The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 3, no. 7 (Apr. 5, 1974)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 9, 1976 called v.4, no. 27 but constitutes v.5, no. 1; issue for July 7, 1989 called v.18, no. 11 but constitutes v.18, no. 13.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44570954
lccn - sn 00229545
ocm44570954
System ID:
AA00014312:00424

Related Items

Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
tBE
jewishFloridian
OF GREATER FORT LAUDE
Volume 19 Number 9
Fort Lauderdale, Florida Friday, April 27, 1990
f~4
Price: 35 cents
Peres Nears Knesset Majority
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
political seesaw tilted sharply
back toward Shimon Peres,
putting him once more within
reach of forming a governing
coalition led by the Labor
Party.
His sudden change of for-
tune was brought about by
Agudat Yisrael Knesset mem-
ber Avraham Verdiger, whose
equally sudden defection,
along with colleague Eliezer
Mizrahi, eight days earlier
deprived Peres of what had
seemed would be a guaranteed
parliamentary majority.
Verdiger, reversing his ear-
lier reversal, said he could now
in good conscience support a
Labor regime, in obedience to
Agudah's Council of Torah
Sages.
The ultra-Orthodox party's
supreme authority, which cut a
deal with Labor two weeks
ago, had ordered its five-
member Knesset faction to
back Peres.
Refusal of Verdiger and Miz-
rachi to comply on ideological
grounds, was unprecedented
defiance.
Verdiger, having made his
peace with the sages, promised
to try to influence Mizrahi to
return to the fold, as well.
That would assure Peres of the
61-vote Knesset majority he


/
M

\0
Sft/i
ZIONIST DEMONSTRATION Moscow A group of Soviet Jews each holding a placard,
protest before the Soviet foreign ministry. The Zionists demand the right of repatriation of Soviet
Jews to Israel and the right of Israeli airline El-Al to fly between Moscow and Jerusalem.
APIWide World Photo.
Administration Criticizes
New Settlements
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
The Bush administration
strongly criticized Prime Min-
ister Yitzhak Shamir's govern-
ment for using its caretaker
status to start new settle-
ments in the West Bank and
Gaza Strip.
"We have repeatedly urged
the government of Israel to
refrain from establishing more
settlements or expanding
existing settlements," State
Department spokeswoman
Margaret Tutwiler said.
"It would be disappointing
that a leadership that was not
prepared to go forward on
peace would be prepared to
take steps on settlements,
which in our view make it
more difficult to develop a
meaningful peace process.
Her remarks were a veiled
reference to the refusal of Sha-
mir and his Likud colleagues to
agree to Secretary of State
James Baker's proposals for
an Israel-Palestinian dialogue
without certain guarantees. It
was Labor's demands that
Likud agree to the talks that
led to the collapse of the coali-
tion government.
Tutwiler repeated the U.S.
opposition to settlements as an
obstacle to peace in the wake
of a report in the Washington
Post, which said that the
Israeli government plans a
crash program to break
ground on four new settle-
ments and install permanent
housing for rabbinical students
encamped in Nabhis and Jews
living a trailer park near
Hebron.
Shamir, who is also acting
defense and finance ministers,
has named Michael Dekel, one
of Likud's most ardent advo-
cates for settlements, to be in
charge of settlements for the
Defense Ministry during the
interim period, the Post
reported.
The United States, mean-
while, was pleased that the
Jerusalem District Court has
ordered Jewish settlers to
vacate a building in the Chris-
tian Quarter of the Old City of
Jerusalem.
"We believe that it would be
in the best interest of reducing
tension for this matter con-
cluded as quickly as possible."
Tutwiler said.
The 150 Orthodox Jews who
moved into the building
which the Greek Orthodox
Church claims ownership over
have announced they will
appeal the decision to the
Israel Supreme Court.
The move into the building
sparked a clash the next day
between police and some 200
Christian clergymen, joined in
by Palestinians.
needs to establish a govern-
ment.
Verdiger, who objects to
Labor's willingness to consider
territorial concessions as a
way to peace, claimed to have
gotten written assurances
from Labor that his views will
not be compromised and his
freedom of conscience
respected.
Latest bombshell in Israel's
mercurial political process
exploded as Likud's Central
Committee was engaged
Thursday night in rancorous
debate at the Binyanei Ha'uma
convention center here.
Issue before Likud was
whether to endorse an agree-
ment its leadership signed
with the Party for the Adv-
ancement of the Zionist-
Liberal Ideals.
That renegade faction was
established only a month ago
by five former members of
Likud's Liberal Party wing,
led by the ex- minister for
economics and planning, Yitz-
hak Moda'i.
Jewish-Christian
Ties Under Strain
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
reserved but generally cooper-
ative relations between Jews
and Christians in Jerusalem
were stirred to the boiling
Eoint by the occupation of a
ousing complex in the heart
of the Old City's Christian
Quarter by 150 Orthodox
Jews, who say they purchased
it legally.
The Greek Orthodox Church
says it is the rightful owner
and never sold the property.
While the dispute is before
the courts, tempers are rising
on both sides.
Two tourists were slightly
injured by stones thrown at
their bus on the Mount of
Olives in East Jerusalem.
Protest riots broke out in Nab-
lus in the West Bank.
There were also ramifica-
tions overseas.
Noting pointedly that Jeru-
salem is sacred to Moslems,
Jews and Christians alike,
State Department spokesman
Richard Boucher said Friday,
"We think that all parties are
well advised to demonstrate
mutual toleration and to
refrain from provocative
actions."
Statements critical of the
settlers were issued by the
American Jewish Congress
and B'nai B'rith International.
Israelis are nevertheless
finding themselves split along
the by now familiar line divid-
ing moderates, who advocate
peaceful coexistence with
other faiths, and nationalist
and religious activists, who
Coatiaaed on Page 2
THIRD CLASS
BULK RATE
US. POSTAGE
PAD
JEWISH
FLORMXAN
JERUSALEM The Conservative move-
ment in Israel is about to open an institute
to assist in the conversion of non-Jews to
Judaism. The legality of its conversions is
sure to be challenged by the Orthodox
religious establishment in Israel.
NEW YORK A trip to Israel signifi-
cantly enhances American Jewish identity
and has a strong impact on communal
participation, according to a new study.
HELSINKI Though a new transit route
for Soviet Jews emigrating to Israel
appears to be opening up in Finland,
Jewish organizations are still concerned
that the overall flow of immigration is still
vulnerable to terrorist threats.
BRUSSELS The Abu Nidal terror
group reiterates its demand that one of its
members, jailed here for a terrorist attack
on a synagogue, be released in exchange
for the freedom of four Belgian hostages it
has held since November 1987.
J


