The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 3, no. 7 (Apr. 5, 1974)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 9, 1976 called v.4, no. 27 but constitutes v.5, no. 1; issue for July 7, 1989 called v.18, no. 11 but constitutes v.18, no. 13.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44570954
lccn - sn 00229545
ocm44570954
System ID:
AA00014312:00433

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Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward


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Full Text
!A Campaign Reaches $5,000,000Mark
e Jewish FLORIDIAN
OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE
i Number 19
Fort Lauderdale. Florida Friday. May 18,1964
Price 35 Cents
p. E. Clay Shaw will install ** mWon-Because of You!
leinstein at annual Meeting
Up. E. Clay Shaw of
County, an avid
, of Israel and the
community, is flying in
.Aashington to install his
pal friend Joel Reinstein as
ait of the Jewish Federa-
f Greater Fort Lauderdale,
[ serves the Jewish commu-
i in 22 cities in North and
| Broward
t installation will take place
e 16th Annual Meeting of
[Federation at 7 p.m..
day May 29 in Soref Hall, at
Jewish Community Center,
| W. Sunrise Blvd.. Planta-
The meeting is open to all
Vibutors to the 1984
Federation-United Jewish
Appeal campaign.
Locally Shaw is a member of
the Florida Bar Association and
the Broward County Bar Asso-
ciation, and has served three
terms as Mayor of Fort
Lauderdale.
Elected to serve a second term
in Congress, Shaw is a member of
the select Committee on
Narcotics Abuse and Control,
and is also a member of the Judi-
ciary Committee and the Public
Works and Transportation Com-
mittee. He has also served on the
Executive Committee of the
Republican National Committee.
Rep. E. Clay Shaw
The 1984 United Jewish
Appeal campaign of the Jewish
Federation has reached the $6
million mark.
The campaign which begins in
the fall and involves 22 citiee in
North Broward County, exceeded
the 1963 campaign by one million
dollars.
UJA general campaign Chair-
man Joel Reinstein and campaign
Co-Chairman Brian Sherr
expressed their delight that the
goal they set when the campaign
began in September was
attained. "This could never have
been possible without the
dedication and tireless efforts of
the hundreds of volunteers who
devoted their time and energy to
this great achievement,"
Reinstein stated -
Edmund Entin. Federation
president, expressed his deep
gratitude to the many campaign
Jhainnan who "went all out for
UJA." "It remarkable to see
the entire North Broward com-
munity join forces for UJA
We truly are one."
It was recently noted in a
national survey of UJA
campaigns across the country,
that Fort Lauderdale had one of
the highest growth raU. over last
year's campaign. The Federation
is very proud of this figure and
the volunteers that made it
happen. This national figure will
make Fort Lauderdale one of the
top producing UJA campaign
cities in the United States.
"This is only the beginning."
Reinstein said, "we are a growing
community, our potential is
limitless."
To Life! Celebrate Israel's 36th
i
despair, the grim
ness of observing Yom
lot commemorating a
of dark destruction
gives way to the jubilation and And so the Jewish community
joy of life and the celebration of f North Broward turns its atten-
the 36th anniversary of Israel s ^ the j.y.iong celebration
independence.
Firat Ha-Omer'-The Jewish 'Count-Up'
be word countdown" has
pe a familiar part of our
ke vocabulary No more
natic moments can be imag-
I than those final seconds just
bre another rocket blasts off
[launching pad on another
ney of exploration into outer
Judaism also has its own
|nting, not that of ten seconds.
rather of 49 da\s. Not a
unt down." but rather a
funtup" the marking of
I day of the seven full weeks
Jt link Passover, the holiday of
peal freedom, to Shavuot, the
Bnl of spiritual deliverance.
r\t Passover, the central theme
[the exodus from slavery to
^om ... but on Shavuot, 50
days later, the main concept is
that of covenant, an eternal bond
between God and the people of
Israel, sealed by the revealatien
of the Torah at Sinai
The period between Passover
and Shavuot thus is one of
increasingly heightened anticipa-
tion, similar to the time in which
an individual would look forward
anxiously and impatiently to a
great event taking place in his
own life.
During this time, each evening
in the synagogue service another
day of the Omer is counted,
recalling the time during the
existence of the great Temples in
Jerusalem when a measure of
barley was brought each day as
an offering before God.
In the midst of this period of
counting, the 33rd day. Lag
BaOmer is singled out for joy
and celebration. It cornea as an
interruption to the period ot
counting that is observed as a
time of semi-mourning, when
weddings are usually not held,
and pious Jews do not cut their
hair.
The observance of this
mourning probably finds its
origin in the struggle of the
Jewish people against the
Romans in the 2nd century of the
commen era. In the struggte.
thousands of students of the
great scholar and martyr. Rabbi
Akiva. died in an inexplicable
plague. The plague ceased on Lag
Continued on Page 6
that will take place on Sunday
May 20 at the 16-acre Perlman
Campus of the Jewish Commu-
nity Center, 6601 W. Sunrise
Blvd.. Plantation.
The campus will be trans-
formed into a "little Jerusalem."
From 10 in the morning to 5 p.m.,
an exciting variety of activities
for persons of all ages will be
available on the campus, around
an outdoor stage, and indoors in
the Samuel M. Soref Hall.
Leading the way from the
menorah, which will be erected in
front of the JCC campus, is an
arched entryway to a miniature
replica of the Jerusalem's Old
City shuh (open marketplace)
with decorations adorning the
area which will be lined with
booths where Israeli and other
foods will be on sale along with
posters, books, dolls, craftwork,
and jewelry from Israel.
Around the campus there will
be other booths and attractions
including pony rides for children,
a petting zoo, and Maccabeah-
S2
om Hashoa
Community Remembers
ln' obligation to remember we shall never forget. Those
"' ih themes echoed in the filled Temple Beth Am Audit-
*W"n. Margate, on Sunday April 29. the day the North
"Howard community gathered to remember the six million Jews
*> perished in the Nazi Holocaust.
Vom Hashoa" day of remembrance was witnessed by
w 1JW people, young and old alike, who felt it their obliga-
*"to .""wmlier the horrors of the Holocaust, so that future
orations will know and prevent such a horror from ever hap-
j *"ib again.
W P,"*"11"- sponsored by the Holocaust Survivors Club of
rih '*". Temple Beth Am. and the Community Relations
2S? ,CRC of th Jh Federation of Greater Fort
uu(T "wuiiji ceremony with six candles one candle lor each of the
indun Jews that perished during the Holocauat. Candles
iTl by "ulwaust survivors, second generation or children of
au8t survivors, and third generation or grandchildren of
,,otocU8l survivors.
HnU*1 d'8n,larie8 read proclamations marking April 29
IkS"1* Um^brance Day and the week of April 29-May 6
""""tKducationWeek.
i!*1 by Kabbi Paul I'loUon. Rabbi of the hoat Temple, the
ng mom only crowd heard testaments from Holocaust
8*vZ! '?i;lutllnK Sam Desperak. president of the Holocaust
SS" .'ul' ,,f Soulh r^orida: Isaac SchlomkowiU. vice
*C" '" llu' Clu>: D* J*pn PoHcier. second generation
vor; nd Miriam Freadman. chairperson of the Planning
CoatiemadeaPae2*
like games, which will begin at 2
p.m.
Children kindergarten through
grade eight will be fielding teams
to participate in such events as
running races, volleyball,
softball. and swimming events.
Co-chairpersons for Israel
Independence Day. Ivy Levine
and Susan Nathanson, hope that
this year's attendance compares
with or betters last years where
over 7.000 people participated in
the celebration.
The day will end with a free
concert by Israeli band
SHAJAR. at 6 p.m.
The day-long celebration is
open to the public and admission
is free.
chel Klauber light* one of the sixcandles in memory of the *
mUUon Jews who perished during the Holocaust


