The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 3, no. 7 (Apr. 5, 1974)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 9, 1976 called v.4, no. 27 but constitutes v.5, no. 1; issue for July 7, 1989 called v.18, no. 11 but constitutes v.18, no. 13.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44570954
lccn - sn 00229545
ocm44570954
System ID:
AA00014312:00414

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Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward


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Full Text
S^ishFlopidian
#) OF GREATER FORT LAUDE
'isa^* _____________________________________________________________________________________________
f
*
Volume 18 Number 24
Fort Lauderdale, Florida Friday, December 8, 1989
FratfSJMcJM*
Price: 35 cents
Annual Public Appearance
Begin Appears
Thinner, Alert
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) For-
mer Prime Minister Mena-
chem Begin made one of his
rare appearances in public
Sunday. It was his annual out-
ing to say Kaddish at the grave
of his wife, Aliza, whose death
seven years ago is believed to
have prompted him to leave
public office.
Wearing a blue suit and a
blue hat, Begin arrived at the
graveside, supported by his
daughters, Hasia and Leah.
He and his son, Binyamin,
recited the memorial prayer.
The once fiery leader of the
Likud bloc, who made peace
with Egypt and shared the
Nobel Peace Prize with the
late Egyptian President
Anwar Sadat, seemed a sha-
dow of his former self.
He looked thinner than ever
and physically weak. There
was a frozen smile on his face
as his family escorted him
through crowds ol spectators
at the cemetery.
But Begin, who is 76,
appeared mentally alert. He
had a word for whomever
shook his hand, and he recog-
nized his former associates.
To Prime Minister Yitzhak
Shamir, his successor, Begin
said, "Welcome back, Sir, and
food luck in whatever you do."
hamir has just returned from
a two-week visit to the United
States and Western Europe.
Begin never explained his
sudden resignation from the
government before completing
his second term as prime min-
ister. Friends say he never
recovered from the depression
that overcame him on the
death of his wife, to whom he
was deeply devoted.
Begin has not participated in
politics since then. He does not
grant interviews, hardly ever
leaves his Jerusalem home and
receives only his oldest friends
and closest confidants.
BEGIN AT MEMORIAL Jerusalem Former Prime Minister Menachem Begin shakes hands
with Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir, left, during a rare public appearance at a memorial service
for Begin's late wife. (AP/Wide World Photo)
U.S. Fights 'Palestine' Within U.N.
Israeli Teachers
In Moscow
Israeli teachers have begun
classes in the first open
seminar for Hebrew studies in
the very heart of Moscow
under the auspices of the
World Jewish Congress.
Three teachers, from
Israel's Tel Aviv University,
are conducting classes for
some 300 pupils in a coopera-
tive arrangement with the
Solomon Mikhoels Jewish Cul-
tural Center. The Mikhoels
Center was opened last Febru-
ary following agreement
between the WJC and Soviet
authorities, the first officially
sanctioned Jewish Cultural
Center in the Soviet Union in
over fifty years.
The instruction of Hebrew
was formerly treated by Soviet
authorities as a crime which
led to the imprisonment of
various Soviet Jewish activ-
ists. "The open teaching of
Hebrew by Israeli instructors
in the heart of Moscow would
have been unthinkable not too
long ago," WJC Executive
Director Elan Steinberg
noted.
UNITED NATIONS (JTA)
Yasir Arafat will not seek
permission from the United
States to attend this week's
U.N. General Assembly debate
on the question of Palestine,
the Palestine Liberation
Organization's chief represen-
tative here said.
"Had he wanted to come, he
would have asked for a visa
two weeks ago," Zehdi Terzi,
who heads the PLO observer
mission, told the Jewish Tele-
graphic Agency.
But whatever relief the Uni-
ted States and Israel may feel
at hearing this news is being
tempered by indications of
new PLO efforts on the diplo-
matic front.
According to sources here, a
draft resolution is being circu-
lated here proposing that the
General Assembly officially
change the name of the PLO
observer mission from "Pales-
tine" to the "State of Pales-
tine," thereby upgrading the
mission's status within the
United Nations from an
"observer" to an "observer
state."
Such a move would indicate
U.N. recognition of an existing
Palestinian state.
The PLO is waging a parallel
diplomatic offensive in Rome,
at the General Conference of
the Food and Agricultural
Organization, a U.N. agency.