"
Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, April 27, 1990
ViewpoiilE
Debate Aids Electoral Reform
Rabbi Menachem Schneerson's interfer-
ence in the very government of the State of
Israel sharply divides Israeli citizens.
It also is the subject of righteous denunci-
ation by many segments of American
Jewry, which previously objected to the
Lubavitcher Rebbe's interjection into the
"Who is a Jew?" issue in previous Knesset
sessions.
For the head of the global Lubavitch-
Chabad Movement to have overruled the
decision of the Agudat Israel party brought
forth criticism from party leader and vet-
eran Knesset member, Rabbi Menachem
Porush.
The Reform Movement of United States
Judaism, in particular, has been sharply
criticizing those Jews who have been fuel-
ing the Lubavitch programs with large
contributions.
The Union of American Hebrew Congre-
gations said that such donations, generally
made because non-Orthodox Jews felt they
were supporting the generally worthwhile
educational programs of Chabad, were
unwise. The UAHC claimed that such
contributions directly benefited the Lubav-
itch leadership in pushing non-Zionist, ultra
Orthodox policies and programs in Israel.
The Rebbe's aides say that Rabbi
Schneerson did not order the two members
of Agudat Israel to defect from a Labor-led
coalition in the Knesset which was about to
form. He "merely reaffirmed" his policy
that no MK could join any movement which
advocated returning an inch of the territor-
ies in exchange for peace.
One bright light may come of the debate.
The Rebbe's interjection may well be the
spark which will permit Labor and Likud to
unite in badly-needed electoral reform.
Some religious parties may go along to
show their displeasure with the voice from
Brooklyn.
A Step in the Right Direction
East Germany has made an unequivocal
expression of guilt and regret for the part
of the German nation in the Holocaust.
Further, it has declared that it must pay
reparations to Jewish survivors and their
heirs as part of that expression.
While even such a forthright action does
not eradicate the concern of Jewry and
other victims of Hitler's madness, it begins
to lessen the fear of reunification of Ger-
many.
Credit must go to the Jews of East
Germany and of all'fiurope'fbr their insist-
ence on the statement from Berlin.
Jewish
I
I
a
I
i
-
I
6
iano
Of GREATER FORT LAUDCROALE
FredShochrt
FREDSHOCHET
Editor and Publisher
SUZANNE SHOCHET
Executive Editor
JOAN C. TEG LAS
Director of Advertising
Published Bi Weekly
Main Office & Plant: 120 N.E. 6th St., Miami. Fla. 33132 Phone 1-373-4805 COLLECT
Member JTA. Sex* Art.. WN8. NEA. AJI'A. PPA.
Jrwiih Klohdiu Don Not GumlM Kuhralk of MtrckudiM AamtiMd.
SUBSCRIPTION RATE: 2 Year Minimum $7.50 (Local Area $3 95 Annual)
Friday, April 27,1990
Volume 19
27IYAR5750
Number 9
Dole Under
Fire From
Congress
By HOWARD ROSENBERG
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Senate Minority Leader
Robert Dole (R-Kan.) pulled
back from his threat to have
the Senate rescind a resolution
recognizing Jerusalem as
Israel's capital, contending
"the less said about the sub-
stance of that issue, the bet-
ter."
"It is too late to unscramble
the egg of the Jerusalem issue.
The damage is done," Dole
told a near-empty Senate
chamber during a period of
routine morning business.
While Dole was speaking,
House Republican leaders held
a news conference on the other
side of the U.S. Capitol to take
issue with some of the minor-
ity leader's recent statements
on aid to Israel, Jewish priori-
ties and the status of Jerusa-
lem, which, they said, are not
mainstream views in the
Republican Party.
In a letter, the Republican
leaders criticized Dole for say-
ing, among other things, that
U.S. Jewish leaders had shown
"selfishness" for refusing to
"give one penny" of U.S. fore-
ign aid to "anybody else"
besides Israel.
"Such personal attacks send
a negative message that does
damage to our party," wrote
House Minority Whip Newt
Gingrich (R-Ga.) and Reps.
Duncan Hunter (R-Calif.), Vin
Weber (R-Minn.) and Bill
McCollum (R-Fla.).
At the news conference, Gin-
grich said he "respectfully dis-
agrees" with Dole, though he
called the Kansas senator a
longtime supporter of Israel.
Weber said Dole made a
"very serious gaffe" by implic-
itly questioning the loyalty of
American Jews, whom he cal-
led "patriotic Americans who
devote themselves to a variety
of causes." He said he pre-
sumes that Dole's statement
was "a slip of the tongue."
JEWISH-CHRISTIAN TIES
Continued from Page 1
insist Jews must assert their
{tresence everywhere, regard-
ess of provocation.
About 200 members of
Peace Now demonstrated near
Jaffa Gate. They were joined
by supporters of Netivot Sha-
lom, a dovish religious organi-
zation.
ine moderates clearly have
the support of Jerusalem's
popular Mayor Teddy Kollek.
Kollek, who champions the
right of Jews to live anywhere
in the city, has called the move
into the Christian enclave dur-
ing the holy days leading up to
Easter, unconscionable.
Bush 'Forgive' Germany
Remark Draws Rebukes
LOS ANGELES (JTA) A
remark by President Bush that
the time has come to "forgive"
Germany for the Holocaust
has drawn sharp criticism
from Rabbi Marvin Hier, dean
of the Simon Wiesenthal Cen-
ter. Additional rebukes of the
President's comments from
several other American Jewish
organizations followed.
Calling the president's state-
ment "morally wrong and
politically dangerous,' Hier
said that "the generation of
Germans who perpetrated the
Holocaust can never be forgi-
ven for their heinous crimes.
Indeed, the only people who
could have granted them for-
giveness perished in the gas
chambers.'
At a time when East Ger-
mans have for the first time
accepted moral responsibility
for Nazi crimes, Bush's words
sent the wrong signal to the
young generation of Germans,
Hier said.
While such Germans are not
responsible for the crimes of
their forefathers, "nonethe-
less, the legacy of Auschwitz
must be permanently embed-
ded into the conscience of the
German nation," he said.
Bush made his comments en
route to Bermuda for a meet-
ing with British Prime Minis-
ter Margaret Thatcher. He
characterized his remarks as
"personal observations,"
rather than official policy.
"I'm a Christian, and I think
forgiveness is something I feel
very strongly about," the pres-
ident told reporters aboard Air
Force One.
"I'm inclined to think we
ought to forgive not for-
get," Bush said, adding that
the Easter season was a spe-
cial time to take stock.
"For those of us who have
faith, most of the teachings
have ample room for forgive-
ness and moving on,' he
added.
Factory Authorized Service
On Most Major Brands
Cam Corders
VCRs
Stereo & Hi Fi Equipment
Serving South Florida Over 28 Years.
C
JL
fACTORY AUTHORIZED
ELECTRONIC SERVICE,
r
1 OS 1 2 NORTHWEST 6th COURT MIAMI. FLORIDA 33 1 68
DADE (305) 758-1717
BWOWARD (305) 523-7070
Fla Watts 1-80O-543-31 47
THIS SUMMER
COOL IT
AT KUTSHER'S
Instead of staying where it's hot enjoy the cool that is Kutsher's.
Cool activities that will warm your heart. Cool entertainment
where you'll enjoy the best in show business.
Plus dozens of cool programs for your pleasure...socials and
guest lectures, bridge instruction and tournaments, get-togethers
and cocktail parties. And more. Lots more.
SOME OF THE HOT STm WHO WILL MAKE IT COOL TINS SUMMER
VIS
Mi TMI FWMUli: 18-hole, 7,157 yard championship golf course,
12 all-weather and cloy tennis courts, a fully-equipped health dub and
exercise center, lakeside walking trails, outdoor and indoor pools,
rocquetball courts, fitness consultant, jogging track, indoor ice skating,
private lake, aerobics, nursery & supervised day comp, teen programs,
and nite patrol
Three delicious meals daily, geared to your own special diet.
Coll us for information about ground transportation from
Stewart International and New York area Airports.
KUTSHER'S
Monticello, Now York 12701 / (9141 794-6000
CAUT0U FREE: (IMJ)U.-1273
Complete Convention Facilities / Major Credit Cords Honored