tuff r(
iy, May 18. 1984
Prominent speakers to highlight
UJA National Leadership Conference
Senator Rudy Boschwitz (R-
Minn) and Rabbi Eugene B.
Boro witz will be among the many
speakers to address the UJA
National Leadership Conference
May 18-20 in Washington D.C.
Sen. Boschwitz, who escaped
Hitler's Germany with his family
in the 1930s, is a firm supporter
of Israel in the Senate. He will
keynote a joint plenary at which
UJA and Council of Jewish
Federations will honor the
American Joint Distribution
Committee (JDCl on its 70th
Anniversary.
Rabbi Borowitz, professor of
Jewish Education and Religious
Thought at Hebrew Union
College-Jewish Institute of Reli-
gion, will try to answer the
question. "How can the Amer-
ican Jewish community be more
than peripheral if Israel is to be
considered the center of Jewish
awareness?"
The UJA National Leadership
Yom Yerushalayim-May 30
Featured speaker at Yom
Yerushalayim on Wednesday,
May 30 at Temple Beth Torah
will be Professor Haim Snaked.
Director of the Center for
Advanced International Studies
at the University of Miami His
topic will be "What Jerusalem
Means to Arabs, Christians and
Jews." Professor Snaked is an
Israeli Sabra who holds degrees
from Hebrew University in Jeru-
salem and a PhD from the
University of London School of
Oriental and African Studies. He
is widely published and one of the
worlds most sought after Arabia*
scholars.
This full day will run from 10
a.m. to 3 p.m. Registration is in
advance with the fee of $5
including a mini lunch. Brochures
which include the registration
form are available at local
temples, the Jewish Community
Center, and the Central Agency
for Jewish Education at the
Jewish Federation of Greater Ft.
Lauderdale. Space is limited to
the first 350 registrants.
The work of the participants of
the Yom Yerushalayim poster
contest have been submitted and
the winning poster will appear on
the front page of the Jewish
Journal. Prizes and awards will
' ? presented on May 30. Judges
for the poster contest are: Jessica
Savitt. Gail Abers and Abraham
J Gittelson.
Simultaneous workshops in the
afternoon will include: the
Literature of Jerusalem,
instructor Abraham J. Gittelson;
Art and Architecture of Jeru-
salem (in Hebrew), instructor
Efrat Afek; I Was Born In
Jerusalem, a film by Yehoram
Goan; Legends of Jerusalem,
instructor Rabbi Elliot Skiddell:
Jerusalem the Capital City
a Political Analysis, instructor
Dr. Michael Leinwand:
Lowest emigration rate in 20 Years
NEW YORK (JTA) The National Conference on Soviet
Jewry s Research Bureau reported that 74 Jews left the Soviet
Union m April, continuing the bare trickle of emigration at its
lowest rate in 20 years.
Jerusalem and the Struggle for
Statehood 1946-48 (in Yiddish),
instructor Rabbi Shimon Azulay;
and Yerushalayim through
Music, instructor Cantor Nancy
Housman.
The day long program will
include music and songs, an
opening and prodaimations from
the cities of Tamarac and
Jerusalem and many delights for
the eye, ear, palate and soul.
Institutions participating in
the North B reward Midrasha
are: Temples Beth Am, Beth
Israel. Beth Israel of Deerfield
Beach, Beth Orr, Beth Torah.
Emanu-EI. Sha'aray Tzedek.
Sholom. Ram at Shalom
Synagogue. Hebrew Congrega
tion of Lauderhill. Liberal Jewish
Temple of Coconut Creek, South
eastern Region United
Synagogue of America, Jewish
Community Center and Omega
Condominium. Programs are
coordinated by the Central
Agency for Jewish Education of
the Jewish Federation of Greater
Ft. Lauderdale. Yom
Yerushalayim is in cooperation
with the Department of Educa-
tion and Culture of the World
Zionist Organization. American
Section and the Zionist Organ-
ization of America. For further
information call 748-8400.
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Conference signals an important
turning point in the annual fund-
raising cycle. Community and
national leadership for the 1964
Campaign will be honored and
UJA"s new 1985 Campaign
leadership will be installed.
Needs and issues that will be at
the center of the 1986 Campaign
will be explored in depth at
plenary sessions and in work-
shops divided according to city
size. Leaders and professionals
from more than 200 communkiee
will exchange information and
receive national staff guidance in
key program areas such aa
Operation Upgrade, New Gifts,
Project Renewal, Oversee*
Program, Washington Missions.
Financial Relations and Young
Leadership.
Representing The Jewish
Federation of Greater Ft.
Lauderdale will be 1984 General
Campaign Chairman Joel
Rein stein, Campaign Co-
Chairman Brian Sherr, and
Federation Executive Director
JoelTellee.
Sen. Rudy Bosckwitt
/
Rabbi Eugene B. Bonwitt
SEE ISRAEL JUNE 11-25,1984
Escorted by Rabbi & Mrs. Theodore Feldman
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y$L\ PRIME MINISTER YITZAK RABIN is shown accepting
E MILLION DOLLAR State of Israel Bond purchase from Star
)tvid. Shown with Prime Minister Rabin are (Left to Right) Allan
Mman. Cemetery Director for Star of David of North Lauderdale,
urfos Kinter, President of Star of David and Philip Weinstein,
rPrtsident of Star of David.
B'SAI BRITH HILLEL ADVISORY BOARD of Broward and
^m Beach Counties recently held its installation of 1984-85 officers
he Holiday Inn West. Those installed were (left to right) Hildegard
Mmann. outgoing president and current counselor; Renee Lefton
Mike Cohen, nee presidents; Florence Lustgarten, recording
jra/ory, Irvine Disraelly. assistant treasurer; Henry Warshawshy,
|rf president; and Julius Kirchih. president. Kneeling is Robert
pldberit. trew BB Women object
to abortion/Holocaust
comparison
B'nai B'rith Women expressed
its "great distress" about recent
articles and statements that liken
abortion to the Holocaust.
"While we respect the right of
all to express their opinions on
abortion, we strongly object to
the use of this false comparison,"
said Beverly Davis, president of
the 125.000 member Jewish
women's service and advocacy
organization.
"The analogy trivializes the
suffering of those who died and
those who survived the horror of
the Nazi concentration camps,"
Mrs. Davis said. "The differences
are profound. Whether or not
abortion constitutes the taking of
a human life has been the subject
of raging controversy involving
personal, theological and moral
judgment. Hitler's systematic
slaughtering of 12 million people
(including six million Jews) was
an act that was politically
expedient. No one has ever
sought to argue it on moral or
theological grounds.
The BBW objection was raised
after a statement by New York's
Archbishop John J. O'Connor
stated on a television news
program: "I always compare the
killing of 4,000 babies a day in
the United States, unborn babies,
with the Holocaust ... To me it
is precisely the same." This was
followed shortly after by release
of a book by President Ronald
Reagan called Abortion and the
Conscience of the Nation, which
contains two articles making the
same comparison.
"We who defend the status quo
of abortion rights in this country
believe that whether or not to
have a baby is a decision to be
made by the woman who is
carrying that fetus; it is her body
and her decision," the BBW
president said. "To compare that
to Hitler's murder of millions of
men, women and children
because of their religion or
nationality is another matter
altogether and to liken the two
distorts the issue."
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Federation annual Meeting
Tuesday May 29
The Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale, pursuant
to its By-Laws, is presenting the following slate of officers and
directors, as certified by the Nominating Committee, for
election at the annual meeting at 7 p.m., Tuesday, May 29, at
Soref Hall. JCC Campus, 6501 W. Sunrise Blvd., Plantation.
All contributors to Federation's 1984 United Jewish Appeal
campaign are welcome.
President: JOEL REINSTEIN
Executive Vice President: BRIAN SHERR
Vice President: SAM LEBER
Vice President: ALAN LEVY
Vice President: SAMUEL K. MILLER
Vice President: JOHN STRENG
Vice President: ETHEL WALDMAN
Secretary: IRVING LIBOWSKY
Treasurer: SHELDON POLISH
DIRECTORS ONE-YEAR TERM
SIDNEY SPEWAK FLORENCE K. STRAUS
DIRECTORS
WALTER BERNSTEINK
PHILIP COHEN
MILTON EDELSTEIN
LEONARD FARBER
IRVING FRIEDMAN
MORRIS FURMAN
TWO YEAR TERM
DR. PHILLIPKANEV
WILLIAM KATZBERG
DAVID MILLER
NORMAN OSTRAU
SAULPADEK
HERBERTSADKIN
SOL SCHULMAN
NEWLY ELECTED DIRECTORS
DANIEL CANTOR MORRIS SMALL
DAVID KRANTZ DAVID SOMMER
DR. ROBERT SEGAUL GEORGE BERMAN
FELICE SINCOFF
Publication of the Nominating Committee's slate in The
Jewish Floridian. which is mailed to the homes of 20,000 con-
tributors to Federation's 1984 United Jewish Appeal campaign,
is deemed, in accord with the By-Laws, to be "appropriate
publicity" to the Federation's general membership.
Additional nominations for any officer or for the board may be
made by filing a petition containing the signatures of 25
members of the Federation.___________-__________
The name of two-year term Director Sol Schulman, was inad-
vertently omitted in previous slates.
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AJComm. Meet Hears Things That Needed Saying
The American Jewish Committee's 78th
annual meeting in New York last weekend
was an exciting place to be.
For one thing, the organization's
reelected president, Howard Friedman,
said in an address a number of things about
the candidacy of the Rev. Jesse Jackson
that have needed saying for a long time.
Mainly, in our view, Friedman pulled no
punches in his assertion about Jackson's
"rainbow coalition'* that it was in fact more
a movement of black separatism than of an
attempt to form a new union of Americans
searching to fulfill their basic human needs.
And addressing the Louis Farrakhan
issue, Friedman frankly charged that this
aspect of the Jackson campaign is tinged
with anti-Semitism.
These are things that needed saying
without equivocation, and Mr. Friedman
said them. But this tone of willingness to
meet the issue square-on was also shared
by other speakers at the meeting.
Touching Other Issues
There were magazine editor Letty Cottin
Pogrebin and Dr. Paula Hyman, dean of
the Seminary College of Jewish Studies at
the Jewish Theological Seminary, both of
whom had some frank words about Jewish
women in religious and civil institutions
and the progress they are making (and not
making) in their struggle to achieve full
membership in some segments of the
American Jewish community.
There was Moises Sabbaj, of Guatemala
City, vice president of the Federation of
Central American Jewish Communities,
who warned his United States audience
that Jews live at added risk in his region
because they are such prominent victims in
the event of leftist takeovers.
And there was Dr. Eugene J. Fisher,
executive secretary of the Secretariat for
Catholic-Jewish Relations of the National
Conference of Catholic Bishops who, in his
examination of the Passion Plays in both
Germany and the United States, warned
authors and producers of such plays that it
is "obviously not sufficient" for them to
justify their "stereotyping and misin-
formation" on the basis that "well, it's in
the Bible," because it is not necessarily so.
It all depends, warned Dr. Fisher, on
"how certain passages or scenes from the
four Gospels are selected and what is
communicated through this selectivity." In
effect, taking things out of context can
cause anything to say anything.
Together, these are mere highlights of
what was a seminal AJCommittee un-
dertaking. Those who attended all of the
sessions must surely have come away with
a sense of personal accomplishment.
Mr. Begin and the JNF
On this occasion of Israel's 36th an-
niversary, former Prime Minister
Menachem Begin has clarified two things.
One is that he will not be running for his
seat in the Knesset in the upcoming July 23
election.
The other, and in a sense more important
thing, is Mr. Begin s message to the Jews
of America reminding them of the urgency
of the Jewish National Fund's tasks in
reclaiming the land of Israel.
When he observes that "the entire free
world can join in celebrating this an-
niversary" because "Israel has emerged as
the stabilizing factor in the volatile Middle
East and the bastion of democracy in the
region," he knows, as former head of state,
whereof he speaks.
More to the point is Mr. Begins ad-
monition to the American Jewish com-
munity that "we should recall that ours is a
land reclaimed from centuries of
desolation," and "I am mindful of the
important role played by the Jewish
National Fund in helping to turn
barrenness and despair into green pastures
and hope."
We think most American Jews know
from personal experience that what the
former Prime Minister says about the role
of the JNF in Israel's development is
historically true.
But it is a mark of his concern for his
country when he declares that "Where once
there were stones and emptiness, now there
are fertile lands and orchards. Forests dot
the landscape from Dan to Eilat.
Blossoming lands replace the parched
desert."
And this, the American Jewish com-
munity must learn to feel with as much
heart and enthusiasm as Mr. Begin himself
musters in his words. With the appropriate
support from its spirited generosity, it will
make the work of the JNF that much easier
to continue.
That
^Jewish Meridian
OK (.Kt'VTl'U VI\UT I tl IU.-UH.I B
OF GREATER HIKT I..U DODALE
FRED K SMOCMET
Edllw and Publisher
AS A NATION, we have
always been a patchwork quilt of
ethnic extractions, and this
quality, unique to us in the world,
has been a source of strength and
constant wonderment.
But what has been occurring in
the last decade or two is no longer
any of these things. In fact, the
patchwork quilt is fast becoming
the root of our national bewilder-
ment and an aggravation of
divisiveness.
THE PATCHWORK quilt is
no longer implicit; today, it is
explicit. We are not a unified
people any longer with ethnic
differences as an afterthought.
On the contrary, these differences
divide us now as ethnicity takes
on a multitude of chauvinistic
characteristics that at their worst
insult the American nationhood.
A report from Stockton, Calif.,
of a recall vote of a white mayor
who purports to be black, and
whose racial preference was
questioned by his black
predecessor, comes up with this
disheartening political assess-
ment of the white mayor's
chances to beat the rap:
"Blacks make up 37 percent of
the district, Latins 47 percent,
whites 8 percent, and Asians and
others 8 percent."
FROM THIS statistical
analysis, we are meant to foresee
how Stockton voters would make
their "political" decisions. I can
think of nothing more dangerous
except possibly the announce-
ment on television of East Coast
polling results in a national elec-
tion, such as the presidential
battle due in November, when
there are still three hours of
polling left on the West Coast.
What is happening in Stockton
is little different from what has
happened, say, in Miami where
long ago the community was
divided up into blacks, Hispanics
and non-Spanish-speaking
whites, the latter a category that
even beats the arrogance of tele-
vision network projection of
winners time-zones before the
fact.
The media are mainly the
miscreants in this divisiveness,
and the results in Miami have
been especially devastating.
Even the white Protestants are
shaken by their growing anony-
mity they do not fall conven
Mindlin
IFnaShoch*
^^-ZZZX^sr** ,hmu+ "* *-"** i-** ot *
SUZANNE SMOOiE
Enacutlv* Edtto
refuge is the social page of the
newspaper, the inner sanctum of
their erstwhile ascendancy, into
which few if any others are
invited even today. This is a
strange communal phenomenon
to behold: the felon in all this
giving succor to one of his
comes to mind here.
THE CATHOLICS are, of
course, living it up in a kind of
renaissance ot power and
presence that was simply unfore-
seeable only two decades ago.
Using the new lingo, I would
suggest that white and black
bpanish-speaking Hispanics and
black French-speaking Caribbean
islanders (Haitians mainly and
when they are not in the midst of
voodoo ecstacy) have given
Catholicism the kind of boost in
Miami that is truly astonishing.
For example, when the Pope
moves, so does the earth in
Miami, and promptly a Page One
banner headline is born.
., w uv >.n conven- urly, when the writer of a
lently into any of the categories *"*; to the editor objects to
so their last Ln8bsh-speaking people (of any
a AO^'WnO Sop^viKK AlHahlnB HalpanT ^^
aoo t SS2Kl2aC?^2f,SSIfS^ *" ^no' "*
e. naflandata Baacn Blvd.. Suit* 707-Q Hallandala Fit 33008 --- "____
Jaw,-, tJtZfZLfLt SV" *" ""* NEA' *"*. > *
Friday, May 18,1984
Volume 13
16IYAR5744
Number 19
ethnic extraction) who in turn
object to the persistently
ubiquitous use of Spanish by
Hispanics (of any color), she calls
this un-Christlike."
What all of this does is to leave
ordinary Eiighah-speaking blacks
and ordinary Engliah or Yiddish-
speaking white Jews absolutely
disenfranchised so far as the
media are concerned.
kL.M!?HT these alienated groups have been
put into the same category ot tml
news media's lack of interest Ml
the one occupied by the deserudl
white Protestants, or even thoul
rare white Catholics (nos
Hispanic, most probably)
whom a couple of generation!^
their Americanism have plaow
their religion into a less chauv|
istic perspective by virtue of than
greater regard for the wisdom J
the separation of church at
state principle.
Of course, the blacks a
have an alternative. They
start a riot and frighten the
lights out of everybody
regardless of ethnic extri
and for very good reason. In
the good reasons behind I
riots in Miami quite oftan
make the columns of the
and occasionally
segments of the evening i
television, where the
reasons are stated, and then
community promptly l^-
about them until the next not
But what about the Jf
What alternative do they -
What can they do to amaUM
the communal indifference t
suffer these days? The fact isJ
there is a sudden and reir*
interest in them in news
rooms that I seem to detso
where the daily reportooau
feature and editorial budget* ar*
decided.
UNTIL RECENTLY. Mi|JL
Jews were largely ignored exesp
to survey their reactione to u
latest Israeli offense that out;
C*mitm*a eft Page ''


Friday, May 18,1984/TheJwihnor^ Page 6
Jewish High School announces
'Contract Course'program
BROTHER'S RESTAURANT, located at 1325
i. Powerline Rd'.. Pompano Beach, through their
intmusity and the efforts of Elderly Services
human. Irving Libowsky of Palm-Air*, have
treed to donate surplus bahed good* to the
Kosher Nutrition program. The beneficiary
fonrv l the Jewish Federation of Greater Ft.
auderdale scries hot kosher meal* daily at two
aitet, one located in the Federation building at
8358 W. Oakland Park Blvd., and the other in the
Lauderhill Mall. Brothers is owned by Hy,
Julius, and Fred Kassof. Pictured receiving the
contributions are Kosher Nutrition participants
Virginia Davis, Shirley Huchital, Harry Ham-
mer. Charles Cohen, Sam Botwinick, I ruin Kern,
Frances Wallack. and Evelyn Rabinowitz.
Students who excell in Honors
classes and qualify via special
tasting, will be encouraged to
take special, new "Contract
Courses now being initiated by
the Jewish High School of South
Florida.
Students who select these
advanced courses will make a
"Contract" with a teacher for a
body of studies which the student
will do on his or her own. The
student will work independently,
yet under the supervision of the
teacher.
The courses will last one
semester, 2 semesters or can be
arranged over the summer. The
students will receive 1 to 4
credits.
"We are very enthusiastic
about this exciting program,"
says Rabbi Louis Herring,
Principal of the Jewish High
School of South Florida. "These
courses go beyond the normal
'Honors courses.' They will
provide the student with the
opportunity to exercise their
intellect and receive an
educational experience before un-
available."
The Jewish High School of
South Florida is located on the
grounds of the Michael-Aim
Russell Jewish Community
Center in North Miami Beach, ft
serves students from both Dade
and Broward Counties and is
sponsored by Jewish Federations
in both counties and Women's
American ORT.
[:]ROWARD
[JAPER *
UACKAGING
FT LAUD 776-6272
I ]ROWARD
IJAPER 4
QACKAGING
EW YORK CITY MAYOR
WARD I. KOCH will receive
American ORT Federation
inanity Achievement Award
Jttmbr20at the Vista Inter
pmal Hotel at the New York
world Trade Center.
" wlnomJu hoth
An Affair of the
Heart
"e Windmill H<
i......
efamiiycei,
1
W.
\>
V
\
NOW YOU CAN USE
LEA&PERRINS RELIGIOUSLY.
Now the condiments and sauces that have met the
highest standards of quality for over 150 years meet kosher
standards, too.
Our Worcestershire sauce is made from the finest
natural ingredients and aged for over 2 years. Our
steak sauce beat A-l in taste tests. Our
English Pub Mustard is rich and
robust. And our H-P is the world's
largest selline steak sauce. Use them
to enhance the flavor of
any dish.
One taste and you'll
be converted.
s< rub
^'Clor Fred
c&a,dt&r?4


Page 6 The Jewish Floridiao of Greater Fort Lauderdale / Friday, May 18,1984
Israel will not participate in peace
conference on the Middle East
UNITED NATIONA (JTA) -
Yehuda Blum, Israel's Ambas-
sador to the United Nations, told
Secretary General Javier Perez
de Cuellar that Israel will not
participate in an "International
Peace Conference on the Middle
East."
In a letter to the Secretary
General, Blum, replying to an
earner letter on the issue by de
Cuellar, recalled that Israel voted
against such a conference in the
last General Assembly. The
Israeli Ambassador declared that
Israel's position is "that the sole
path to a peaceful settlement in
the Middle East is that of direct
negotiations, based on Security
Council Resolution 242 which
has already proven effective in
bringing about the Camp David
accords and, through them, the
Israeli-Egyptian treaty of peace
ofMarch"26,1969''
Blum explained that the
General Assembly resolution,
adopted on December 13, 1983,
calling for an International Peace
Conference on the Middle East, is
"contrary both to the Camp
David accords and Security
Council Resolution 242 on which
they are based."
B'nai B'rith sets up Hillel Academic Associates
WASHINGTON A
worldwide network of Jewish
academics interested in
fruthering Judaism, Judaica and
Jewish public policies is being set
up by B'nai B'rith International.
Callel Hillel Academic
Associates and representing the
evolution of five years of effort by
B'nai B'rith International and
B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundations,
the association held its organi-
zational meeting at the B'nai
B'rith headquarters, with a group
of representative academicians
from across the country. Rabbi
Stanley Ringler, director of B'nai
B'rith Hillel's community affairs,
has been appointed to direct this
new program.
Gerald Kraft, president of
B'nai B'rith, said the new group
will be responsible to the
immediate needs and problems of
Jewish academicians as well as
issues of concern throughout the
Jewish community. They will be
involved in the full spectrum of
B'nai B'rith programs around the
world.
Kraft said the organization is
committed to programs of
"Jewish social and cultural
enrichment among colleagues
worldwide" and to "scholarly and
advocacy work in Jewish public
policy interest."
Kraft added that the asso-
ciation will also offer oppor-
tunities to participate in special
seminars in Israel, Europe and
America and to meet and interact
with colleagues locally as well as
internationally.
Mica's disabled vet legislation passed
Legislation sponsored by Rep.
Dan Mica (D. Fla.) passed the
House subcommittee
unanimously. The legislation to
reinstate a policy allowing
military veterans to receive pres-
criptions ordered by their private
physicians was passed May 2,
1964.
The action of the House
Veterans Affaire Subcommittee
on Hospitals and Health Care
will ensure that military veterans
with service-connected
disabilities and under the care of
a private physician will continue
to receive necessary prescriptions
from the Veterans Adminis-
tration (VA|.
Previously, prescriptions
received from a private physician
were sent to the VA which would
fill and return them by mail.
Disabled veterans were notified
last fall that this practice would
be stopped.
"This placed a real hardship on
many disabled veterans who do
not live within a reasonable
distance of a VA facility. This
problem, in fact, is a big reason
many are using private
physicians instead of going to
VA doctors," Mica said.
Mica filed the bill after
learning of the VA's decision to
stop providing medication to
disabled veterans not being
treated in VA facilities. That
decision was prompted by an
administration legal opinion
questioning the statutory
authority for the agency to
furnish medications.
Mental health
Division seeks
Volunteers
TQ>|rt
LAG B'OMER
Continued from Page 1
Ba'Omer. and the day has thus
been marked by festivity, picnics,
and in Israel especially, by
special ceremonies. There, at the
town of Meron, the burial place of
the mystic scholar. Rabbi
Shimon Bar Yochai, who lived at
that time, and was forced to flee
from the Romans and seek refuge
in a cave for many years, bon
fires are lit throughout the night,
dancing and singing u
for hours, and boys of
whose hair has not yet b are given their first hsjrot
Throughout Jewish
other tragic periods htvTi
to the mourning of the
period, including the deet
of Jewish communities
the Crusades, the Chmk_
programs in Poland darinTl
1600s and the stuggle i
the Nazis in World War II.
Lag Ba'Omer took on to i
tionsl element in being celeor
as the day of the acholin,
which the study of Torti i
held supreme, despite all pJ
cutions. In contemporary r
in American Jewish life ta
been a focus upon the
Teacher and many conn
have instituted the cuswei
observing "Yom Ha-morih?]
day of recognition of the ,'-
teacher.
Lag Ba'Omer thus
morates the eternal con
of the Jewish people to Tons\
its study as essential elen
its survival. Lag Ba Omerul
a way-station, a moment of |
and festivity in the awe in
period leading to the peak i
rience in Jewish history, |
giving of the Torah at Mt.!
Florida Branch of Women' League for \
Conservative Judaism to hold conference
The Broward County Mental
Health Division is embarking
upon establishing a volunteer
program. Needed are persons in
the community willing to assist
staff with therapeutic recrea-
tional activities, who have skills
and talents that they are anxious
to share with others or indi-
viduals who just want to lend a
helping hand. Anyone interested
should contact Ruth D. Franzen,
Community Relations Coord-
inator at 963-3156.
The annual Spring Conference
of the Florida Branch of
Women'8 League for
Conservative Judaism will take
place on May 20-22 at the
Konover Renaissance Hotel on
Miami Beach. According to
Florida Branch president, Helen
Applefield. the conference will be
attended by leaders of affiliated
Conservative Synagogue
Sisterhoods throughout the
entire state who will develop
programs and goals for the
coming year.
The theme of the confer
entitled, "Generating PosiuV
Many workshops dealing
that theme will be ofi
including: "Coping."which(
with aging parents, and with^
changing family roles; i
"Avoiding Future Shock
Women."
The Florida Branch is one o
branches of Women's
which boasts a membership]
200.000 across North
and Israel.

