The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 3, no. 7 (Apr. 5, 1974)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 9, 1976 called v.4, no. 27 but constitutes v.5, no. 1; issue for July 7, 1989 called v.18, no. 11 but constitutes v.18, no. 13.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44570954
lccn - sn 00229545
ocm44570954
System ID:
AA00014312:00442

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Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward


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Full Text
le Jewish FL
* :
IDIAN
OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE
l Number 30
Fort Lauderdale, Florid* Friday, October 6,1964
Price 35 Cents
Festival of Sukkot-The Season of Our Rejoicing
hm of the Jewish ymr
i of contradictory, yet
complementary ele-
rom the intensely
iwesome, solemn and
fs of Rosh Haahanah
[ippur. until five daya
a we enter into an
ferent mood, one that
i heights of spiritual
)nai rejoicing in the
of the holiday of
gled and interwoven
ic of joy and gladness
iliday are aspects of
emembrance, divine
providence, the beauty and
bounty of nature, and above all
else, the love and supremacy of
Torah.
In a unique and fascinating
fashion, Judaism takes each of
these concepts and concretizes it
in a specific observance. The
holiday of Sukkot overflows with
these mitzvot and with the
customs that embellish them,
and thus becomes a festival of
unequalled joy and happiness.
Let us examine each of these
concepts and explore how each of
them is reflected in the com-
hekel devalued by
e percent: 400 to $1
sides reported progress toward a
"package deal of wage and price
freezes. Histadrut Secretary
General Yisrael Keaaar said he
would cooperate if the "load falls
equally" on all sectors of the
economy.
LEM IJTA) The
devalued by nine
effort to stem the
of dollars by the
ce Minister Yitzhak
it a "moderate
He said bringing
down to an official
; 400 to II would not
|by any more "big"
and should calm
t Minsiter Gad
orted that the
' coffers were
more than 1600
public rushed to
[in anticipation of a
nation of the Shekel.
Shekel the more
dollar on both the
! black markets.
Israel sources who
opposed to a new
ud that they could
Ithe nine percent
t is followed quickly
I economic austerity
rinet ministers met
ut leaders and both
mandmenta of the holiday.
Central to the festival is the
concept that the Exodus from
Egypt, from slavery to freedom,
and the wanderings in the desert
protected only by Divine
Providence, must not only be
remembered, but relived in each
generation. Thus the mitzvah to
erect a Sukkah, a frail and
temporary structure, symbolic of
the booths in which our ancestora
lived in the desert, and the
'clouds of glory' that were a never
failing source of protection.
Life may seem fragile, the fate
of the Jew, and of the Jewish
people may seem precarious, yet
the longing and the conviction of
eventual redemption the
coming of the Meshiach are
never extinguished. This ideal is
reflected in the very essence of
the Sukkah it must have a roof
of branches that make the shade
greater than the light. Yet, the
light of the sun and of the stars
mutt be visible, so that light
rather than darkness is the
essential element.
Still another concept
Judaism in its essence ia a reli-
gion of time in which its holidays,
its holy daya and its history are
sanctified. Yet we must be spe-
cially sensitive to the physical
world around us, and to its
bounty. Thus the Sukkah must
be made of the elements of the
earth; it ia the "Festival of the
Harvest;" and we pray for rain
that will bring life to the earth
and all that grows within it.
Deeds of loving_kindneea must
complement the rituals of the
holidays of Sukkot so that the
commandments between man
and God are joined by the
commandments between man
and man. Thus, to the Sukkah we
invite the ancestors of the Jewish
people, one each night
Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Joseph,
Moses, Aaron and David. And
similarly, we welcome our
friends, and even strangers, to
share with us in the joy of being
and living in the Sukkah.
Central, of course, to Judaism,
is the concept that the study of
Torah equals all others, indeed it
is a 'sheer delight'! Thus on the
final day of Sukkot we complete
the reading of the Torah and
immediately begin it again; we
march around the synagogue
with the Torah scrolls on the
night and day of Simchat Torah;
we dance and sing, and wave the
gaily decorated flags. Each child
joins the adults in receiving an
aliyah over the Torah; and the
final aliyah ia termed the 'Groom
of the Torah' while the beginning
honor is called the "Groom of the
Beginning of Creation."
Finally, Sukkot reminds ua
that the land of Israel is em-
bedded in the heart and the soul
of the Jew no matter where he
may reside in the far-flung
Diaspora. Thus we pray for rain
that the land of Israel may be
fruitful in the year to come; we
introduce the agricultural ele-
ments of this Harvest Festival;
and we long for the time of
redemption and the "ingathering
of the exiles."
May you enjoy, and rejoice on
the holiday of Sukkot!
Reflections of the Campaign Chairman's Leadership Mission
"The special affinity we have
as Jews for one another was
evident throughout
especially in our meetings with
Israelis and our hosts in our
Project Renewal 'twinned' city of
Kfar Saba. We truly are one and
are partners for life.
Alan Levy,
1986UJAca
1966 U JA General Campaign
Chairman.
"Meeting with young Israeli
leaders and engaging in a very
frank discussion of our partner-
ship was exciting."
Ethel Waldman,
Federation
"This was a truly historic
moment being in Israel with the
leadership from around the
United States to kick off the 1966
campeign.lt waa inspiring to sea
everyone doing their best to help
Israel."
"We expected to hear a lot
about Israel'a problems but we
also saw a strong, vibrant and
growing country. It waa a strong,
emotions! experience."
JudahEver,
1965 UJA chairman of the
Accountants Division.
The above quotes were just some
of the feelings of the participants
of the Campaign Chairman's
Leadership Miesion, having just
returned from an intensive eight-
day miesion to Israel that cul-
minated in Jerusalem with the
kick-off of the 1966 National U J A
Campaign.
Some 360 top community lead-
ers and key lay people from all
over the country were privyed to
this educational and energized
mission.
Mission participants met with
the new Prime Minister, Shimon
Peres, who spoke about the Is-
raeli economy and the hope that
the new government of national
Caravan comes to Fort Lauderdale Oct. 14
is an educational
-ed to train key
.cities throughout
F*> have raised more
7"> in their annual
Appeal cam-
1 or "conference on
"izes the issues of
,-. focusing on
'most sophisticated
"nsion as pre.
for 1986.
.'dale Federation'.
cwnpaign chairman
*! campaign co-
chairmen EHmiinH Entin and
Alan Levy, anticipate a success-
ful turnout for the invitation-only
event, to be held 9 a.m. Sunday,
Oct. 14 at the Federation
building.
Jay M. Jacobean, director of
Campaign and Community Serv-
ice of the Florida Regional UJA
office, has been appointed by
National UJA chairman, Alex
Grass, aa Caravan's National
Project manager.
Jacobean announced that
Harry Rosen, Director General of
the Jewish Agency, will act as a
trainer and chairman of Fort
Lauderdale's Caravan Program.
Rosen is a graduate of MIT,
with a Master's degree from Ohio
State University and the author
of several books.
Also training the Caravan par-
ticipants will be UJA national
vice chairman, Kenneth J. Sch-
wartz. Schwartz ia a former
member of the Board of Directors
of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation, as well as s farmer
chairman of the Worker Training
sessions there. He is also s former
president of Temple Sinai in
North Dade.
The Caravan Program is a
joint effort between the United
Jewish Agency, and the Joint
Distribution Committee.
'o awards to be presented
't Oct. to breakfast
^Federations
S"T volunteer.
" u> the loa*
.AppailI Con2
* AD in*tad
Xwards *>r
abdication and
** 1984 cam-
ending aucceaa.
1*01 b. presented
Tamarac. Samuel K. Miller,
chairman of the Condominium
Cabinet, said. "Each volunteer ia
a 'star' in his own right for the
time end effort spent in collecting
for UJA. They all ahould be
extremely proud of their efforts
and we hope to see them busy st
work for the 1966 campaign."
A highlight of the program will
be a eong and comedy routine by
the popular Israeli entertainer.
Danny Tadmore.
Federation abides by
UJA policy on
'green' Bonds
National United Jewish Appeal and Joint Distribution Coi
mates officials ieeued a policy directive that State of Ian
Bonds of LESS THAN TWO YEARS, since issuance, cannot be
accepted in payment of pledges to the UJA campaigns
Acceptance of such Bonds known aa "green" Bonds
because they are so new and so far from maturity poses a
finanrhll hf "h'p "" F-WaHnsia dsltvring euti to ipr*>Tt the
humanitarian need, of Jew. in Israel since the cash for those
Bonds is unavailable unti the Bonds may be redeemed.
In line with the National UJA policy, the Board of Directors
of the Jewish Federation of Greater Ft. Lauderdale reeolved to
accept pledgee only for those Bonds that are at least two years
old.
unity, will be able to solve
Israel's problems and unite the
country.
Participants also visited then-
Project Renewal neighborhood,
with Fort Lauderdalss traveler.
visiting Kfar Saba, and feeling its
home hospitality.
Participants also broke off in
to small groups and discussed the
partnership between American
Jews and Israelis.
Finally, all the four major UJA
missions touring Israel at the
same time, including the cam-
paign chairmen', leadership
mission, embarked on Jerusalem
to kick-off the 1966 campaign.
The opening session brought
out s clear demonstration of the
commitment the Jews in the
Diaspora have for Israel and pro-
vided the participants with the
inspiration to make the 1966
campaign the moat successful
campaign ever.
"The Mission wss s greet suc-
cess ws came back to Fort
Lauderdale re-charged with our
sense of purpose for the coming
1966 Federetion-UJA cam-
paign," said Brian Sherr, mission
Also participating in the mie-
sion waa Federation campaign
director Bruce Yudewitz.