Friday, April 27, 1990/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 3
East German Apology
Welcomed By Leaders
NEW YORK (JTA) Rep-
resentatives of American and
world Jewry were quick to
respond to the East German
parliament's unequivocal
apology to the Jewish people
for their suffering in the Nazi
era, and its acceptance of
responsibility as an heir to
the Third Reich.
A statement, filled with
contrition and self-reproach,
was delivered at the televised
inaugural session of the new
Volkskammer, where Chris-
tian Democrat Lother de
Maiziere, elected just a
month ago, was installed as
prime minister.
"East Germany's first
freely elected parliament
admits joint responsibility on
behalf of the people for the
humiliation, expulsion and
murder of Jewish women,
men and children," said the
statement, read by Sabine
Bergmann-Pohl, speaker and
acting head of state in the
new regime.
"We feel sad and ashamed.
We ask the Jews of the world
to forgive us."
Apologies were extended
as well to Israel, with whom
the parliament expressed
hope of soon establishing dip-
lomatic relations.
The statement was a total
rejection of the position held
for 40 years by East Ger-
many's Stalinist rulers, that
the GDR bore no responsibil-
ity for Nazi atrocities because
it was founded on anti-
fascism.
"There's widespread rec-
ognition that this is an
important historical state-
ment turning over from the
fast and looking to the
uture," said U.S. State
Department spokesman
Richard Boucher.
Dr. Israel Miller, president
of the New York-based Con-
ference on Jewish Material
Give The Gift of Trees
Through the Jewish National Fund
SAY IT WITH
TREES FOR:
WEDDINGS
BIRTHDAYS
BAR MITZVAHS
BAT MITZVAHS
IN MEMORY OF
A LOVED ONE
JNF...
Your link to the
land of Israel
tees
Playgrounds
Roads
Agriculture
Special Projects
Planned Giving Programs
I The Jewish National Fund's M-Fne number
is your connection Id the dtowUtloii el Israel!
A Ring of 5 tees-$35
A Circle of 10 Trees-$70
A beautiful certificate will be sent
Your gift is a tax deductible way to support
JNF's Forest Program throughout Israel.'>
Visa or Mastercard Accepted *J
1-800-542-TREE
or write: 7771 W Oakland Part Blvd.. Suite 217, Ft. Lauderdale. FL 33351
Publix Meat:
Great Choice!
Choose from a large
selection of meats
including beef,
lamb and
veal. Or take
your prefer-
ence to our
meat cutter,
and we'll
custom cut
your order.
Whatever
you choose,
it's the best
in town!
Publix
Claims Against Germany,
welcomed the East Berhr
declaration.
World Jewish Congress
President Edgar Bronfmar
called the GDR's statement
"the first step in the founda-
tion of a new relationship
between the Jewish people
and the whole of the German
people."
In a footnote from Prague,
abbots of the Roman Catholic
Church issued a statement
expressing regret for the
church's failure to ac! against
the Nazi genocide against the
Jews during World War II.
The statement voiced
remorse that church leaders
did not "raise our voices" to
assist the rescue of Jews.
It added, "Our help to
those persecuted was not
helpful enough."
The statement also wel-
comes Czechoslovakia's re-
establishment of diplomatic
relations with Israel in Feb-
ruary.
Sussers' To
Head Reunion
Molly and Paul Susser, of
Plantation, have been selected
as Florida coordinators of a
special homecoming celebra-
tion and 40th birthday party
for Congregation Darchay
Noam, Bayswater Jewish Cen-
ter, Far Rockaway, New York.
The gala homecoming and
40th birthday party will be
held on Sunday, June 3, at 5
p.m., in the Bayswater Jewish
Center.
The birthday party and reun-
ion will feature a cocktail hour
with hot and cold hor
d'oeuvres and open bar, full
deluxe dinner, dancing and a
special Memory Lane exhibit
displaying photos and other
memorabilia of the "Darchay
Noam family."
Broward Resident
Awarded Scholarship
Colleen M. Breuning of Plan-
tation, a senior at Florida
Atlantic University, has been
awarded the first Alvin and
Lenore Katz Scholarship for
academic excellence in the
fields of human resource man-
agement and labor relations.
Breuning, who plans to gra-
duate in December with a
bachelor of business adminis-
tration degree in human
resource management, cur-
rently has a perfect 4.0 grade
point average at FAU. She
enrolled as a full-time student
at the University last year,
after compiling an overall col-
lege grade point average of 3.8
during several years of part-
time study.
The scholarship, which pro-
vides $250 per semester, has
been awarded to Breuning for
the upcoming summer term
and the fall semester.
The scholarship was estab-
lished by Alvin and Lenore
Katz of Boca Raton. Alvin
Katz has taught management
ourses in labor relations and
msiness policy for nine years
it FAU as an adjunct profes-
or.
Synopsis Of
The Weekly Toroh Portion
. "And if her means suffice not for a lamb, then she shall take
two turtledoves, or two young pigeons"
(Lev. lt.8).
TAZRIA
TAZRIA Cleanliness and uncleanliness are further defined,
here in relation to childbirth and leprosy. "If a woman be
delivered, and bear a man-child, then she shall be unclean seven
days And she shall continue in the blood of purification three
and thirty days .. But if she bear a maid-child, then she shall be
unclean two weeks and she shall continue in the blood of
purification threescore and six days. And when the days of her
purification are fulfilled ... she shall bring a lamb of the first year
for a burnt-offering, and a young pigeon, or a turtle-dove, for a
sin-offering, unto the door of the tent of meeting, unto the priest"
(Leviticus lt.t-6). Suspected lepers are to be brought to the
priest, who quarantines the case for seven days. A careful
description of the varieties of leprosy is followed by rules for the
leper's identification and isolation. "And the leper in whom the
plague is, his clothes shall be rent, and the hair of his head shall go
loose, and he shall cover his upper lip, and shall cry: 'Unclean,
unclean." All the days wherein the plague is in him he shall be
unclean; he is unclean; he shall dwell alone; without the camp shall
his dwelling be" (Leviticus 13.16-1,6).
(The recounting of the Weekly Portion of the Law is extracted and
based upon "The Graphic History of the Jewish Heritage," edited by
P. Wollman-Tsamir, published by Shengold The volume is available
at 45 West 45 Street, New York, NY 10036 (212) 246-6911.)

