dec. 28, at ,
their 12:30 p.m. meeting at Tem-
ple Beth Am.
WOMEN'S LEAGUE
FOR ISRAEL
The Margate Chapter will meet
on Tuesday, Dec. 28, at 12:30
p.m. in the Catharine Young Li-
brary to hear their guest, Alfred
Golden from the Anti-Defama-
tion League of B'nai B'rith,
speak on anti-Semitism.
HEBREW CULTURAL CLUB
Hebrew speaking people are
cordially invited to hear Rina
Genn speak on "The Woman in
Israel" at the next meeting of the
Hebrew Cultural Club (Chug
I vri) of Century Village in Deer-
field Beach. The meeting will be
Tuesday, Dec. 28, at 1 p.m. at the
Clubhouse.
YIDDISHE GEZELSHAFT
Monday, Dec. 27, at 2 p.m., the
members of the Yiddishe Gezel-
shaft will meet at the Community
Room in the Basics Shopping
Center at Oakland Park Blvd.
and University Drive to continue
their ongoing discussion of "The
Meaning of Yiddishkeit "
B'NAI B'RITH
A program centered around the
activities of the B'nai B'rith
Youth Organization (BBYO) is
planned for the meeting on Mon-
day evening, Dec. 27, of the Cy-
press Chase Lodge. The meeting
will begin at 7:30 p.m. in the
Council Room of the Lauderdale
Lakes City Hall.
B'NAI B'RITH WOMEN
Maurice Berkowitz will be the
guest speaker for the next meet-
ing of the Hope Chapter. The
meeting and "Bagel Break" will
take place at the Jewish Commu-
nity Center on Tuesday, Jan. 11,
at noon. For information call
Pearl Pfeffer.
\
^^B
New Project on the Agenda For JNF
The reception at the home of
Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Brodzki for
Charlotte Jacobson, National
President of the Jewish National
Fund, was the setting for the an-
nouncement of a million dollar,
long term project of the Greater
Fort Lauderdale Jewish National
Fund Council.
The project will provide an
active recreation area, nature
trails, picnic sites and reforests
tion in the Lahav Forest in Israe
which is situated outside of Beer
sheva. Barrett Rothenberg, Pres
ident of the Greater Fort Lauder
dale Jewish National Fund, wel-
comed Mrs. Jacobson and the
guests who were there. Ha
pledged his support for the
project and encouraged all
bers of the Jewish commun
support this important proa
Mr. and Mrs. Brodzki, Ml
Mrs. Rothenberg, and RabJ
Mrs. Jeffrey Ballon will repd
the JNF council at the meetL
the JNF National Assembly!
held in Israel in March, 19831
Women's League Has Its Day
s
Community Calendar
THURSDAY, DEC. 23
Pioneer Women-Na'Amat
Broward Council: 9:30 a.m. Gen-
eral meeting. 1303 N. State Rd. 7,
Margate.
Temple Beth Israel: 12:30 p.m.
Games.
Free Sons of Israel-Fort Lauder-
dale Lodge: 7:30 p.m. General
Meeting. Whiting Hall, Sunrise.
Temple Emanu-El: 7:45 p.m.
Board Meeting.
HADASSAH:
Chai Chapter, Pompano
Beach: Noon. Meeting. Pompano
Reach Recreation Center.
Shoshona Tamarac Chapter:
12:30 p.m. Meeting. Tamarac
Jewish Center.
B'NAI B'RITH WOMEN:
Bermuda Club Chapter: Noon.
Meeting. Clubhouse.
B'NAI B'RITH:
Pompano Lodge: 8 p.m. Gen-
eral meeting. Palm Aire Country
Club, 551 So. Pompano Pkwy.
Inverrary Lodge: 8 p.m. Meet-
ing. Temple Beth Israel.
SUNDAY, DEC. 28
Temple Kol Ami: 6:30 p.m.
Games.
Temple Beth Torah Tamarac: 7
p.m. Games.
MONDAY, DEC. 27
Women's League for Israel-Tam-
arac Chapter: 11:30 a.m. Paid up
Membership Luncheon. Italian
American Club, 7300 McNab Rd.,
Tamarac. Call Adele Epstein.
ORT Lauderdale Weal Chapter:
Noon. Meeting. Temple Beth Is-
rael.
Yiddishe Geselabaft: 2 p.m.
Meeting. "Discussion on Mean-
ing of Yiddishkeit" Basics Shop-
ping Center, Community Room,
University Dr. and Oakland Park
Blvd.
Temple Emanu-El: 7 p.m.
Games.
B'NAI B'RITH:
North Broward Council
Lodges: 9:30 a.m. Executive
Board. Regional office, 800 W.
Oakland Park Blvd.