Pge2 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Friday. October 6. 1984
TheSukka
The SUKKA is e booth or eat.
It is a symbol of the lilumae
period, when the Jew* lived in
makeshift shelters made of palms
and branches.
The SUKKA is a small booth
or hut buik of wood. The roof
must not be solid. It is covered
with a variety of green branches,
m such a way that the sky may
be seen from the inside at all
times. Home SUKKOT are buih
outdoors. Often patios may be
improvised as SUKKOT by
placing foliage over the roof.
Since SUKKOT is Harvest
Festival, the inside of the
SUKKA is decorated with
flowers, ripe red pomegranates.
clusters of grapes, strings of
bright berries. Indian corn and
other colorful vegetables and
fruits.
Observant Jews have all their
meals in the SUKKA during the
first seven days of the Festival.
They recite the following

4

*--
.:"
"Blessed art Thou. 0 Lord our
God. King of the Universe, who
hast sanctified us by Thy
commandments and hast
commanded us to dwell in the
SUKKA."
SPECIAL MEANINGS
Together the lulav and etrog
are called the four species, which
means four kinds. We have seen
that they are symbols of the
harvest. But over the centuries
the four species have reminded
people of many other ideas as
well. According to one theory, the
lulav and etrog are like different
parts of the body. The etrog is
the heart: the straight palm is
the backbone: the myrtle, with
its oval leaves, is the eyes: and
the willow is the mouth. Put
them all together and they make
a whole person who is able to
harvest crops and then give
thanks to God.
There is another idea that the
four species are like people. The
etrog. myrtle, willow, and palm
are all different they have
different shapes, different smells,
different ways of growing. In the
same way. people are different,
no two alike, each with special
strengths and weaknesses. But
just as we bring the four species
together because they are all part
of the growing world, in the same
way all of us different as we
are belong together as part of
the Jewish people Together we
become something greater than
ourselves, something important
and strong.
THE ENDING OF SUKKOT
The final day of Sukkot has its
own name. She mini A tie ret This
day is different from the rest. We
do not wave the etrog and lulav.
Instead of being festive we are a
little solemn. We are slowly
letting go of the joyous Sukkot
Holiday.
A special ceremony takes place
on this day. a prayer for rain. To
the Israelite farmers, living in a
dry land, this was enormously
important. If there wasn't
enough rain during the fall rainy
season, their crops would not
grow weD the following spring.
Up until now. the Sukkot
celebration has been one of
thanks for the harvest already
completed. But the prayer for
rain is a prayer for the future.
asking God to take care of the
Jews as in the past. Now. in this
country, we seldom need to pray
for rain: but we never stop
needing to pray for God's care,
and so we repeat the same words
our ancestors repeated:
For You are the Lord our God,
Who makes the wind blow and
the rain fall
Sukkot is over, until next year.

THE DEERFIELD BEACH CHAPTER of the Anti-Dtkm
League of Bnai B'rith presented Eileen Manion (left) dirtctorTi
Percy White Library in Deerfietd Beach, with an assortment of I
dealing with Jewish themes. Presenting the books are (left tori*
Lucille Blum, co-chairman of ADL; Gertrude Kushner, praubu.
the Chapter; and Mollie Hecht. ADL chairman ^
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Friday, October 5,1984 / The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 3
Cost of living index rose
by 16.5 percent in Israel
, Vie. AugM. the no* tm ym w, the Xl Z?,M ~^T V "*"" "
Bt figure ever lor tnat *
Jewish groups submit Supreme Court
brief on school prayer case
American Jewish
ess, acting on behalf of
of national Jewish organ-
M, has asked the U.S.
ne Court to invalidate as
fcstitutional an Alabama
that provides for a
knt of silence for prayer and
ation in the public schools.
AJCongress amicus, or
of the court" brief was
Ion behalf of the National
Community Relations
ory Council, an umbrella
of national Jewish com-
I organizations, in the
of Wallace v. Jaffree, scheduled
to be heard by the Supreme Court
in the new term beginning Oct. 1.
It is landmark case because it
will be the first time the high
court will pass upon the consti-
tutionality of "silent prayer"
legislation, and the decision may
affect similar laws now in effect
in 22 other states.
The suit against the state of
Alabama was brought by Ish-
mael Jaffree, a resident of Mobile
County, who challenged two
Alabama statues authorizing
organized silent prayer in the
public schools. He claimed such
prayer activities were openly
practiced in Mobile County
public schools attended by his
three children and violated the
constitutional requirement of
church-state separation.
Judge W. Brevard Hard of the
U.S. District Court for the
Southern District of Alabama
dismissed Mr. Jaffree's com-
plaint, ruling that the U.S.
Constitution does not prohibit a
Continued on Page 4
Golden elected Vice President of JESNA
of the Anti-Defamation League.
He is believed to be the only
individual in the United States to
simultaneously serve on the
Board of Directors of three
Jewish Federations (Miami,
Hollywood, Ft. Lauderdale).
He has served on the Dade
County Personnel Board, the
Miami Beach Public Relations
and Citizens Advisory Board-
Currently he is on the Human
Relations Board of Miami Beach.
Mr. Golden recently returned
from Israel where he was the only
person in Florida invited to the
International Conference on
Jewish Education which was
convened by the State of Israel,
the Council of Jewish Federa-
tions and the World Zionist
Organization.
Mayor of Rafah murdered
Golden, longtime corn-
leader, has just been
Vice President of the
Educational Services of
IAmerica (JESNA).
[Golden has a distinguished
of service in the secular
leish communities having
jPresident of the Central
by for Jewish Education,
per and Chairman of the
[Board of Dade County and
National Commissioner
Bel and a Life Commissioner
TEL AVIV (JTA) The Mayor
of Rafah, the Gaza Strip town
now bisected by the Israel-Egypt
border, was murdered as he was
returning home from a nearby
mosque after Friday night
prayers. Four men have repor-
tedly been detained for
questioning. Abdul-Hamid
Kishta, 54, died in the hospital
shortly after the attack. Kishta's
family said he had been loved by
all the townspeople, and they
could think of no reason for the
murder.
But Damascus Radio said he
had been killed because he had
collaborated with the Israeli
authorities. The radio said PLO
members had carried out the
assassination. Special security
measures were taken in the town
during the funeral.
JOANN LEVY of Fort Lauderdale (pictured), recently attended the
UJA Young Women's Leadership Cabinet annual retreat in New
York. The Young Women's Leadership Cabinet is comprised of young
women from all over the U.S., who are highly trained volunteers and
well versed in all facets of UJA and Federation. Levy is currently the
chairman of the Young Women's Leadership Development Steering
Committee of the Women's Division of the Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale.
IKOSHER HOTEL
PALM BEACH
FLORIDA AREA
- FREE INFORMATION BOOKLET -
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OVERLOOKING PALM BEACH
Ine INTRACOASTAL WATERWAY"
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_MRS.GINSBERG
(305) 655-8800
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^L*?EACH RESIDENCE HOTEL
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33401
2*W SPACE IS LIMITEI
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D4YS.
From the people of EL AL
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The airline of Israel
Challah leh.. tatty bread, traditionally served on holiday* CHALLAH RECIPE Combine on* package
yeast 2 teaapoons sugar and 1 Vi cups lukewarm water. Let stand 5 minutes Sift i^i cups of ftour and 2
lipuoiei salt in a bowl Make a well in middle and crack 2 eggs. 2 tablespoon* salad oil. 1 cup warm water and
wait mrnti___" '* Work into the flour Knead dough on a (Toured surface until smooth Place in bowl and
brush KT with a little salad oil Cover with towel, put in a warm spot and let rue I hour Push down, cover again
and Wt rsae until double in bulk Flour hands and roll dough into 3 equal strips Braid together and place in
baking pan Cover with a towel and let rite until it doubles Brush with 1 egg yolk and spnnkle with poppy
* iced* Bake at 375* for 50 minutes or until browned Dip in honeyfor a tweet New Yrar