ISears mSHBS SYSTEMS CEXTB1
NATHAN A. TARLER Representative 1027 N. Federal Highway (305) 523-7702 Fort Lauderdale, fl 33304
*"
vttn
AU. *00Tj)tnraiir
FuHt & Condition***
jufjc-ErrlsrfaJnmen
0BM**** S^SXIU
ns
cowmmi**!**
$fO dbto.occ.
vsssssssr
loinusroR
SilAVUOT
JUKE *-
memoes uincH
JVSMW
SUMMER
RATE
t:-si -*

TO
Fiddler on the Qyde.
By the banks of the river Clyde in the bonny town of Glasgow,
there thnves a small but active Jewish community center. And hoe a
simple stage boasts shows put on by its proud members. You might be
stirred by bagpipes wailing to the strains of Hava Nagila. Or even see the
nora danced by men in kilts.
While productions like these do the heart good, the Scots have
an encore that does the palate good, as well: A wee sip of fine scotch
whuky. Americans have also taken kindly to this tradition and made
JfcBRare Scotch the one preferred above all others. For so delicate and
so refined is its taste that J&B is the scotch that whispers. And that is
why we recommend it as the perfect libation sunrise, sunset or when-
ever the curtain calls.
J&B. It whispers.
SSfWaWMWScrttf.WWfy .M? Th. PMang.cn Ccpo^on


Friday, May 18,1984 /The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 7
fcBYO Pennies Day at Six Flags Atlantis
B'tfi B'rith
awion IBBYO)
Youth Organ-
has designated
KtJw3 as BBYO Pennies
Jr theme park located in
lollywood.
TV program to designed to
idp BBYO in its Six Million
tany Project to commemorate
bat Jews who perished in the
,'azi Holocaust.
BBYO has been collecting
wwiies for four years. The
[urpose is to visually show the
Kity of the number of su
Billion. To date, over one million
pennies have been collected.
When they reach their goal of six
million, BBYO youth will go
through an allocations process
and distribute the monies among
the various national and local
Jewish charities and s Holocaust
memorial.
Special discounted admission
prices to Six Flags Atlantis are
on sale at the BBYO office.
Prices ar 17.60 plus 100 pennies
for adults, and $6.60 phis 60
pennies for children under 10.
Six Flags Atlantis has donated
one of its fountains to BBYO on
-
MARGATE RECOGNITION DAY: A special breakfast was held to
thank the many volunteers from the Margate area who worked dil-
igtnth raising the funds needed to support the UJA campaign.
Margate Chairman. William Katzberg; Co-Chairman Harry Glugover
and Advisor Israel Resnikoff were present at the breakfast. Rabbi
Kurt Stone of Temple Beth Torah gave the invocation. Ft. Lauderdale
Federation Exevutive Director, Joel Telles and Campaign Associate
Paul Irvine offered their sincere thanks on behalf of the Federation for
the superb effort of the Margate volunteers. Paul Levine was
presented a "Talith" for his worh in the Margate area.
Libraries offfer various programs
The Broward County Library
System is offering a number of
free programs to the public at
various branches around North
Broward. The programs being
offered include:
At Coral Springs Branch, 10077
NW 29 St., Coral Springs.
The sculpture and mixed media
display of Tobey Archer will be a
featured display during the
month of May
Knitting lessons will be offered
'or adults ,,t 9:30 a.m.
Wednesday May 23 and 30.
Beginners art- ask.'d to bring No.
6 short needles and four-ply
*orstedyarn.
At East Regional Branch. 1300
Sunrise Mlvd.. Fort
Lauderdale.
Sonune? Solstice" starring
iry ronda and Myrna Ix>y will
","l 7:30 p.m.
At North Lauderdale Branch.
6601 Blvd. of Champions, North
Lauderdale.
Librarian Cindy Genovese will
nt an introduction to the
pres
Turtle Walk Library, a
lending service, at 10:30
Wednesday May 23.
toy
a.m.
June 3, so that all monies tossed
in to the fountain will be donated
to the project.
For further information
contact 926-4136.
Coata Rica defies
'Diplomatic
Terrorism'
PANAMA CITY. Panama
(BBI) The president of Coeta
Rica declared that he would "not
give in to diplomatic terrorism"
and move his nation's Israeli
embassy out of Jerusalem.
Addressing the annual conven-
tion of B'nai B'rith Interna-
tional's Caribbean District,
President Luis Alberto Monge
said that he transferred the Coeta
Rican embassy from Tel Aviv
"not for military or economic
reasons, but because of
morality," and would not move it
back again.
In recent months Arab nations
have threatened to act against
any country considering moving
its embassies in Israel to Jeru-
salem.
In discussing Central America,
Monge said that he believed that
"Nicaragua to an obstacle to
peace." He added that the
presence of an American force to
necessary "because the Cubans
and Soviets are there."
The Costa Rica President was
presented with B'nai B'rith
Human Rights Award for his
achievements in building
democracy in his country, and for
fighting prior to his election as
president against communists
for workers' rights. He was also
praised for moving the embassy.
Pictured Heft to right) are Harriet Meltzer and Rose Saber.
Volunteers for Israel
return as "reservists'
Harriet Meltzer of Boca Raton
and Rose Saber of Margate are
once again returning to Israel in
the Volunteer for Israel program.
Meltzer, a life member of
Hadassah and an active
participant of the TechnJon
Society, told of her experiences
while working with young Israeli
boys and girls. On her last vol-
unteer trip to Israel, Meltzer
explained that she and Saber
tested, cleaned, and packaged
electrical equipment for instal-
lation on the Amphibian tanks.
Saber, also a life member of
Hadassah, states that although
both women visited Israel prior
to their volunteer trip, the
rewards and experience did not
compare to what they
encountered as 1963 volunteers.
Considering themselves
"reservists" in the Israeli Army,
due to their prior service, both
women feel "rewarded in
knowing that their presense
relieves some pressure of an Is-
raeli reservist i nd gives the
reservist time to spend with his
family."
Meltzer indicated that the
Volunteers for Israel program to
not for Jews only, and that many
non-Jews have participated. For
further information about Vol-
unteers for Israel contact Ben
Dinkes at the Jewish Community
Center at 792-6700.
x
PLANNING
ON MOVING
TO ISRAEL?
HOW WONDERFUL
Call me, Esther, 1-83&6554
and let me quote you
rates. Also local moving &
long distance moving
anywhere in the U.S. o
overseas.
A.B. VAN LINES INC.
(Of Miami)
Introducing the Delicious Taste of
Maxwell House Decaffeinated Coffee.

A )
presented at
T'J<"*iay Mav 22
"NEW1
The films
"he" and
7:30
p.m.
Yoeng
"Only the Ball to
"Sports Bloopers"
! be show,, at
lusdavMav29
im! Biegelei!*n wiU discuss
ar.g Job interviews
^Vtlsrat 7:3 *
^ard Blvd. Plantation.


. *
/
-j<* ~
m
wettti
art of
"3 Billy
presented
SvcanSew,llbe demon-
Wednesday May 23.
^yMav%i:30a"d4pm-
P* Weri^Jy 2.4- ""I t 3:30
"Wnesday May 30.
,9 f'cittoen talent .how
Station tntd hl "
wn Kecreatwn Depart
St^B'wch. eeoo SuiMet
^AyLChildren of a!
P Thursday May 24.
V'A Maxwell Hou I >< delicious
sett's mack rtia^teabeans. Yet this ground
mast i'offo iiifin niV so you can enjoy* it anytime.
i lui v Maxwell House Dei.ii i-i i i.n* ., Delit ttnvf
(rood to the last Decaffeinated drop:
.

M


.reater Fort Lauderdale / Friday, May 18, 1984
B'nai B'rith begins campaign
to defeat Equal Access Bill
WASHINGTON B'nai;
B'rith International has called for
the defeat of the so-called Equal
Access Bill which would require
secondary schools permitting
student groups to meet during
free time on school property to
also grant religious groups the
use of such facilities.
Stuart Raskas, chairman of the
Grass Roots Action Network of
B'nai B'rith, which is spearhead-
ing the Jewish service organiza-
tion's campaign, said the bill
"would turn our schools into
parttime churches."
Sponsored by Rep. Don
Bonker (D., Wash.), the bill,
which was approved by the1
House Education and Labor
Committee by a 30 to 3 vote,
would cut off funds to any school
that allowed student-initiated
clubs on its premises but denied
that privilege to religious groups.
In addition, although these
meetings could take place only
during
"non-instructional'
Golden to attend World
Conference on Jewish Education
Alfred Golden, prominent
Jewish community leader, has
been invited by Prime Minister
Shamir to attend a World
Conference on Jewish Education
in Israel, June 18-20.
Golden is the only repre-
sentative of Broward County
attending the conference. He will
be joined by such nationally
prominent Jews as Max Fisher,
Jerrold Hoffberger and Mort
Mandell.
The purpose of the conference
will be to highlight the
importance of Jewish Education
in stemming the loss of numbers
of Jews to assimilation, inter-
marriage and apathy. It is hoped
that the Jewish communities of
America and throughout the
world will become sensitized to
the need to promote Jewish
Local students
compete in National
Bible Contest
Four students of the religious
school of Temple Beth Orr, Coral
Springs, under the direction of
their principal Joshua Lichtiger,
participated in the regional finals
of the National Bible Contest, an
examination in which students in
Jewish schools throughout the
United States and Canada part-
icipate each year.
The examination, sponsored by
the Department of Education and
Culture of the World Zionist
Organization and organized
locally by the Central Agency for
Jewish Education of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Ft.
Lauderdale, is designed to
involve students from day and
synagogue schools throughout
the country in both Hebrew and
English Divisions.
The students, Adi Benitah,
Matthew Karsh, Ilene Lederman
and Joshua Strikowski studied
portions of the books of Genesis
and Numbers for several months
in preparation for the examina-
tion and were able to respond to a
large number of the difficult
questions that require broad
knowledge of literally every
sentence in these books.
Abraham J. Gittelaon, CAJE
Director of Education for North
Broward noted that "the efforts
of the students and the inspira-
tion and guidance provided by
their principal Joshua Lichtiger
were vital factors in the achieve-
ments that these students made
on this year's examination. We
look forward to their becoming
regional winners in the future and
participating in the National
Finals in New York City."
This year marks the 25th anni-
versary of the Contest whose
objectives are to promote a
greater interest in Bible among
students of Jewish schools in the
United States, to encourage more
extensive reading and study of
the Bible, to strengthen the place
of Bible study in the curriculum
of Jewish schools and to ovate an
attachment to the Bible through-
out ones lifetir
Education among the Jewish
people.
Golden has long been identified
with almost every facet of Jewish
life, having been president of
Central Agency for Jewish
Education, National Commis-
sioner of ADL, Hillel and is the
only person in the U.S. to simul-
taneously serve on the board of
directors of three Federations:
Fort Lauderdale, Miami and
Hollywood. Mr. Golden is the
President of Riverside Memorial
Chapels of Florida.
hours, the school's principal
would have the authority to
decide what that means. The
principal would also determine
whether the religious group's
membership is sufficient to make
it eligible and thus he could bar
some minority religions.
The bill is "a profound threat
to our public school children and
to the principle of the separation
of church and state," Raskas
declared.
The B'nai B'rith leader noted
that while the bill requires reli-
gious clubs in schools to be
student-initiated, they need not
be student-controlled. Control, he
stated, "could be in the hands of
outside religious groups." He ex
plained that because all school
activity must be supervised by
teachers, the authority of the
teachers conceivably could be
mobilized on behalf of particular
religious beliefs.
Raskas declared that the
Bonker bill would not only allow
proselytizing by everyone from
Christian Fundamentalists to the
Reunification Church (Moonies I
and other cults, but would divide
the students along religious lines.
"It would make the public
schools a battleground for reli-
gious rivalry," he said.
BB Sunrise Lodge receives
'Outstanding Lodge' award
The South Broward Council of
B'nai B'rith Lodges, consisting
of 34 lodges, granted its "Out-
standing Lodge" award to the
Sunrise Lodge at the Council's
Installation breakfast held April
8 at Pier 66.
As a double bonus, Sunrise
Lodge president Hy Kipnis,
received the "Outstanding
President of 1983" award.
Accomplishments of
Sunrise Lodge induded
enrolling 32 members, raisini
over 116,000 for B'nai B'ritl
philanthropies, sponsoring i
successful blood drive. ooUectini
food and clothing for the needy,
raising over $45,000 for Ism
Bonds, and the publication of i
monthly newspaper.
Now there's a great-tasting,
sugar-free drink for people who
want to look and feel their best.
New Crystal Light- Drink Mix
It's sweetened a whole new
way. so there's absolutely no
saccharin and no saccharin
aftertaste. Crystal Light comes in
lots of delicious natural flavors.
And there's just 4 calories a glass
Try Crystal Light. It'll make
a believer out of you.