A resolution currently
before the FAO conference
would not only upgrade the
PLO's status from non-state
observer to full membership,
but would channel interna-
tional food assistance to Pales-
tinians through the PLO.
In Washington, the State
Department threatened to
withhold U.S. funding to any
U.N. body, including the Gen-
eral Assembly and the FAO,
that recognizes the PLO's pro-
claimed "State of Palestine."
"The United States govern-
ment does not recognize Pales-
tine," State Department spo-
keswoman Margaret Tutwiler
said at a news briefing Mon-
day. "It does not satisfy the
generally accepted criteria
under international law for
statehood."
A law adopted by Congress
bars U.S. funding specifically
to any U.N. agency that
"enhances" the PLO's status.
The General Assembly, how-
Continued on Page 2
11
\1
Egyptian Spy For Israel Ends Silence
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) An
Egyptian woman who once
spied for Israel with her hus-
band has broken her decade-
long silence on the affair with
a complaint that the Israeli
authorities are neglecting her.
The woman, who now lives
in Israel, claims her husband
gave Israel advance warning
of the Yom Kippur War.
Her story has revived the
controversy over why Israel
was unprepared when the
Egyptian and Syrian armies
struck suddenly on Yom Kip-
pur 1973. Israel suffered
nearly 3,000 dead or missing in
a month of fighting.
Inshrah Shahin, 45, who
changed her name to Dina
Ben-David, has no regrets
about having spied for the
Jewish state.
But she is bitter over her
poor economic condition, con-
sidering that she and her late
husband, Ibrahim Shahin,
worked for Israeli intelligence
from 1967 until they were
caught in 1974.
"I photographed every air-
port, every military base and
every bridge in Cairo," she
told reporters Sunday. "The
films were hidden in puppets
and sent to Israel. Every six
months we sent more than 40
rolls of film."
Ibrahim, a Palestinian from
Ramla, was hanged by the
Egyptians in January 1977.
Inshrah was sentenced to
death but pardoned by then
President Anwar Sadat and
released in a prisoner
exchange.
She and her three sons fled
to Israel 10 years ago and
adopted Hebrew names. Nabil,
Mohammed and Adel are now
Yossi, Haim and Rafi.
The story unfolded this week
because the military censor
feared the family would sell it
to a foreign news organization,
which would then publish a
distorted version damaging to
Israel.
According to Rafi Ben-
David, his father warned
Israel that war was imminent
in 1973, but his messages were
ignored.
"I admit that I spied for
Israel. I don't regret it, but I
do regret that I came to this
country," his mother said.
She acknowledged that she
and her husband had spied for
money. Each was paid $1,750
a month. After coming to
Israel, the government paid
each of her children $25,000,
but she received nothing, the
woman claimed.
She said she works as a cook
for $500 a month. One son is a
cook, another a waiter and the
third a student at Cairo's Al-
Azhar University.
"We've lived here several
years, and no one knows who
we are and how much we
contributed to the State of
Israel," Rafi Ben-David said.
"My father paid with his life.
And now, for his sake, I want
the entire country to know
who was Ibrahim Shahin."
Security sources tended to
flay down the family's part in
srael's intelligence network in
Egypt. They were employed to
gather basic information.
TMIRO CLASS
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PAD
JEWISH
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Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, December 8, 1989
Viewpoint
-a
Israel's recognition of the
Zionist Organization of
America's pivotal role in the
establishment of the State
is implicit in the number of
high level government offi-
cials dispatched to the
ZOA's 87th National Con-
vention.
The four-day conference
in Miami Beach will hear
from Moshe Arad, Israel's
chief envoy to the United
States, and from Eliyahu
Ben Elissar, who heads the
powerful Knesset Foreign
Affairs and Defense Com-
mittee.
ZOA's leadership in help-
ZOA Role
ing achieve instant recogni-
tion of Israel by the United
States is well documented.
Not as well known is the
organization's part in estab-
lishing many of the most
important Jewish agencies
in this country.
Potent AIPAC, Israel's
foremost lobbying organiza-
tion, and the United Israel
Appeal are among the
direct products of ZOA.
In selecting our commun-
ity for its annual conven-
tion, the Zionist Organiza-
tion of America recognizes
the ongoing importance of
South Florida to both the
Zionist Movement
American Jewry.
and
At a time when Israel is
under subtle but obvious
pressure from Washington,
the ZOA convention offers
an important sounding
board for a united voice of
the Jewish people.