Cypress Chaste Lodge: 7:30
p.m. General meeting. BBYO
vouth participation. Lauderdale
Lakes City Hall.
HADASSAH:
Fort Lauderdale Tamar Chap-
ter: 10 a.m. Board Meeting.
TUESDAY, DEC. 28
Temple Beth Torah Sisterhood:
noon. Games.
Pioneer Women-Na'Amat Debra
Club: Noon. General Meeting.
Lauderdale Lakes City Hall.
Women's League for Israel-Mar-
gate Chapter: 12:30 p.m. Meet-
ing. Al Golden of ADL speaking
on Anti-Semitism. Catharine
Young Library.
Hebrew Cultural Club: 1 p.m.
General Meeting. Rina Genn
speaker. Century Village Club-
house Room F.
HADASSAH:
Rayus Tamarac Chapter:
noon. General Meeting. Lawrence
Schuval speaker. Tamarac Jew-
ish Center.
Somerset Shoshona Chapter:
Noon. General meeting. Recrea-
tion Hall, Somerset Phase I.
Masada Margate Chapter:
12:30 p.m. Meeting. Oakland Es-
tates Choraleers will entertain.
Temple Beth Am.
North Lauderdale Chai Chap-
ter: 1 p.m. Meeting and Book Re-
view by Rose Sher Weiss on
"Just Because They're Jewish."
North Lauderdale City Hall.
WEDNESDAY, DEC. 29
Pioneer Women Na'Amat-Negev
Chapter: 12:30 p.m. Mini lunch
and Cards. For information call
421-7867. Temple Beth Israel of
Deerfield Beach.
Temple Beth Iarael: 7:30 p.m.
Games.
Temple Beth Orr: 7:45 p.m.
Games.
THURSDAY, DEC. 30
Temple Beth Iarael: 12:30 p.m.
Games.
Pioneer Women-Na'Amat-Negev
Chapter: Dec. 30 through Jan. 1,
weekend at Epcot Center in Dis-
ney World and two dinner the-
atres. Bus Transportation pro-
vided. For information call Batty
Waga, Rona Schimel, Estelle
Cohen, or Hannah Levine.
WOMEN'S LEAGUE HAS ITS DAY Mayor
Walter W. Falck proclaimed Dec. 8 Women's
League for Israel Day in Tamarac. On the occa-
sion of its 54th birthday, the organization was
commended for the humanitarian work it does.
Mayor Falck is shown holding the proclamation
to Florida Council President Muriel Lunden,*
Ruth Sperber, Regional Director; Cecilt Fini
President of Tamarac Chapter; Faye Rostnsteiii
Council Vice President; Lucille Kimmel, Pret[
dent Woodmant Chapter and Freda Rosen, Pns
dent Woodlands Chapter look on.
Pentagon Pals
Plan Includes Egypt, Snubs Israel
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) The De-
partment of Defense announced a new
central command to deal with the
possibility of military dangers in the
Middle East, the Persian Gulf and the
Indian Ocean which includes Egypt but
excludes Israel. Israel along with Syria
and Lebanon will continue to be dealt
with under the European command
which is headquartered in West Ger-
many.
A PENTAGON spokesman explained
that Israel was excluded because it is
considered part of the Mediterranean
area. He said the new command is
basically a Southwest Asia comr
and Egypt was included because
borders on the Red Sea and Sudan
The new command, which will have ill
headquarters at the Macdill Air Fc
base in Tampa, Fla. will have 230,1
people from all branches of the U.
military in the United States availabJj
for use in case of danger in the area it wil
co ver. This is in addition to the Rap"]
Deployment Force which is also heac
quartered at the Tampa base. The nei
command covers Egypt, Sudan
Somalia, and the Persian Gulf countnesj
Iraq, Iran, India, Pakistan
Afghanistan.



aw*
December 24.1982
The Jewish Fbridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 9
News Capsules
^tinuedfromP-g*!
the State Department de-
i'lhis report.
[Jerusalem, senior political
h Jew the indifference of
a public opinion to these re-
fl contrast.it withtheon-
tented criticism levelled at
jafter the Beirut refugee
Jmassacre-s
From Near East Report
[jVRON MISSION
ure from the post of
.dor to the United States
Endowed down the diplo-
T.ctivityofEphram^Evron.
.was the first Israeli to
Greek Premier Andwas
u since his election,
ding to the Jerusalem Pott.
K 90-minute meeting was
lit Papandreou's requeet af-
vron had cleared it with la-
i Foreign Minister YiUhak
ar Evron told the Post he
msthe pro PLO Papandreou
moderate his anti-Israel
rk and adopt a more
1 attitude in the future
it's doubtful whether he will
me a friend of ours.