'age 4 The Jewish Fkridian of Greater Fort Lauderdele / Friday, October 5,1964
Peres and the West Bank
The extent to which Shimon Peres' new,
and for him first, administration as Prime
Minister of Israel will change previous
Israeli policies can be judged by what is
likely to happen on the West Bank.
Peres promised in his run for election
that he would bring the IDF home from
Lebanon within months of his victory. And
that the settlement expansion policy of
Yitzhak Shamir and his Likud ad-
ministration would be slowed and finally
halted.
Despite the news about a possible new
mediator's role for the United States
between Israel and Syria toward the
ultimate end of bringing the IDF home,
that possibility is still only that and
remains to be seen.
But Israel Harel, executive director of
the Council of Jewish Cities and Set-
tlements in Judea, Samaria and Gaza, is
already on record that he does not believe
that the new government headed by Prime
Minister Peres will stop the growth of
settlements in the territories.
On the contrary, Harel predicts that the
"present growth" will continue. If it is
curtailed at all, he says, it will not be Peres'
conviction that will bring it about, but the
present "catasthropic" state of the Israeli
economy, with inflation running at 400
percent.
"If the present settlements will be ex-
panded, and a good number of people move
in there, it will satisfy us," Harel declares.
"It will be a policy we can live with."
It is of course, entirely possible that
Peres will have something different to say
about Harel s assessment of the set-
tlements' future. Nevertheless, Hard's
sentiments cannot be dismissed lightly.
Not even by Peres.
Senate approves resolution calling
Syrian Jews to be allowed to emigr
WASHINGTON (JTAI The
Senate has approved a resolution
filing on President Hafez Assad
of Syria immediately to "permit
all members of the Syrian Jewish
community to emigrate from
Syria to the United States."
The concurrent resolution,
approved unanimously, and
introduced by Sen. Daniel
Moynihan (D-N.Y.I, noted that
Assad stated in an interview in
1976, that he would allow the
members of the Syrian Jewish
community to emigrate to the
U.S.
The resolution also noted
Syrian restrictions on travel
abroad by Syrian Jews, aa well as
laws requiring that all Jews bear
special identification cards, and
restrictions on Jewish rights of
inheritance. The Syrian govern-
ment forbids all members of the
Syrian Jewish community the
right to emigrate.
International attention focused
on the estimated 4,000-member
Syrian Jewish community when
last December. Lilian Antabi
Abadi.s26.yr ieh woman, wu foJ?|
murdered in Aleppo r1
her 6-year-old son,
her 3-year-old <** --*
"H the author** .
desire to improve the cm
poor relationship irjjl
country." Moynihan 3
away to do | w^
permit those members ,
Syrian Jewish communbl
desire to do so to emiaS/
U.S."
Peres to meet with Reagan
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Premier Shimon Peres will meet
with President Reagan in
Washington on Oct. 8. The
arrangements were concluded at
a meeting of Peres with U-S.
Ambassador Samuel Lewis.
Peres will also confer in
Washington with Secretary of
State George ShulU and their
talks are expected to focus on
economic matters.
Peres' two-day working visit to
Washington establishes the time
frame in which the new Labor-
Likud unity government must
set in motion its oronnmir
austerity plan.
Peres is expected to seek ad-
ditional large economic aid from
the U.S. beyond the $2.6 billion
the Reagan Administration has
allocated in outright grants for
fiscal 1986. The unity govern-
ment's economic program
therefore must be seen aa viable
fa the U.S. by the thai
meets with the President i
Secretary of State.
Lewis told reporters thaj
the President is camp
re-election and has Little |
see visiting foreign
Israel's "special reuti
with the U.S. made a i
this case. He said there i
"great receptivity" is
ington to the new Pre
the unity government.
Iran reports to UN on Its Jewish minority
In a report to the UN on the
status of its minorities, Iran
asserted that "the minorities
enjoy all the necessary freedom"
and draws a positive picture of
the position of the Jewish com-
munity in the country, the World
Jewish Congress reported.
According to the UN Office of
the WJC, the Iranian report out-
lines the current status of its
Jewish community in a four-page
document periodically submitted
to the UN Commission on
Human Rights. The report notes
that "contrary to misleading
propaganda reflection both
Eastern and Western arrogance,
the Constitution of the Islamic
Republic of Iran, which is in-
spired by the noble lews of Islam,
not only officially recognized the
rights of the minorities of divine
religious, but actually stressed
the preservation of cultural,
social, economic and political
freedom within the framework of
Israel's Co-op farmers suffer
heavy income losses
Netanyahu appointed
Israel's new UN Ambassador
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Binyamin Netanyahu, the
Minister, or No. 2 official at the
Israel Embassy in Washington,
has been appointed Israel's
Ambassador to the United
Nations and will head the Israel
delegation at the General
Assembly under Deputy Premier
and Foreign Minister Yitzhak
Shamir.
Netanyahu will succeed
Yehuda Blum, who last June
concluded six years as Israeli
representative to the world body.
The appointment of Netanyahu
was announced officially after the
first weekly Cabinet memclng of
the newly installed unity govern-
ment.
Born in Israel in 1949, and
educated in the United States,
Netanyahu is the younger
brother of Yonathan Netanyahu,
the Israel Defense Force com-
mander who led and was killed in
the Entebbe rescue operation in
1976.
JERUSALEM Sever infla-
tion and the declining value of
the shekel compared to Western
currencies is costing Israel's
Moshayim (Cooperative farms)
heavy income losses, as much as
$500 million in the past five
years, according to Nissim Zvili,
head of the Jewish Agency's
Rural Settlement Department.
Zvili said the lost income is a
result of spiraling production
coats and decreased market
revenues. Israeli agriculture
exporters have to pay shipping
Five synagogues In France
declared historic monuments
PARIS (JTA) Five
synagogues, some hundreds of
years old, have been declared
"monuments of national historic
importance" by the French
Ministry for Cultural Affaire.
Under French law "historic
monuments" cannot be altered
but in exchange can obtain the
aid of the state-paid architects for
any renovation work.
fJewlsti Floridiar
nr i ui-tiii afnii* a ---------
W i.KMIKK HIKT |.\| |>KHI)\I.K
FSEDK SMOCMET
Editor and Puontnat
Fuohihod WaoMy WdSaplamaar _.
Sacond ClaM Foataga Fatd M
-tPMnaps
Fr*tfSrto<*
Mad-May. SMWa
The Cultural Affairs Ministry
will also pay for part of the
restoration of the synagogues
Some of the buildings are in
urgent need to have part of their
roofs and walla rebuilt. The
ynagoguee are in Nancy,
Mulhouse, South, Cohnar and
Gueb wilier.
A number of Jewish historians
nd research students have
appealed to the Minister of
Cultural Affairs. Jack Lang
urging han to set up a Jewish
museum. Lang said last year that
his department is planning aucfa a
museum but that negotiations
under war for
costs in dollars and the steadily
declining value of the shekel in
terms of Western currencies
seriously trims the profit margin.
This is especially true in
European Common Market
countries that account for 66
percent of Moahavim farm ax-
ports.
Zvili, who spoke proudly of
settlement achievements and
promise, said inflation has im-
peded long and short range
planning and frustrates settlers.
"It is difficult to do long-range
planning while the value of the
shekel we spend depreciates so
much from dsy to day," said
Zvili. "It is even hard to take
short range steps," he added.
"We receive our income in dollars
very three months- apend it in
shekels every day By the end of
three months, the prices have all
changed, and by the time the
Moshavnik gets his gres
or chicken coop, the cost
risen significantly."
Islamic laws."
According to the
the Iranian Constitution i
recognizes "Jews,
and Christians" as
minorities. It points out I
minorities have their on I
papers and msgaanw
that of the Jewish r
entitled "Tamooi,"
"printed in appreciable
ties."
Noting that "minoritis]
total freedom to _
their religious c^remonia,]
report states that "dwr
religious nature of tot
Revolution" there has I
appreciable increase i
practice of religious
and ceremonies and thS
increase has been shoal
percent among the Jew-'
Public holidays are L
the observance of major i
festivals and or
"Christians have one
leave for Christmas
and Jews have three days I
celebratiOT of the Pavej
report added that on the ssj
tiona of the Prime Mmslsj
Passover holidays wereerM
to one week for the Jew*
Regarding reUgkwi
tions, the report seyi
have more than 30 ay
places of worship *>
tione fa Iren" It further'i
that "the minorities u>W"j
numerous r^f*J"M
merits and shrines, M
extant that only fa I-
there more religious *,
eetabuehmenu for the J"
there are in Iran.''
Supreme Court brief
>
.niun__
---------------.pji.immwn.
Advaniatng Supartaor Abraham a Haajam
Fort Laudardaia Hollywood Adaartiama OMlea: Am. Savtaoa 2300 Mdo.
2S0E Ha*aneaiieiacwS*.,ewar07-OH.........Wa. ISMS WiowTsUsaW
Plani 120 NESth St., Miami. Fla 33138. Phonal 3r*4SM
Mambar JTA. Savon Art*. WHS HtA, AJPA, and FF>A
Coatfausd from Pegs*
state from establishing a religion.
!:&!&* ** "srtainaa by
the U.S. Court of Appeals for the
Eleventh Circuit. Alabama has
Mind the Supreme Court to
overrule the appeals court.
WAHNfSMOCMET aCQUil bn "ohT^^J!L ^ aa.Tb!.,?*,f ** that SfaCS
EaoH,ie*, ZFpS*1 ""x* from the city the Alabama statute requires a
& T municWit? "** "^ r^l?-^*2^
Ft ami the beginning of the school day
a time usually rassiiied for
the
the
the
__.__. rT^ST""' "iiupiw irwior rpwanaiaa noaiTiaau
SUBSCRIPTION AATES 2>u> M.mmum |7 50(Local AraaUSS Annual)or Dy mambarantt)
.......*---------------'--mi "mi1111111111811
j*. FadaralK* of Croat*- Fon Laudardaia: Jo* Mamatam. riMliawM. Jo* TaMaa. Ej-cwOvarj.ee*.
Can AOars Edilor Lor. Gmioarg. A..,.lnt Editor S38S W Oakland Fm*lKYdForUja^dataFT
1332. "*>~<30*;4SaaaM*.orth.Fad.oaiT^
%?.??"**'""' J0mth ***" <* ** fort Laudardaia. F.0 So* 2SS10. Tamarae Fl
Friday. Octobers, 1984
Volume 13
9TISHRI6746
Number 30
municipality.
.JO" PftWoa issued by ,
Jswish historians calls on Lena
and the government not to lose
tune end to start work on the
project. Hundreds, some sav
tfHweanda of artistic objects of
Jswish interest are stored fa
various museums and national
"Usctions, sometimes never on
view, and could become the core
of a Jswish museum of interns
tionai reputation.
aWvsnunentissltoJ-J
ordsr to actnmiw--n
***** '"^Sf s
v ">* undlrm
saeoniinodstion. a1
out.
ceremonial exercises it
"beepeaka a ceremonial, religious
Purpose, one wholly inconsistent
with s secular educational one."
The purpose of the Establish-
ment Clause of the Constitution
was to guard against government
**rvity designed solely to an-
axuage religious observance, the
AJCongress brief notes.
The broad question posed fa
Court
Ths brief
PW*
dealing
held thst under e
tions govsinn>aBt"
special coMid***"*
SrSsothsycssI
ttatthtoprii>?Pf*"