MIAMIAN JERROLD GOODMAN (right) met with British
Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher recently when the Technion
Israel Institute of Technology awarded her an honorary
doctorate degree at a special ceremony in London. Goodman, who
attended the ceremony with his wife, Jane, represented the
Southern Region of the American Society for Technion (ATS) as
part of a group of American and British dignitaries.
jewishFloridian o
OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDAIE
fMShwM
FREDSHOCHET
Editor and Publisher
SUZANNESHOCHET
Executive Editor
JOAN C. TEOLAS
Director of Advertising
Published Bi-weekly
Main Ottlce & Plant: 120 N.E. 6th St.. Miami, Fla. 33132 Phone 1-373-4805 COLLECT
Neater JTA. Sevea Art*. WNS. NBA. AJPA. and FPA.
Jewiafc Meridian Dot. Not GiuuIr Kaaamta of Mercteadiee Advertise*.
SUBSCRIPTION RATE: 2 Year Minimum $7.50 (Local Area $3.95 Annual)
Friday, December 8,1989
Volume 18
'Palestine'
Continued from Page 1
ever, is not just another U.N.
agency. It receives its funding
from the overall U.N. program
budget.
If the U.S. cuts off its contri-
bution to this budget, the
United Nations could conceiva-
bly be seriously crippled. The
U.S. assessment this year of
$216 million represents 25 per-
cent of the total budget.
A cutoff of U.S. funds to the
FAO would also severely
weaken that agency. Of the
$267.6 million FAO budget
this year, $61.4 million was to
come from the United States,
though it has not yet been
paid. In addition, the United
States owes the FAO another
$21 million in arrears.
Tutwiler termed the PLO
effort to gain full recognition
in the FAO "an objectionable
attempt to politicize the
important work of this
agency."
Such an effort "does nothing
to contribute to the settlement
of the political issues involved
and does substantial harm to
the FAO's credibility as an
organization worthy of U.S.'
support," she said.
Tutwiler said the U.N. Relief
and Works Agency is the
appropriate means for provid-
ing "humanitarian assistance
to the Palestinian people." She
pointed out that in 1989, the
United States provided $63
million to that agency, the
largest contribution of any
country.
10 KISLEV 5750
Number 24
;JH\e>
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Friday, December 8, 1989/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 3
By HOWARD ROSENBERG
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Jewish groups are disap-
pointed with Congress' failure
to iron out differences in vari-
ous versions of pending child-
care legislation, making pas-
sage of a bill impossible for
this year.
But they are unhappy for
different reasons.
Most Jewish organizations,
while disappointed, have
vowed to use the time between
the congressional sessions to
lobby against a popular provi-
sion in the House and Senate
bills that would allow federal
funds to be used for sectarian
child-care programs.
Such groups were not oppos-
ing the use of government
funds for non-sectarian pro-
grams, even if they were spon-
sored by churches or syna-
gogues.
Orthodox Jewish groups,
which oppose any such restric-
tion, were disappointed that a
legislative compromise was
not achieved, because Con-
gress seemed primed to permit
the more sweeping use of fed-
eral funds.
The grant distribution sys-
tem for child-care funds, and
not whether or not they could
go to sectarian programs, was
the main stumbling block law-
makers could not overcome
before adjournment.
It remains unclear whether
either version of the bill will
satisfy President Bush. He
wants parents seeking child-
care services to receive tax
credits, and has threatened to
veto legislation that does not
follow his approach.
The New York Times
reported that Bush may also
veto any child-care package
that does not allow federal
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Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, December 8, 1989
Children's Facility Dedicated In Israel
Leaders of B'nai Brith
Women from the United
States and Canada recently
dedicated a new wing at the
organization's Residential
Treatment Centers in Jerusa-
lem for emotionally disturbed
boys.
South Florida delegates
WIB'JUTH WOMEN < HILDRI N HOMI
Seen at the entrance to the BBW Children's Home are, from left, to
right: Beatrice Sopenoffand June Pleason of Palm Springs; Hyla
Lipsky, international president of B'nai Brith Women; Lillian
Rudin of Margate and Marlene Powder of North Lauderdale.
3 Hour
Hanukah
Telethon
A 3-hour Hanukah Telethon
will be aired on the National
Jewish Television Network,
Cable Channel 24, Sunday,
Dec. 10 from 1-4 p.m. for the
benefit of the Friends of the
Israel Defense Forces. Spon-
sored by Ambassador Uri
Savir, Consul-General of Israel
to New York, the telethon will
present a host of American
and Israeli entertainers, musi-
cians, artists and celebrities.