Friday, May 18,1984 / The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 9
Above all, the lowest.
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W .
IMCDVA/ Bf2mg
to
1_V4
THE LOWEST
J'afnmg The Surgeon General Has Determined
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SOn PACK tOOt f IITER. MENTHOL 2 no. "w". 01 mg. neow
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(** Mis w*ct M *3FTC ftaport a FTC m*od
NOW THE LOWEST Of ALi BRANOS
\

i


Jewiah Floridian of Greater Fort LaudeniaJe / Friday, May 18,1964
All About
Medicare
By Fran Rasumny Barrett, J.D.
Q. / belong to an HMO called
Av-Med. They want me to see the
doctor every three months
whether I feel ill or not. Also,
when I go in, they make me sign
a paper without me even knowing
what they are billing for. I don't
want them to cheat the govern-
ment but I like the service I am
getting there. What should I do?
JX. Margate
A. It is good that you are
concerned however, there is no
need for alarm in this case. When
you joined the HMO you were
joining a plan that is geared to
preventive medicine. The HMO's
get reimbursed per enrollee, so if
they keep you healthy, then they
will be actually helping them-
selves also. You should certainly
see the doctor as often as neces-
sary to keep you well. Also, since
the HMO's do get paid per
enrollee they are not mailing in
individual claims to Medicare.
So, don't be concerned when they
ask you to sign that you received i
treatment. 1
Q. / saw a doctor in New York
last September. I sent the claim
into Medicare in Jacksonville,
and to this day I stiU have not
been paid. I don't understand
what the holdup could be. I did
get some correspondance from
Jacksonville but I don't under-
stand it. Can you please help me
with it?
E K Fort Lauderdale
A. Since you saw a physician in
New York, your claim should
have been sent to the carrier in
Sen. Percy request review of Radio Liberty broadcast
Organizations
B'NAI B'RITH WOMEN
The Cypress Chase Chapter of
B'nai B'rith Women will hold its
installation of 1984-85 officers at
noon Mondav June 11 at Temple
Emanu-El. 3245 W. Oakland
Park Blvd.. Port Lauderdale. The
following members will be
installed as officers: Vicki Pearl-
man, president; Edith Yahm,
Honey Bernstein. Francis
Friedland. Blanche Handelman.
and Mollie Rosengarten, vice
presidents: Bella Rosman.
treasurer: Helen Parnes. Gert
Kadanoff. and Cele Cohen, secre-
taries.
HADASSAH
The Bat Ami Tamarac Chapter
of Hadassah will hold its next
meeting at 11:30 a.m. Monday
May 21 at the Tamarac Jewish
Center, 9101 NW 57 St..
Tamarac The agenda will include
the installation of the following
1984-85 officers: Dorothy
Pittman. president: Lillian
Ginsberg. Klla Suresky, Hilda
Marsden. and Frances Rosenthal,
vice presidents: Estelle
Arbitman Minnie Winter, and
Yolande Aferiat, secretaries: and
Frances Marcus, treasurer.
The annual donor luncheon is
scheduled for Wednesday May 23
at Inverrary Country Club.
TEMPLE SHAARAY
TZEDEK
Seven members ol Temple
Sha'arav Tzedek will celebrate
their B'not Mitzvah on Friday
night May 25. The celebrants are
Tillie Black. Minnie Fink, Sadie
Lescht. Dorothy Reifman, Lillian
Rosen, Jean Weiss and Esther
Wurmbrand, who all studied
under the tutelage of Ebie Kurtz
for the past four years.
New York. The note from
Jacksonville said that they were
transferring the claim to New
York for you however, we also
sent in a duplicate claim for you
to the proper carrier, and since
then you have gotten reimbursed.
This column is a service of the
Jewish Family Service of Brow-
ard County, a beneficiary agency
of the Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale. Ques-
tions or problems conc,ning
Medicare, supplemental in-
surance or HMO's should be
directed to anyone ofJFS three
offices: 735-3394 in Lauderdale
Lakes; 427-8508 in Deerfield
Beach; 96&0956in Hollywood.
WASHINGTON Upset by
reports that Radio Liberty has
transmitted anti-Semitic and
anti-democratic broadcasts into
the Soviet Union. Sen. Charles
Percy (R. III.) has asked for an
immediate review by the board
which oversees the Congres-
sionally funded station.
Percy, Chairman of the Senate
Foreign Relations Committee
and one of the leading Senate
supporters of U.S. overseas radio
broadcasting, learned earlier that
parts of a January 13, Radio
Liberty broadcast contained
comments which could be
constructed as inflammatory
against Jews in Ukraine.
The broadcast included selec-
tions from memoirs of Mykola
Kovalevsky, a minister of Agri-
culture* in Ukraine in the early
1900's, which seemed to justify
the attacks on Jews in Ukraine
which occurred in the 1800's and
the early 1900's.
"It is inexcusable that such a
broadcast could ever be aired.
Incredibly, the broadcast
occurred in the context of the
official anti-Semitic campaign
being waged by Soviet media in
Going To Mexico City?
Com* to LIZA S.A. and see the lataat designs and
finest craftsmanship in GOLD and SILVER Jewelry
JAKE and ARI ROSENBERG
Personal Attention
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525-8610
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Ukraine now. Radio Liberty
broadcasts should not be so
intensive," Percy said.
An analysis provided by B'nai
B'rith International concluded
that this broadcast and others
were a "clear abridgement" of the
Program Policy Guidelines of
Radio Free Europe-Radio
Liberty.
Percy requested a review of the
B'nai B'rith findings by the
Board for International Broad-
casting and a report by BIB of
any remedial actions which have
been undertaken or which are
planned to correct these
problems.
Sen. Percy said that "TV,.
reporte are Bhocking. It i* J:
propnate for Radio Liberty l\
produce and broadcast propin|
which are inconsistrmtwS
American ideals and fore*.!
policy objectives. This is ,
serious problem that must be
corrected immediately."
"I do not want Radio Liberty I
to be discreted by its own broad
casts, because the station serves
a useful function and I support H |
strongly. I want it to merit the
consistent Congressional support
which it has had and deserved for
many years." Percy said.
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Great Entertainment Q 2 Shows Nightly
. 'Danong 10 4 Orchestras
Free Golf on Two 18-Hofe Golf Courses. Tennis. Roller
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Ourjupervised Youth Programs Have Facilities
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M
Lillian Brown Proudly Presents
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See another great line-up of famous
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Friday, May 18,1984 / The Jewiah Floridian of Greater Fort Laudardale Page 11
Chaplaincy Corps to hold workshop dinner
^ Chaplaincy Commtaata,of
J wish Federation of Great*
^uderdale. under the dirac-
Fort ^SiAlbert B. SchwaiU.
KNortUHdUndala.
th# "working' dinner will be
Center; Rabbi David Gordon,
feplain at Northndge General
ST North Beech Community
Hospitals; Rabbi David J.
Mauner. chaplain at Manpto
General Hospital; Rabbi Elliot
Skiddell. chaplain t Plantation
General Hospital; Rabbi Kurt
Stone, chaplain at Humana
Bennett Hospital; and Rabbi
Joseph Unjrner. chaplain at
Humana Hospital Cyreaa.
Keynoting the- dinner, which is
designed to upgrade, study, and
exchange new ideas. Dr.
Michael S (ioldstin. Dr
Goldstein will discuss. "The
Doctor. Nurse and Chaplain in
Israel and U.S.
research teams
test new heart valve
A group of Israeli and U.S.
scientists will soon begin clinical
toting of a new prosthetic heart
valve which its developers believe
will be safer and longer-lasting
than those currently in i
the Intensive Cera Unit at that
Critical Moment."
A Phi Beta Kappa from New
York Unviersitv, Dr. Goldstein
has served aa the director of the
Medical Intensive Care Unit at
Jackson Memorial Hospital,
associate director of Pulmonary
Medicine at Broward General
Medical Center, and has taught
numerous classes dealing with
medicine at the University of
Mimi. Currently he is a
consultant at the Veteran's
Administration Hospital in
Miami.
According to Rabbi Schwartz,
this 'working' dinner, which is
held twice a year, is designed to
"add a new dimension to the
service of the chaplains." At the
dinner, Rabbi Schwartz will
discuss, "Jewish Laws Sensi-
tivity to the Emergency Crisis."
LsrcaL
The valve was designed by a
U.S. team lead by Dr. David
Lederman, with the support of
the National Institute of Health,
and will be manufactured in
Israel by Omikron Scientific of
Rehovot.
It is reported that the Israeli
research group is headed by Prof.
Bernardo Vidne of Tel Aviv
University's Sackler School of
Medicine and the Tel Aviv
Medical Center's Department of
Cardiovascular Surgery, and Dr.
Shmuel Einav of the TAU
Facility of Engineering. Prof.
Gerald Austin and Prof.
Mortimer Buckley of the Depart-
"lent of Thoracic Cardiovascular
Surgery of Massachusetts
General Hospital in Boston are in
**rge of the project in the U.S.
Rabbis to Vote
On Women's Pulpits
NEW YORK Reform Rabbi
Beverly Magidsin. whose appU-
* to become the first
^wervative woman rabbi was
)ted last year by narrow
urgins in dramatic roll call
*i st the 83rd convention of
* Rabbinnical Assembly, the
J^twi of Conservativs
"* "th RA convention this
WOth.
JlL,pp,icatkm "d that of
J**bn woman Reform rabbi,
DC S^ W*e*on.
idL^ b?n Wovad by the
3?Pte RA committeaal and
^P^tiorTS^SomaRA
nSfciT1 *" Conservative
JbbttwulbevotedooM(iyl6tt
Uk. u nY.entk>n Wwnaaha
^. NY. Rabbi Wolfe Kabnan.
Jjwecutive vice president said.
* conventKin will be haid May
13-,7t the Concord Hotel.
Call:1.80f>687^000
Ext. R.4349
And ski.
Israel.
Discover its many wonders on a
TWA Getaway1 Vacation.
Jerusalem Masada. Nazareth. Breathtaking.
But you'll also ftnda few things in Israel you might not expect to see. Like
cJorlotL^^vaca^ to choose from ^^^"^^
for example a 9-day vacation starting at just $298* Other Getaway
kracl& Tte Hoh>nds marvels include visits to Rome Paris. Athens-even
a Greek Islands cruise So call yourtravel agent or TWA
^y PJFQE1S
For sfw 1984 Gets**/
Israel & Tr-Hotyisnds
brochure .jut com-
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You re going to like us
Prom i298 to $339 per person, double occupancy, excluding airfare.


Jreater Fort Lauderdale/ Friday, May 18,1984
Community Calendar
Compiled by Lori Ginsberg,
Federation 748-8400
FRIDAY MAY 18
UJA National Leadership Con-
ference: May 18-20. Sheraton
Washington Hotel.
Yiddish Culture Society of Fort
Lauderdale: 1 p.m. Celebration of
Israel's 36th birthday. Broward
Federal Savings Bank, 3000 Uni-
versity Dr., Sunrise.
SATURDAY MAY 19
Temple Beth Torah, Men's Club:
8 p.m. Three-act Show featuring
a pianist, clarinetist, and a come-
dienne. Donation $4. At Temple,
9101 NW 57 St., Tamarac.
SUNDAY MAY 20
LAG B'OMER
JCC: 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Commu-
nity-wide Israel Independence
Day Celebration.
Temple Beth Am-Singlea Club: 2
p.m. Book review by Jerry
Lay ton. At Temple, 7206 Royal
Palm Blvd., Margate.
Temple Beth Torah: Noon.
Torah dedication presented by
David and Blossom Waldman in
memory of parents. At Temple,
9101 NW 57 St., Tamarac.
Temple Sha'aray Tzedek, Men's
Club: 9 a.m. Speaker: Nathan
Goren, administrator of the
North Broward Hospital. At
Temple. 4099 Pine Island Road,
Sunrise.
MONDAY MAY 21
WLI:
Tamarac Chapter: 12:30 p.m.
Luncheon and meeting. Italian-
American Club, 7300 McNab
Road, Tamarac. Interested
members call 721-6917.
Margate Chapter: 12:30 p.m.
Paid-up membership luncheon.
Teen Center in David Park.
B'nai B'nth-Sunrise Lodge: 7:30
p.m. Meeting. Whiting Hall,
Sunrise.
HAD ASS AH:
Gil ah Inverrary Chapter:
Noon. Donor luncheon. Wood-
mont Country Club.
Bat Ami Tamarac Chapter:
11:30 a.m. Meeting and install-
ation of officers. Mini-lunch.
Temple Beth Torah, 9101 NW 67
St., Tamarac.
Hebrew Congregation of Lander-
hill, Sisterhood: Noon. Luncheon
and card party. Castle Gardens
Recreation Center.
Coral Springs Area Coalition of
Jewish Organisations: 7:30 p.m.
Meeting. C.S. City Hall.
TUESDAY MAY 22
HADASSAH:
Maaado Margate Chapter:
Noon. Installation of officers and
meeting. Esther Cannon will in-
stall officers. Temple Beth Am,
7201 Ryal Palm Blvd., Margate.
Ray us Tamarac Chapter:
Noon. Installation of officers and
meeting. Irving Lewkow will tell
Yiddish story. Lime Bay Choral
Group will entertain. Temple
Beth Torah, 9101 NW 67 St.,
Tamarac.
Pioneer Women Na'amat-Debra
Club: Noon. Meeting. Rabbi
David Gordon will speak.
Hawaiian Gardens Phase 5 Rec-
reation Hall.
WEDNESDAY MAY 23
Jewish War Veterans-Win.
Kretchman Auxiliary: 12:30 p.m.
Meeting. Mini-lunch. Broward
Federal, 3000 N. University Dr.,
Sunrise. Community Room.
ORT:
Inverrary Chapter: 11:30 a.m.
Installation of officers.
Luncheon. $8.50. Inverary
Country Club. 485-2364.
Lauderdale West Chapter:
Noon. Installation of officers.
Mini-lunch Deicke Auditorium,
5701 Cypress Rd., Plantation.
Dade- Broward Lupus Founda-
tion: 8 p.m. Rheumatologist Dr.
What every
noridian should
know about the
In a nutshell, it is simply
"owning" tor a lew days
or a whole summer, the
most vacation for the
money you could pos-
sibly imagine.
A great Summer Pack-
age that includes 3 fabu-
lous meals daily golf, ten-
nis, biking, riding, jogging,
health club, swimming.
Summer fun in a summer
climate. Cool mountain
breezes. Nights serenaded
by top Show Business
Talent Dancing. And fun.
Special programs for tots
to teens. And if relaxation
is what you want, you
couldn't pick a nicer
place or time.
The Concord Summer.
#o*
$77
(per person, per day. dbl. occ.. based on weekly stay,
excluding holidays, FAR3 fabulous meals daily)
CALL 1-800-431-3850
Let us tell you about our
fabulous fare for Horidians.
OONOORD
RESORT HOTEL
Kiamesha Lake. New York 12751
%
Charles Kahn. Parkway Regional
Medical Center.
B'nai B'rith Women-Cypress
Chase Chapter: Noon. Gift of
Love luncheon. $12.60. Inverrary
Country Club.
Temple Beth Torah, Sisterhood:
Noon. Meeting. Rabbi Zolondek
will speak. At Temple.
THURSDAY MAY 24
B'NAI B'RITH WOMEN:
Hope Chapter: Noon. Meeting.
Bagel Break. Hank Meyer,
National Hillel Commissioner,
will speak. Deicke Auditorium,
5701 Cypress Road, Plantation.
Bermuda Gob: Noon. Paid-up
membership luncheon. Club-
house.
Free Sons of Israel-Fort Lauder-
dale Lodge: 7:30 p.m. Meeting.
Whiting Hall, Sunrise.
Hadassah-Annon Castle Gardens
Chspter: Noon. Meeting and in-
stallation of officers. Castle Rec-
reation Hall.
B'nai B'rith-Pompano Lodge: 8
p.m. Meeting. Palm-Aire
Country Club, 551 S. Pompano
Pkwy.
FRIDAY MAY 25
Workmen's Circle-Fort Lauder-
dale Branch: 1 p.m. Meeting.
Choral Group from JCC will en-
tertain. Margate Catharine
Young Library. 6810 Park Dr.,
Margate.
B'nai B'nth-Concord Lodge: 7:30
p.m. Meeting. Broward Federal,
6736 University Dr., Tamarac.
SUNDAY MAY 27
B'nai Brith Wynmoor Lodge:
9:30 a.m. Meeting. Temple Beth
Am, 7206 Royal Palm Blvd.,
Margate. 974-1041.
CJCS Conference: May 27-30.
Biltmore Hotel, Los Angeles,
Calif.
JCC: Rain date for Israel Inde-
pendence Day.
MONDAY MAY 28
B'nai Brith-Aliyah Unit: 8 p.m.
Meeting. Sunrise Savings, 9001
W. Oakland Park Blvd.
B'nai B'rith Women-Oakland Es-
tates Chapter: 11:30 a.m.
Meeting. Harmonitones and Phil
Fredericks will entertain.
Boutique opens at 11 a.m. Oak-
land Club Inc. Social Center.
WEDNESDAY MAY 30
Central Agency for Jewish
Education (CAJE) of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort Lau-
THURSDAY MAY 31
B'nnl B'rith WomeiKW,
C^kCW.: Noon.fiE
Gcrnldine Lerner will entertain
Mini-lunch. Temple Beth Am
7206 Royal Palm Blvd., MargS'
GOEXOTIIG PLACES
%
PLAN MING A TRIP
Travel with National Council o<
Jewish Woman. For new 1964
Brochure describing $,.
aatlonal tours to ISRAEL, with
extensions to EGYPT, ROME
LONDON, MADRID, and SWIT
ZERLAND: Highlights In
EUROPE, CHINA, THE ORIENT
GREAT BRITAIN, SPAIN, ITALY
COSTA RICA, and CANADIAN
ROCKIES.
Pleat. Call
Eth.l Harsh
473-6772
or
Geri Levin
484-2994
^-Jg^yTjfcMi *W* an early bird's look at the community
that s changing the very definition of adult congregate living.
meab allSSSf ImSfr ^ ^Tn,,includes Vur apartment Iraditional
oTsocial cXaf'^JlS$ ^ membershiP fee! Y<*' enjoy a full schedule
^vSleTo'f^u^ *a!EP0rt??n' ^ morel C*" us today-our limousine
il anting ^ "* *"" ^ <** The F,oridj Club. Who could ask
IFLORIDAV? CLUB
---------------------------^"t""K"-W."Hlv,nKF.K,l,lvlM..n.. ,foo, *. s,.,,. <(t JJJJ "* "* *"