L addition. Evron acted as a
to former Secretary of
Alexander Haig, who
pd Israel to receive an honor -
degree from Ben-Gurion Uni-
rsiiy in Beersheba.
From Near East Report
WARMER RELATIONS
WITH LEBANON
. between Israel and the
. Gemayel government in
non seem to be improving,
ding to Ehud Ya'ari, a re-
ron Israeli television.
[Yi ari holds that the improved
union may be seen in the pub-
iion of lour articles in the
langisi newspaper Al Amal
bg for close ties with Israel.
inotes that the articles have
Keen criticized by the Moslem
rship in Lebanon and takes
Its a sign of an emerging con-
Ms that the state of war with
rlmust end.
He reports that several close
ps of the late Bashir Gemayel
f viewed in Jerusalem as an ally
Ifarael have been appointed
I key posts in Amin Gemayel's
ainistration.
Prom \car F.nsi Report
LEADER OF
ULTRA RIGHTWING
. CHRISTIAN GROUP IN
[LEBANON SAYS LEBANON
SHOULD SIGN PEACE
AM)MUTUAL DEFENSE
TREATY WITH ISRAEL
By Gil Sedan
[JERUSALEM Ettienne
fe. leader of the ultra-right-
g "(iuardians of the Cedars"
Kemeru in Lebanon, declared
ft* recently that Lebanon
uld not only sign a formal
1 treaty with Israel but also
treaty of mutual defense, and
Jg hacked Israel's terms for
IWxlrawing its forces from
pUkanon.
[Sacre, a Maronite Christian
_ known as Abu Are, de-
l!l^''(i thal a" Palestinians be
ted to leave Lebanon and
|*rn.'d that the Syrians and the
Tjwtine Liberation Organize-
J*" are now already coming
l*k to Beirut."
jj* refused to condemn the
gwacre of Palestinians in the
IjMila and Sabra refugee camps
|"*est Ik-irut last September,
l*1^' the killings a Lebanese re-
[*n U) "ght years of bloody
W'fg and killings" which cul-
**ted in the assassination of
non
Jye!
I ""langists
that the number of Jewish set-
tlers on the West Bank will be
tripled over the next three years.
The Jewish population will reach
75.000 according to Michael
Dekel, Minister of Agriculture.
Dekel said interest in settling
on the West Bank was rising, not
only among the traditional sup-
porters of a "Greater Israel" such
as the Orthodox Gush Emunim,
but among Israelis who want to
improve their housing and
quality of life. He said trade
unions and employers were in-
terested in establishing new set-
tlements for specific groups of
workers and there were govern-
ment plans in that direction.
The Likud government heavily
subsidizes housing for Jewish
settlers on the West Bank where
homes cost a fraction of what
they cost in Israel. The aggres-
sive settlement policy has
brought Israel sharp rebukes
from Washington on grounds
that it undermines the peace
process.
operated with Britain in develop-
ing that country's Chieftain tank,
but the British began hedging on
delivery of the tank to Israel.
The Israelis responded by pro-
ducing their own tank, the
Mercava, which in the Lebanon
war destroyed many of the Soviet
Union's top-line T72 tanks,
piloted by Syrians. The Israelis
and some foreign military
analysts consider the Mercava
the best tank in the world.
The Mercava is heavy and
slow, however, and has not yet
attracted export buyers, accord-
ing to foreign military sources.
The appeal of Israel's weapons
might be described by the sales
pitch of a certain American
, grocery chain: price and pride.
Israel's weapons are cheaper
than competitors of similar
quality. They are proven in com-
bat at depressingly regular in-
tervals. They enjoy a reputation
for reliability and for avoiding
the excessive complications of
some American and European
products.
By Dan Goodgame
Herald Staff Writer
Tr*1 in the assassination of
Ration's President-elect Bashir
' ""tavel. leader of the Christian
"angists
JEWISH SETTLERS ON
WEST BANK TO TRIPLE
0VER THE NEXT 3 YEARS
By Gil Sedan
JERUSALEM A govern-
* official told the Knesset's
V^'c ( ommittaa
itly
AIDE TO BEGIN
CONFIRMS SETTLEMENTS'
EXPANSION
TEL AVIV Deputy Prime Minister. David
Levi, said recently that "a mas-
sive program of building" was
being undertaken at established '
Jewish settlements in the occu-
pied West Bank of the Jordan.
Interviewed on the Israeli
radio. Mr. Levi said, "More set-
tlements will be created soon, but
only under the authority of the
ministerial committee on settle-
ments."