ESS* **"'*"*
SfUflOWAU
0CEAMF**J
MMOHALKHOm
,^-ie.Cnt^ta""11?"; ,
ss=S52sr"~
MEMORIAL DAY
4 DAYS/3 MfiWTS$93"-
(M***0,
MAY 25-28
8HAVUOT-4 0.ys/3Ntflhts-MAY29-JU
mCUIOES 2 FULL "^T^''iaHaai star.
-"'SESSw
jjACoas
Owo'-9m,
L'Crlflim
Discover the Assisted Living program at The Court at
falm-Aire. It's uniquely designed to offer the welcome pri-
vacy of spacious studio, one-bedroom, and two-bedroom
homes, instead of a small, single room. Personal care is avail-
able at all times with assistance in eating, dressing, bathing,
medications and ambukuon. Andvall residents receive prior-
ity access to our on-site long term skilled narsing center.
The Court at Palm-Aire is Broward County's best full-
service retirement community offering seniors independent
residential homes as part of its Lifecare program, an on-site
skilled nursing center, and comprehensive Assisted Living
program.
Receive the Assisted Living care you need while main-
taining your valued independence and dignity. And, it's
available now! We're located within The W>rld of ftlm Aire.
Drop by for a complete tour or call 305/975-8900, for addi-
tional infonnation._______
cr, r> >9Kl Assisted Lwag Program
(fte [purtrX 2701N. Come Dr., Pompano Beach, FL 35069
___SSL. M-97SJ900
For more information, fill out and return this coupon, or call 30S-97SS900.
NAME________________________________________________
ADDRESS_____________________________________________
CITY
STATE
1
PHONE(
Another Kaplan Organi&mon Lifeam Community
Best time to Call
ZIP
_]F5-90_|


Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, April 27, 1990
Florida Federations Slate 'Fly-In'
Sephardic Gathering Expects 1,000
NEW YORK The 1990 annual convention of the
American Sephardi Federation, traditionally billed as the
largest gathering of Sephardim in the U.S. is expected to
draw up to a thousand participants to Chicago on Labor
Day weekend, Sept. 2-4.
Veterans Benefits Handbook Available
One of the government's perennial best sellers, "Federal
Benefits for Veterans and Dependents," has been updated
for 1990 and is now available from the U.S. Government
Printing Office.
Canadian Congress Appeals Sentence
TORONTO The Canadian Jewish Congress is appeal-
ing a sentence given to a Skinhead who admitted spray-
painting swastikas and anti-Semitic slogans on a suburban
synagogue in June 1989, arguing that he got off too lightly.
Zvonimir "Sid" Lelas, 21, who collects Nazi memorabilia
and is active in the Ku Klux Klan, drew a six-month prison
sentence, plus two years' probation.
First Woman Police Commander Named
TEL AVIV (JTA) A 37-year-old mother of three just
made local history by becoming Israel's first woman police
Srecinct commander. Shulamit Korem, a resident of Upper
lazareth, was put in charge of the Migdal Ha'emek police
station.
East German Jews Seek Personal Amends
EAST BERLIN (JTA) Some Jewish activists here may
seek more personal amends from the new East German
regime than the universal apology it made to the Jewish
people at the opening of its new Parliament.
Czech
President
Balances Policy
PRAGUE (JTA) Vaclav
Havel, the playwright presi-
dent of Czechoslovakia, has
written himself an evenhanded
role in the Middle East con-
flict.
He will arrive in Jerusalem
later this month as the first
Czech chief of state to visit
Israel, in order to receive an
honorary degree from the
Hebrew University.
Meanwhile, Palestine Liber-
ation Organization leader
Yasir Arafat arrived here for a
two-day state visit, part of
Havel's Middle East balancing
scenario.
Arafat arrived to a compara-
tively cool public reception,
probably because of his former
cordial relation with the dis-
credited Communist regime.
Florida Association of Jew-
ish Federations annual "Fly-In
Day" in Tallahassee May 1 will
include presentation of the
organization's "Humanitarian
of the Year" award.
Nan Rich, chair of govern-
Kopelman
Named Outreach
Director
Levitt-Weinstein Memorial
Chapels, one of South Flor-
ida's largest Jewish funeral
homes, appointed Jeffrey
Kopelman Director of Com-
munity Outreach. A 16-year
resident of South Florida,
Kopelman has more than a
decade of Jewish funeral ser-
vice experience.
Jeffrey and his wife Judith,
daughter of Rabbi Zvuelen
Yerachmiel Glixman, reside in
North Miami Beach with their
four children. Both are active
in the Toras Ernes Chevra
Kadisha.
Kopelman is president of the
Channah Miriam Schwartz-
baum Shabbos Challenge, an
organization which involves
young Jewish men and women
with Torah Judaism. He is
vice-president of Young Israel
of Greater Miami, a board
member of Congregation Aha-
vas Yisrael, B'nai Israel of
Greater Miami and Youth Syn-
agogue of Kendall.
One of Kopelman's first acts
for Levitt-Weinstein will be
the presentation of a series of
workshops designed to provide
insight into the dynamics of
grief and loss, combining ele-
ments of contemporary psy-
chological concepts with tradi-
tional Jewish teachings.
mental affairs, and Bernie learn how to better access
Friedman, director of the asso- state, local and federal funds
ciation, are coordinating the for refugee assistance, elderly
gathering at the state capital, care, day care and other
Federation delegates will human service programs.
THE FRESHEST
WATER YOU CAN
BUY IS
3500 YEARS OLD
The Mountain Valley Water being bottled
today fell as ram over Hot Springs. Arkan-
sas. 3500 years ago. when there were no
pollutants, no urban wastes, no additives.
It flows from the earth today pure and
enriched with a complement of good miner
als. including calcium and magnesium.
MOUNTAIN VALLEY WATER
SPRING WATER FROM MOT SPWNGS RK
Purely for drinking.
DADE
,~\1hL SPRING V.:.-
' "ARBONATEj
696-1333
BROWARD
764-1234
cJVfounitain
Valley
i^Vater ,
*4Ot ICRINtl, MM. '
oz.(ipr. i?n*
e/dan
RENT-A-CAR
FROM
'OCCAM.
TT3H
im-rmujn
Bagels and Lox and
Maxwell House Coffee.
It couldn't be
anything but
Sunday
morning.
WWMM
III N I.UIIION INK AIIII'OIM I II AT
HI II /I IT/I HAII A Jl Mil. AI I M
A MRI I ON Nl IANVA III AVIV
A'.HIKMI III I II '.Ml VA
At last there's time for a leisurely breakfast,
unhurried conversation and the chance
to enjoy a second (or even a third) cup of
rich, delicious Maxwell House* Coffee. It
couldn't be anything but Sunday morning
CERTIFIED KOSHER
FOOOS
Maxwell House* Coffee. Always... Good to the Last Drop!


Friday, April 27, 1990/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 5
Double-Edged Sword
High Costs Of Living 'Jewish Life' Questioned
NEW YORK High costs
of living a Jewish life includ-
ing synagogue affiliation, Jew-
ish education, and Jewish soci-
alization experiences such as
travelling to Israel often act
as a doubled-edged sword
within the Jewish community:
a disincentive to affiliatiion for
"marginal" Jews and a pen-
alty for those families who are
very committed although it
may leave them financially
insecure.
This was the major conclu-
sion that evolved from a recent
day-long consultation spon-
sored by the American Jewish
Committee, to examine the
significance of cost and affor-
dability on Jewish communal
involvement and to begin to
develop creative policies to
eliminate some of the barriers
that exist.
Consultation brought
together leading sociologists,
demographers and communal
professionals including: Dr.
Gerald Bubis, Hebrew Union
College Jewish Institute of
Religion, and chair of the
AJC's William Petschek
National Jewish Family Cen-
ter; Dr. Murray Friedman,
Mid Atlantic director, Ameri-
can Jewish Committee; Dr.
Barry Chiswick, University of
Illinois; Dr. Barry Kosmin,
Council of Jewish Federations;
Dr. Bernard Reisman, Horn-
stein Program, Brandeis Uni-
versity; Dr. J. Allen Winter,
Connecticut College; and Dr.
Jack Ukeles, Ukeles Associ-
ates.
Rabbi Aryeh Meir of AJC's
Downtown Festival
Events Slated
Several important events
open to the public will occur
inside the theatre of the Fort
Lauderdale Museum of Art
during the 6th Annual Down-
town Festival of the Arts co-
presented by Whitbread Race
Sponsor Beefeater Gin. Alamo
Rent-a-Car and C&S Bank.
Gregory von Hausch, direc-
tor of the Fort Lauderdale
Film Society, is having a spe-
cial print of "Captains Coura-
geous" flown in from Califor-
nia which will be shown on
Friday, April 27th at 6:30 p.m.
On Stage Expo, the first
annual Theatre Festival, is
also being planned at the
Museum on Saturday. April
28th, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Festival Entertainment Chair-
man, Cindy Garron, has
invited several professional,
semi-professional and com-
munity theatre groups to par-
ticipate.
The Opus Playhouse from
Coral Springs is scheduled to
perform from 9 to 10 a.m.; The
Children's Theatre of Fort
Lauderdale will present "Rea-
sons To Be Cheerful" from
10:30 to 11:30 a.m.; Standing
Room Only Productions is
doing scenes from a comedy
from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m.; a
special group will perform
from 2 to 3 p.m. and the
Theatre Company of Planta-
tion will present scenes from
"The Wizard of Ox" and
"Agnes of God" from 4 to 5
p.m.
For information call 761-
5359.
Jewish Communal Affairs
Department coordinated the
consultation.
A study of Jewish affiliation
costs in Philadelphia, con-
ducted by Dr. Rela Geffen
Monson and Dr. Ruth Pinken-
son Feldman, both of Gratz
College, served as a data base
for the consultation. Many of
the participants noted that
there is a strong need to pene-
trate the consciousness of lay
and professional Jewish lead-
ership to direct social policy
and economic assistance not
only to the poor but also to the
middle class.
Dr. Ukeles stressed that the
Jewish community is unde-
rserving the "partially
engaged" to whom the issue of
cost is a serious roadblock, and
poorer Jews who should not be
forced to "trade off their Jew-
ish affiliation for decent nutri-
tion and clothing.
"The issue at hand is what is
right, what is Jewish," he said.
"The institutions of our com-
munity should be accessible to
all and at this time, they are
not. What we lack is a system
for setting fees which is fully
equitable. Such a system
should be based on income,
assets and family size."
Dr. Bubis said that "being a
Jew, in a serious way, involves
a serious financial commit-
ment. So much of what deter-
mines Jewish life today is eco-
nomic."
He continued that the Jew-
ish community is in a conflict
over how priorities should be
set in terms of allocations:
dollars for the elderly, dollars
for Jewish education, dollars
for Israel. All are high priori-
ties.
Among his proposed policy
suggestions:
Jewish organizations
should work together toward
the systematic establishment
of a more equitable method for
determining the fair share
based on income, assets and
family configuration;
Establish a system of
American Jewish Bonds in
which people could invest capi-
tal in the Jewish future to be
used to fund Jewish communal
life;
Communities should estab-
lish local "think-tanks" to
develop creative strategies
and workable policies for their
areas.
As long as the approach con-
tinues to be fees for services, it
is inevitable that the highest
priority will be dollar-raising
and the lowest priority will be
Jew-raising," said Dr. Bubis.
Dr. Chiswick suggested a
retructuring of fees by remov-
ing high up-front fees in the.
early years of Jewish involve-*
ment, when money might be
tightest for the family, and
subsidies that would be tar-
geted to activities where the
impact on Jewishness is great-
est for the family, namely,
early child-care and day
schools. Additionally, Dr. Chi-
swick urged Jewish leadership
to reconsider their longstand-
ing policy of opposing aid for
private Jewish education for
reasons of church/state separ-
ationism.
Dr. Steven Bayme, direc-
tor of AJC's Jewish Communal
Affairs Department spoke of
the "ethos of affluence" within
the Jewish community.
"Jewish values have never
been opposed to affluence, per
se," he said. "However, one of
our biggest challenges is to
build a community whose
ethos does not revolve totally
around affluence and thereby
excludes the economically dis-
advantaged."
"To insure Jewish continu-
ity, Jewish education, as a spe-
cific example, cannot be con-
sidered a luxury item. The real
Continued on Page 7
y/k/fa/fa A HEALTHY IDEA FROM