LnJv.lMl.Mj4
/'
Jewish Floridian of Gr^terforthZuderdMl^PaS^f
!25*3*
1
*ri

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B'nai-Bnot Mitzvah
Broward Knights of Pythias
to attend convention
TEMPLE KOL AMI
The B'nai Mitzvah of David
Danzig, sonof Sheila and William
Danzig of Plantation, and Ken-
neth Moll, son of Linda and Jim
Moll of Plantation, was cele-
brated at the Saturday morning
May 12 service at Temple Kol
Ami, Plantation.
At the Saturday morning May
19 service at Kol Ami, Scott
Kubinchik, son of Linda and
Harvey Rubinchik of Plantation,
and Joseph Price, son of Caryn
and Michael Price of Davis, will
become Bar Mitzvah celebrants.
WEST BROWARD
JEWISH CONGREGATION
Brian Chesal, son of Marlene
and Nathan Chesal of Plantation,
celebrated his Bar Mitzvah at the
Saturday May 5 service at West
Broward Jewish Congregation,
Plantation.
TEMPLE BETH TORAH
The Bat Mitzvah of Ellen
Wasserstrom, daughter of
Glenda and Barry Wasserstrom
of Coral Springs, will be cele-
brated at the Friday night May
18 service at Temple Beth Torah,
Tamarac.
The following morning at the
Saturday May 19 service, Greg
Gershengorn, son of Roberta and
Richard Gershengorn of Lauder-
hill, will become a Bar Mitzvah
celebrant.
The Bat Mitzvah of Norms
Kramer, daughter of Sandra and
Stanley Kramer of Sunrise, will
take place at the Friday night
May 25 service at Beth Torah.
The B'nai Mitzvah of Bryan
Cadugan, son of Barbara and
George Cadugan of Tamarac, and
Ted Sweet, son of Roni and
Steven Sweet of Sunrise, will be
celebrated at the Saturday
morning May 26 service at Beth
Torah.
TEMPLE BETH AM
The B'nai Mitzvah of Jamie
and Jason Schwartz, daughter
and son of Laurie and Harvey
Schwartz of Coral Springs, will
be celebrated at the Saturday
morning May 19 service at
Temple Beth Am, Margate.
RNicole Weiner, daughter of
Marie and Alvin Weiner of Coral
Springs, will celebrate her Bat
Mitzvah on Sunday May 20 at
Beth Am.
Statfeld
Miller
Polsyn
Shiff
Ami Greenberg, daughter of
Iris and Robert Greenberg of
Boca Raton, will celebrate her
Bat Mitzvah at the Saturday
morning May 26 service at Beth
Am.
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL
Jay Kelt, son of Arleen and Peter
Kell of Sunrise, will be called to
the Torah in honor of his Bar
Mitzvah at the Saturday May 19
service at Temple Beth Israel,
Sunrise.
Alysa Siegd, daughter of Pam
and Victor Siegel of Sunrise, will
celebrate her Bat Mitzvah at the
Friday night May 25 service at
Beth Israel.
TEMFLE EMANU-EL
Just en Shiff, son of Michael
Shiff and Idelle Shiff of Fort
Lauderdale, celebrated his Bar
Mitzvah at the May 5 service at
Temple Emanu-El, Fort Lauder-
dale.
Ira Jeffrey Miller, son of Laura
Brandeis of Fort Lauderdale,
celebrated his Bar Mitzvah at the
May 12 service at Emanu-El.
Jennifer L. Statfeld, daughter
of Myra and Barry Statfeld of
Lauderhill, will celebrate her Bat
Mitzvah at the Saturday May 19
service at Emanu-El.
Zeva R. Polsyn, daughter of
Paula and Abraham Polsyn of
Plantation, will become a Bat
Mitzvah celebrant at the Satur-
day May 26 service at Emanu-El.
Delegates from the six lodges
in the 10th Pythian District of
Broward County will be among
the many Pythian delegates
attending the 99th Grand Lodge
of Florida Convention from May
24-27 at the Seville Hotel on
Miami Beach.
The six Broward lodges are:
Fort Lauderdale No. 201, Quad
City No. 204. Margate No. 208,
Plantation No. 210, Lauderdale
No. 213, and Coral Springs No.
215.
Delegates from the 32 lodm.
and 28 Pythian Sisters TenpE
throughout Florida are expected
to attend. Martin Deringa
Grand Chancellor of the Grand
Domain of Florida, will preside.
Among the activitiai
scheduled are the installation of
officers and selection of winning
entries in the Knights of Pythias
Poster Contest.
May Jewish
bestseller list
Tarsbis, daughter of
Marilyn and Joseph Tarshis of
Coral Springs, will be called to
the Torah in honor of her Bat
Mitzvah at the Friday night May
25 service at Beth Am.
WASHINGTON Based on a
sampling of Jewish bookstores in
cities across the United States,
The B'nai B'rith International
Jewish Monthly has selected in
its May issue the following as
best-selling books of Jewish
interest. They are listed
alphabetically by title.
HARDCOVER
The Halakhic Man. Joseph B.
Solveitchik. Jewish Publication
Society. S12.95. English transla-
tions of the seminal essays of the
Orthodox intellectual leader.
In the Storm. Sholom Aleichem.
Pantheon. $12.96. The spirited
diaries of a young Dutch woman
written before her deportation to
Auschwitz.
The Retreat. Aharon Appelfeld.
Dutton. $12.95. At the onset of
World War II, a group of Jews
attempt to escape to a hilltop
outside of Vienna.
Torah from Our Sages: Pirke
Avot. Jacob Neusner. Rossell.
$18.95. A new American
translation and explanation.
PAPERBACK
Choosing Judaism. Lydia
Kukoff. Hippocrene Books.
$5.95. A convert's story.
Gates To the New City. Edited
by Howard Schwart. Avon.
$12.95. Anthology of Jewish
literature.
The Jewish Manual. Introduction
by Chaim Raphael. NightinGale
Books. $9.95. A facsimile edition
of the first Jewish cookbook
printed in English.
On Equal Terms: Jews in
America. Lucy Dawidowicz. Holt
$6.95. A study of Jews in
America during the past century.
The Precious Legacy. Edited by
David Altshuler. Summit Books.
$17.50. Essays and photographs
cataloguing the Judaic treasures
of the State Jewish Museum in
Prague, now on exhibit in the
United States.
JEWISH ACCORDING TO TRADITION.
Star of David Cemeteries and Funeral Chapels are Broward
County's only all Jewish Cemetery/Funeral Chapels. Consecrated
by the Broward Board of Rabbis, staffed solely by Jewish Funeral
Directors and Memorial Counselors. Star of David is
concerned about Jewish burial traditions. These
traditions are the laws of our fathers and their forefathers
before them. These traditions are our heritage, so they
are important to us...And they are important to you.
Star of David Cemeterie- and Funeral Chap*I.
Tamarac Lauderhill Hollywood
Broward. (305) 525-0800
Dade. 949-6100 S. Palm Beach. 722-9000 W. Palm Beach. 734-8440
Send to: Star of DevM Cemeterie* Funeral Chapels. P.O. Box 25700. Tamarac. FL 33320
D I want more information on property selections at Star of David D North Broward D South Broward '
C I want more information on pre-arranged funerals.
D I want more information on your property exchange program. Our lots are In .__________________
------------------------cemetery at__________. ___________________
NAMfc
ADDRESS
CITY
_ PHONE
STATnt
ZIP

^^^Buns
/ May 18-7:40 p.m. __ May 25-7:44 p.m. June 1-7:48 p.m.
!
And
CONSERVATIVE
TEMPLE BETH AM (974-8650). 7306 Royal Palm Blvd.. Margate 3306S.
Service*: Monday through Friday 8: JO a.m.. S p.m.. Friday late service 8
p.m ; Saturday 9 am.. 5 p.m.; Sunday 8 a.m.. 8 p.m. Rabbi Paul Plotkin.
Rabbi Emeritus. Dr. Solomon Geld. Cantor Irving Grossman
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL (742-40401. 7100 W. Oakland Park Blvd.. Sunrise
33313 Services: Monday through Thursday 8 a.m.. 5:80 p.m.: Friday 8 am.,
5 p.m.. 8 p.m ; Saturday 8:48 a.m.; Sunday am ,8:80 p.m. Rabbi Philip*.
Labowifi, Cantor Maurice Neu.
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL OF DEERFIELD BEACH (431-7060). 300 S.
Century Blvd.. Decrfleld Beach 33441 Services: Sunday through Friday 8:80
a.m.. 8 p.m. Friday late service 8 p.m.; Saturday 8:46 a.m.. and at candle-
Ughtlng time Rabbi Joseph Lananer, Cantor Shabtal Ackerman.
TEMPLE BETH TORAH (731-76M). 9101 NW 67th St. Tmarac 88821 Ser-
vices: Sunday through Friday 8:80 a m.. 6 p.m. Late Friday service 8 p.m.
Saturday 8:48 a.m., 6 p.m Rabbi Kurt F. Stone. Cantor Henry Belasco.
TEMPLE B'NAI MOSHE (942-6380). 1484 SE Serd St. Pompano Beach
33060 Services: Friday 8 p.m. Rabbi Morris A. Skop.
TEMPLE SHA'ARAY TZEDEK (741-03S6), 4009 Pino Island Rd.. Sunrise
33321 Services: Sunday through Friday 8 a.m., 6p.m.; Late Friday services
p.m.; Saturday 8:48 s,m. 6:80 p.m. Cantor Jack March ant
TEMPLE SHOLOM (943-8410). 183 SE 11 Ave.. Pompano Beach 83080 Ser-
vices: Monday through Friday 8:46 a.m. evenings: Monday through Thur
aday at 6 p.m., Friday evening at 8. Saturday and Sunday t am Rabbi
Samuel April. Cantor Samuel Renter.
CONOREOATION BETH HILLSL OF MAROATE (974-SJtO). TSMMargate
Blvd.. Margate 88088. Services: Sunday through Friday 8:16 a.m. 8 30 pnv
Late Friday service 8 p.m. Saturday 8:48 a.m., 6:80 p.m. Rabbi David
Manner Cantor Joel Cohen.
CONOREOATION B'NAI ISRAEL OP CORAL SPRINOS (For Ramblewood
East residents). 768-4819. Services: Dally 8:80 a.m.. 8:80 p.m ; Saturday 9
am David Karaman, President.
HEBREW CONOREOATION OF LAUDERHILL (788-SJSOI. 3048 NW 49th
Ave Lauderhill 88818. Services: Sunday through Friday 8:80 a.m.. 680
p.m.; Saturdays 48 am Rabbi Israel Halpern.
NORTH LAUDERDALE HEBREW CONOREOATION: (731-7883 or 733
2723) Services at Banyan Lakes Condo Clubhouse, MM Bailey Rd
Tamarac. Friday at 8 p.m Saturday 9 a m Charles B. Fyler. President.
ORTHOOOX
TEMPLE OHBL B'NAI RAPHAEL (733-78841. 4SM W. Oakland Park Blvd..
Lauderdale Lakes 83813. Services: Sunday through Thursday 8 am 8 p m
Friday 8a.m.. 8p.m., Saturday 8:46 a.m., 8p.m.
SYNAGOGUE OF INVBRRARY CHABAO (T4S-17T7). 7TW NW 44 St.. Lin-
coln Park West, Sunrise 88831 Services: Sunday Mya* Friday 6 a.m.. 5
p.m.. Saturday f a.m., in p.m. study ereups: Man. Sunday loiiowiM
services; Women, TuesdaysSp.m. Rabbi Area Lieberman.
YOUNO ISRAEL OF DEERFIELD BEACH (421 1887). IBM W. Hllliboro
Blvd.. Deerfleld Beach 33441 Services: Sunday through Friday 8 a.m and
sundown. Saturday 8:46 a.m. and sundown Cantor Sal Cuoien Sidney
Schosier, President
YOUNO ISRAEL SYNAGOGUE OF HOLLYWOOD-FORT LAUDERDALE
(988-7877), 8391 Stirling Rd.. Fort Lauderdale 88813 Services: Monday
through Friday 7:0 a.m.. and sundown; Saturday, ta.m.. sundown; Sunday
8am, sundown. Rabbi Edward Davis.
CONOREOATION MIODAL DAVID (TM-8M8). STB W. McNab Rd..
Tamarac. Services: Dally g a.m.; mlncha 6 p.m. Rabbi CRaNn SnyMr-
Ceaarofatten president Herman Fleischer.
RECONSTRUCT MNIST
RAMAT SHALOM (473-8600), 11801 W. Broward Blvd.. Plantation 83836
Services: Friday 8 18pm, Saturday, 10a.m Rabbi Elliot SklSdeM.
REFORM
TEMPLE BETH ORR (768-8382), 3161 Riverside Dr., Coral Spring* *
Services: Sunday a 80 a.m.; Tuesday. Thursday T:IS p.m.; FrtdaySpm ;
Saturday 10 a.m Rabbi DsnaM R. Oerber. Cantor Nancy Heusman.
TEMPLE B'NAI SHALOM OF DEERFIELD BEACH (4M3M3). Sarvlcttat
Menorah Chapela. MM W. HUlaboro Blvd.. Deerfleld Beach. Friday I P ">
Rabbi Nathan H. Fish, Cantor Morris Lovtesea
------------------- "* msaBf. vewirei reran t* kVVinaSjm.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL (711-3310). SMS W. Oakland Park Blvd.. Lauderdale
Saturday, only on holiday, or
eHrey Ballon. CaaMr Jerome
Lakes 33811. Services: Friday 8 16 p.m
celebration of Bar-Bat Mltsvah
TEMPLE KOL AMI (473 -IMS). MM Peter. Rd. Plantation SSSM. Mrvkm-
rrtday I 14 p.m.. Saturday lOMa.m. Rabbi SaeMon J. Merr, CswbK "
CerbMra.
LIBERAL JEWISH TEMPLE OP COCONUT CREEK (Ml-MM) Sst****:
Friday night services twice monthly at Calvary Preabytertan CJaireh,
Coconut Creek Parkway Rabbi Bruce S. Warsbal. Temples touaettng Rabbi
rasjpTGS RS. ItftOtV
Ptent^""%
eu^.