**
Friday, October 5,1984 / The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 5
Fort Lauderdale to be well represented
at the General Assembly in Toronto
Sheraton Centre and
Lj York Hotels in Toronto,
^no will be the headquartere
for the gathering of some 2,600
Jewish community leaders from
cities across the United States
B'nai B'rith urges separation
of Church and State
WASHINGTON Following
plenary session during whkh
ates voiced their fear of
iibling First Amendment to
, U.S. Constitution B'nai
fith International unanimously
roved a resolution urging the
engthening of the wsll bet-
i church and state.
|The resolution, approved
; the Jewish organization's
nvention opposes "all forms of
Iganized prayer, religious
es or Bible classes" in
Iblic schools; public funding or
play of religious symbols on
iblic property: the recently
oved equal access law
PRDAN SHAPIRO, son of
I oiid Mrs. Stuart Shapiro,
tntts Kabbalat Shabbat at
JHebrtw Day School of Great-
jprt Lauderdale. The Hebrew
School is a beneficiary
J that receives funds from
Viwish Federation of Greater
' Lauderdale through its
M Jewish Appeal campaign.
lEXOTiriG PLACES
%
NAMING A TRIP
Iwith National Council of
W Women. For new 1964
J[*u'" describing ten-
P* lours to ISRAEL, with
WOm to EGYPT, ROME
NOON MADRID. i*gm.
*> Highlights in
?lRiraIN'SPA,N',TALY-
CKIEJ; ,nd CANADIAN
Call or
'Hrh Gerl Levin
8772 484-2894
HOWARD
ill:
ACKAGING
*& 6272
R0WARD
ftPER4
Raging
permitting student religious
clubs to meet on school property;
and attempts by public officials
and church leaders to "link
government to church and church
to government" and to claim
"God's authority" in political
campaigns.
"Government," said the
resolution, "must remain neutral
in matters of religion. This
neutrality is not intolerance, but
is vital to the survival of a demo-
cratic society whose government
doee not burden its citizens with
religious choices or doctrines. Ws
affirm our view that separation of
church and state is a funda-
mental precept of our consti-
tutional government."
and Canada and their overseas
guests for the 63rd General As-
sembly of the Council of Jewish
Federation, Nov. 14-18.
The key theme fo the GA will
be the community leader as a
learning person. Scheduled to
speak will be Dr. Henry Kissin-
ger. Dr. Gerson Cohen, Chancel-
lor of the Jewish Theological
Seminary; Leon Dulzin, chair-
man of the Jewish Agency Exe-
cutive; and Mendel Kaplan,
world chairman of Keren Hay-
esod.
Msjor issues confronting Fed-
erations in the coming year will
be explored in depth. Issues such
as Ethiopian Jewry, Peace in the
Middle East, Soviet Jewry and
Black-Jewish Relations.
Attending the GA from Fort
Lauderdale will be Federation
president Joel Reinstein and his
wife, Pearl; Federation UJA
general campaign chairman
Brian Sherr and his wife, Janet;
Federation immediate past-presi-
dent and 1985 campaign co-chair-
man, Edmund Entin, and his wife
Roslyn, president of the
Women's Division; Alan Levy,
1985 campaign co-chairman, and
his wife Marsha; Federation
treasurer Sheldon Polish, and his
wife, Lois; Missions Chairperson
Barbara Wiener; Project
Renewal chairperson Alvera Ac-
kerberg Gold; Chairman of the
North Breward Board of Rabbis,
Rabbi Jeffrey Ballon; Dan
Cantor; Jean Kletzky; and Es-
ther Lerner, campaign co-chair-
person for the Women's Division.
With G. Washington '* Seasoning
and Broth they won't be frugal
with your kugel!
i
*er
G.WASHINGTON'S
GOLDEN POTATO KUGEL
If no one^ clamoring tor your
kugel. it's time you brought it to
the attention ol G. Washington's
Golden Seasoning and Broth
G Washington s is more than a
flavor enhancer It's a complete
seasoning Its special blend of
herbs and spices flavors your
kugel in more ways than one
Just mix in G Washington's
Seasoning and Broth before
baking and you'll have a kugel
to kvell over!
K CertUM Keeker and Pttve
3 cups grated potatoes.
drained
3 eggs, well beiten
2 packets G.Washington's
Golden Seasoning and Broth
to esp potato flour
4 tablespoons melted butter
3 tablespoons grated onion
to teaspoon baking powder
to teaspoon pepper
Combine all ingredients; mix well Place in greased tVi quart baking dish
Bake in 350* F oven for 1 hour or until brown Serve hot Serves 6 to 8
Does yourcraefcer go to pieces
when it meets cream cheese?
It's easy to imagine spreading
delicious cream cheese on something
besides a bagel.
But it's a lot harder to do.
Croissants crumble. Chips chip.
And it's terrible to see what hard
cream cheese can do to an
innocent piece of toast. Just terrible.
The Spreadable Cream Cheese
K CERTIFIED KOSHER
aSrfil*ONTCMr'TO
WHIPPED CREAM CHEESE
Temp Tee whipped cream cheese
is whipped.
So it's smooth and creamy, and
very easy to spread.
Even on something as delicate as
a potato chip.
Temp Tee whipped cream cheese.
It's bigger than the bagel.
Mr Grocer Kraft. Inc will reimburse
you fat the face value ol this coupon
plus 8< hande^ aeovjance provided
you redeemed I on your retail sales
of the named product(s) and thai
upon requeet you agree to fumteh
proof of uuechaoe of sufficient prod
uct to covatU redemption* Coupon
O Kraft, Inc. 1983
IOC

void where taxed, prohibited, or
restricted by law, and may not be
aseignedortranslerredbyyou Cash
value 1/20C Customer must pay
applicable tax For redemption, mail
to Kraft. Inc Dairy Group. PO Box
1799. CUnton. low* 52734
11300 317717


il
Judaica High School begins new Hebrew program
The Judaica High School o.
North Broward has begun a new
program in intensive conversa-
tional Hebrew for the commu-
nity's teenagers. The Hebrew
Immersion Program gives
students an opportunity to learn
Hebrew fluently. The program is
open to all teenagers in the
community who are enrolled in
the Judaica High School.
More than 200 students have
enrolled in the 1984-1985 Judaica
High School of the Jewish Fed-
eration of Greater Fort Lauder-
dale, sponsored by synagogues in
North Broward and the Federa-
tion's Central Agency for Jewish
Education. Teenagers from 8th
through 12th grades from
Temples Beth Am, Beth Israel,
Beth Orr, Emanu-El, Ramat
Shalom and the West Broward
Jewish Congregation will meet
for three trimesters during the
course of the 1984-1985 school