Among the celebrities will be
M.C. Mike Burstein, Hostess
Caroline Stoessinger, Ambas-
sador Johanan Bein, Israel's
representative to the United
Nations; Deputy Consul Gen-
eral Mordechai Yedid; Brig.
Gen. David Hermesh, Consul;
authors Howard Fast and
Leon Uris; musicians David
Amram, Giora Feidman, San-
dra Johnson Bar-Dor, Cantor
Yossi Mellovani, artist Ovidia
Al-Kara and many others.
Phones will be manned by
volunteers to receive pledges
and calls. The toll free number
is 1-800-752-2598.
joineu Minister of Education
Yitzhak Navon and Mayor
Teddy Kollek in opening the $2
million dormitories at
the B'nai Brith Women's Chil-
dren Home, said to be a model
for residential/educational
facilities serving youngsters
from troubled family circum-
stances.
Mended Hearts
The Mended Hearts, a sup-
port group for post heart sur-
gery patients, family and
friends, will hold its next meet-
ing on Sunday, December 10,
at 1 p.m. at the Florida Medi-
cal Center Auditorium, 5000
West Oakland Park Blvd.,
Lauderdale Lakes.
AMIT
Masada Chapter meets on
Wednesday, December 13th at
noon at the California Federal
Savings and Loan, at 6848 N.
University Drive, Tamarac.
Sheriff Nick Navarro, with wife Sharron, receives the Great
American Traditions Award from Thomas Neumann, Executive
Vice President of B'nai B'rith International.
It's Easy To Advertise Here
Call 373-4605
Dr. Siegel To
Host Workshop
Dr. Bernie Siegel, author of
Love, Medicine & Miracles and
Peace, Love & Healing, will be
presenting a full-day workshop
on creative healing methods
for cancer patients at The
Retreat in Sunrise on Thurs-
day, December 21.
Dr. Siegel, a professor at the
Yale University School of Med-
icine and the president of the
American Holistic Medical
Association, will discuss and
demonstrate the use of such
unique healing methods as bio-
feedback, music and art thera-
pies, relaxation training,
guided imagery, visualization,
and hypnotic suggestion. The
concepts promote the integra-
tion of body, mind and spirit as
part of the healing process.
For information, call (305)
370-0200 or 1-800-EMOTION.
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Whereshoppingisa pleasure.
JnuifiiUmilmiilMimt) The Upper
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Friday, December 8, 1989/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 5
Ask Rose
to pick up
Or your old set of golf clubs. Or your old power
tools. Or your son's old tricycle.
Just call toll-free, and we'll pick them up, at your
convenience, for resale at the Douglas Gardens
Thrift Shops.
The proceeds will help buy medicine and medical
supplies for Rose and other residents of the Miami
Jewish Home and Hospital for the Aged. And you'll
feel like a million without spending a dime.
Call for free pick-up:
1-800-876-GIVE
I Ik unit julhori/cd thrill shops ol lhc Miami Jewish Home ] L.
jnd Hospiul lor lhc Aiced. All gills lax-deductibltr --
Technion
Conference:
U.S. Women
Haven't Gained
Haifa Status of American
women in science and technol-
ogy "has not changed substan-
tially during the past ten
years."
This was one of the major
findings presented to the
"fifth International Confer-
ence on Gender & Science in
Technology" held at the Tech-
nion Israel Institute of
Technology. One of the main
lectures at the conference was
of the Guest of Honor, Nobel
Prize Laureate Dr. Rosalvn S.
Yalow, who was awarded a
Technion Honorary Doctorate.
Margrete S. Klein, an offi-
cial of the U.S. National Sci-
ence Foundation, noted that
while American women cur-
rently earn 26 percent of the
doctorates in science and engi-
neering, they represent only
12 percent oi college and uni-
versity faculty members.
TUNE IN TO A SPECTACULAR
3-HOUR HANUKAH TELETHON
jp^| Sponsored by Ambassador Uri Savir
lL*Zr M Consul General of Israel to the U.S. in New York
IS JJ? On Behalf of the Friends of the Israel Defense Forces
World-Acclaimed U.S. Israeli Entertainers, Musicians
and Celebrities Will Appear for the Benefit of the Friends
of the IDF, including Ambassador Johanon Bein, Israel's
Representative to the United Nations and Deputy Consul
General Mordechai Yedid.