Israel has built 103 settle-
ments, housing about 25.000 peo-
ple, in the West Bank since cap-
turing the area from Jordan in
the 1967 war. Government offi-
cials have said that no decision
on new settlements had been
made since Sept.^, when the
committee on settlements, the
highest body empowered to deal
with the subject, approved the
construction of seven new out-
posts.
Claude Malka. an Agriculture
Ministry spokesman, said recent-
ly that 11 new settlement, were
on the drawing board, adding.
You can be sure" they will be
approved.
From NY. Times,
ISRAEL BORROWED'
TECHNOLOGY TO BUILD
ARMS INDUSTRY
TEL AVIV Israels inde-
pendent weapons industry was
born of urgent necessity and was
nurtured by a typically Israeli
blend of ingenuity and chutzpa.
President Charles de Gaulle of
France in 1967 blocked further
delivery of French-made Mirage
jet fighters on which Israels air
force then relied.
The Israelis then arranged the
theft of a full set of Mirage blue-
prints and by 1973 were produc-
ing and Hying their own vamUon
of the Mirage, called the Kfir.
Foreign military analysts con-
sider the Israeli "copy superior
to the French original.
De Gaulle in 1969 extended his
embargo, which halted delivery
of five missile boats Israel had
bought. So the Israelis sent a
band of sailors, disguised as Nor-
wegians, to seize the vessels. On
Christmas Eve. they boarded the
boats at Cherbourg harbor and
raced them across the Mediter
ranean to Israel.
Israel then developed its own
acclaimed missile boats, the
Reshef. Dvora and Dabur.
Weapons expertt say Israel
also haY "borrowed" freel' *"
patented technology used in
American arms WPP^. *...
raeLThelsreeliShafrirair-^-'J
missile. popular m S
America. reported to be a v,r
tual copy of the American-made
AIM missile.
In the early 1970a. Israel co-
SOME PLANES BUILT
STRICTLY FOR EXPORT
TEL AVIV Although Israel
justifies its weapons exports as a
necessary outgrowth of its
domestic needs, it has developed
some products primarily for sale
abroad.
The best example is the Arava,
a stubby, rugged and versatile
aircraft that can transport every-
thing from civilian passengers
and paratroopers to a light tank.
It can take off and land on
short, bumpy airstrips. A Cali-
fornia company called Airspur
uses the Arava to fly commuting
businessmen.
Development of the Arava was
led by Moshe Arena, an aero-
nautical engineer who now serves
as Israel's ambassador to the
United States.
Israel uses only a handful of
Arava aircraft in its own mili-
tary, but has sold more than 70
for export, almost all of them to
Latin America.
Dan Goodgame
(Miami Herald)
EINSTEIN PAPERS
AT LAST ARRIVE
IN JERUSALEM
JERUSALEM (AP) The
Hebrew University here has re-
ceived the personal papers of
Albert Einstein a collection it
said contains more social and po-
litical commentary than scientific
works by the father of space-age
physics.
The archives, which include
letters to and from such figures
as Sigmund Freud, Franklin
Roosevelt and George Bernard
Shaw, arrived here recently.
Einstein, who died in 1955,
willed the papers to the univer-
j sity's Jewish National University
l Library, but the executor of his
literary estate had kept them at
Princeton University for 27
years.
Einstein, an American born in
Germany, is a revered, almost
mythical, character in Israel
partly out of Jewish pride and
partly because of his strong links
to the early Zionist movement
and later to the state of Israel.
He turned down the offer to be
Israel's first president, saying, "I
have neither the natural ability
nor the experience necessary to
deal with human beings and to
carry out official functions."
From Associated Press
KOSHER RECIPES
EASY DELICIOUS
I Send stamped envelope $1.00
KOSHER KITCHEN
P.O. Box 215
New City, N.Y. 10956
to'0
%*^
^sfc**
Thousands of Jewish f.mili.s throughout NorthBroward will bo ca'led to
SS^Scommllmint. to tho 1983 United j^***"^ J"Jj ^22
HtiaT throuahout America for thla maaalva happening ?n behaH of our fellow
5 ^^lSS!Zmt^ m th. world, and right here at home.
UJA NEEDS YOU
Give us one hour or fi^*f,mp0rtant ** "^
SUPER SUNDAY
January 23,1983 9 AM-9 PM
Israel Wants You at Super Sunday Headquarters
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER
Temple Beth Torah
9101 Northwest 57th St., Tamarac
Korfm lefceahmente all day... Celebrate Super Sunday with your friends.