-v
" : Hi
**
A Mock Restaurant was set up by the Hebrew
Immersion Program of Federation's Judaica High
School. Only Hebrew spoken here.
c
year.
For
further information con-
tact Sharon
8400.
HorowiU st 748-
MISS DEBBY acts out the story of the Three Bears toJ
Toddler class in the Center's Ackerberg Sculpture Garden. J
Cooperman, "a charter member" of the Early Childhood 7a,
Staff, has been a popular "specialist" with the toddlers enwlltdun
JCC programs.
CPR classes offered
Libraries offer free programs
At West Regional Branch, 8601
W. Broward Blvd., Plantation.
Attorney Herbert Goldfeld will
discuss Florida wills at 2 p.m.
Wednesday Oct. 10.
At Tamarac Branch. 8601 W.
McNab Rd., Tamarac.
"A Musical Evening in Old
Vienna," a recorded concert, will
be presented by Murray
Ferguson at 7:30 p.m. Thursday
Oit.ll.
At Sunrise Branch, 6600 Sunset
Strip, Sunrise.
Lawrence Taylor, account
executive with Advest. Inc., will
conduct an investment seminar
at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday Oct. 8.
At Margate Catharine Young
Branch, 5810 Park Dr.. Margate.
A six-part series of craft
classes will begin at 9 a.m.
B'nai B'rith begins drive
to register Jewish voters
Noting that John Kennedy was
elected president by an average
of less than one vote per election
district, B'nai B'rith Interna-
tional has instituted a drive to
register both adults and college
students for the current presi-
dential campaign.
The drive is under the direction
of the B'nai B'rith Hillel Founda-
tions, generally described as the
"Jewish address on Campus,"
and B'nai B'rith's Community
Volunteer Services Commission.
Edwin Shapiro, chairman of
the B'nai B'rith Hillel Com-
mission, pointed out that while
81 percent of eligible Jews and
about 50 percent of the rest of the
electorate voted in the last presi-
dential elections, only 35 percent
of those of college age went to the
polls.
According to Harry Levitch,
CVS chairman, a major part of
A Diversified
Jewish Quiz
By RABBI
DAVID W.GORDON
1. Why is the Hebrew word for
life. "Chayim" in the plural, util-
ized in our individual prayers?
2. What is the greatest threat
that faces the American Jew?
3. Why is the Minhah (After-
noon) Prayer considered the moat
meritorious?
4. What is remarkable about
the formation of a Minyan, a '
quorum of ten male worshippers?
5. What did Lewis Browne
imply when he stated. "There
seems to be one way to kill the
Jews and that it with kindness."
6. What happened to the
Hebrew Language following the
establishment of the State of
Israel?
7. Name the Founder of
Conservative Judaiem?
8. Who said, "The only profes
sion I know that doea not bar
Jews la the Rabbinical
Profession?"
9. Who founded Yeshiva
University?
10. Who teaches that "A good
name is rather to he choeen than
greet riches?"
See Page 1# far
the CVS program is to assist the
elderly handicapped to register
and vote. Often, the elderly and
handicapped find voting polls on
second and third floors in build-
ings that lack elevators and
escalators.
The CVS program has been
approved by both the Democratic
and Republican national com-
mittees.
"Americans enjoy the rights of
self-government and the freedom
that accompanies a true
democracy," Levitch said.
"These rights are denied to many
of our brethen and were denied to
most of our ancestors throughout
Jewish history. We should not
and cannot take our citizen-
ship for granted."
Thursday Oct. 11. Pre-
registration is required for the
course. The fee is $6 for the
series. For information call 972-
1188.
Dr. Murray Massin will
present a lecture on the music
and life story of American tenor
Jan Peerce at 1:30 p.m. Friday
Oct. 12.
An eight-part series of bridge
lessons will begin at 9:30 a.m.
Tuesday Oct. 9. The course is
$16. Pre-registration is required.
For details call 972-1188.
Personal color consultant Lois
Biehler will explain the use of
colors to enhance beauty at 7:30
p.m. Tuesday Oct. 9.
Instructors certified by the
American Heart Association
Broward County Chapter, will be
teaching a series of CPR courses
at several Broward County loca
tions.
For specific dates and times
call the location of your choice.
Fort Lauderdale Fire Depart
ment, 564-8901. 2871 E. Sunrwe
Blvd., Sta. No. 4. Fort Lauder
dale.
North Lauderdale Library
973-4820. 6601 Blvd. of Champ-
ions, North Lauderdale.
Plantation General Hospital
587-5010. 401 NW 42 Ava.
Plantation. Ask for In-Service.
Tamarac Fire Department
722-7590. City Hall Council
Chambers. 5811 NW 88 Ava..
Tamarac. Ask for Frank 1
Veterans Administratka, |
2101. 6699 N. Dixie
Oakland Park. Ask for
Hammack.
PLAN!
ON MOVING
TO ISRAEL?
HOW WONDERFUL
Call me, Esther, V
and let me quote y
rates. Also local movingj
long distance movii
anywhere in the U.S.
loverseas
A.B. VAN LINES INC.
______(pf Miami)
f GARDE* RAVIOLI \.__________________
The Jewish Homemakers Guide to Delicious Italian Cooking
Calls for Chef Boy-ai^dee Cheese Ravioli.
2 packages (JOox each) froten
chopped broccoa
2 tablespoons grated Parmesan
cheese
h cup finely chapped anon
1 medium dove garlic, crushed
W cup chapped red or green peppers
1 tablespoon butter or margarine
2cans(15 Cheese Ravtaa m Sauce
Cook broccoli according to package directions; drain wel. Add
Parmesan cheese and mix well. Saute onion, garbc and peppers in
butter until lightly browned; combine with broccoli. Place Ravioh
in saucepan over low heat; stir occasionally until thoroughly
heated. Add half of the broccoli mixture to Ravioli; save half for
garnish. Arrange m shallow or IV* quart serving dish. Garnish
edge with remaining broccoli. Serves 4 to 6.
riii'i
<\. "?- 'M A
TOffn
(( jT 1 \ I d^U m I *\. !
> -Vtt%>
Buy State Of Israel $250 Certificates
With The New, Improved Features
START A VISIT TO ISRAEL
purchase of El Al tickets for fl.ghts to and from Israel under current provisions.
f henort'f'cates ^,C,?shed In ,srael- after vear/$260; 2 years/$275;
3 years/$295; 4 years/$320; 5 years/$)60,in Israeli currency.
STO?^^" t0 ZSSSf*** hoUer add W00 and receive a
5UU Israel Bond ... or receive $250 principal.
Ideal Gift for Bar/Bat Mitzvahs,
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\l
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For Additional Information and Pn*pectus Callor Vitit W
ISRAEL BONDS
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JWiAttito


Friday, October 6,1984 / The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 7
VANTAGE
THE TASTE OF SUCCESS
i
%
I
wm
V
<0 ^;
B^B '* /K":.''* ""

Great 7asfe
with Low Tar.
That's Success!
^nmg The Surgeon General Has Determined
lh8! Cigarette Smoking Is Dangerous to Your Health.
CA
>
! ULU.J 4
> :U>
lmg."*.078.nwBnB .wci|OTJe.ffC8poflB


i
Community
Compiled by Lort Ginsberg.
Federation 748-8400
FRroAYOCT.5
Jewish Federation-Womena
Division: 10 a.m. Executive
board meeting. Federation
building, 8368 W. Oakland Park
Blvd., 748-8400.
Free Blood Pressure Readings: 9
till noon. Jarvia Hall, Lauder-
dale-by-the-Sea, 4601 N. Ocean
Dr.
SATURDAY OCT. 6
YOM KIPPUR
Sunrise Jewish Center Singles
Group: 10 pan. till 2 a.m. Post
Yom Kippur dance for singles age
21-35. 4099 Pine Island Rd., Sun-
rise.
Temple Beth Am: 3 p.m. Free
and open Yiskor service for the
community. 7206 Royal Palm
Blvd.. Margate.
SUNDAY OCT. 7
Temple Kol Ami B'Z'i: 2 p.m.
Meeting featuring a nutritionist.
At Temple.
Hadassah Aviva Chapter: Din-
ner dance at Bahia Mar celebrat-
ing 10th anniversary featuring
founder Ruth Zindler.
Temple Beth Am Singles Club: 2
p.m. Meeting. Jerry Layton will
perform. Donation II. At
Temple. 972-5865.
Temple Beth Am, Man's Club:
9:30 a.m. Meeting. At Temple.
B'nai Zion Harry Matinaky
Simcha Chapter: 7:30 p.m. After
Yom Kippur dance and social.
Donation $3.50. Luigi's Dance-
world, 4850 W. Oakland Park
Blvd.. 748-9331.
MONDAY OCT. 8
Jewiah Federation-Women's
Division: 10:30 a.m. Board
meeting. Speaker: Martin Lip-
nack. president of pro-Israel
PAC. Federation building, 8358
W. Oakland Park Blvd., 748-
8400.
Hadassah Bat Ami Tamarac
Chapter: Noon. Meeting. Film:
"If I Forget Thee ..." Mini-
lunch. Tamarac Jewiah Center,
9101 NW 57 St., Tamarac.
Bnai Zion-Harry Matinsky
Simcha Chapter: 7 p.m. Meeting.
Lou Mass will present "Nostalgic
World of Literature," Broward
Federal, 1856 W. Hillaboro Blvd.,
Deerfield Beach. 722-0963.
AARP Tamarac Chapter: 1 p.m.
Meeting. Tamarac Jewish
Center, 9101 NW 67 St.,
Tamarac.
Hadassah-Fort Lauderdals
Tamar Chapter: 12:30 p.m.
Meeting. Two films will be
shown. Hawaiian Gardens Phase
II Clubhouse.
ORT Pine Island Chapter: Noon.
A cosmetician will give make-up
advice. Donation 60 cents. Nob
Hill Recreation Center, 10400
Sunset Strip, Sunrise.
Hadassah A viva Chanter: 10
a.m. Board meeting. Oakland
Estates Social Center.
TUESDAY OCT. 9
B'nai Brith Women: Noon.
Meeting. Robert Brown of Pro-
fessional Insurance Programs
Inc., will discuss Medicare. Gait
Ocean Mile Hotel.
Pioneer Women Na amat Tamara
Chapter: Noon. Meeting. Water-
bridge Recreation Center, 1060
Del Lago Circle, Sunrise.
Temple Beth Orr: 7:30 p.m. Be-
ginning session of a seminar
entitled "The Contributions of
the Jews." Seminar to continue
Organizations
BRANDEIS
UNIVERSITY NWC
The West Broward Chapter of
Brandeis University National
Women's Committee is holding a
book sale and is seeking dona-
tions of hardcover and paperback
books. For pick-up information
call 484-6227 or 473-5179.
every Tuesday.
WEDNE8DAYOCT.10
UJA Condominium Awards: 10
a.m. Awards breakfast. Tamarac
Jewish Center. 9101 NW 67 St..
Tamarac. 748-8400.
Pioneer Women Na'amat-Negev
Chapter: 12:30 p.m. Meeting.
Temple Beth Israel, Deerfield
Beach.
Temple Kol Ami: 7:30 p.m. Fail
Harvest Festival celebrating
Sukkot.
B'nai B'rith Women-Coconut
Creek Chapter: 11:30 a.m.
Meeting. Speaker: Dr. and Mrs.
Eli Gottlieb. Subject: Jewish life
in South Africa. Mini-lunch.
Temple Beth Am. 7205 Royal
Palm Blvd., Margate.
NCJW-N. Broward Section: 1
p.m. Meeting. Speaker: Carolyn
Slaton, League of Women Voters.
Broward Federal. 3000 N. Uni-
versity Dr.
Hadassah Hatikvah Cypress
Chase Chapter: Noon. Film:
"Israel's Mediterranean Shores."
Temple Emanu-El. 3245 W. Oak-
land Park Blvd.
Friendship Singles Club of Con-
cord Village: Noon. Lunch.
Government Jobs
*16,559-$50,553/yr.
Now Hiring. Your Area.
Call: 1-805-687-6000
Ext. R-4349
Donation li.50. Clubhouse. 6601
N. University Dr.
ORT Coral Springs Chapter: 8
p.m. Meeting. Program: A
Toast to Israel and to the U.&..
including an Israeli salad bar and
desserts. Mullins Park Commu-
nity Center. 10000 NW 29 St..
Coral Springs.
Brandeis University NWC-W.
Broward Chapter: 11:30 a.m.
Meeting. Study Group Showcase.
Speaker: Attorney Christine
Lambertus. Subject: Estate
planning. Deicke Auditorium.
6701 Cypress Rd.. Plantation.
THURSDAYOCT.il
SUKKOT
ORT Tamarac Chapter: 11 a.m.
Meeting. Italian American Club,
7310 W. McNab Rd. 721-1299.
WI.I Plantation Chapter: 12:30
p.m. Meeting. Plantation Central
Park. 581-0860.
ORT Sunrise Village Chapter:
12:30 p.m. Meeting and games.
Mini-lunch. Browsrd Bank
Community Room, 3000 N. Uni-
versity Dr., Sunrise.
FRIDAY OCT. 12
SUKKOT
f&fL
0CS*F*T
Camp*******"*"
HOUDMSPECIAL
5 DMSI4 NIGHTS
CoJorTVtrMrlgenlBJ
ft^AkCondfttontf
Strictly Dieter* Uwi
Muate*Enw1akMwl]
Social Proorems
Pool Frse Ch*m
CatKtoMlvMalt
Rabbinical!
Resident atosho^i
dairy pooW*
*104
per person
dbie.occ.
8UCCOTH-.Oct.10M
SIMCHATTORAH:
Oct. 17-21
m .-,*. RATES FOR LONGERSTAtt
ERIC JACOBS,
ft
DOLPHINMAMA
WINNERS!
Dolphmmania is easy 10 play and rx> purch.i ary Jus) i* k up ,i
tree DOLPHINMANIA COLLECTOR CARD Mid GAME TICKET ,.l you.
nearest participating Pubtu scratcriott lhepri/et- "tin'game
ticket and you could become an INSTANT WINNER! It you don I win
instantly YOU CAN STILL WIN by collectinq the perforated (>"
game ticKet and placing them in the msk rung picture and number y |
on the collector card
$500 $1,000
Alice Thomson Mary Louisa Clayton
Miami
Kevin Rogan
Mil.ini.ii
Stella Beavdin
Pembroke Pines
Olga Jausto
Lake Worth
Delray Beach
Edward L McGuigan
Pompano Beach
Harbart Skolnick
Pompano Beach
Nadean Vancill
Plantation
$2,500
Toni Weston
Miami Snores
^ where shopping is a pleasure 7 days a week