Friday, May 18,1984 / The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort ]
'age
\oMindlitL
(erica's Ethnic Patchwork Quilt
Locates the Nation's Unity
Israel for young readers
.tisoed frnP**
^.. But this news treat-
fTis like putting them on
dirval rack. Either way,
t-
, j, t feature they have
about Alzheimer s
_j The victim is no longer
Iboozales or Maria Tereslta
i necessarily. It is now
Cohen or Isidore
or Sadie Rose
who is doing the suf;
The obligatory "story"
j the reactions of the
ft*, or three rabbis to the
recent Israeli offense in
i no longer stands alone.
_j rebirth of interest in the
I community, equivalents
tag things have devel-
In reporting, say, the
quotidian, the press
i finds something new: the
xm success stories of indi-
a, from custodian to bank
nt; the seminal influence
backward and dormant
i to bring the city to a posi-
i in international banking
r; the wonderful aftermath
| from the perspective of two
later: Mariel, a fortunate
ce in retrospect.
WHEN it comes to the
this kind of progressive
inventiveness
enow goes astray. Remember
(1940s and even the 1950s,
i "no dogs or Jews allowed"
the upper reaches of
i Avenue and Bal Harbour
s? They always made big
Veil, now that the media's
it-brokers are discovering,
were, "Jews in the News"
again, how do the Jews
Uy (are? Why the very same
rthey fared in the late 1940s.
1 biggest story, once again,
iliied according to the mode
soap opera, is that old
natory policy against
sh and black (English-
king 1 don't know abut
nishspeaking) members.
[NOTHING HAS changed but
l?81 of cnaracters. This time,
i Miami Mayor Maurice
'white. Hispanic.
II. who refuses to quit his
ship.
IH would be better, says Ferre
explanation, to work from
M he intends to, so that
81i Club can come to be
the error of its ways and
^ its policy against Jewa.
1 "Ration response to the
K of this old bell has not
Appointing. The condi-
\ reflex still operates on
the boardrooms of the
l magnates: think Jewish.
^discrimination.
[ lne has passed, if no
T hM been made in the
all Vlew. of Jw*h
I^ve8 give the media
to reasseea their
'ways.
^""Defamation League
%BnthhMent*redtne
g gusto ,d fca tmdi-
"!^*nt8 about the evils
ST110"* Not to o"t"
. *it,PL to ~PPly him
*"Uble synopsis of its
im w *0cial ckjb "ti-
*to Bath Club in the
nPn. workinwthin
n <** clubs devilish
Myor\ t?hanin8 Wi"
**2* W'lSwlS empl of it8 8>nfVl
^wnK must we aJ] wilt
to get the good or bad
word?
However abort or long a wait is
appropriate in the eyes of the
ADL, the American Jewish Com-
mittee can hardly be expected to
stand by wordlessly as the spot-
light focuses on a rival organ-
ization.
Enter its masterminds with a
new old view. In the abstract,
people ought to have a right to
socialize or not with whom they
wish. So concludes the
Committee. On the other hand,
remember executive suite
discrimination the phrase of
yesteryear played aa an art song
upon the thundering hoofbeats of
the great horse Silver as the Lone
Ranger rode against community
wickedness?
EXECUTIVE SUITE
discrimination is a phenomenon
gracticed right there, in the feri-
ties of social clubs, where Jewa
are denied admittance and where,
aa a consequence, they miss out
on the big business deals cosum-
mated precisely in those facilities
on the golf course and tennis
court, at the bar and in the dining
room. So warns the American
Jewish Committee: when the
Bath Club denies membership to
Jews, it deprives Jews of the
bask American right to the
pursuit of property.
Of course, juxtapose this
fiddle-dee-dee against the
statistics detailing the large
numbers of Jews in places like
New York. Philadelphia, Boston,
and Chicago, where they suffer
with the rest of the nation the
economic burdens of unemploy-
ment, inflation and the prospect
of a poverty-ridden old age. For
them, executive suite discrim-
ination is another soap opera all
of its own.
Focus instead on the more
immediate problems of Jewish
education, a growing rate among
young Jews of intermarriage,
disaffection with religious insti-
tutional identification, rising
rates of drug and alcohol addic-
tion, wife-beating and divorce.
And and alarming tendency
toward disaffiliation by mere
atrophy social and ethnic
phenomena which once marked
Jews as unique by their absence
from these unhappy problems.
THESE ARE the stark leal-
ities of the American Jewish
experience today these and the
increasing Jewish communal
need to deal with its sged and
infirm in more appropriate ways.
The media's view of Miami Jews
wraps the Lone Ranger in the
cloak of Don Quixote as the Don
moves to battle windmills and
sheep.
How many lives would be
changed were the Bath Club to
relent? Whan the media divide a
community by ethnic extraction,
like the nation itself, the commu-
nity is reduced to pitiful cliches.
Store the Vim
Our Oolda: Tke Story of Golda
Mtir. David A. Adler. Illustrated
by Donna Ruff. The Viking
Press. 1984. 64 pagas. Ages 8-12.
10.96 (cloth).
We Live in Israel Gemma
Levins. The Bookwright Press,
distributed by Franklin Watts.
1984. 84 pages. Agee 9-13. $9.90
(cloth).
A Picture Book of Israel. David
A. Adler. Holiday House. 1984.
40 pages Ages 84. 810.98
Reviewed by NaaaaJ Khaabarg
Jewish Books
jijLib in Review