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1989, 1:00 P.M. 4:00 P.M.
National Jewish Television Network
Cable Channel 24
Appearing are (partial list): Mike Burstein, Master of Ceremonies;
Caroline Stoessinger, Hostess; Ovadia Al-Kara, David Amram, Udi
Bar-David, Sandra Johnson Ben-Dor, David Broza, Bella Davidovich,
Howard Fast, Giora Feidman, Lucas Foss, Brig. Gen. David Hermesh,
Consul; Sharon Kam, Cantor Yossi Mellovani, George Mgrdichien,
Avram Pangas, Ann Rophe, Rabbi Sol Roth, Keiko Sato, Alexander
Toradze, Leon Uris, Zita Zohar. Sy Margolis, Executive Producer; Avi
Even, Producer; Barry Speert, Asst. Producer; Roman Kent, Treasurer.
Special Telethon Phone Numbers: 212-684-0669 or 1-800-752-2598
The Friends of the IDF is the tax-exempt, American fund raising partner of Israel's
largest, broadest-based volunteer organization, the Association for the Wellbeing
of Israel's Soldiers. We provide for the soldier as an individual and try to make
the lives of our young men and women a little less difficult by supplying social,
recreational and educational services.
Your tax-deductible contribution may be sent directly to: Friends of the IDF,
15 E. 26 St., Suite 1300, New York, NY 10010.
For more information, call Barry Speert, 212-684-0669
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Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, December 8, 1989

Jonathan Bratter
Jonathan David Bratter, son
of Wendy and Craig Bratter,
of Lauderhill, will be called to
the Torah on the occasion of
his Bar Mitzvah on December
16, at Temple Beth Israel,
Sunrise.
Maternal grandparents are
Anita and Larry Robbins, Lau-
derhill. Paternal grandparents
are Eve Bratter of Tamarac.
Jonathan is a student at
Nova Middle School and enjoys
tennis, football, ice skating.
He has two brothers, Adam
and Jordan.
Gregg Lefkowitz
Gregg Alan Lefkowitz, son
of Karen Weiss and Bill Lef-
kowitz, will be called to the
Torah on the occasion of his
Bar Mitzvah on Dec. 16, at
Temple Beth Israel, Sunrise.
Maternal grandparents are
Leo & Selma Pollack, Planta-
tion. Paternal grandparents
are Harry & Roslyn Lefkowitz,
of N. Miami Beach.
Gregg Alan Lefkowitz is a
student at Nova Middle School
7th grade. His hobbies are
basketball, tennis, bowling.
He has a sister, Tara Joy.
Scott Wiener
Scott Wiener, son of Nancy
and Ira Wiener of Sunrise, will
be called to the Torah on the
B'nai Mitzvah
Sabrina Bergman
Sabrina Bergman, daughter
of Ami and Carol Bergman of
Sunrise, will be called to the
Torah on the occasion of her
Bat Mitzvah on December 23,
at Temple Beth Israel, Sun-
rise.
Maternal grandparents are
Louis & Ethel Faden, Planta-
tion. Paternal grandparents
are Manuel Bergman and Syl-
via Bergman, of North Miami
Beach.
Sabrina is a student at Bair
Middle School.
Sabrina has a brother,
Adam.
Larry Levine
Lawrence Marc Levine, son
of Judy and Max Levine of
Sunrise, was called to the
Torah on the occasion of his
Bar Mitzvah on Sat., Dec. 2,
1989, at Temple Beth Israel,
Sunrise.
Maternal grandparents are
the late Louis and Annette
Perlmuter. Paternal grandpar-
ents are Clara and Hyman
Levine, of Lauderdale Lakes.
Larry is a student at Nova
High School. Larry's hobbies
are sports and video games.
Larry has a sister Amy who
attends the Hebrew Day
School.
Jason Gol
Jason Gol, son of Abraham
and Janet Gol of Sunrise, will
be called to the Torah on the
occasion of his Bar Mitzvah on
December 9, at Temple Beth
Israel, Sunrise.
Maternal grandparents are
Bernard and Bernice Abra-
moff, Margate New Jersey.
Paternal grandparents are
Sara Gol of Miami Beach.
Jason is a student at Temple
Beth Israel (Heb). His hobbies
are sports.