* -
Publix Bakeries open at 8:00 A.M.
Available at Pubiix Stores wlth^
Fresh Danish Baksrles Only.
Made with Wheat, Barley. Rye.
Millet. Oats and Corn, Only
70 Calories per 1-oz. Slice
Choice Grain
Bread
loaf W W
Available at Publix Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
Filled with Apples
and Cinnamon
Apple Streudel
$-|69
each
Available at AN Publix Stores
and Danish Bakeries.
An Old Fashion Favorite
Banana Nut Loaf............ch 99*
Danish Pecan Ring........ach$1w
Bran Muffins..............6 99*
Prices Effective
Oct. 4th thru 10th. 1984
Available at PuMx Stores with
Freeh Danlah Bakeries Only.
Chocolate Cake Filled
with Cherries and Topped
with Whipped Cream
Black Forest
Cake
$a29__
7-inch
Available at Publix Stores with Freeh
Danish Bakeries Only.
French Stock
Baguettes.....................2 $1
Chicago Hard Rods. 10 99*
Choose from Peanut Butter or
Oatmeal Raisin nft
Cookies.........................d,10B
Filed with Assorted Fruit Flavors
Jelly Filled Donuts........seen 30*



-
Friday, October 5,1984 / The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 9
ELAQVESVOU
MOTIONS
lOKVEUCVER.
6^1 Tj^L* Thls ,s the vear of El A1 Israel Airlines fabulous low, low round trip fare.
Y/ g ^/ Let the people of Israel take you to the land of Israel.
KX/FI I OX/FD YUF vacation ^gins when you step on board. Your fare includes a delicious
f\ii inTca nr kosher menu featuring lox> bagels and cream cheese for breakfast. There are
OUR FARE. even free drinks. And El Al is the only airline that flies 747's direct from Miami
to Tel Aviv. This round trip fare effective November 12,1984.
6^44 Just ^n extra and we ,! 8*ve yu round triP airfare from Tel Aviv to the beautiful
y I Red Sea resort of Eilat.
KVFII A IOT ^US three ^^^ at me faDulus Laromme Hotel. Yfe also include two
,?. LvJI sumptuous buffet breakfasts and one delicious continental breakfast. Plus a
IN ElLAT. complimentary drink on arrival. This special package is available Monday to Thurs-
day, November 16,1984 thru March 15,1985. (Not available 12/24/84 thru 1/5/85.)
w ^J Jk ^\ An El Al exclusive between November 16,1984 and March 15,1985. Now the air-
Y(t 1 ir line of Israel flies you round trip from Tel Aviv to Cairo to spend three fabulous
IfX/EI 1 am tlic *avs *n ^8yPt- This El Al exclusive includes Tel Aviv/Cairo round trip airfare
WAV and lhree ^gkk at me beautiful Ramses Hilton for only $249.
WAY TO CAIRO. This includes being met at the airport by English speaking representatives,
transfer to and from the Ramses. Now you can have it all. Israel and Cairo in one magical trip.
6O *% f* Between November 19,1984 and February 28,1985, El Al Israel Airlines gives
vfj m, m C J you its "Sunsation" vacation package to Israel. Package price includes round
KVC ntyv> mP airfare from Miami, five nights in a first class hotel, bed and breakfast
Vr\ ^^ and a Hertz Rent-A-Car for five ^Y8-
Km u ^AYS. Choose from the Basel Group Hotels, or for an extra (g&kn C^j^>
wuu' deluxe Laromme Jerusalem Hotel, the Tel Aviv or Jerusalem Hiltons. You ^ r%u*mm6mm/
I cn always add extra days. (Not available 12/14/84 thru 1/5/85.)
For more information call your travel agent or El Al toll free at 1-800-223-6700.
For a free, detailed color brochure on our packages, write El Al Israel Airlines,
,p. Tour Brochure, PO. Box 10777, Long Island Gty, New York U101.
nth ge price based on purchase of round trip El Al ticket from US. to Tel Aviv. Price subject to change
mout notice. Certain restrictions apply. Contact your travel agent or El Al for details and fares from your city.
eLzlhLza&z-
The airline of Israel
Ajevv>sh expression meaning to beam with pride and joy Comnwnly associated with chik^


Page 10 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale / Friday, October 5,1984
All About Medicare
By MARGARITA FIKS
Q: Tm on Medicare now, but
rm thinking of joining an HMO.
I heard that if you join an HMO,
you will hvae to give up your
Medicare. Also, should I still
keep my BC-BS when I join an
HMOt
A: When you join an HMO,
you don't give up your Medicare.
However, instead of reimbursing
you, Federal government pays
directly to the HMO, where you
receive medical care. You must
continue to pay the Medicare
Medical Insurance (Part B)
premium each month in order to
stay enrolled in the HMO. In
return, the HMO will provide you
at least with the services to which
you are entitled under Medicare.
Moat HMOs provide their
members with additional
Medicare benefits, such as
physical exams and routine
check-ups. However, members
cannot go outside the HMO for
medical care, unless a patient had
a medical emergency. Generally,
you will not need supplemental
insurance. However, there are
still few HMOs which allow their
members to seek outside help
(Example: CAC in Miami has a
Answers to A
Diversified Quiz
1. We pray for two lives A
life of health of the body and a life
and well-being of the soul.
2. Jewish illiteracy, ignorance
and unawareness of our great
heritage.
3. It requires deep commit-
ment to interrupt the business
day to recite it.
4. Ten ordinary laymen may
form a quorum for the conduct of
a formal religious Service but
nine most distinguished scholarly
Rabbis cannot.
5. Let them be and they cease
to be.
6. From a language of prayer
and literature it developed into a
daily spoken language of enrich-
ing communication.
7. Rabbi Isaac Leeser.
8. Dr. Stephen S. Wise.
9. Dr. Bernard Revel.
10. Book of Proverbs Chapter
22 Verse one.
5TRV 5 DfiYS
PflV POR 4
winomtu
HOTEL
JERUJAlEm
Enjoy 5 nights at the
super 3 star Windmill
Hotel and pay for only
four (including breakfast)
Valid 1 11.84 28 2 85
"Kosher restaurants
"Sabbath elevator
'1 33 air conditioned rooms
"Walking distance to the centre
of Jerusalem and the Old City
Don't wait Book your
winter vacation now at
Jerusalem s one of a kind
hotel
3 Mrndele St Tjlbieh
Jerusalem 92147 Isra
63111 Tele* 26536