^'CKBVKJEV
*"i*outn
Fleischmanns
LKXJXcomol
..Fleischmanns,
."SE-OOtcomoi .
Margarine

Margarine

Koahar
FLEISCHMANN'S GIVES EVERY MEAL A HOLIDAY FLAVOR.

SAVE
40c
WkM yw toy any tw
SttatOTMftMCfcaftSOl
MTMUII CHlCWH< *cjm mmii m* c *
woe IMKCOIMMM.IIC iwrtanaim
wrMtMM mm fm MM**. mtmtmt m
[HHIiiCI > WSCO'I Cww wo
MCI MWCW m** mil riMwMjw)
WHO MIISCO tWAHOS MC CMS KPT
I3U0 lMWCtTTOMMKlMO TGUS7M4I
40c
SAVE 15*
Whan you buy any paefcaga of
nVaWgarfi*
mnt* Light
at
z*
32
AMM30?
MTAKCft On* CM*On M> *rcMM H l*oMCt
MM. Cmmi ft Mr MM in Cm*
II* NMMCO MUMS. MC Mm |W
ftntwftti iMmHwMWiii. Hiilnmiii w
mmi Hi amito* cmm* ***
PMcy 1*i Iim mw lw cuih n*ni|lio
MM)* MMCOMMOS MC CMS 0CPT
13130 IMWCCTTWUVI .Oil MO TOWS M0


Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, April 27, 1990
Gorbachev Statement
On Anti-Semitism Debated
NEW YORK (JTA) Soviet
President Mikhail Gorbachev,
addressing a meeting of the
Communist Youth League in
Moscow, has made what is
believed to be his first public
statement condemning anti-
Semitism.
Leaders of Soviet Jewry
advocacy groups responded to
the lone-awaited statement in
mixed fashion, some welcom-
ing it, but others saying it
minimized or only partially
addressed the problem.
Gorbachev's long-awaited
remark came quietly, in
response to a question posed in
Moscow at the 21st annual
congress of Komsomol, the
Communist youth movement
of the Soviet Union.
Asked what measures he
intended to take in response to
"abnormal conditions of life
and activities of Jews in the
Soviet Union" because of anti-
Semitism, Gorbachev replied,
"I believe that we ought not to
allow raging of nationalism,
chauvinism, anti-Semitism or
any other 'isms' to occur."
"It is necessary to take the
path of harmonizing intereth-
nic relations, to set up legal,
economic and social prerequis-
ites for people of all ethnic
groups," wherever they live,
he said. "There is no other way
that I know of."
A copy of the statement was
forwarded by Yuri Dubinin,
Soviet ambassador to the
United States, to Rabbi
Arthur Schneier, president of
the Appeal of Conscience
Foundation, an interfaith
group that promotes religious
freedom in Soviet bloc coun-
tries and other nations that
experience
repression.
any religious
Herman
needs your
old set of
golfchibs.
Or your old power tools. Or your daughter's bicycle.
Or your old dining room set.
Just call toll-free, and we'll pick them up, at your
convenience, for resale at the Douglas Gardens
Thrift Shops.
The proceeds will help buy medicine and medical
supplies for Herman and other residents of the Miami
Jewish Home and Hospital for the Aged. And you'll feel
like a million without spending a dime.
Call for free pick-up:
1-800-876-GIVE
I hi i.nly authorized Ihrill shops ol ihi Mumi Jewish Home *
.ind Hospii.il lor Ihv \%k& All Kills (jxdidutllhk
Iraqi Offer
Conditions
Rejected
JERUSALEM (JTA) A
reported offer by President
Saddam Hussein of Iraq to
dismantle his weapons of mass
destruction if Israel does the
same seemed to satisfy four of
the five U.S. senators who
held a news conference win-
ding up their fact-finding mis-
sion to the Middle East.
Only Sen. Howard Metzen-
baum (D-Ohio), the lone Demo-
crat in the group, led by Sen-
ate Minority Leader Robert
Dole (R-Kan.), was dubious of
Hussein's peaceful intentions
and in fact suggested that the
Iraqi leader suffers from a
"war psychosis."
In Washington, the Bush
administration welcomed Hus-
sein's reported offer, but not
the condition attached to it.
The senatorial junketeers
visited Egypt, Jordan and
Syria before coming to Israel.
But it was their unscheduled
side trip Thursday to Iraq
reportedly arranged by Presi-
dent Hosni Mubarak of Egypt
which aroused greatest
interest.
That was possibly because
Hussein shocked the world
with a threat to destroy "half
of Israel" with chemical weap-
ons in his arsenal.
Arab Terrorist
Attack On Plane?
TEL AVIV (JTA) Mystery
surrounds Tass reports that a
Soviet airliner carrying Jews
to Israel was the target of a
Palestinian terrorist attack in
Cyprus.
Israeli and Cypriot authorit-
ies said they had no informa-
tion about the alleged incident.
Soviet airliners, moreover,
do not fly to Israel.
The official Soviet news
agency reported, nonetheless,
that an Aeroflot jet carrying
Jewish immigrants to Israel
was attacked by Palestinians.
JERUSALEM (JTA) Settlers in the West Bank and
Gaza Strip are taking advantage of the current political
vacuum to rush new settlement projects to completion. The
jettlers established two new West Bank settlements this
week: Rehan 5, in the northern Samaria region, and Ramat
Gidron, near Jerusalem. They are the last of eight
settlements approved by the now defunct Likud-Labor
unity government when it was formed in 1988.
EAST BERLIN (JTA) Rapid progress is expected in
East Germany's drive to establish diplomatic relations with
Israel, following the new government's unprecedented
statement of apology for crimes committed against the
Jewish people during World War II.
WASHINGTON (JTA) The United States decides not
to rejoin the U.N. Educational, Scientific and Cultural
Organization, in part because of its cooperation with the
Palestine Liberation Organization and its stance on Israel.
TEL AVIV (JTA) The Likud caretaker government
grants a long- denied license for a group of local doctors
and South African investors to open a private hospital in
Haifa.
NEW YORK (JTA) Though a new transit route for
Soviet Jews immigrating to Israel appears to be opening up
in Finland, Jewish organizations here remain concerned
that the overall flow of immigration is vulnerable to
terrorist threats.