Jewish Federation Super Sunday
8360 W. Oakland Park Blvd.
! port Lauderdale, Fl. 33321
I BSSSSWSSS-
748-8200
i
uSi^fSuTbeu^ienTa^nTa^
NAME _
ADDRESS
PHONE
i
i.
t
i
U
*** TMaeday.Jan.2S _____Wadnaadat.Jen.2S
Monday, Jaa 24



Page 10
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, Decemb
*r 24,1982
Synagogue Sounds
NEW YEARS EVE; WHEN IT
OCCURS ON FRIDAY NIGHT
The Rabbinical Association of
Greater Miami, the most compre-
hensive rabbinic group in the
community encompassing Ortho-
dox, Conservative, Reform and
Reconstructionist, calls upon the
Jews and Jewish organizations of
this area to respect the sanctity
of the Sabbath by refraining from
sponsoring or attending ac-
tivities that conflict in any way
with the observance of the Sab-
bath and attendance at religious
services.
Inasmuch as New Year's Eve
occurs this year on Friday eve-
ning, the Rabbinical Association
of Greater Miami specifically
urges the entire Jewish commu-
nity to abstain from planning or
participating in parties and cele-
brations on that evening. It
further urges all Jews to attend
the religious services scheduled
in their respective congregations
as a manifestation of their per-
sonal dignity and self-respect, as
well as the spirit of rededication
to the principles of our religious
faith and to our spiritual regener-
ation.
YOUNG ARTISTS' WORK
WILL BE DISPLAYED
The Religious School of Tem-
ple Emanu-El will sponsor an art
show and sale of works by the
students of the religious School
on Jan. 22 and 23 at the Temple.
Sandy Goldstein, principal, an-
nounced that the subject matter
is to be of a Judaic theme using
all media. Further information
can be obtained from the school
office, 731-2310.
JEWISH CONGREGATION
WEST BROWARD
On Friday, Dec. 17, during the
Sbabbat evening services, a Tree
of Life sculpture was dedicated
by the West Broward Jewish
Congregation. In honor of Hanu-
kah an original Hanukah Contata
was performed by the Temple
choir at the same service.
TEMPLE BETH AM
William Katzberg, noted col-
umnist, will install the new offi-
cers of Temple Beth Am at their
annual Installation Dinner and
Dance on Sunday, Jan. 2 at 7
p.m. Donation is $7.50 per per-
son. Please call the Temple office,
974-8650, for tickets.
B'nai B'not
Mitzvah
TEMPLE BETH AM
The Bat Mitzvah of Para
Faber, daughter of Saul and
Viola Faber of Coconut Creek.
will be celebrated on Friday eve-
ning, Dec. 24 at services.
The following morning, Dec.
25, the Bar Mitzvah of Joshua
Kornitsky, son of Myron and Ju-
dith Kornitsky of Coral Springs,
will take place.
TEMPLE BETH AM
The B'nai Mitzvah of David
Frieder, son of Susan and Saull
Frieder, and Scott Gurvis, son of
Robert and Myra Gurvis, all of
Coral Springs, were celebrated at
Shabbat services on Saturday,
Dec. 18.
TEMPLE BETH TORAH
Eric Spector, son of Artu
and Selm. Spector of ct
Spnngs, will become a Bar &
vah at worship services on
day morning, Dec. 25. *
WEST BROWARn
JEWISH CONGREGATION
Paul Jason Goodstein m>
Stephen and Bonita Goodab2 !
Plantation, celebrated h^0
MOzvjh at services on Saturda;
Jewish Santa Complains About Firing
PENSACOLA (AP) -
After seven years as a shopping
mall Santa, a 30-yea.r-all Pen-
sacola man has bean fired,
because,he says, he is Jewish.
So former Santa Larry
Robertson has filed a discrimina-
tion complaint.
"I think the religion had some-
thing to do with it," said
Robertson. "It stinks to me."
He just looked too young for
Young Judea
Holds Winter
Convention
Hashachar (Young Judea), the
largest Zionist Youth Organiza-
tion in the United States, held
their Winter convention for
Young Judeans in the 9th
through 12th grades at Camp
Owaissa Bauer in Homestead
Dec. 20 to 23.
Hashachar, The Dawn, is
sponsored by Hadassah. Jean
Feinberg, a former Region Presi-
dent who serves on the National
Board of Hadassah, is currently
chairman of the Florida Hadas-
sah Zionist Youth Commission.
Present at the convention were
the education director of the
American Youth Foundation, Dr.
Danny Levine; National Hashac-
har Director, Rabbi Avi Zab-
locki; and Vice-counsel General
of the Israeli Consulate, Oded
Ben Hur. Representatives of the
parent national organization,
presidents of Young Judea and
the five local Shlichim (emissar-
ies from Israel) Rena Genn, Yossi
Shochat, Allan Milstein, Matic
Marcus and Yoni Weil, as well as
the delegation from Puerto Rico
also participated.
St. Nick, Robertson's former
employer said.