is a service of the IWB jewiih Book Council,
IS East 26th St., New York, N.Y. 10010
treatment
knowledge of Israel and Jewish
history.
The book's major flaw to the
ack of even a short introductory
The three book, reviewed bw *"& l "Si
address a long-standing need lor
hooka about Israel and its people
APICTURIBOOKOF
ISRAEL
that are appropriate for younger
readers.
Of the three, the moat cap-
tivating is David A. Adler s Our
Golda. The Story of Oolda Mtir
the one individual who was
(and still is) in the minds of
many, the living embodiment of
Israel. Adler's approach may be
unique in the field obfbiography
for youngsters: he catches the
imagination of his audience by
giving greatest emphasis to the
young Golda, allowing readers to
identify with her and then
drawing them on to learn more.
Rather than a matter-of-fact
recitation of dates and informa-
tion, this is an anecdotal recount-
ing of Golda s Ufa Each of the
book's five chapters covers a
geographical place that
corresponds roughly with the
major periods of Golda's life. The
chapters are Kiev, Pinak,
Milwaukee, Palestine, and Israel.
Adler does an excellent job of
creating a sense of each of these
Glaces, vividly bringing them to
fe as Golda grows from a young
girl in Russia to a young woman
in Milwaukee, discovering social
justice and Zionism, to pioneer in
Palestine and. finally, to founder
and leader of Israel.
Adler's descriptions of place
are lively and immediate; he
effortlessly weaves into his
narrative many facts about
Jewish history while telling his
readers about how difficult life
was for Golda and her family in
Russia, what immigrant life waa
like in America. The story is
simply told in language and style
accessible and interesting to
young readers, without the
complexities of detailed political
history.
According to the publisher,
this is the first biography of
Golda for this young age group.
It is a successful effort and
deserves wide readership.
Of the two books about the
land of Israel, We Live in Israel
by Gemma Levins, and A Picture
Book of Israel, again by David A.
Adler, the former is the more
attractive and worka best aa a
book about the country.
However, the volumes are aimed
at different age groups and each
approaches the subject from a
different angle.
We Live in Israel attempts to
describe the nation in the voices
of the people who live than. The
book Is composed of 28 abort
interviews with Israelis from
every walk of life: aabra and
immigrant; Jew and Arab; kib-
butxnik and rabbi; taxi driver
and veterinarian; student and
politician: and so on.
Each first person narrative
comprises a two-page spread with
text and three full-color photos.
including one of the speaker. The
voices are natural, straight-
forward and varied. While there
a* definitely some gung-ho props
ganda hare, there is no one parti-
cular party line expressed, and
everyone loves the land because
it's thalr home.
The publisher does not categ-
orize this book by age level and
despite it* appearance as a bask
library reference book, it is not
unifying theme. AlseV the
publisher has slowed the use of
some Isaa common English
spellings and transliterations
from the Hebrew.
The book includes one page of
facta about Israel, an index and a
very short glossary.
A Picture Book of Israel by
David A. Adler could have bean
much more successful if only It
had been more carefully designed
and manufactured. Exactly aa
the tale states, this is an intro-
duction to Israel, mainly through
pictures, for young readers. The
text is well written and entirely
appropriate for beginning
readers. Although it takes a
secondary role to the pictures (as
it must), it covers a lot of ground
in few words.
It is unfortunate that most of
the 56 black-and-white photo-
graphs are mediocre end badly
printed they are too dark and
some are even out of focus. Also,
the photo credits are listed right
underneath the captions, which is
extremely distracting. Even the
cover photo, in color, a well-
known shot of Jerusalem old and
new. is extraordinarily dulL
David A.Adit-r
Focusing on the contrasts that
are part of the character of the
nation, Adler briefly looks at all
of Israel ancient and modern,
desert and city, land and sea. He
touches on all the regions of the
country, the major cities and
centers, flora and fauna, history,
religion and, of course, the
people. And it is here, with the
pictures and text about the
variety of people that inhabit this
land, that this short book suc-
ceeds best, positively singing
with wonder and love at the end.
An index makes this additionally
appropriate for libraries.
Naomi KUinberg, a freelance
writer and reveiwer, works as an
editor for a New York publisher.
w?
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Lw Israel's Six Presidents Have Dealt With Their Powerlessness
By SIMON GMVER
iThe title of President
'3y implif the prero-
Jveu. wield considerable
" But Israel s
esident has prestige
Ithout power. He is, in
r virtually the only
tiz'en of the country who
not expected, or even
Ititled to express a poh-
| opinion.
K Presidency was designed
[fassVl founding fathers as a
,r head of state, the opposite
I w the US Presidential role.
country's political frame-
ri is based loosely on the
jtish parliamenury system of
vernment and thus the Presid-
icy parallels the role of the
htish monarch,
lunlike Queen Klizabeth II. the
eli Presidency lacks wealth,
imp and circumstance and has
connection with the armed
es or the religious establish-
int. In fact the Israeli
sident is most closely akin to
j Presidents of the Italian and
fest German Republics.
I FOR ALL its ostensible
pthority. the Israeli President is
tually a constitutional rubber
np. The President appoints
(government from the Knesset
rty best positioned to form a
lling coalition, but it is not he
|ho in effect makes the operative
cision. The President also
help unify the many and varied
immigrants. They initiated the
open style of the Presidency with
such practices that continue
today like inviting the public into
their home on the Sukkot
holiday.
Zalman Shazar was elected
President on Ben Zvi's death in
1963. Shazar, a noted Zionist
leader and cultural figure and his
wife, also Rachel, were the first to
move into the new Presidential
residence in Jerusalem. The
residence is an impressive
building which strives to combine
the austerity of Zionist values
with the trappings of importance
that the Presidency deserves.
THE ORIGINAL building was
a large wooden hut and symbol-
ized the modesty of Israeli life in
the early days. Disapproval for
the more ambitious new building
was often expressed, and it is
said that Shazar was reluctant to
move into it. Surprisingly, struc-
tural defects demanded that a
good deal of building work be
carried out in 1983.
Shazar was succeeded in 1973
by Ephraim Katzir, an eminent
scientist. Katzir's Presidency is
considered by observers as one
which aroused little public enthu-
siasm. Ami Gluska feels that
Continued on Page 18
Chaim Webmann 1949 1952 Yitzhak Ben Zvi 19521963 Zalman
IsRaeL
ppoints the judiciary, diplo-
atk representatives, the state
xnptroller and Hank of Israel
[officials. But he appoints only the
ple that the Prime Minister or
priate authority request
to appoint.
The President is elected by a
secret ballot of Knesset
Members, and his powers, or
anther lack of them, are defined
m i Knesset act of 1961. The act
|*s amended in 1964 to limit the
[Presidency to two five year terms
I'or any one person. A President
cannot be tried in a court of law
loot can be deposed by a Kneset
I'M* for unbecoming behavior, or
competence. Such a possibility
| w never been considered.
Ami Gluska is President
IFEJttV*'a 9P"man, and
MM the same post during
l Yitzhak Navon a term
iff Gluska points out that
15? Ith* P"*"1""* has no
[Wal power it has enormous
S?' ""* ^Kfent should
" and inspire unity
J2* country's diverse
JJ,;lyi."Hi.flatii
|5t M MPW to .11
i^EA man hv*
r**.the burden of heading
SST- renowns
*** nd one of the great
nr^wecKoice to become
Sly t Jv""**
^ V which the poat of
*** ZX m6ow* with
k .od "*>* Ailing
WaznunT m,ent*r*d office
-Ch,.!" ******
\ *1^^* ******
teSss
I ^ SET* ** of history
Ephraim Katzir 1973-1978 Yitzhak Navon
1978-1963
1963-1973
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sjicaifi rt\r
The Six Powerless Presidents of Israel
Continued from Page 17
such comment is unfair: "Pre-
sident KsUir was not strong on
public relations," he asserts,
"but he worked every bit as hard
as any Precedent in meeting
people and leading the nation."
Gluska agrees that it was the
instincts of President Yitzhak
Navon, who was a Labor MK and
former Secretary to David Ben-
Gurion, that added a new dimen-
sion to the presidency. Navon
won the hearts of Israelis with a
warmth, energy and endeavor
that made him, his wife, Ophirs,
and their two young children the
best-loved presidential family
since the establishment of the
State.
"THE FACT that President
Navon was of Sephardic origin
offered new pride and hope to
Israel's oriental Jews," says
Gluska, whose own ancestors
came to Jerusalem from the
Yemen. Navon's familiarity with
languages, including Arabic, his
popular approach to all commu-
nities and traditions, his image as
a leader who really cared for the
ordinary people and understood
their problems gave him an
unusual and even unique status
in the country considering the
built-in limitations of the office.
Some felt that Navon tres-
passed into forbidden political
territory when he came out in
support of a commission of
enquiry following the Sabra and
Shatilla massacres commited by
the Phalangists in Beirut. Others
saw his demand, and his later
revelation that he would have
resigned if the Kahan Commis-
sion had not have bean set up, as
the style of moral leadership that
the President should initiate in
such fateful matters. Navon
declined a second term of office.
Following the Navons has
made the task of President
Chaim Herzog all the more chal-
lenging. Since he came into office
in May, 1963, President Herzog
is constantly being compared to
his predecessor.
Born in northern Ireland and
educated at Cambridge and
Sandhurst, be has been a soldier,
diplomat, politician, lawyer,
industrialist and writer. Critics
say he keeps a cool distance from
the people. "I must admit I
haven't taken the President's
temperature," says Gluska,
sternly casting aside such
insinuations. "But I can toll you
the President has immersed
himself in turn work with a similar
warmth and vigor to President
Navon."
GLUSKA ADDS that each
President is an individual who
brings his own style to the job.
Unquestionably, President
Herzog has worked unflagginly
in his first eight months in office,
making hundreds of speeches and
visits and attending innumerable
ceremonies, as well as two
important state visits to the
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It is noteworthy that he was
elected against the Likud's
candidate, from the Labor
benches of the Knesset. The
respect in which he is held was
shown by the fact that a number
of coalition MK's preferred him
to Menachem Begin s candidate.
His wife. Aura Herog, has also
lent prestige to the role of First
Lady. Head of the Council for a
Beautiful Israel, she is also the
founder of the Education
Ministry's Public Council for
Arts and Culture.
Perhaps most significantly, at
a time of bitter divisions in
Israeli society, the current Pre-
sident seems unafraid to speak
his mind when he deems the
issues touch upon the public
interest but are not party-
political. Thus he has attacked
Jewish terror groups, saying that
because of Arab sensitivity, their
abortive attempt against Jeru-
salem's sacred Temple Mount
could have led to "a natural
catastrophe of major propor-
tions."
HE ASKED the Haifa theater
to remove part of the script of
their play, "Messiah," because
religious circles considered them
to be "Blasphemous." He said he
had sought in advance to find
concensus on both sides before
making his decision, deleting the
phrase, "Cursed be you,
Almighty," and it was "a lot of
nonsense to say the President
was repressing free speech." He
strives first and foremost to
bring people and streams
together to foster understanding,
to serve as a unifying influence.
Though non-orthodox, he is a
traditionalist who comes from an
orthodox family. His wife is half-
Sephardi, and many of his rela-
tions have "inter-married." On
the right of the Labor Party, he
espoused centrist concensus
philosophies.
The Presidency, it seems, is
therefore in good hands. Israelis
are not inclined to change the role
of the office.
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Friday. May 18,1984 / the Jewish Flpridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
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Page 20 The Jewish Floridian erf Greater Fort Lauderdale Friday, May 18, 1964
Rabbi Paul Plot kin and Rabbi Emeritus Solomon Geld of Temple Beth
Am. were integral parts in the Yom Hashoa program.
Lighting the many Yahrzeit candles were third generation survivors.
Yom Hashoa
Cot.ed fro. Pa*e 1
and Acting committee.
The Legacy was read by survivor Rose Sacks and accepted by
Fran Klauber, second generation survivor.
Cantor Irving Grossman of Temple Beth Am gave the
memorial prayer while Dr. Solomon Geld, Rabbi Emeritus at
Beth Am. chanted the Mourner's Kaddish.
Esther Cannon, a CRC member, told the participants that it
is the community's obligation to never forget "the atrocities
suffered at the hands of the Nazis during the Holocaust."
Children of the religious schools of Temples Beth Am, Beth
Orr. Sholom. and Judaka High School were led in a procession
down the aisles of Beth Am singing "Ani-Maamin" "I
believe."
fly the President of the Senate
of Florida, Sen. Curtis Peterson,
to Martin Lipnack, member of
the national council of AIPAC
and acting as a representative of
the Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale, Sen, Peter
Weinstein's resolution comme-
morating the anniversary of the
Holocaust.
By Senator Weinstein
A resolution urging the people
of Florida to join in
commemorating the Holocaust.
WHEREAS, in the entire
history of humankind, there has
bean no greater violation of
human rights than the Holocaust
perpetrated by Nazi Germany,
and
WHEREAS, the horror of
genocide began for the Jewish
people with Adolf Hitler's rise to
power in Germany in 1933,
beginning with the burning of
books written by Jewish authors
and the establishment of the
concentration camp at Dachau,
escalating by 1938 to the burning
of synagogues and the pillaging
of Jewish shops and businesses
throughout Germany, and
further escalating by 1938 and
1939 to large scale killing as
German Jews were imprisoned
and Jews living in conquered
Eastern Europe were forced into
labor camps and sealed into
ghettos, and
WHEREAS, the Holocaust
has become a reminder to all men
and women who cherish liberty
and justice that they should
never be complacent in that
liberty or secure in that justice,
and a reminder that they must
always honor the commitment to
fight new forms of tyranny lest
these lead to new Holocausts.
and
WHEREAS, the United States
Holocaust Memorial Council is
again calling for a national
observance with prayers, comme-
moration, and study, to renew
our determination to prevent the
recurrence of genocide against
any national or ethnic group, and
WHEREAS, Governor Bob
Graham has joined the President
and the Congress of the United
States and states and cities
Kollek Objects to Pope's Letter on Status of Jerusalem
JERUSALEM (JTA)
- Mayor Teddy Kollek
said here that Pope John
Paul II ignored the com-
plete freedom of worship
available to all faiths in
Jerusalem when he issued
his apostolic letter last
week urging "special in-
ternationally -guaranteed
status' for Jerusalem.
In remarks during Easter
holiday visits to Greek Orthodox
and Catholic prelates in Jem
salem, Kollek maintained that
the Pope neglected to take into
account Israels constant efforts
to help various Christian
denominations in the city.
THE POPE'S letter, addressed
to Catholics in Israel and to all
people of the Middle East,
repeated the Vatican's long-
standing call for the interna-
tionally recognized status of
Jerusalem "so that one aid* or
the other cannot place it under
discrimination."
The Pope also acid a Pales
tinian homeland and security for
Israel were fundamental require-
ments for a lasting Mideast
peace.
The letter, althugh it broke no
new ground in terms of Vatican
policy, was not well received in
Israel. A Foreign Ministry
spokesman told reporters last
week that "Jerusalem has been
the capital of the Jewish people
throughout history and will
remain Israel's capital forever"
and that there has never been
such complete freedom of
worship as that presently avail-
able to all faiths under Israeli
policy.
But government officials here
noted that the Pope did not call
for the internationalization of
Israel's declared capital, a posi-
tion the Vatican maintained prior
to 1970 but subsequently
dropped.
INSTEAD, the Pope was
recommending an "interna-
tionally-guaranteed statin
a formula which bad ex-
pressed the Holy See's position
for the past 14 years. There was
no need, thee store, the officials
said, for Israel to react diplom-
atically to the Pontiffs letter.
Kollek, in his conversations
with local churchmen, said it was
"strange" that the Holy Father
had forborne to take note of the
"good situation, the good will
and readiness to assist" which
existed on the part of the Israeli
authorities.
The mayor stressed that Jeru-
salem was not only the Holy City
but also the City of Peace. The
authorities, be said, were making
every effort to counter acts of
extremism and non-tolerance
"from whichever quarter they
emanate."
Rallies in W. Germany Urge
Russians to Free Aging Hess
BONN (JTA) Dozens of rallies were held
throughout West Germany over the Easter holiday
urging the release of Rudolph Hess, Hitler's former
deputy, who marked his 90th birthday last Thursday in
Spandau prison where he is the last surviving war
criminal inmate.
Hess is serving a life sentence. Many of the rallies in
his favor had a political character. The participants called
for an end to portraying Germany as the country
responsible for World War II. While right-wing ex-
tremists are very much in evidence in the national
campaign to free Hess, many Germans in no way linked to
the Nazi ideology have participated.
The federal government has issued several appeals
recently for the release of Hess. The three Allied powers
U.S., Britain and France would agree to release him
on humanitarian grounds, but the Soviet Union refuses to
go along.
our nation in designating
the week of April 29-May 6, 1984.
as Holocaust Education Week
and the Days of Remembrance of
the victims of the Holocaust,
NOW. THEREFORE.
Be It Resolved by the Senate
of the State of Florida:
That, in tribute to the spirit of
freedom, justice, and compassion
to which all Americans are
dedicated, and in memory of the
victims of the Holocuast and
recognition of the survivors who
have rebuilt their lives, the
Senate of the State of Florida
calls upon citizens of the state to
join in the international comme-
moration of the Holocaust in the
hope that we win strive always to
overcome prejudice and
inhumanity through education,
vigilance, and resistance.
BE IT FURTHER
RESOLVED that a copy of this
resolution, with the Seal of the
Senate affixed, be presented to
Mr. Jules Arkin, representing the
Florida Association of Jewish
Federations, and to Mr. Paul
Orlan. representing Holocaust
survivors, as tangible tokens of
the sentiments of the members of
the Florida Senate.
By His Excellence, Robert
Graham, Governor, an official
statement regarding the
commemoration of the
Holocaust.
In the history of human kind,
there has been no greater
violation of human rights than
the Holocaust of Nazi Germany.
The horror of genocide, which
began for the Jewish people when
Adoiph Hitler came inton^,-.
Germany in 1933. began wgT,'
burning of books wnttea
Jewish authors and
establishment of a concentn
camp in Dachau. By the
1938. synagogues were b
burned and Jewish shops
business were being
throughout Germany.
In 1938 and 1939, large
killings began when Ge..
Jews were imprisoned, and J
living in conquered Ei
Europe were forced into u
camps and sealed into ghettos.
The Holocaust has become il
reminder to all men and woqmJ
who cherish liberty and justed
that they should never bt
complacent in that liberty or
secure in that justice. They must
always honor the commitment to
fight new forms of tyranny, lest
these lead to new Holocausts.
The United States Holocaust
Memorial Council is again calling
for a national observance with I
prayers, commemoration and
study to renew our determination
to prevent the recurrence of
genocide against any national or
ethnic group-
Therefore, in tribute to the
spirit of freedom, justice and
compassion to which Americans
are dedicated, and in the hope
that we will strive always to
overcome prejudice and inhum-
anity through vigilance and
resistance. And in memory of the
victims of the Holocaust and in
recognition of the survivors, I am
proud to designate April 29 to
May 6. 1984 as Holocaust Educa-
tion Week in Florida.
Congress urged to initiate
International day of remembrance
NEW YORK (JTA) The
Workman's Circle has urged
Congress to initiate, through the
European Parliament. an
International Day of Remem-
brance for the Victims of the
Holocaust.
The appeal came from Dr.
Israel Kugler. president of the
Workman's Circle in comme-
morative services in memory of
the six million Jews who perished
in the Holocaust.
Kugler said he was contacting
Congressional leaders to get the
necessary Congressional
resolution addressed to the
European Parliament, an inter-
parliamentary organization to
which the U.S. sends delegates.
so that "we can give those
nations who were affected by the
Holocaust an opportunity to
rekindle a candle and a memory
and to teach children that,
indeed, another Holocaust shall
never again face mankind
He said that the Holocaust "is
not just a Jewish tragedy. It is*
tragedy shared by the world. Its
lessons must be remembered not
just by Jews but by the posterity
of the world. Every nation was
touched by the Nazi-induced
Holocaust. Yet textbooks are
barren with regard to the lessons
to be learned from the Holo-
caust."
Share the Legacy...
learaberidcyoar children_______
Join us on the Israel Mission of Your Choice.
Family
Family
Singles
Campaign Leadership
Chazak (Men Only)
Family
Chazon
July 15,1984
July 23,1984
July 22,1984
OCt. 16.1984
NOV. 26,1984
December
January
Contact the Missions Office for information:
Jewish Federation of Greater Ft. Lauderdale
P.O. Box 26810. Tamarac, Fl. 33320-6810
748-8400


Friday, May 18,1984 / The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 21
uihout Israel, physicians and scientists
vted by the Israel Cancer Research
j m engaged in innovative research to
\the cause and cure of cancer. Here Dr.
\Fabian, an ICRFfunded Fellow at the
School of Medicine, Tel Aviv
University, performs an experiment seeking
to regulate the growth of cells in normal and
malignant states. ICRF funds provide the
largest private support for cancer studies in
Israel
Israel Makes Strenuous Efforts
To Obtain Release of Diplomats
BjHUGHORGEL
EL AVIV (JTA) -
is making strenuous
through diplomatic
nels to obtain the re-
of three members of
[Israeli mission in Beirut
^ured by Syrian forces
their car apparently
lyed into Syrian-held
ptory north of the Leb-
i capital. There was no
liate indication of
the three Israelis
being held or what
planned to do with
! three men were identified
n Florentine, Shmuel Roza
[Nachum Nesher. They were
ed here as administrative
members of the Israeli
office to the I^banese
^rant. Their status as
ts is uncertain inasmuch
w and Ubanon have never
i formal exchange of
s.
hjASOJS RADIO claimed
w Israelis were on a
J mission and confirmed
'opture. Israeli sources said
IW will be held respon-
"t 'l** safety. Israelre-
-T working through the
ljJT.nunenl *nd the
tofr>dly power, to
P* released. A Foreign
u. "Pokesman said
, Jjbk Shamir had
ES of elforU
fhdffjTf th U.S. on
*?*that th* u.s. is
hwC^5ernet
I """new no detail,.)
oreumstancea
U w*netr north of the
l**?JS2.unkno
r passed through a
^y roadblock and
"*fSU7-,' pro-
iL**S ST**.
l^ nj tSd0" 8eein
""* ined to turn
"^ Dy byn soldiara
while attempting to escape on turned them over to the Syrians,
foot. Other reports said they were either freely or because they were
held bv Lebanese soldiers who forced to.
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c*age 22 The Jewish Fbridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale / Friday, May 18,1964
A wonderous look at American Jews
The American Jewish Album:
1654 to the Present. By Allon
Schoener. Rizzoli International
Publications Inc. 342 pp. $46.
Reviewed by Sylvia A.
Herakowitx
In 1851, an American Jew
named Abraham Abrahamsohn
left the East Coast to make his
fortune in the Gold Rush. To get
to California he first had to travel
by steamer to Panama, and then
by land on mule train over the
isthmus of Panama to the Pacific
Ocean where he "had the great
rack of finding a place as dish-
washer and bootblack for first
class" on a steamer bound for
San Francisco.
Abrahamsohn's
straightforward descriptions of
the gold-crazed city are wonder-
fully interesting. He describes
the large gambling houses with a
background of incessantly loud
music performed by "many of my
compatriots especially on the
flute and the guitar." That kind
of enchanting tidbit of historical
detail is only one of dozens of
other reminiscences compiled in
The American Jewish Album, a
wondrous anthology of personal
narratives, letters, essays, and
documents that record the
Jewish experience in America
from 1654 to the present. But
what really gives dimensions to
this album are the photographs.
The result of this combination,
says historian Henry Feinberg,
"is a composite historical fire still
smoldering in the ashes of the
past."
One can read this album in
many ways. My suggestion
would be to first go through all
the pictures in order to quell your
curiosity; following that binge,
you can then relax and tackle the
narrative. There is enough
material here for countless hours
of reading pleasure. History buffs
will have a field day!
One word of criticism:
Although the book is handsomely
designed and visually exciting,
there are some glaring spelling
errors that mar an otherwise
excellent text.
Sylvia Hershowitz is the director
of the Yeshiva University
Museum in New York City.
Egypt Submits Arms Shopping
List to W. German Manufacturers
By DAVID KANTOR
BONN (JTA) The Egyptian government has
submitted a weapons shopping list to West Germany and
would also like to manufacture German tanks in Egypt
under a licensing agreement, it was reported here.
The official request was made by the Egyptian
Defense Minister, Abu Ghazala at a meeting in Cairo with
Bonn's Deputy Foreign Minister, Juergen Moellemann,
last week. Moellemann told reporters on his return that
the government has not yet decided to approve the arms
sales to Egypt. It is understood, however, that it is giving
favorable consideration to the Egyptian requests.
CAIRO WOULD LIKE to purchase Gepard anti-air-
craft armored vehicles, Roland anti-aircraft systems,
Marder armored troop-carriers and scores of electronic
systems for military use.
They are also seeking license to assemble a new West
German light tank, which they would call "Fahd"
(Leopard)) at a plant near Cairo. The tank is not identical
to West Germany's Leopard I or Leopard II the latter
regarded by military experts as the best tank extant
but would be built in cooperation with the Krauss Maffei
Co. which builds the two Leopards at its Munich plant.
LESTER MACKETZ of Providence, R.I., and Boynton BetcA
leads discussion of future programming for B'nai B'rith Inter*
at a joint meeting of the Jewish Organization's Adult
Education, Community Volunteer Services and Israel comn
Washington. Macketz is chairman of B'nai B'rith's Pngnml
mittee which coordinates and assists in planning the program