n
yoU'U
THE RIGHT CHOICE FOR YOUR BEST SUMMER VACATION
mi Exarm Acrmt gke*t ammmm
AusumB?L(miHom
n tt Outdoor* Moor PooH ^425
KDEp L****> Opmn Bar < Butt*
PmrWm Saturday Night*
i omomtmAS km row Hal WMM
TWO MFfERBiT SHOWS
mmv
Now ffy AMBUCAN AIRUMES
to Stewart International Arport.
[Ncwtxrfi. N Y (t *1 (M* you ty X tieMporl)
#
PER WEEK I
Par Person
INCLUDES 3 HEALS DAILY
SPECIAL DISCOUNT FOR
FOUR WEEK STAYS OR LONGER I
Transfers From & To
.,,. Airport AvaiaWe
RPLICH
so FMXsauna. *y Mm tnm***-r
iwysisss ni-au

Con we talk
great vacations?
$1299(,ulyii5>
r* no. osusii Ohmi J?OT
ROONDTMP RJQHTB' THE UNO
THE RESORT THE FOOO* THE FUN
THE TWO WEEKS and Yours Truly
JOAN RIVERS S8
? JERRY VALE-July 14
* FRED TRAVALENA July 21
? JOHNNY MAESTRO
& THE BROOKLYN BRIDGE July 28
* RITA RUDNER August 4
* BOBBY VINTON August 11
* NORM CROSBY August 18
* DIONNE WARWICK August 25
* CAROL LIEFER September 1
45 Holes ol Goll Indoor & Outdoor Tennis Indoor &
Outdoor Pools Health Club Steam Room Sauna Air
Conditioned Card Rooms'Dance Classes & Exercise
Classes 'Speedy Garfm Band-Top Star Studded
Entertainment
_____Low Rates for Extended Stays
ofadM thrMnrn* a day and your an****. Mom
Hrrxx*k. Caff uttodayforconqtmi
MtajrCtotoatfAMbw
OnecaBdoesitaO!
CALLTOLLFREE
1-800-367-4637
Ut&f
(914)
iFUhburg.N:
4344000
Or S* your Tray*Ag*tt'UH