Margarita Fiks
Freedom of Choice Benefit). If
your HMO has a similar policy,
you may continued to use your
supplemental insurance.
Q: I just received a notice from
Medicare that they will not pay
for my last doctor's bill, since I
have exceeded a 24-visits per year
limit on office visits. They called
it "overutilization.'' I'm furious.
I came from New York and never
knew anything about such rules.
Is it a new policy? Please let
other people on Medicare know
about it
A: Although Medicare is a
Federal program with the defined
guidelines, it allows insurance
companies that handle Medicare
claims to have slightly different
interpretations of Medicare
provisions from one state to
another. Blue Cross-Blue Shield
of Jacksonville handles Medicare
Part B for the state of Florida.
BC-BS has set a 24 visits per
calendar year limit on office visits
in order to comply with the Part
B Limitation of Liability
Provision. This is not a rigid
provision, and you will be
reimbursed for the exceeding
visits as long as they were
medically necessary. You will
need to get a written statement
from your doctor, explaining why
so mani visits. were necessary.
Medicare needs to maintain its
funds. The 24 visits per year
limitation is used to avoid
payments for the unnecessary
visits.
Q: / went on Medicare in June
of this year. I know that you have
to meet a $75 deductible in order
for Medicare to pay for your
doctors. I heard that you must
meet it once a fear. Does that
mean I must pay my new
deductible in June, 1985?
A: You will have to meet the
Medical Insurance (Part B)
deductible each calendar year.
Even though you began your
Medicare coverage in June, 1984,
you must meet a new deductible
starting January, 1985.
Jewish Family Service is a
recipient agency of Jewish Fede-
ration of Greater Fort Lauder-
dale, Jewish Federation of South
Broward and the United Way of
Broward County. If you have a
Medicare question or problem:
CALL Medicare Information
Service of Jewish Family Service
of Broward County at 966-0956 in
Hollywood, 735-3394 in Fort
Lauderdale, and 427-8508 in
Deer field Beach.
Challenge of
absorption of
Ethiopian Jews
Yehuda Dominitz, Director-
General of the Jewish Agency's
Immigration and Absorption De-
partment, stated recently that it
is difficult for Ethiopian Jews to
adjust to Israeli life. "But their
absorption is necessary for them
as well as for us to avoid the need
for another Project Renewal in
ten to fifteen years.
"You can't plan too far in
advance.'' Dominitz said on the
eve of the first National Con-
ference in Israel of the United
Jewish Appeal-Community Cam-
paign. "We don't know how
many Ethiopian Jews are
coming, or when, or their state of
health. And there are constant
surprises."
The one certainty, he said, is
that the challenge is formidable
to help these Jews, who are black
and have been recognized by
Israels Chief Rabbis as Jewish,
to adjust to a complex modern
world after life in a primitive
society.
Gulfside Getaway
5 Days, 4 Nights only $189.95 v
3 Days, 2 Nights on., $99.95
Double occupancy. Including tsios and gralultloa.
May 1st through December 15th, 1984
If ickj*Me IMMW DumiM. D.t MwOt I
PACKAGE INCLUDES 4 NIGHTS 2 NIGHTS
Double room (or 2 people 4 Nights 2 Nights
Continental breakfast for 2 4 Mornings 2 Mornings
Dinner for 2 2 Evenings 1 Evening
Welcome Cocktail tor 2 in ojr Gangplank Lounge
Special Coif Discounts available
Miles ot whit* sand beach*-, heated swimming
pool live entertainment in lounge, tennis and Kolt
nearby Boat trips available for sightseeing rishinjj
and shelling Children 18 and under FREfc in room
with parenls Children s meals at menu prices
Write or call for reservations...
(813) 597-3151
**4
Off
*w
11000 Gulf Shore Drive North
Vanderbilt Beach Naples, Florida 33940
Portugal to open
Resident Embassy in Israel
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Premier Shimon Peres ho
received personal assurance*
from Premier Mario Suarez of
Portugal that he will honor the
commitment he gave Pare*
sometime ago to open a resident
Embassy in Israel when Para*
becomes Prime Minister.
The message was delivered by
Jose Luis Nunes, a key Suarez
political aide, who called on Peres
recently. The Israeli Prime
Minister responded with a warm
invitation to Suarei to vtoi
I- Nunes heads the
faction in the por
parliament.
Pea and Suarez I
members of the Svti
International. PortuMlu!,
el established dip|
relations in the 197r/j
open*! a resident Emh
Lisbon but until now r
has been represented in !*,
a non-resident Ambassador.
CaadleuKhtkiaiTiati
Oct.5-6:46pjn.
Oct. 12- 6:39 pal
CONSERVATIVE
TEMPLE BETH AM iST4-SJB0i. 7306 Royal Palm Blvd Margin I
Services: Monday through Friday 8:90 a.m.. 8 p.m.. Friday lawnrrtaj
p.m.. Saturday a.m.. 5 p.m Sunday 8 a.m.. 5 p.m Rabbi Paul "
Rabbi Emeritus. Dr Solomon Geld. Cantor Irving Grossman.
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL 1742-40*01. 7100 W. Oakland Park Blvd.
33313 Services: Monday through Thursday 8 a.m., 8:30 p.m.: FrldaylU
5p.m.. 8 p.m Saturday 8:48 a.m.; Sunday am 8:80 p.m Rabbi FkBHJ
Labowiti, Cantor Maurlca Neu.
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL OF DEERFIELD BEACH 1421 70*0} Ml
Century Blvd.. Deerfleld Beach 88441 Services: Sunday throughFrKmyfcJ
am.. 5 p.m. Friday late service 8 p.m., Saturday 8:46 a m. and at <
lighting time Rabbi Joseph Lanener. Cantor Shabtai Ackerman.
TEMPLE BETH TORAH (721-7*80 >. 9101 NW 87th St.. Traarac MSB
vices: Sunday through Friday 8:80 a.m.. 8 p.m. Late Friday atmctlsi,
Saturday 46 a m 5 p.m. Rabbi Kurt F. Stow. Auxiliary RBW Nj
Zolondeh.
TEMPLE B'NAI MOSHE (043-6380). 14*4 SE Sard. St. Pompano I
33080. Services: Friday 8 p.m. Rabbi Morris A. Stop.
TEMPLE SHA'ARAY TZEDEK (741-03B6). 4000 Pine Island Rd. I
33821 Services: Sunday through Friday 8 a.m.,8p.m I-et*
pm.. Saturday 8:46 a.m.. 6:80p.m. Basil aware 8.
Marchaat
TEMPLE SHOLOM < 042-6410). 188 SE 11 Avo.. Pompano ^^"fJ
vices: Monday through Friday 8:46 a.m. evenings: a*011** VTm *
day at 6 p.m.. Friday evening at 8. Saturday and Sunday a."
Samuel April. Cantor Samuel Ranter.
CONOREOATION BETH MILLEL OF MARGATE (t74-8080l. """yjj
Blvd.. Margate 3S04B Services: Sunday through Friday 8 15 a .but -r.
Late Friday service 8 p.m Saturday 8:46 a.m.. 6:30 pm. "w
Manner. Cantor Joel Cohan.
HEBREW CONOREOATION OF LAUDCRHILL 1783-95*01 2H N* J!J
Ave LauderhlU 88818. Services: Sunday through Friday S. a.
p.m Saturday 8 46 a.m Rabbi Israel Halparn.
NORTH LAUDERDALE HEBREW CONOREOATION: ^n*1J"\
27221 Services at Banyan Lakes Condo Clubhouse. M60 BaW
Tamarac. Friday at p m Saturday 8 a.mT'Chartes B. Fyier. P
ORTHODOX
TEMPLE OHEL B'NAI RAPHAEL (733-7BS4). 4861 W. <***"**'?*t.
Lauderdale Lakes 38313. Services: Sunday through Thursday
Friday k a m.. 5 p.m Saturday 8:46a.m. Bp.m
SYNAGOGUE OF INVERRARY CHABAO (748-1TTTI. T".^*'|,si.'.l1
coin Park West. Sunrise 33821 Service*: Sunday through Frlaay
p.m., Saturday ? a.m.. 5: jo p.m. Study eroup*: Wen, sunosr
services, Women, Tuesdays 8 p.m. Rabbi Aron Lieberman
YOUNO ISRAEL OF DEERFIELD BEACH (421-18871 J*?*."^,
Blvd.. Deerfleld Beach 33441. Services: Sunday through r rta*>_
sundown Saturday 8:46 am and sundown. Caaeor MIR** Bar*
SebJSBter, PreaMeaL __ AUDERAM
YOUNO ISRAEL SYNAGOGUE OF HOLLYWOOD-FORT LAW" ^
(96B-7877). 32S1 Stirling Rd., Fort Lauderdale 88812 str*Jr*n <
through Friday 7:80 am .and sundown: Saturday, tarn .sum*"
8 a.m.. sundown Rabbi Edward Davis. b
CONOREOATION MIODAL DAVID (736-38831. 'JJ'^JJw $af
Tamarac Services: Dally 8 a.m.; mlncha 6 p.m Rat* a
Congregation president: Herman Fleischer.
RECONSTRUCTIONIST
RAMAT SHALOM (472-8800). 11S01 W. Broward Blv^ P"J"
Service*: Friday 8:18p.m.; Saturday. 10a.m. Rebwi Bin*""
REFORM
TEMPLE BETH ORR (768-8313). 3161 Riverside Dr.. Coral'P^Ci
Services: Friday 8 p.m.. Saturday 10 a.ro. Rabbi Jerreld *
Nancy Hawsntan.
TEMPLE B'NAI SHALOM OF DEERFIELD BEACH f *** F'rkiay I
Menoreh Chapels. 3806 W. HlUaboro Blvd.. Dearnw W"-
RabM Nathan H. Fish, cantor Morris Lev****
TEMPLE RMANU-RL (781-3810). SMI W. Oakland P******, ^S\
Lakes 88811 Service*: Friday CIS p.m ; Saturday. ?**!?mr
celebration of Bar Bat Mltsvah RsMJtHrty aNea. C8*wr
TEMPLE KOL AMI 147218011, 8300 Peter* Rd.. ^",1M-!r*C8,,
Friday 8 16 p.m.. Saturday 1080 a.m. RaBM J ""
LIBERAL JEWISH TEMPLE OF COCONUT CEEEK ("ffrU*1
Friday rugnt services twice iiathty at Calvary Fr*e*?tar*L
Oooonut Creek Partway RaaWi Brwca S. -
WMT BROWARD JEWISH I
I: Friday l
concbation (mm*))*".**
r 8: IS p.m.; Saturday. m*r**m'