"I have no objections to his
faith," said Mary Ann Adams,
marketing director at University
Mall. "If faith had been an issue,
he wouldn't have been hired from
the beginning.''
Robertson had started his
eighth season as Santa on Nov.
20, but was ousted. He has filed a
complaint with the Pensacola-
Escambia (County) Human Rela-
tions Commission, claiming he
was fired because of age and
religion.
"I've never had any com-
plaints," Robertson said. "If
there had been complaints in past
years, they would have rw>
made known to ma.'
From Miami Herald
LEBANON ASKS
FOR BEEFED UP MNF
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON Lebanon
has asked the United States,
France and Italy to increase the *
number of troops they have in the
multinational force (MNF) in
Beirut, the State Department
confirmed.
But Department Deputy
spokesman Alan Romberg said
he could not say how many
additional troops were requested
or whether the mandate for the
MNF would be expanded from
Beirut and its immediate area by
the request.

CaxlUUgkUBg Time ?
Friday, Dec. 24-5:18
Friday, Dec. 31-5:22
x t v iv v:
' t : : it : I -:
t v : : r :
Ba-ruch A-tah Aso-nye, Elo-haynu Melech Ha-olam,
Asher kid'shanu B'mitz-vo-tav, V tzee-va-nu
L'had-leek Nayr shel Shabbat.
Blessed art Thou, O Lord our God, King of the Universe,
Who has sanctified us with Thy commandments
And commanded us to kindle the Sabbath lights.
We Treat Varicose Veins Without Surgery
ROBERT M. BIEGELEISEN, M.D.
ANNOUNCES THE OPENING OF HIS FLORIDA OFFICES
PRACTICE LIMITED TO
INJECTION TREATMENT OF VARICOSE VEINS
ANDCAPILLARYDILATATIONS(SPIDER VEINS)
BY COMPRESSION SCLEROTHERAPY
24 S.E. 6th STREET
BOCA RATON. FLA. 33432
368-7033
1111 N. 35th AVENUE
HOLLYWOOD, FLA. 33021
981-3808
Synagogue Directory
Orthodox
Temple Ohel B'nai Raphael (733-7684). 4351 W. Oakland Park
Blvd.. Lauderdale Lakes 33313. Services. Daily 8 a.m. and 6
p.m.: Friday 6:45 p.m.; Saturday 3:45a.m. and7:16p.m.
Synagogue of Inverrary Chabad (748-1777), 7770 NW 44th St
Lincoln Park West. Sunrise, 33321. Services: Daily 8 a.m. and 6
p.m.: Friday, 7 p.m.; Saturday 9 a.m. and 7:30 p.m. Study
Group*. Women, Wednesdays at 8 p.m.; Man, Sundays
following service. Rabbi Aroa Lieberman.
Young Israel Synagogue of UearOeld Beach (421-1367), 1640
Hillsboro Blvd.. Deerfield Beach 33441. Services: Daily 8:15
a.m. and sundown; Saturday 8:45 a.m. and sundown; Friday 7
p.m. Presidium: Jacob Held, Morrie Sept anus. Charles Wetae-
preaa, Cantor Sol Chaain.
Young Israel Synagogue of Hollywood-Fort Laaderdak- (966-
7877), 3291 Stirling Rd.. Fort Lauderdale 33312. Sarvicea: Dirty
7v30 a.m. and sundown; Saturday: 9 a.m.; Sunday 8 a.m. Rabbi
Edward Da via.
Conservative
BY APPOINTMENT ONLY
Congregation Beth Hillel of Margate (974-3090). 7640 Margate
Blvd.. Margate 33063. Services: Daily 8:15 a.m. and 5:30 p.m.;
Friday 8p.m.: Saturday 8:45 a.m.
Hebrew Congregation of LauderhUl (733-9560), 2048 NW 49th
Ave.. Lauderhill 33313. Servkea: Daily 8:30 am. and 5:30 p.m.;
t-ridav li n.m.: Saturday 8:45 a.m. Rabbi Iarael HaaMrn.
Hebrew Congregation of North Lauderdale (for information:
(741-0369). Service-: Friday 5 p.m.; Saturday 9 a.m. at Banyan
Lakes Condo. 6040 Bailey Rd., Tamarac. President: Mwray
Handler.
Temple Sba'aray Tiedek (741-0295), 8049 W. Oakland Park
Illvd Sunrise 33321. Services: Daily 8 a.m. and 5 p.m ; Friday
H p.m.: Saturday 9 a.m. and 7 p.m. Rabbi Albert N. Tray.
Cantor Jack Merchant.
Temple Beth Am (974-8650), 7205 Royal Palm Blvd.. Margate
33063. Services: Daily 8:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m.; Friday 5 p.m.
and H p mjpaturday 9 a.m.; Sunday 8 a.m. Rabbi Dr. Solomon
Geld. CanthV Irving Grooemaa.
Temple Beth Iarael (742-40401. 7100 W. Oakland Park Blvd.
Sunrise 33313. Sarvicea: Dairy 8 a.m.; Friday, 5:30 p.m and8
p.m.; Saturday 8:45 a.m. and sunset; Sunday 9 a.m. Rabbi
Phillip A. LabowiU. Canter Maurice Nea.
Temple Beth Israel of Deerfield Beach (421-7060). 200 S. Cen-
tury Blvd.. Deerfield Beach. Service*: Daily and Sunday 8:30
a.m. and 5 p.m.. Friday 8 p.m., Saturday 8:45 a.m. and at
candle-lighting time. Rabbi Loon Mirsky. Cantor Shabtai Ac
kerman.
Temple B'nai Moahe (942-5380), 1434 S.E. 3rd St.. Pompano
Beach, FL 33080. Servicoa: Friday, 8 p.m Rabbi Morrii A.
hop.
Temple Sholom (942-6410), 132 SE 11th Ave., Pompano Beach
33060. Services: Daily 8:45 a.m.. Friday 8 p.m., Saturday and
Sundays 9 a.m. Rabbi Samuel April, Canter Jacob J. Renser.
Temple Beth Tnrah (721 7660), 9101 NW 57th St.. Tamarac
33321. Service*: Daily 8:30 a.m. and 5 p.m.; Fridays 5 p.m. and
p.m. Cantor Henry Belasco.
Congregation B'nai Israel of Coral Springs (for information:
753-6319). Servicea: Daily at 8:30 a.m. and 5:30p.m.; Saturdays
at 9 a.m. President: Herb Davit.
Reform
Temple Emanu-El (731-2310). 3245 W. Oakland Park Blvd.,
Lauderdale Lakes 33311. Servkea: Fridays 8:15 p.m.: Saturday
services only on holidays or celebration of Bar-Bat Mitrvah
Rabbi Jeffrey Ballon, Cantor Jerome Kleawrat.
Temple Koi Ami (472-19881. 8.90 Peters Rd.. Plantation, 33324
Servicea: Fridays 8:15 p.m.; Saturdays 10:30 a.m. Rabbi Shel-
don Harr, Canter Gene Carbarn.
Temple Beth Orr (753-3232). 2161 Riverside Dr.. Coral Springs
33065. Servicea: Minyan Sundays 8 a.m.. Tuesdays and
Thursdays 7:30 a.m.. Fridays 8 p.m., Saturdays 10:30 am
Rabbi Donald R. Gerber, Cantor Nancy Hausman. ftl
West Broward Jewish Congregation (for information: 741-01/1
or P.O. Box 17440, PlanUtion33318). 7473 NW 4th St., Pta"*
twn. Servicea: Fridays 8:15 p.m; Saturdays for Bar-Bat Mitt-
voh only Rabbi Kurt F. Stone. .
Temple B'nai Shalom of Deerfield Beach (for information: 42*
2532), Leopold Van Blerkom) Servicea: Fridays 8 p.m
Menorah Chapels, 2306 W. Hillaboro Blvd., Deerfield Beach
Rabbi Nathan H. Fieh
ReconBtmctionist
Raanat Shalom (472-3600). 11301 W. Broward Blvd.
Plantation. 33325. Servicea: Fridays 8:15 p.m., Saturdays
only for Bar-Bat Mitzvah, 10 a.m. Rabbi Eliot Skiddell
Liberal
Liberal Jewish Temple of Coconut Croak (for W*^'
7219 or 973-6628. '973-6611, P. O. Bo* 4384, Margate 330WI
Founding Babbi: Aaron B. I Wo.


, December 24,1962
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort tgrfgrfgfa
>1&*
NORTON
rmm co!"
WITT BE
YEAR-END
?-*



11
AN OUTSTANDING
RADIAL VALUE
MAXITRAC
HIGHWAY RADIAL
WHITEWALLS
iEFGoodrich
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Plus 1.67 RET.
SIZE
P175/80R13
P185/80R13
P182$feR14
P195/75R14
P205/75R14
P215/75R14
PRICE
F.E.T.
M39
1.64
40.09
4L25.
42.62
43.90
1.78
1.93
Best Steel
eltedRadia
UFESAVER XLM
WHITEWALL
2.06
"/]
TO
45J9
2.31
2.47
P155/80R13
Plus F.E.T. 1.53
SIZE
P165/80R13
SALE PRICE RET.
46.86
1.69
SIZE
P205/75R14
SALE PRICE F.E.T.
59.37
2.34
P215/75R15
46,28
249
P175/80R13
P225/75R15
48-77
P235/75R15
53.61
270
P185/80R13
289
P195/70R13
PREMIUM 4 PLY
POLYESTER CORD WHITEWALLS
P205/70R13
P205/70R14
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A78x13
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25.01
27.91
28.53
29.73
1 59
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1.80
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1.88
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48.57
1.78
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60.45
2.48
49.85
1.92
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64.62
2.68
50.82
1.98
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59.70
2.33
52.32
2.14
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61.73
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TWO STEEL BELTS & POLYESTER CORD
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Available in 2 Ply only
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P165/80B15
P205/75B15
P215/75B15
P225/75B15
P235/75B15
pwice
31.97
33.81
35.75
37.93
38.79
39.88
41.82
42.92
44.25
46.57
35.75
37.44
44.14
45.60
47.78
50.10
F-E.T.
1.44
1.50
1.63
1.69
1.70
179
1.95
2.07
2.20
2.35
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NAPLES
2085 E Tamiam. Tr 774-4443


Page 12
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, December 24
Self Basting. (Broth Batted) Broad
Breasted. U.S.D.A. Intpactad. Quick
Froaan. 1 CMb* and Over Our Own Brand
Publix
GradaA
79C)
This holiday season, create some delicious magic from Publix.
For your holiday table, prepare both a plump, tasty, golden turkey
and a lean, fresh, rosy ham. Then complement the meal with a
variety of PubJix' fresh and flavorful produce. It's a magic time of
year, made even more delicious and memorable with the festive
foods from Publix.
(Broth Basted) Broad Breasted,
USD. A. Inspected, Quick Frozen,
4 to 7 -t). Average (Grade A)
Publix Turkey
Breast..................... i*.
Swift's Premium, U.S.D.A.
Inspected, Quick Frozen. 104m.
and Over (Grade A)
Butterball Turkey. .
Swift's Premium, U.S.D.A
Inspected, Quick Frozen. Under
9-tjs. 15-oz.(GradeA)
Lin Butterball
Turkey.................... .
Swift's Premium, U.S.D.A.
Inspected, Quick Frozen, 9 to
11-t>. Average
Smoked Turkey.... .
Armour Golden Star, Quick
Frozen, U.S.D.A. Impacted,
3 to 5-t>. Average, Basted
Boneless Turkey... .
*
89*
Swift's Premium or Sunnytand. Whole
or Shank Portion. Fully Cooked
Smoked
Ham
(Butt Portion...................lb. $1.39)
(Shank Half.....................lb. $1.39)
(Butt Half........................lb. $1.49)
Florida Grown, Blooming
Potted Mums.........*.'
(In 6.5-inch Pot.................. $3.89)
Beautiful
Seasonal Bouquet. mm
Decorative, Seasonal
Winter
Arrangement..........*
6-inch
*2
2*
vjm
House of Raeford. (With Dressing,
Giblet Gravy and Cranberry
Orange Relish) 9 to lOlb. Avtrags
Cooked
Turkey Dinner
$1795
1(14 to ifHb. Average........$27.95)/
99*
!
Swift's Premium, USD. A. Inspected, Quick
Frozen, Under 16-t>. Average (Grade A)
Stuffed Butterball
Turkey.................... Ib %V
U.S.D.A. Inspected, Quick Frozen,
8 to 13*. Average
Empire Turkey...... 99*
Ocean Spray, JeSed or
Whole Berry
Cranberry Sauce.
Libby's Pumpkin.
Trappey'a
Whole Yams........
Decorative, Medium Size
Holiday
Poinsettias
(Large Size 6-inch Pol.........$3.69)
16-01
can
16-01
can
17-.
can
59<
63*
63*
1.
1
i*
Sweet Cream. Lightly Salted
Level Valley
Butter
$139
Hb.
aJaW
(Limit 1 with other purchases of $7. or
more excluding afl tobacco products)
Swanson's
Chicken Broth.... 3
Green Giant, SBced or Whole
Mushrooms.......
Green Giant
NibletsCorn.......3 '^ 1"
Green Giant, Cream Style or
Whole Kernel
Corn...................
.14.S-OI.
can*
4S-o*.
Jar
Price* and Coupons EffetjW
thru Friday,December 24,1982
QuantHy Rights Reserved.
Where
17-01.
cant

rteaa tflmcthf in bade. aVoward. Palm Baach, Martin. SI. Lucia and Indian Rlvar Counliaa OmV!
Green Giant
Sweet Peas.........3 mZ %V
EartyJuna
Le Sueur Peas.... 2 Vat 'l*
Pubix, 12-inch Wide
Aluminum Foil......*&" *2"
W-o*.


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