Jason has three sisters,
Jaime Gottlieb, Amy Gol, Lor-
rie Gol, and a brother, Jeffrey
Gottlieb.
occasion of his Bar Mitzvah on
December 9, at Temple Beth
Israel, Ft. Lauderdale.
Maternal grandparents are
Edith and Simon Cutler, Wil-
mington, Massachusetts.
Paternal grandparents are Lil-
lian and Meyer (deceased)
Wiener, of Tamarac.
Scott is a student at Nova
Middle School. His hobbies are
baseball, tennis, computers
and playing pool (at camp). He
was manager at Nova Middle's
baseball team last spring. Spe-
cial awards include Math team
at Nova Eisenhower in the
4th-5th grade and on Math
Team at Nova Middle in 6th
grade. On honor roll at Nova
Middle last year.
He has two sisters, Erica
and Marilyn.
Jennifer Weston
Jennifer Weston, daughter
of Bev and Bernie Weston of
Plantation, will be called to the
Torah on the occasion of her
Bat Mitzvah on Friday, Dec.
22, at Temple Beth Israel,
Sunrise.
Maternal grandparents are
Irene & Ted Greene, Colum-
bus, Ohio. Paternal grandpar-
ents are Fannie and Al Wes-
ton, both deceased, of Pitts-
burgh, Pa.
Jennifer is a student at 8th
grade Seminole Middle. Her
hobbies are cheerleading, gym-
nastics, soccer & Softball.
Special awards include mem-
ber Junior National Honor
Society, State Softball Cham-
pion, Regional & State Soccer
Champion.
Jennifer has a sister Debbie
and two brothers, Doug & Jon.
Deborah Holds
Holiday Sale
Deborah Heart and Lung
Center is holding a Holiday
Sidewalk Sale on Friday,
December 8 and Saturday,
December 9, from 10:30 to 4
p.m. The sale will take place at
the Deborah Hospital Founda-
tion Regional Office in the
University Shoppes, 4942-44
No. University Drive, Lauder-
hill.
Synopsis Of The Weekly Torah Portion
. "And he dreamed, and behold a ladder set up on the earth, and
the top of it reached to heaven; and behold the angels of God
ascending and descending on it"
(Gen. 28. 12).
VAYETZE
VAYETZE On his way to Haran, Jacob lay down to rest at a
place where God appeared to him in a dream, promising to be with
him and to give the land to him and his seed after him. Rising the
next morning, Jacob lifted the stone on which he had slept, and
set it up as a pillar. He called the place Beth-el, meaning "house of
God." and vowed to serve God there when he returned to his
father's house. The Lord would would be his God.
In Haran Jacob worked twenty years as a shepherd for Laban
seven years for his first wife, Leah, seven years for his second
wife, Rachel, and six years for the sheep. His wives gave him their
maid servants Bilhah and Zilpah as wives. Jacob's four wives bore
him 11 sons: Reuben, Simeon, Levi, Judah, Dan, Naphtali, Gad,
Asher, Issachar, Zebulun, and Joseph; he also had one daughter
named Dinah. At God's direction, Jacob returned home to his
father's house. On the way he met the angels of God.
(The recounting of the Weekly Portion of the Law Is extracted and
baaed upon "The Graphic History of the Jewish Heritage," edited by
P. Wollman-Tsamlr, published by Shengold. The volume is available
at 75 Maiden Lane, New York, N.Y. 10038.)
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Friday, December 8, 1989/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 7
Reform Integrates
Converts And Born Jews
By BEN GALLOB
NEW YORK The director
of a Reform outreach program
for prospective Jewish con-
verts and partners in inter-
marriages is convinced that
the program has begun to
change American Jewish nega-
tive attitudes about such Jews.
Director Lydia Kukoff, her-
self a convert, helped found
the program 10 years ago,
sensing the noticeable lack of
integrated programs for con-
verts in the Reform move-
ment.
Kukoff described the unique-
ness of the outreach program,
declaring that "while in other
movements, individual syna-
gogues may offer programs
for Jews-by-choice or for inter-
married couples, Reform is the
only movement in the Ameri-
can Jewish community which
has a mandate to do such
outreach."
Kukoff s official title is dir-
ector of the movement's Joint
Commission on Outreach. She
has an office in Manhattan in
the House of Living Judaism,
the Union of American
Hebrew Congregations head-
quarters, and one in Los
Angeles, where she lives with
her husband, Ben, a TV pro-
ducer; they have two children.
Kukoff, 47, grew up in a
Baptist family in Philadelphia
I and was impressed at an-early
age by the "intelectual tradi-
I tion" of Judaism.
After earning a bachelor's
degree in English literature at
Beaver College in Glenside,
Pa., she enrolled for a master's
degree in Judaic studies at the
Los Angeles branch of the
Hebrew Union College-Jewish
Institute of Religion, Reform's
academic and rabbinical semin-
|ary.
She married Ben in New
I York in 1965, and proceeded
synagogue
News
Temple Kol Ami
On December 8, Friday
evening, at 8:15 p.m., Temple
Kol Ami, 8200 Peters Road in
Plantation, will host Rabbi
Frank Sundheim, as a special
pulpit guest. Rabbi Sundheim
is the Southeast Director of
the Union of American
Hebrew Congregations.
On Saturday morning,
December 9, Services will
begin at 10:30. At this time,
Stacey Trop, daughter of Judy
and Michael Trop, will be cal-
led to the Torah in honor of her
Bat Mitzvah.
On Friday evening, Decem-
ber 15, Services will begin at
8:15 under the leadership of
Rabbi Sheldon J. Harr and
Cantor Seymour Schwartz-
man. In anticipation of Chanu-
kah, a Brass Quintet will be
featured.
On Saturday morning,
December 16, Services wili
begin at 10:30. At this time,
Alan Vickness, son of Sheila
and Stephen Vickness, and
Joshua Stein, son of Kathy and
Mitchell Stein, will be called to
the Torah in honor of their
B'Nai Mitzvah.
with conversion, which was
performed by a reluctant Con-
servative rabbi, William Ber-
kowitz.
Partly from her own experi-
ence, she had decided that
very little Jewish communal
attention was being given to
the emotional needs of newly
converted Jews-by-choice and
their need to integrate into the
Jewish community both during
and after conversion.
In April 1968, Kukoff began
to implement a post-
conversion support system
program with the help of
Rabbi Erwin Herman, who
was then UAHC regional dir-
ector in Los Angeles.
Later she met Rabbi Alexan-
der Schindler, the UAHC pres-
ident, and he pushed the move-
ment to undertake a major
ongoing outreach effort.
In 1983, the Joint Commis-
sion on Reform Jewish Outre-
ach of the UAHC and the
Central Conference of Ameri-
can Rabbis, which is the
Reform rabbinical association,
Lydia Kukoff
was established, with Kukoff
as its first director.
The underlying motivation
for the outreach program is
the conviction of the Reform
movement that assimilation is
the greatest danger to Jewish
Continued on Page 8
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Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, December 8, 1989
Reform
Continued from Page 7
survival in North America.
The assimilation peril is the
principal reason for CCAR's
severely criticized proposal for
patrilineal descent in deter-
mining Jewish identity. Such
indifference to traditional
norms has evoked mistrust
and even hostility among born-
Jews.
Kukoff believes that the out-
reach program has helped
born-Jews better understand
the concerns of prospective
Jews and of converted Jews.
"We have come a long way in
the last 10 years to sensitize
born-Jews really to know the
heart of the stranger," she
said.
The outreach program also
has "hands-on" components to
help Jews-by-choice under-
stand, as Kukoff put it, why
born-Jews nostalgically
describe chicken soup as Jew-
ish penicilin and why most are
so deeply attached to Israel.
Kukoff has found that the
outreach effort extends well
beyond the parameters of the
Reform movement.
She cites the widespread
use, outside the Reform move-
ment, of the library of out-
reach manuals and other
resources materials for inter-
married couples and their fam-
ilies, plus a film with discus-
sion guides.
Kukoff said these outreach
tools have been sought and
used by Jewish centers, Jewish
family services and by Conser-
vative and Reconstructionist
congregations.
She agreed that one espe-
cially difficult area of outreach
is the problem of reaching
intermarried couples. The
Jewish partner, by marrying a
non-Jew, has cut himself or
herself off from any commun-
ity ties. The Jewish spouse is
acutely aware of the inherent
tensions in such a marriage
and is understandably reluc-
tant to take any action that
might worsen such tensions.
The outreach program uses
radio spots and general press
advertising to attract such
Jews. "Once we make a con-
tact, the outreach is generally
well received by such couples.
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