Friday, October 6,1984 / The Jewiah Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 11
Explaining Sukkot to children
, palm Branch: The
Meaning of Sakket.
[Chaikin; illustrated by
1 Friedman. Clarion
\l964 82 pp plu* index.
oil. $12.96 cloth.
jbySaeBaraadk
b you, Miriam Chaikin!
Le just made thia review-
Lbration of the harveat
[of Sukkot much more
J than every before.
uuji, an accomplished
[whose writings include
\ Purim and Chanukah, ia
Lpetent. She covera the
fthoroughly. and, more
kt perhaps, in a lively,
[style. H a hook >8 ncil m*
, we cannot entice young
[to pick it up. Children
Vjoy Chaikin'sbooka.
Living into the historical
[of Ownership. Management
latJon (required by S USC
[Title o( publicaUon: Jewiah
I Greater Fort Lauderdale.
No 89*420 2 Date of
JO. 1S4. 3 Frequency of
tkly mid-Sept through mid-
|cckly balance of year. A -
a published annually: 46. B
ubicrlpUon price: 18.96. 4
jinown office of publication:
ndale Beach Blvd Suite
fldtle, Fla 33008 5 Loca-
jiarters of publlahera: 130
*t. Miami. Fla. 33132. 6
editor, managing editor:
thet. 120 N.E. 8 Street,
, 13132 7 Owner. Fred K.
I N.E. 8Street. Miami. Fla.
I Known bondholder!, mort-
(other security holders hold-
! l percent or more of total
I bonds, mortgages or other
|tlany None. for comple-
ofltorganiiatlon: None. 10
land nature of circulation.
order: average no. coplea
| during preceding 12 months
actual no coplea single
led nearest to filing date:
copies printed net press
(.28400. Bi paid circulation: 1
ugh dealers and carriers.
and counter sales, 0, 0: 2
icrlpuons 21304. 22808; C)
Circulation 21304. 22808; D)
uUon by mall, carrier, or
. samples, complimentary
copies. 80. SO. El total
. 21354. 2285 F l copies not
I li office use. left over, un-
|for spoiled after prlnUng.
Slums from news agenta: 0.
21973. 23400 1 certify that
| made by me above are cor-
Pfttts
>chet, publisher

Jewish Books
J lu b in Review
is a service of the IWIFlewiih Book Council,
75 East 26th St., New York. N.Y. 10010
background, depicting our an-
cestors wandering in the desert,
building their little huts
(aukkahet for shelter, creating
the first temples, celebrating
their plentiful harvests offers
contemporary readers not only an
educational experience, but an
emotional linkage aa well. We are
the deacendenta of these early
Jews and we carry on many of
their traditions.
Besides providing youngsters
with a Biblical perspective, the
author tells how the holiday waa
celebrated at various crucial
times during our history, (such aa
the Holocaust, and by different
groups of people (Falashas, Is-
raelis, Russian Jews). There ia
discussion of American customs
in Orthodox, Conservative, and
Reform Congregations. Hebrew
phraaea, prayers, and songs are
liberally sprinkled throughout
the book but are always ex-
plained.
A good non-fiction book re-
quires bibliographic and
reference aids to help the reader
understand the text and to en-
courage additional reading on the
subject. Chaikin has included a
brief bibliography of other
Sukkot books, a quite decent
glossary of Hebrew words,
another of phraaea pertinent to
Sukkot, and an index.
Marvin Friedman has created a
large number of black and yellow
sketches to make a handsome
contribution to the design of the
book.
Malka Drucker writes a similar
holiday series for Holiday House.
Drucker emphasizes customs and
celebrations including practical
suggestions for enjoying each
holiday (crafts, cooking, games).
Chaikin places her emphasis on
the significance and meaning of
each holiday. The two authors
supplement each other well.
Teachers, librarians, and par-
ents will find Shake a Palm
Branch to be spirited beginning
to a joyous year. This ia a book to
be brough out each year to herald
in the holiday.
Sue Borancik, Librarian of
Temple Adath B'nai Israel.
Evansville, Ind., served as Book
Award chairman of the Associa-
tion of Jewish Libraries, 1982-84.
She also travels around the Mid-
west as a storyteller, telling tales
to audiences from nursery school
to nursing home age.
Hadassah plans
Young Leadership Institute
Hadassah Young Leaders
Institute, now in its third year,
has reached out to young women
across the country, bringing
them together for overnight
Sunday-Monday intense learning
experiences.
This year institutes will be held
on Oct. 21 and 22 in new York
City, and Chicago on Dec. 2 and 3
and in Florida on Dec. 9 and 10.
This year's theme "Connec-
tions," represents these women
aa young leaders to Hadassah, to
Israel and to each other. Ellen
Hershkin, coordinator of the
Institute stated, "Our hope is
that each woman will come away
from the institute with a stronger
feeling for the connection bet-
ween Hadassah, Israel, America,
and her colleagues.
a
L^
Easy to Feel Like ah
Without Spending a Dime
^Qtance, its,ust a living room
S^^ Or maybe iti
Eg^fiitedw.thfoors.Orack)set
(i^na be worth much to you.
^^hrnHhonsift^orth
^JJ and medical supplies tor
E^^sp,,alter the Aged
r^^yxxi donate to the
^.Sennfhr,,,s^
totoork 01 course- we win be
"ccSlP vour ^rcnandise at
^-v^9'asGardenSTn"'t
^ out your garage arid
W^'closets.
rr!S'Anc,VOu1ltfeell.kea
CH-
751-3988 (Dad*)
981-8245 (Broward)
5713 N.W 27th Ave
3149 Haliandate Beach Blvd
In
In
Irving Cypen Chairman o the Board
Harold Bach. President
Aaron KrevUz. Chauman. Thrift Shop
ComrMtiee
JCC offers child
protection workshop
"Protecting Our Children" ia
the topic of a workshop offered
by the Early Childhood Depart-
ment of the Jewish Community
Center of Greater Fort
Lauderdale, 6601 W. Sunrise
Blvd., Plantation. The workehop
will be given at 7:30 p.m.
Monday Oct. 8 at the Center.
"All parents should be aware
of the necessity of learning the
right techniques necessary to
safeguard our youngsters either
at home or while they're out in
the community," said Robin
Levine, Early Childhood director.
On the evenings agenda:
professional speakers, an aware-
ness workshop, a film, and a
question and answer period.
The public is invited to thia
free workshop. For more in-
formation call the JCC at 792-
6700.
WECARE VOLUNTEER Mae
Sommers (left) brings a donation
of yarn and holiday foods from
the Bat Ami Chapter of
Hadassah to Rhonda Putterman,
JCC WECARE coordinator. One
of WECAREs ongoing projects
is the distribution of food and
supplies to needy families at holi-
day times.
vaW^iiariwiivjr. s. xVr
MOVING &
STORAGE
Local ft Long Distance Licensed ft Insured
Hollywood
923-3300
Ft. Lauderdale/
Pompano
563-5680
Dade
758-6500
When the World was .
3500 Years younger ,*
It rained over Hot Springs, Arkansas, 3500 yeais ago.
That rain is rising in the Mountain Valley spring today,
geologists report.
No wonder Mountain Valley Water is *o pure. It has
never been touched by man made pollution
Yet long before we knew this, Mountain Valley was the
only water to earn nationwide popularity. It's sodium
free, naturally hard, excellent to taste. Have it delivered
to your home and office.
c^ou^i^VSlley^rVSter
FROM NOT SPRINOf, ARK.
Dade
696-1333
Broward
563-6114
STATE OF
ISRAEL BONDS
BOUGHT AND SOLD
Invest in
Israel Securities
e e
WERE SPECIALISTS IN
ISRAEL SECURITIES
*
TRANSACTIONS DAILY VIA TELEX
TO ISRAEL STOCK EXCHANGE
<>Leumi
ant Lowm. mWMi B M
NASD
- 5Pendinrp a dime f&QHH, !K??fi5Sr*
18 East 48th Street
New York. N.Y. 10017
Securities (212)759-1310
itiOffl Ton Free ($00) 221


PaSe12 The Jewiah Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale / Friday, October 5.1984
"mm
THE DISCOUNT
TIRE CO.
WITH
INTEGRITY
***#!* ***lL
POLVST6EU

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Exclusive Ntr4T^;

r^
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P235 75-15
P185 75-14 P195 75-14. P205 75-14. P215 70-15
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