IV
V
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Jerusalem is the Capital of Israel and proclaimed April 30 Jen
Uay m bunnse The participants of the trip also brought the*
Sunrise to the Israeli cities of Tel Aviv and Yavneh, Sunrises,
/111 fy'ured receiving the proclamation from Lou Perm
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sa^pss^BP^PBiel
On A Personal Note
Diafy of 17-Year-Old Warsaw Girl
.CABLALPEBT
,A_ I have rjeen queried
about my choice of
lU?writ* .bout. Re.de"
our government's effort*. As
Minister of Defense Moshe Arena
has pointed out. this ws not
Israel's first war. Following the
Six-Day War Israel was engaged
long and bloody War of
'""^iwthereisno m a long ana Diooay war
BC! uld wX a Attrition along the Sue. Gaul.
days a year,
of themes in
^g"untry. R-ther
^, what guidehnfs
I overseas
for
THE ISRAEL army was then
located on battlefields much,
much further from home than
Beirut. Our troops were pinned
down in a Bar Lev Line which
ultimately proved to be valueless.
The death toll rose constantly
but not once in those days did the
then opposition do or say any-
thU,gJ, T^ciears thing which might handicap or
wbm*ted to andfleers K ^ Government in
'r' ""ffi aTr, itsconduct of the wK. Too much
make sure that! m wM ,t sUke. Now m ^00,^,,,
Labor has shown no such
rHow do I determine
gpecifk subject is,
"suitable
'unwittingly, reveslmg
g that might be of vslue
aW -
od that. 1 subject myself
onal censorship. In reply
ky questions, let me make it
Ctonrethatlamnotobjec-
fo the contrary, when it
ito love of Israel, desire to
rael flourish and be strong,
acern for the quality of life
lean not be objective. Ism
perhaps even pas-
dy partisan.
t THAT reason, perhaps. I
criminating in my choice of
ju. I hope that not eyery-
[i write sounds Pollyanish. I
quently critical, but I am
ware of the kind of coverage
Israel has been receiving
can television, in Time
The New York Times
papers, and I do feel
t is necessary to a degree to
t some of the false and mis-
reports to which the
as public is subjected.
many of my colleagues
the country, in both the
I and the visual media, feel
I to exercise any restraint.
believe that as journalists
are obligated to publish
ything which makes a "good
They are subject to no
I or national responsibility;
freedom of the press is
unt. And the savage
rks against the Israel
nment (most of them
jucally inspired) which see the
I in this country are reflected
t dispatches sent abroad by
pi correspondents in Israel.
I value freedom of the press.
^democracy sets up certain
a as the price for such
in. We are all called upon to
some of our freedoms,
irecently passed a strict law
restrains the freedom of
to smoke whenever and
* they like. We accept
pawns as 10 when and where
|Jcross streeis. the speed at
<*** are permitted to drive.
l*Pw of body exposure or
^ *Hvity in which we can
* m Public. In every case
|wn.m is the welfare of the
"t public.
US"T and ,,%en *
pwned televiaion have gone
^raelgeis.he greatest
73' .{ s,aled earli<*.
" this 11 politicaJly in-
uJS!,P! ,,nl> natural
iS^P^Per to decry
l*Won mK' WhethCT
kmd "of dyrnam,cs bout
Wkm u cntl"sm, the
S>- ."load to the
W in "ych'lKical at-
"d^..*^-If one
.^octj Kh dePrion is
I* Mitv*l .
^^J*"1* t0 ^e
rC^,VTherc*
Sunt h!^ e ,n ^banon.
^^rpmgcritKrisrnb
S. ,lw. nd the Ul-.imed
^nstrationa
"ndin(.Khand of "
" effect sabotaged
restraint, and many of the
country's journalists have lent
themselves to what is in effect a
political campaign waged on the
backs of the military.
I have many faults to find with
the present government, and I
certainly do not agree with all its
policies. But there are so many
journalists and commentators
engaged in lambasting the
government that my services are
not required in that direction.
Rather do I seek to cover a more
neglected aspect, showing the
positive, the constructive, the
unusual, the cheerful or even
just the normal aide of Israel
today. There is much to tell. I
hope my readers approve.
.Seven Art$ Feature Syndicate
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
diary of a 17-year-old girl, de-
scribing her life hidden in a cellar
in Warsaw during the first 113
days of the Nazi occupation of
the Polish capital, has been
donated to the Holocaust
Memorial Museum at Kibbutz
Lohamei Haffetaot in western
Galilee, by the diarist.
Described as the "Polish Anne
Frank Record," the 64-page ac-
count of her life in the cellar,
together with 60 other Jews, wee
recently found by the young
writer, now Lily Gokienberg,
during spring cleaning.
IsrcaeL
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Bagels and cream cheese
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Because delicious Lender* Bagels can1_be
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And nettwr wi your breakfasts!
KCertfcfletfl

\


Events Dm % Unsettle Reagan fs Mideast Scenai
By London Chronicle Syndicate
President Reagan's
nationally-televised news
conference on April 4 rein-
forced some longstanding
impressions about his
policies in the Middle East.
And that could portend
venous problems in his
quest for American Jewish
support against his Demo-
cratic challenger in
November.
Shortly after Reagan stopped
Mwenng reporters' questions in
East Room of the White
Mouse, some of his top Jewish
supporters active in his reelection
??CS *trted to worry about
' President's statements, espe-
cially his comments about maim
amme an "evenhanded-
approach to the Arab-Iaraeb
conflict Reagan also expressed
hop* that Jordan s King Hussein
might still agree to enter peace
talks with Israel.
HIS USE of the word -even-
handed king considered a
codeword among Middle East
observers was seen in Wash-
ington as referring indirectly to
his Administration's strong
efforts to block pass^ ^
VongresB oi legislation forcing
the transfer of the U.S. Embassy
to" Td Aviv to Jerusalem
I here was no specific reference
made to the embassy issue at the
news conference.
But both Democratic
irontrunners. Walter Mandate
and Gary Hart, support an
fmfT^y move ReaM nd the
third Democratic candidate, the
Kev Jesse Jackson, oppose it
tearing it would preiudice the'
final status of the city and might
even 8park anti-American
^TJ? throughout the Arab
and Moslem worlds. The issue
naf,.b5*n wWy debated and
publicized in the U.S. in recent
weeks.
At the same time. Reagan did
not criticize in any way King
Hussein for lashing out against
t*e U.S. in March and for
rofusng to get involved in the
V* -sponsored peace process.
I his also was in marked contrast
to the latest spate of statements
made by both Mondale and Hart
bitterly condemning Hussein s
refusal to sit down around a
negotiating table with Israel.
INSTEAD the President
simply repeated what he has said
on so many orcaeiom in the past
- namely that his September 1.
1962 Arab-Israeli peace initiative
"continues to be our plan."
"I believe that King Hussein
still feels and believes that he
would have to he an important
part, being the next door neigh
bour to Israel, in bringing about
such negotiations." Reagan said.
"I continue to believe in this
This is the answer. It's what
started us from the very begin-
ning in the Middle East to
continue the Camp David
Process, to persuade other
nations to do what Egypt did in
making that peace.''

m 4
sentiment in the Arab world The
President has baen informed b\
his foreign policv advisers
mcluding Secretary of State
C^orge Shultz. that the Jeru-
salem Embassy issue has badlv
damaged U.S. credibility in the
Arab world U.S. credibility
earlier had been shaken bv the
surprisingly speedy withdrawal
ofL S military involvement in
Lebanon as soon after Reagan
had pledged that the U.S. would
never "bug out of that country
Asked whether the U.S. had
tost credibility as a result of its
military ullout from lebanon.
Reagan replied: '' We may have
But he then went into a
lengthy defense of the Adminis-
tration's record in lebanon and
the initial dispatch of the
Marines to serve in the multi-
national peacekeeping force
there. He basically repeated
lonpunding U.S. positions,
without breaking any new
ground. He explained the US
puUout as resulting from the
changed situation" on the
ground, especially the Syrian
refusal to leave Lebanon. The
Marines were never sent to
Lebanon as a fighting force, he
said, merely as peacekeepers. But
*?r**y were kroed to dig into
fortified positions, their rote was
changed, and there was no
PW left in keeping them
Reagan said that "at the
Present moment, you have .
group of Arab nations who still
have never retreated from their
position that Israel does not have
a right to exist as a nation, and
were trying to persuade them
that we can be evenhanded. and
we re not trying to dictate any
Peace of any kind, that we simply
want to be of help if we can aa ar
intermediary in bringing about i
negotiation that will erase th.
issues and the problems thai
n**e kept them apart so that
they can settle back and live in
peace together. Were going to
continue to try to do it."
THAT STATEMENT was
clearly designed to ease appar-
ently mounting anti-American
HE INSISTED the U.S. was
still engaged diplomatically" in
seeking some end to the conflict
in Lebanon. He said elements in
the Middle East he did not
name them had recently
sought stepped up U.S. involve-
ment in the diplomatic arena.
But Reagan refused to blame
his own Administration for the
dear failures in Lebanon. Like
Secretary ShulU. Reagan blamed
Congress and ita opposition to
the U.S. presence in Lebanon as a
major factor in the setback to
U.S. interests there. The debate
in Washington merely encour-
aged America's adversaries in
Lebanon and Syria to resist s
diplomatic solution, convinced
the U.S. would simply leave
Lebanon in any '
t
Conversations with the Hart
and Mondale camps in recent
dsys have made dear they both
are prepared to make the Middle
r-ast a major issue in either s
campaign .gainst Reagan after
, DmocUc convention fa,
San Francisco in July. Both
Democratic candidates m
ire^y preparing lengthy papers
~ t^kmgpoint."- ti!3
thsu criuciam of Reagan record
on Israel. *
FINDING MAJOR areas of
difference will not be difficult.
There were many tense period
between Washington and Jeru-
salem during the first term of the
Rea. Administration,
beginning in 19b 1 with the
controversial Saudi AW ACS
sale, the temporary suspension of
fighter aircraft deliveries and
other military equipment to
Israel following the destruction
of the Iraqi nuclear reactor in
June of that vear and the
annexation of the Golan Heights
later in December.
Already. Mondale has staked
out his down-the-line support for
Israel, even telling a nationally-
televised debate that he opposes
the concept of a Palestinian
homeland on the West Bank
and Gaza. Instead. Mondale. like
Hart, has pledged support for the
I- amp David accords.
MONDALES impressive
victory ,n New York was in Urge
measure the result of a lopsided
three-u>-one margin of support
over Hart in the Jewish oinim,-
mty there. If Mondale should
now go or. to capture the nomin-
ation in July, that solid base of
Jewish support in New York will
come in very handy.
And the pressure will mount on
Reagan to follow the Democrat's
tead by courting the Jewish vote,
pus additional talk of an
ajlLlljIll" policy fa, ^
Middle East is likely to end
Tb wiU be first year sine,
}r? rZl both lan* nd the
UnitedI State, wilI hold national
election during the same year
That wifl unpose special resW
tions on both sides.
Neither, of course, wants to
interfere openly fa the domee
affairs of the other. But each will
have some private preferences
,kil MSP1* for >pte.
there, is little doubt that ihe
Administration would love to see
STUw j^r1"1 <***.
S. officials believe, will be more
rreponsivetoU-SoncernsinX
region, especially the need to
CmiinUt to KiDg "* hy
St "n ""mediate settle
Pecully Reagan and ShulU
f szrjs? as
during ^ "
Administration in imptemSSg
the basic trust of the Reagan*
Pe-ce plan namely the^aXc?-
option in some way oUha W-
Bk with Jced.nymTchanT!
* real peace u^ ]Ed
security arrangements.
Israeli officials also will have
some leanings on the U S
content Visiting Israeli politi-
cians have warned that if the
Americans try to interfere in
I sraeli politics in favor ofa Labor
the Israeli Government will not
hesitate in following suit vis-a-vte
the IS campaign.
But the Reagan people
probably will not involve them-
selves in the Israeli contest. They
will be very cautious. They face a
basic dilemma. White they would
like to see Labor win. thev don't
want to upset any furter the
Jewish ommunitv in the US bv
distancing Washington from
Jerusalem right now.
So the Israeli Government can
expect a relatively receptive ear
in the U.S. in the coming weak.
and months. This may not have
?n a that apparent at
Keajjan s news conference, but it
will be increasit
lined as the poln}
the Untied Sti
following the no
Democratic cantf
Naturally,
exerted on Israeli
in Lebanon and tl
September 1. 1983
also be on the Den
in seeking supf
many friends il
States, especially ]
with large Jewish
Those positive
the Reagan Adml
done for Israel -]
economic and milit
the enhanced
military cooperalj
prospects for
between the two i
not be mentiof1
Democrats. R
importers will I
points.
PLO Claims Jac_
As 'Great Candid
K**w2 daUM Rev' J" ***>" 4
iiL!jm Mansour. deputy observer for the 1
hnr^i at,.?Il8' referred to ^e Democratic 1
5S.M that great <*****." stating
candidate supports the PLO."
PaJSn^80!? WAS SPEAKING at a "t
ThiS TniJ^?ts ho8ted bv ** Harvard i
ST*' The d~ion centered on the pi
there is growing support for the PLO in the Un3
found ^T^ ma?nt*ined that evidence of this
Actual J^ai9 8ucceM the Democratic
vS&H *?** runnin vefy Pr **
Hart. l Walter I*""*ale "* Colorato
Begin, Meridor Woi
Run on July 23 Bal.)
Begin wilZu Z {JJA) Fo P~nrl
name and th? e^ons- lw* R*^ report^
for election ^ rtnaI *** of. H6rut member
^trtl1f^Ailt?F I8J.f mes was submitted to t
UP tet&n?*% S** w* to meet Thursday]
order Ac^JP1 [ 12 Kneeat candidates in n
in n '^SS? ^P? to to have his n-
B**tZ7 ****** the bottom of the listj
resiamed \m^' who ** **> aadusion
^S^y ^fe^T1"" woukl "'


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