Friday, April 27, 1990/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 7
A Less Than Brave New Rock World
By DANIEL B. SYME
When I was a teenager in
I the '50's and early '60s, rock
and roll was regarded in some
3uarters as "music of the
evil" that should be barred
I from the airway as a threat to
sexual morality. The beat
frightened the self-appointed
guardians of decency the
rhythmic cadence, the danc-
ing, Jerry Lee Lewis' pulsat-
ing piano and of course Elvis
Presley's pelvic thrusts. Like
all of my generation, I strongly
opposed any efforts to censor
this new music.
Rock and roll thrived despite
the bluenoses. Teenagers,
determined to choose their
own music, bought records,
packed concerts and won the
battle to play their own songs.
Ultimately, even adults
learned to live with the slightly
suggestive lyrics and primitive
tempo if not with the high
decibel level of that era's
strange new music.
Several months ago, I began
to receive literature from a
group called the Parents'
Music Resource Center, an
organization of prominent
Americans, including Tipper
Gore, the wife of Tennessee's
Senator Albert Gore, Jr.
One announced goal of this
group was to promote legisla-
tion requiring the labeling of
record albums and audio tapes
that glamorize violence; mur-
der, suicide, rape, sado-
masochism, drugs and alcohol.
The idea was to alert parents
to the contents of the records
their teenagers were buying,
just as movie ratings serve as a
guide to appropriate films for
young people.
Recalling efforts by some
politicians and church leaders
to censor rock and roll during
my own youth, I initially
opposed the PMRC's goals, in
sympathy with the parade of
popular recording artists who
spoke out against labelling.
Then I took the trouble to read
the lyrics of some of the songs
to which my 11-year-old son
and his friends had been listen-
ing. I was stunned. There was
no subtlety, no masking of
intent, no double entendres.
It was all there, out front.
One title, "Bodily Dismember-
ment," by a group called Rigor
Mortis, provides foot-tapping
music to the graphic details of
an ax murder. m^^
Another, "Welcome to the
Terrordome," contains blat-
antly anti-Semitic lyrics ("Cru-
cifixion ain't no fiction") that
revive the repulsive and histor-
ically-discredited accusation
that Jews are guilty of deicide.
It is also possible to program
your CD player with lyrics
extolling rape, substancce
abuse and racism.
I am not in favor of prohibit-
ing the distribution of such
material, as abhorrent as it
may be. But I am persuaded
that consumers have a right to
know the content of the
recordings their youngsters
buy and play. That is not cen-
sorship. It is truth in advertis-
ing full disclosure, if you
will. If people want to make
informed purchases of brutal
and obscene material, that is
their constitutional right.
My new awareness of the
contents of contemporary rock
music has shaken me deeply,
not only for what the songs
say, but for the world they
reflect. Mary Travers, of
Peter, Paul and Mary, has
observed perceptively that
popular music does not change
society but rather mirrors its
reality.
The group's recording of
"Blowin'in in the Wind, for
example, did not create opposi-
tion to the Viet Nam War but
served as an anthem for mil-
lions who already shared the
sentiments the song expre-
ssed. Similarly, the "acid
rock" of the late 60's and 70's
reflected the drug use, flight
from reality and preoccupation
with self that characterized
that period.
If Mary Travers' assertion
holds true today, we have a
genuine crisis in our hands.
The message is depressingly
clear. So many of our young
people have become inured to
the world of drugs, violence
and hate that they can listen or
dance to the beat of music
about dismemberment, rape or
murder apparently without
giving it another thought.
If that is so, the erosion of
values our society faces is far
more serious than any of us
Cantors' Concert Thrills
East European Audiences
has realized. It is certainly not
a problem that can be solved
by putting a label on a record-
ing or tape. But if tagging a
song for bigotry or porn or
violence will not make them go
away, it will at least raise
public consciousness to the
point of recognizing that some
people are producing this kind
of poison, selling it and making
money out of it.
Regrettably, today's parents
and the general public, if not
deaf to the problem, have at
least failed to project the conc-
ern and outrage necessary to
combat the purveyors of such
slickly-packaged sewage. Until
they do, our young people and
our society remain at risk.
Rabbi Syme it vice president of the
Union of American Hebrew Congrega-
tions.
Cost of Living
Continued from Page S
problem confronting Jewish
day schools is not personnel
the issue that is usually dis-
cussed but rather the capac-
ity of middle class parents to
afford this type of schooling.
"Jewish leadership must rec-
ognize the need to target social
policy toward special Jewish
subpopulations the near
poor, single parents and mutli-
child homes.
Dr. Friedman indicated that
"the Jewish community is fac-
ing a quiet but no less signifi-
cant crisis involving its future
in this country that has to be
recognized as threatening as
earlier and present-day
assaults on Jewish safety and
security. How we adjust our
constitutions to this threat will
be a measure of our creativity
in developing a viable Jewish
life in the coming years."
AMSTERDAM (JTA) The
Wiener Foundation's annual
concert tour brings some of
the world's greatest cantorial
voices to Jewish communities
in Eastern and Western
Europe.
In the East, the audiences,
though mostly lacking a deep
Jewish background, have been
enthralled.
Hundred of Jews walked for
miles Friday evening and Sat-
urday to hear the fabulous
voices of Ben-Zion Miller,
David Bagley and others fresh
from their concerts in Hun-
gary.
The Wiener Foundation
operates a school for chaz-
zanut in Tel Aviv in collabora-
tion with the Tel Aviv munici-
pality and the Great Syna-
fogue in Jerusalem, and con-
ucts a similar institute in
Moscow.
The performance part is
achieved by inviting the
world's most distinguished
cantors on tour.
"Every year, another com-
bination of cantors performs,"
Haim Wiener of Miami Beach
explained. But "we want to
promote the cantorial art, not
the cantor," he added.
Miss America Told to Refrain
NEW YORK The Miss America Organization has
requested that Miss America 1990, Debbye Turner, refrain
from using rap songs containing Christian messages in her
presentation to public school children.
FUND RAISER
Executive Director for Florida office
Experienced in Deferred Giving Direct
Solicitations Community or Organization
Functions Excellent Fringe Benefits
Send resume for appointment.
Israel Histadrut Foundation
276-5th Avenue. New York 10001
Oat nutrition you can't get
from corn flakes
The delicious,
crispy flakes in
ft>st Oat Flakes
are a significant
source of oat bran.
You'll love the
great taste and
the oat nutrition
you can't get
from corn flakes.
And, it's certified
Kosher.
Where keeping Kosher is a delicious tradition."
C 1990 Qwwnl Food. Corpon*on


Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, April 27, 1990
With the new AIMReach OufWxrldPlan,
you can call again and again and save up to 20%.
at&t
The right choice.
The voices of home. Hear them again and again with
the new Reach Out WtoridPlanmth rates as low as
74< a minute to Israel.
This new calling plan gives you a world of savings
during convenient calling hours-15 hours or more,
Monday through Friday And 24 hours a day, Saturday
and Sunday
Reach Out World can reduce your monthly inter-
national phone bill by up to 20%! And the more you
talk, the more you save, because you'll enjoy an addi
tkxial 3% discount on that portion of your call after the
tenth minute.
And Reach Out World gives you more than Israel.
It gives you the world.with savings to over 40 countries
and areas. You'll even save on state-to-state long distance
calls you dial directly from your home.
Only ATaTgives you all these savings, hours aixl
countries for only $3 a month.This $3 fee entitles you to
a reduced perminuterate.
Sometimes there's nothing more important than the
sound of a loved one's voice. When you sign up for the
Reach Out World /-Yam,you'll hear it better than ever
with the clearest, fastest, most reliable connections in
the worldThectxineiikms of AT&T Call or return the
coupon today
1800 537-37o9^ Ext. 566 ^^^____
**YfJ|r*inK*KlJ>
Save up to 20% on calls to Israel
with the AVkTReacb Out' XforldPlan.
Ami mi calls lucnvr <0ottoaild arras KiM call mir Kilglish \|X\iknn:
ifHMRMaitwovr rrtxi 166. or
a Km sijoi m up i<* iiu- xurKmetom RMW '*
D IVum* siiid mi- nn nv inh mai m
Nanx--
Vkln-ss-
diy.
.Man-.
JHp.
H>i____!__Z
MHii.miri-

J


Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EH8LJKTCF_QS8BHY INGEST_TIME 2013-06-29T04:02:44Z PACKAGE AA00014312_00424
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES