The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 3, no. 7 (Apr. 5, 1974)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 9, 1976 called v.4, no. 27 but constitutes v.5, no. 1; issue for July 7, 1989 called v.18, no. 11 but constitutes v.18, no. 13.

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44570954
lccn - sn 00229545
ocm44570954
System ID:
AA00014312:00404

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Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward


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jewishFloridian
Sz OF GREATER FORT LAUDE
Volume 18 Number 14
Fort Lauderdale, Florida Friday, July 21, 1989
fotfSJMClMt
Price: 35 cents
End Of Marriage
For Labor and Likud?
By GIL SEDAN
(JTA) The Labor Party
id the Likud have maneuv-
themselves into a virtual
^vorce, though, on the face of
both have every reason to
reserve their marriage of
anvenience.
The alternative would seem
be a return to the chaotic,
fvisive political situation that
revailed after the inconclu-
ive Knesset elections last
lovember.
[The Labor Party Executive,
i top leadership forum, voted
/erwhelmingly Monday to
id Labor's coalition with
likud, which it accused of
[recking the peace initiative
idertaken by both parties.
JThe initiative envisions
Jalestinian elections in the
lest Bank and Gaza Strip, to
followed by negotiations
Hth Israel, first for a five-year
)terim period of Palestinian
;lf-rule and, later on, to
etermine the final status of
Ike territories.
| The plan was hammered out
Prime Minister Yitzhak
lir, the Likud leader, and
jfense Minister Yitzhak
ibin, the No. 2 man in the
ibor Party hierarchy.
I But the Likud Central Com-
littee, which met on July 5,
perwhelming endorsed a set
four principles proposed by
^trty hard-liners.
They placed new restrictions
and preconditions on the peace
plan, rendering it unpalatable
to even moderate Palestinians
who might have been per-
suaded to endorse i t.
Strategies Shamir
Is Considering
The Central Committee
move was seen as a defeat for
Shamir at the hands of his
party's extreme right wing,
led by Ministers Ariel Sharon,
David Levy and Yitzhak
Moda'i.
But the feisty Shamir insists
that he won the battle. There
is "absolutely no change in the
peace initiative," he told a
visiting West German politi-
cian.
That being the case, as far as
Shamir is concerned, the part-
nership with Labor should con-
tinue.
While he appeared to be
denying the obvious, associ-
ates of the prime minister
were outlining stratagems by
which he could turn tables on
his right flank.
Shamir could ask the Cab-
inet to reaffirm its endorse-
ment of the original peace ini-
tiative, which it gave all but
unanimous approval in May.
Such a move would put
Sharon and his allies in the
minority within the govern-
ment or force them to vote for
the plan in its pristine form.
Another option open to the
prime minister is to talk with
influential Palestinians in the
territories.
That would demonstrate
that he is not bound by
Sharon's principle that no
negotiations can begin before
the 19-month-old Palestinian
uprising is permanently
crushed, Shamir's aides said.
The problem there is to find
any Palestinians of influence
who would agree to meet with
Shamir in the present circum-
stances.
It is also questionable
whether Labor would play
along with Shamir's attempt
to assert leadership in the
peace process. Clearly,
Labor's patience is running
out and so is the influence of
those Laborites who support a
continued partnership with
Likud.
Both Parties Buying Time
Still, Israeli politicians never
slam the door. The Labor
Executive's decision was only
a recommendation. It must be
approved by the party's 1,300-
member Central Committee.
No date has been set for the
Central Committee to convene
on the matter, but it is unlikely
to meet before August.
Labor's final word, there-
fore, is left hanging, with
Continued on Page 2
Shamir Concessions
Lead To Peres Move
mm^^m I I Ml^
TEL AVIV Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir, left, and
Trade Minister Ariel Sharon are all smiles following their
compromise at the heated Likud block Central Committee
meeting. Shamir agreed to demands of his right-wing rivals
within Likud, placing four restrictions on plans for
elections among Palestinians in the Israeli-administered
territories. (AP/Wide World Photo)
JERUSALEM Finance Minister Shimon Peres, leader of
Israel's Labor Party, is assisted by police after angry
mourners at a funeral heckled him, threw stones and forced
him to leave. The rite was for one of the 12 Israelis among
the Ik killed when a Palestinian forced a bus off the Tel
Aviv-Jerusalem highway. Peres reacted to Shamir's com-
promise two days later and called on Labor to withdraw
from the current coalition government, and asked for new
elections. (AP/Wide World Photo)
Begin Joins In
Asking Restraint
JERUSALEM (JTA) Former
iPrime Minister Menachem Begin
emerged from seclusion this week to
id his voice to those of current Israeli
leaders condemning the random vio-
lence against Arabs that has broken out
since the July 6 bus disaster that
claimed 14 lives and injured 27.
Begin, 75, has been a virtual recluse
|since his surprise resignation in 1983.
But the former leader of Likud and its
[hard-line Herut faction told Israel Tele-
I vision that while the "abhorrent crime"
[shocked every Israeli, violent reactions
|will only deepen the hatred between
Jews and Arabs.
Begin did not appear on the screen.
|His statement was read by his spokes-
[man and confidant, Yehiel Kadishai.
President Chaim Herzog issued a simi-
Jlar appeal for restraint when he spoke
ISunday at the funeral of Moshe Kol, a
former Cabinet minister and one of the
|signers of Israel's Declaration of Inde-
endence. Kol died Saturday at the age
3f87.
Eagleburger Heads
U.S. Mission To Israel
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
The Bush administration plans
to send some of the State
Department's top guns to
Israel next week in the hope of
resuscitating the deteriorating
Prospects For Israeli Prime
[inister Yitzhak Shamir's
peace initiative.
Reports from Israel said the
U.S. delegation would be
headed by Deputy Secretary of
State Lawrence Eagleburger
and would include Dennis
Ross, director of the State
Department's policy-planning
staff, and John Kelly, assistant
secretary of state for Near
Eastern and South Asian
affairs.
But State Department
deputy spokesman Richard
Boucher said that, while
Eagleburger may head
the U.S. delegation, there has
been no final decision yet.
Secretary of State James
Baker, at a news conference in
Warsaw, also said he is send-
ing "someone" to Israel to
clarify Israel's position on the
proposed Palestinian elections
in the West Bank and Gaza
Strip.
Baker said that Shamir's
decision, under pressure from
his Likud bloc, to put tough
new conditions on the elections
plan "give rise in our minds to
the question about the serious-
ness of purpose" of the Israeli
government.
Clarification is needed "if we
are to continue to support" the
plan, he said.
The United States has been
trying to sell the Israeli pro-
posal to the Palestinians. But
it has indicated that this will be
an impossible task if Shamir
seeks to impose the conditions
he accepted at a Likud Central
Committee meeting.
They are that Israel will
never give up any territory,
that Jewish settlement in the
territories will continue, that
Arab residents of East Jerusa-
lem will not be allowed to
participate in the elections and
that the elections cannot be
held until the uprising stops
completely.
Baker told reporters that if
the elections proposal bogs
down, "then we would have to
look a little more closely at the
prospects for an international
conference."
Such a conference is ana-
thema to Shamir, who pro-
posed the elections plan as an
alternative to a peace confer-
ence, which would include the
five permanent members of
the United Nations Security
Council.
The new conditions are also
opposed by Israel's Labor
Party, whose leaders voted to
recommend that the party
withdraw from the govern-
ment coalition with Likud.
The United States does not
Continued on Page 2


Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, July 21, 1989
End of Marriage
For Labor And Likud?
Continued from Page 1
ample time for patching up
differences with Likud.
But it remains for Shamir to
prove he still leads his own
party, and the peace initiative
is a major test of strength. If
the prime minister can pull off
a vote of confidence in the
Cabinet, he will have given
Labor the assurances it needs
to postpone a decision to leave
the government.
There is one rumor floating
that if Sharon continues to be
recalcitrant, Shamir may dis-
miss him from the govern-
ment, where he now holds the
industry and trade portfolio.
What all of this boils down to
is that both Labor and Likud
are buying time. For if the
present government falls, the
consequences are unpleasant
to contemplate.
Labor is not likely to prevail
in new elections, since the
Palestinian uprising has pro-
pelled the electorate further to
the right.
But Likud has no more
chance of winning a governing
majority now than it did in the
last elections.
In their coalition agreement
last year, Likud and Labor
pledged that if either party
broke the alliance, they would
submit motions to dissolve the
Knesset and hold new elec-
tions within 100 days.
But no one expects the par-
ties to abide by that agreement
if either one thinks it has a
chance to form a government
with the minority parties.
Holocaust Freight
Car Sent To U.S.
BALTIMORE A railroad
freight car used to transport
thousands of Jews to a Nazi
killing center in Poland in
1942-43 has been donated to
the United States Holocaust
Memorial Museum by the Pol-
ish Government. The freight
car, one of a handful of its kind
surviving, arrived at the Port
of Baltimore.
The train car was used to
transport Jews from Warsaw
to the killing center of Treb-
linka where more than 750,000
Jews were gassed to death
Eagleburger
Continued from Page 1
"get involved in Israeli polit-
ics," Boucher said when asked
about the Labor move.
But the U.S. delegation is
expected to press Shamir to
restate his original peace pro-
posal, in the hope that might
prevent a Labor walkout.
Boucher said he no comment
about statements Palestine
Liberation Organization leader
Yasir Arafat made in an inter-
view with The New York
Times, published Monday.
Competition For
Religious Backing
That means Likud would try
to put together a narrow-based
coalition with the ultra-
Orthodox and right-wing par-
ties.
Labor would try to do the
same, though its task would be
harder, because it would be
seeking a coalition of incom-
patible elements: the anti-
religious left wing and the
ultra-Orthodox.
In either case, the ultra-
Orthodox would be placed in a
position of power far exceed-
ing their electoral strength.
Shamir, and Vice Premier
Shimon Peres, the Labor
Party leader, have both
started a tentative courting of
the religious parties.
Shamir met Monday with
leaders of Shas, the National
Religious Party and the Agu-
dat Yisrael. Peres had a talk
with Rabbi Menahem Pinhas
Alter, the Vizhnitzer rebbe.
If a government crisis
becomes inevitable, those talks
will intensify. Both major par-
ties will be courting the rabbis,
as they did after the elections
last year, promising legislation
that could impose Orthodox
rengious practices on Israel's
largely secular population and,
at the same time, alienate
large numbers of Conservative
and Reform Jews overseas.
On the political side, a right-
wing coalition led by Likud
would change the face of
Israel.
Sharon would surely get his
wish to be appointed defense
minister, the office he held
during the disastrous Lebanon
war in 1982.
Other ministers would be
likely to come from the far
right. People like Rafael Eitan
of Tsomet, Rehavam Ze'evi of
Moledet, and Geula Cohen and
Yuval Ne'eman of Tehiya
could make Sharon and his
cohorts look like moderates,
some analysts say.
Advocates of a Labor depar-
ture from the national unity
government spoke this week of
serving heroically as a princi-
pled force in the opposition.
But they may find themselves
fighting courageously in the
opposition, while a new kind of
Israel is formed before their
very eyes.
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Arafat was quoted as saying
"the Likud decision means a
deadly blow to elections, no
matter what the cosmetic fixes
they try to put on it now."
SS^'"^ Indrvidual levels may vary. For a
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Friday, July 21, 1989/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 3
DOUBLE WHAAWV
%J77\
Convent; No Vatican/Jewish Conflict
By RABBI
MARC H. TANENBAUM
It is a positive thing that the
meeting of the World Jewish
Congress Executive in Mon-
treal duringearly May adopted
a resolution abandoning an
earlier pronouncement of its
American Section calling for a
worldwide Jewish boycott of
Pope John Paul II.
While this latest action may
in time help ease the mounting
tensions in Vatican-Jewish
relations the worst I have
seen during the past 30 years
much damage has been
done, and it will take consider-
able knowledge, experience
and wisdom to correct the pre-
sent troubled situation.
The core of the problem
remains the presence of the
Carmelite convent on the
grounds of Auschwitz.
The pious, determined nuns
created the problem by their
unilateral transforming of a
Nazi warehouse used for stor-
ing Zyklon-B gas into a con-
vent. But some Jews, I believe,
have misconstrued the stub-
born Carmelite issue.
The removal of the convent
to other quarters which has
been agreed upon by all parties
is overwhelmingly an issue
that concerns the Polish
Catholic Church, the Polish
government, the Carmelite
Order and world Jewry.
By church law and discipline,
only the Polish church has the
power to remove the convent,
which is under its jursidiction.
The pope and the Vatican have
much influence, but not the
decision-making' power, and
there is a basic difference
between power and influence.
Last week, Cardinal Jan Wil-
lebrands, Vatican head of
Catholic-Jewish relations, at a
meeting with several of us,
confirmed that the Polish
Catholic church possesses deci-
sive authority to move the Car-
melite convent to a new cen-
ter.
He said the Vatican and he
personally can and will help in
the transfer, but only in the
background.
It is a weird irony that most
Roman Catholics have a lim-
ited perception of papal infal-
libility (only in "Faith and
Morals"), but some Jews in
their naivete believe that the
pope is infallible in everything
in the Catholic's-world.
All he has to do is snap his
fingers, and the convent and
tin. nuns would disappear. 11 it
has not disappeared yet, obvi-
ously the pope does not want it
to, therefore, boycott the
pope.
Well, the Vatican also knows
how to play the boycott game.
My intuition tells me I don't
yet have hard evidence to con-
firm it that when the Vati-
can and the Anti-Defamation
League canceled their sched-
uled meeting in early May, the
first time to my knowledge
that has happened with a Jew-
ish group in 30 years since
Vatican Council II, the Vatican
was signaling that it does not
like thi* boycott trifling with
its Holy Fii..w.. ^uunues,
I'm afraid there will be further
reprisals.
Meanwhile, the issue
remains as it was at the begin-
ning. The convent, which dis-
torts the meaning of Aus-
chwitz to the Jewish people,
must be removed to an interim
place until the new center and
convent which the pope
committed himself to support
in Vienna in June 1988 are
constructed.
That is the issue that must
be negotiated directly, wisely
and with calm effectiveness by
world Jewry, the Polish
Catholic authorities and the
Polish government.
Letters from our readers:
No Waiver
Editor:
While it is true that Soviet
Jewish emigration figures are
heading toward the 1979 level
of 51,000 for the first time
since that year; we strenuously
disagree with those Soviet
Trade proponents who are
beginning to urge a waiver of
the Jackson-Vanik Amend-
ment to the 1974 Trade Act.
That law denies the Soviets
and other non-market coun-
tries Most Favored Nation
trade status until free emigra-
tion for all is instituted by
policy and law.
To justify a waiver, Presi-
dent George Bush must certify
to Congress not only the exist-
ence of high emigration levels,
which are currently being
demonstrated, but additionally
that these high levels will be
sustained by revisions in the
Soviet emigration laws which
would remove barriers and
assure free emigration for all.
These revisions in Soviet law
have been promised, but, as
yet, have not been made.
We have learned the painful
lesson of the early and mid-
1980's when show trials
against emigration activists
and plunging emigration levels
followed a brief period of high
emigration. The Soviets con-
tinue to use emigration arbi-
trarily and capriciously, sub-
ject to self interest, producing
emigration rates that fluctuate
year to year. Jews can and will
continue to be held for ransom
until new legislation imposes
the rule of law on Soviet emi-
gration policies and authorit-
ies.
Jackson-Vanik imposes this
legislative requirement. The
Soviets have agreed to these
criteria through the Helsinki
Process, most recently in
Vienna this past January.
There, again, they pledged
legal reform, positive resolu-
tion of all outstanding Refuse-
nik cases, and continuing high
emigration levels in exchange
for the Western signatory
nations' acquiescence to a
human rights conference in
Moscow in 1991.
The full implementation of
the explicit requirements of
Jackson-Vanik is the criteria
for a waiver. The South Flor-
ida Conference on Soviet
Jewry, the Union of Councils
for Soviet Jews, Natan Shar-
ansky's Jerusalem-based
Continued on Page 6
Viewpoint
Frivolous Flagwaving
It is a demonstration of the respect that
citizens have for the solemnity and integrity of
the United States Constitution that mandates
against a hasty action to amend it.
President George Bush and others seeking
support for a constitutional amendment which
would ban flag-burning are making light of the
integrity of the Bill of Rights.
A greatness of the Constitution and its first
10 amendments is that it translates an idea
into reality. The protections offered to its
citizens make real an amorphous concept, one
which is copied worldwide by nations and
peoples seeking the ultimate freedom
accorded Americans.
The fabric of the flag burned is not the
desecration. The ultimate insult would be to
make a mockery of the privileges assured
citizens in their natural rights to freedom of
speech and expression.
While deploring the burning of our nation's
symbol, we must remember that an even more
important part of America gives the right of
dissent to those with whom we most passion-
ately disagree.
Muddies Waters
The United States Supreme Court decisions
which have again barred depictions of the
Nativity a purely Christian symbol from
public property, but have permitted public
display of a Hanukkah Menorah, along with
other "balancing" religious items, seem to fall
within the mainstream of American thinking.
Separation of church and state clearly calls
for prohibiting crosses on courthouses.
But permitting Christmas trees on the
White House lawn as part of a so-called
national holiday is balanced, in the opinion of a
Supreme Court majority, with allowing the
Menorah to represent the important role
which Judaism and Jewry have in the United
States.
Purists can argue with authority that nei-
ther Christmas tree nor Menorah belongs at
City Hall.
But the sectarian aspect of the winter
holidays cannot be so easily denied. Santa
Claus may not come to Jewish homes, but his
presence is everywhere.
The Menorah denotes the joyous nature of
Hanukkah. It is far better than a "Hanukkah
bush," if we must have the Christmas tree.
But one wonders whether this Menorah ruling
may lead to the Court's sanction of Christmas
carols in public schools, somewhat balanced by
Hanukkah melodies.
Of even more concern is the mounting effort
to "return" prayer to the public school. That is
a front on which all Jews should unite to
oppose with all our resolve and resources.
Jewish Floridian o
Of GREATER FORT LAUOEROALE
AVWS/Wdk*
FREDSHOCHET
Editor and Publisher
SUZANNE SHOCHET
Executive Editor
JOAN C. TEOLAS
Director of Advertising
Published Bl Weekly
Main Office a Plant: 120 N.E. 6th St.. Miami, Fla. 33132 Phone 1-373-4806COLLECT
Mmtar JTA. Sma Art.. WNS. NBA. AJPA. an* IT A.
Jewfaa nirKii Dm* Net CfU. itult af MiiiSnHii A+iwUms.
SUBSCRIPTION RATE: 2 Year Minimum $7.50 (Local Area $3 96 Annual)
Friday. July 7.1989
Volume 18
18TAMMUZ5749
Number 14

____
-

=


Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, July 21, 1989
Certified as Board Diplomate
Sy Weiner, D.D.S. has
become board certified as a
diplomate of the American
Board of Endodontics.
A graduate of the State Uni-
versity of New York at Stony
Brook and Georgetown Uni-
versity School of Dentistry,
Dr. Weiner received his spe-
cialty training in endodontics
at Medical College at Georgia
School of Dentistry. He has
been in private practice for 10
years.
Dr. Weiner and his family
reside in Plantation.
Networking Social
By Esprit De Corps
The Florida Chapter of the
Arthritis Foundation, South-
east Branch, has organized a
fund-raising group called
Esprit De Corps that will be
hosting a "networking social"
on July 27, at the Club of 110
located in the 110 Tower in
Downtown Fort Lauderdale, 5
p.m.-8 p.m.
Esprit De Corps, is made up
of young professionals from
Broward and Dade counties.
Not only is Esprit De Corps
purpose to support the
Arthritis Foundation, but to
provide a setting each month
where young professionals can
meet and network with others
in the business community.
For information: 484-5600 in
Broward or 374-0190 in Dade.
Dr. Sy Weiner
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Friday, July 21, 1989/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 5
Amit Women
The Florida Council of Amit
Women recently held their
annual luncheon where mem-
bers from South Dade to West
Palm Beach gathered at a hotel
on Miami Beach. Shown left to
right are members of the
Dimona Chapter in Boca
Raton: Noni Jontiff Manya
Gass, Felice Friedson, chapter
president holding her son Gav-
riel, Amit's newest associate
member; Sue Andron and
Patricia Weissman.
Bar Mitzvah
GREG HALKUFF
Greg Halkuff, son of Richard
and Lynn of Coral Springs,
will be called to the Torah on
the occasion of his Bar Mitz-
vah, Saturday, July 22, at
Temple Beth Am of Margate.
Greg is a student of Ram-
blewood Middle School of
Coral Springs and his interests
are baseball, basketball, foot-
ball and soccer.
Olympia & York Name Glass
Glass received his M.B.A.
from Harvard Business
School, and a B.S. degree from
Renssalear Polytechnic Insti-
tute. A resident of Miami,
Glass is president of the Har-
vard Business School Club of
South Florida, and a member
of the National Association of
Industrial and Office Parks
and the Mortgage Bankers
Association.
Howard H. Glass
Howard H. Glass has joined
Olympia & York Southeast as
vice president of finance in
charge of the financial opera-
tions throughout Florida and
the Southeastern U.S.
Previously, Glass was execu-
tive vice president of Sonnen-
blick-Goldman Southeast Cor-
poration in Miami.
Headquartered in Fort
Lauderdale, and headed by
David Shapiro, president and
principal, Olympia & York
Southeast is the U.S. develop-
ment firm associated with
worldwide Olympia & York
Developments, Ltd. Its pro-
jects and land holdings include
the Olympia Place "super-
block" mixed-use project in
downtown Orlando, the joint
venture Cypress Creek at Cor-
porate Park in Ft. Lauderdale
and four city blocks in down-
town Miami.
Do n t Forget!
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Department DF
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Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, July 21, 1989
Broward County Parks Events______
SUMMER NATURALIST
LUNCHEON SERIES
The free annual summer
Naturalist Luncheon series
will end with a luncheon on
August 2 at 11 a.m. at the
Fern Forest Nature Center,
201 Lyons Road, Pompano
Beach.
Judy Hicklin, a sea turtle
conservationist, will give a
conference and present a slide
show of sea turtles species.
For information: 975-7085.
Fiction Award__
NATURE
HIKES AND WALKS
The Broward County Parks
and Recreation Division has
announced the following
schedule of nature hikes and
walks from July 24-30:
Fern Forest Nature Center,
201 Lyons Road South
(between Atlantic Blvd. and
Cypress Creek Road, will hold
free nature walks at 2 p.m. on
Saturday, July 29, and Sun-
day, July 30. For information:
975-7085.
Deerfield Island Park, Intra- For information: 370-3750.
coastal Waterway at Hillsboro
Blvd. and accesible only by
boat (boat transportation pro-
vided), will hold a free nature
walk at 8:30 a.m. on Wednes-
day, July 26, and Saturday,
July 29. For information: 360-
1320.
BUTTERFLY WORKSHOP
Tree Tops Park, 3900 SW
100th Ave., Davie, will hold a
free "Butterflies in Your Gar-
den" workshop from 1 to 3
p.m. on Saturday, July 29.
BIRD WATCHING
Deerfield Island Park, Intra-
coastal Waterway at Hillsboro
Boulevard, will sight and iden-
tify birdlife on the island on
Tuesday, August 1, on the first
Tuesday of the month guided
tour.
SKEET & TRAP SHOOT
The Markham Park Target
Range, 16001 W. State Rd. 84,
will host a registered skeet
and trap shoot sponsored by
the Amateur Trap Association
from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on
Sunday, July 30.
For reservations: 360-1320. For information: 389-2005.
Barbara Diner man, a staff
writer with Azen. Kaplan &
Associates, won third place
out of a field of 166 in the 1989
Florida State Writing Compe-
tition.
The awards banquet was
held at the Seventh Annual
Florida State Writers Confer-
ence at the Sheraton Orlando
North in M ait land. The confer-
ence is sponsored by the 1500-
member Florida Freelance
Writers Association.
Dinerman placed in the
novel chapter division of the
Summer
Health Series
The Court at Palm-Aire, an
independent lifecare commu-
nity, is sponsoring a free sum-
mer lecture series on health-
related topics for seniors.
The series, called Thursday
Health Break, will continue
every other Thursday at 10:30
a.m, at The Court at Palm-
Aire auditorium, 2701 N.
Course Drive, Pompano
Beach.
The lectures consists of:
Aug. 3, Urinary Problems of
the Older Adult; Aug. 17, My
Life My Death Who
Decides; Sept. 7, Dealing with
the Loss of a Loved One; and
Sept. 21, Eating Well to Stay
Healthy and Prevent Cancer.
Emigration
Continued from Page 4
Soviet Jewry Zionist Forum,
and the Soviet Jewry Zionist
Forum, and the Soviet Jewish
emigration leaders inside the
Soviet Union itself, all call for
the prompt evacuation of all
of Jackson-Vanik. We all anxi-
ously await the day Mikhail
Gorbachev makes his Vienna
assurances a concrete reality.
We anxiously await the evacu-
ation of all Refuseniks. We
anxiously await assurances
that all of the half-million
Soviet Jews, who have taken
the first steps towards emigra-
tion to escape the intensified
expansion of popular anti-
Semitism, will be able to com-
plete their escape.
It is manifestly premature to
waive the Jackson-Vanik
amendment at this time. The
first step to Most Favored
Nation status must be made by
Moscow first, not Washington,
and must be made in concrete
legislative reforms, not assur-
ances, promises, and current
trends.
SANDY CANTOR
Congressional Liaison
South Florida Conference on
Soviet Jewry
national competition for her
opening chapter of "Aggres-
sive Postures." The finalist
judge was author Patrick D.
Smith, a three-time nominee
for the Pulitzer Prize and two-
time nominee for the Nobel
Prize for Literature.
A former award-winning
contributing editor of Echelon,
a Halsey publication, Diner-
man has been affiliated with
Azen, Kaplan since 1981.
A native of Boston and a
Coconut Creek resident, Din-
erman graduated from Sim-
mons College and holds a mas-
ter of arts degree in English
and American literature from
Boston University.
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-___
__


Friday, July 21, 1989/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 7
Synagogue Directory
CONSERVATIVE
CONSERVATIVE SYNAGOGUE OF COCONUT CREEK (97M666) Lyont Plan,
M! Lyons Road, Coconut Creek 88063. Sarviea: Sunday through Friday, 8:00
m.; Sturdy through Tnurafur. 4:80 p.m.; Friday evening, 8:00 p.m.; Saturday
^,;ing, 9:00 a.m. RanW William MaraW. Caator Yehuda H.ilbra. '
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER (721-7660), 9101 NW 67th St.. Tamarac S3321
gcrricei: Sunday through Saturday 8:30 a.m., Sunday through Friday 5 p.m. Late
Frida;. service 8 p.m. mi Knrt F. Stone.
TEMPLE BETH AHM (431-6100). 9730 Stirling Road. Hollywood 33024. Service.:
diiU 8 a.m.; Monday-Thursday 7:30 p.m.; Sabbath 8 p.m.. Sabbath morning 8:45
.m.. Jr. Cong. 10 a.m.Rabbi Avraluua Kaaaek. Cantor Eric I.indenbaum.
TEMPLE BETH AM (974-8660). 7206 Royal Palm Blvd., Margate 33063. Services:
Mondav through Friday 8:30 a.m., 5 p.m. Friday late service 8 p.m.; Saturday 9
tm 5 p.m.; Sunday 8:30 a.m.. 5 p.m. Rabbi Paul Ptotkin. Rabbi Eaieritaa. Dr.
Solomon Geld. Caator Irviag Grossmen
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL (742-4040). 7100 W. Oakland Park Blvd., Sunrise, 33313.
gerricei: Monday through Thursday 8 a.m.. 5:30 p.m.; Friday 8 a.m., 5 p.m., 8 p.m.;
Saturday 8:45 a.m., 6 p.m. Sunday 8 a.m. Rabbi Howard A. Addison. Caator
Maurice A. Nen.
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL OF DEERFIELD BEACH (421-7060), 200 S. Century
Blvd Deerfield Beach 33441. Service*: Sunday through Friday 8:30 a.m., 5 p.m.
Fnda> late service 8 p.m.; Saturday 8:46 a.m., and at candlelighting time. Caator
Skabtai Aekeman.
SUNRISE JEWISH CENTER. TEMPLE SHA'ARAY TZEDEK (741-0295), 4099
Pine Island Road, Sunrise 33361. Service*: Sunday through Friday 8 a.m., 5 p.m.;
Late Friday service 8 p.m.; Saturday 9 a.m., Candle lighting time. Rabbi Berahard
Presler. Caator Barry Black, Caator Emeritus Jack Marekant.
TEMPLE SHOLOM (942-6410), 132 SE 11 Ave.. Pompano Beach 33060. Service*:
Monday through Friday 8:45 a.m.. evenings: Monday through Thursday at 5 p.m.,
Friday evening at 8. Saturday and Sunday 9 a.m. Dr. N. Saul Goldman, Rabbi.
Cantor Niaaiai Berkowitz.
CONGREGATION BETH HILLEL OF MARGATE (974-3090), 7640 Margate
Blvd., Margate 33063. S*rvie**: Sunday through Friday 8 a.m.. 5 p.m. Late Friday
service 8 p.m. Saturday 8:45 a.m.; 5 p.m. Rabbi Arrow Drasin. Cantor Joel Cohen.
HEBREW CONGREGATION OF LAUDERHILL (733-9560), 2048 NW 49th Ave.,
Lauderhill 33313. Servie**: Sunday through Friday 8:80 a.m.; 5:30 p.m.; Saturday
8:45 a m. E*i sanwl Hala*B.
CONGREGATION BETH TEFILAH (formerly North Landerdale Hebrew Coa-
gregatioa) (722-7607), 6436 W. Commercial Blvd., Tamarac, FL 33319. Services:
Sunday to Friday at 7:45 a.m. Friday at 6 p.m.; Saturday at 8:45 a.m. Chart** B.
Frier. Preaideat.
B'NAI AVIV (389-4780) at Weston/Bonaventure. Service*: Friday, 8 p.m.. at
Country Isle* Elementary School, Weston. Rabbi Leoa Fiak.
ORTHODOX
CHABAD LUBAVITCH COMMUNITY SYNAGOGUE (344-4856) 9791 W. Sample
Road. Coral Springs 33065. Service*: Monday and Thursday 6:45 a.m. Tues., Wed. &
Friday 7 am. Saturday 9 a.m Sunday 8 a.m. Rabbi Yoesie Deaburg.
TEMPLE OHEL B'NAI RAPHAEL (733-7684). 4351 W. Oakland Park Blvd.,
Lauderdale Lake* 33313. Service*: Sunday through Friday 7:30 a.m. (PeUium) &
8 a.m., 5 p.m., Saturday 8:46 a.m., 5 p.m.
SYNAGOGUE OF INVERRARY CHABAD (748-1777), 4561 N. University Dr..
LauderhUl 33351. Servie**: Sunday through Friday 6:46 a.m., 8 a.m., 6:15 p.m..,
Saturday 9 a.m., 5:80 p.m. Stady groapa: Men, Saadays following *ervicea;
Women. Tuesday. 8 p.". Rabbi Area Liebenaan.
YOUNG ISRAEL OF DEEFIELD BEACH (421-1867), 1880 W. Hillsboro Blvd.,
Deerfield Beach 33441. Services: Sunday through Friday 8 a.m. and 6:30 p.m.
Saturday 8:46 a.m. and sundown: Joseph M. Reiaer. President.
YOUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD-FORT LAUDERDALE (966-7877). 3291
Stirling Road, Fort Lauderdale 33312. S*rviee*: Monday and Thursday 6:15 a.m. 4
7 15 a.m. A Sundown. Tuesday, Wednesday A Friday 6:16 a.m. A 7:30 am and
sundown; Saturday. 7:16 A 9 a.m., A sundown; Sunday 8 a.m. A sundown.
Rabbi Edward Davt*.
CONGREGATION MIDGAL DAVID (726-3583), 8575 W. McNab Road. Tamarac
83321 Servieea: Daily 8 a.m., mincha 5 p.m.; Saturday 8:45 a.m. and 5:15 p.m.
Rabbi Chain) Schneider.
RECONSTRUCTIONIST
RAM AT SHALOM (472-3600), 11301 W. BrowartBlvd Plantation 3332.V
Services: Friday, 8:15 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m Rabbi Elliot Skiddell. Caator Bella
Milim.
REFORM
TEMPLE BETTIKVAH(741-8088),8890 W.OaklaiylParkBlvd..*>.*aWjjl
88351 Servieea: Friday 8 p.m. Seaior Rabbi Moma Gordon. Aenstant Rabbi
Steven Perry. Caator Ron Graaer.
TEMPLE BETH ORR (753-3232), 2161 Riverside Dr Services: Friday 8 p.m. except last Friday of month at 7:30 p.m.; Saturday 10 a.m.
Rabbi Mark W. Gross.
TEMPLE B'NAI SHALOM OF DEERFIELD BEACH (422532,_ Service, at
Menorah Chapels, 2305 W. HUlaboro Blvd., Deerfield Beach 33441, Friday 8 p.m.
Rabbi Alton M. Winter. Caator Mo*ke Leviaaon.
TEMPLB EMANU-EL (731-2310). 3245 W. Oakland Park Blv, <****
....... SHU. Service.: r>iday 8:00 p.m^Saturd^ on^m^^
celebration of Bar Bat Mitivah. Rabbi Edward M. Maline. tantonai
Stephanie Soresek.
TEMPLE KOL AMI (472-1988). 8200 ^ J^""'}^ oSL *
8:16 p.m., Saturday 10:30 a.m. Rabbi Sheldon J. Harr. Caator Seymonr
Schwartiman. __.
LIBERAL JEWISH TEMPLE OF COCONUT (Mil g^g-^WaaS
Fnda, night aervice. twice monthly at C*%J*!SSktS
I oconut Creek Parkway 33066. Rabbi Brace S. Warsaal. Cantor Jacob tsars
TEMPLE BAT YAM (928-0410), 5151 NE 14th Terr ftj"*"** 33334
Serviee: Friday 8 p.m. Saturday 10:30 a.m. Rabbi Lewis Littaaan.









Cam*
*v*r*r

**^*%Zm*****zL,fWry
HKH WW $3?
7-DAY 8PUT TAY V* r- ^ % ^

ASK'
Scholarship
Fund At
Temple Beth Am
David L. Weinberg, Presi-
dent of Temple Beth Am, May-
ate announced the establish-
ment of the Ruth E. Cohan
Scholarship Fund. >
This fund will be used to
assist candidates in furthering
their Jewish education and the
income from the fund plus con-
tributions will be made availa-
ble annually to candidates
reviewed by a scholarhship
committee established for this
purpose, according to Mr.
Weinberg.
Miss Cohan, a resident of
Coconut Creek for the past
two and one-half years, was
born in Brooklyn, N.Y., and
lived in Jersey City, N.J., prior
to moving to South Florida. A
graduate of Montclair State
Teacher's College, Miss Cohan
did post-graduate work in Pub-
lic Administration at N.Y.U.
and Fairleigh Dickinson.
The first woman in the Plan-
ning and Control Department
at the U.S. Navy's Naval Sup-
ply Depot in Bayonne, N.J.,
Ruth retired from the Navy
International Logistics Con-
trol Office as a Planner and
Budget Specialist. Subsequent
to her retirement, Miss Cohan
went to work for Jersey City.
Among her many interests,
Ruth was Vice President of the
Temple Beth El Sisterhood in
Jersey City. She is a past
president and life member of
the National Council of Jewish
Woman and a benefactor of
the Friends of Music and Art
of Hudson County, New Jer-
sey. Additionally, she is a past
president of the Woman's
Grand Jury Association of
Hudson County and a member
of the Jersey City Cultural
Commission. In South Florida,
Ruth is on the Board of Direc-
tors of NC JW and chairman of
Life Memberships.
Area Deaths imtm
BLOOMBERG
Ralph E.. Ft. Lauderdale, service* held
July 7 at Levitt-Weinstein.
WASSERMAN
Anne, 73, Margate, July 13, services held
July 14.
ROTHFELD
Bernard. 72. Lauderhill, service* held
July 14.
Candlelighting
July 21
July 28
Aug. 4
Aug. 11
7:55 p.m.
7:52 p.m.
7:48 p.m.
7:42 p.m.
Benediction upon Kindling
the Sabbath Lights
BORUCH ATTO AD-ONAI
ELO-HEINU MELECH HO-
OLOM ASHER KID-
SHONU BEMITZ-VOSOV
VETZI-VONU LE-HAD-
LIK NEYR SHEL
SHABBOS.
Blessed art Thou, O Lord our
G-d, King of the universe who
hast sanctified us by thy com-
mandments and commanded
us to kindle the Sabbath light.
I re* Federal < onMimei
Information ( .u.il<>K
l)cpt. OF. Pueblo. Colorado 811KW
When a loss occurs
away from home.
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC.
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service
Dade County
FW2-2IKW
Rrow.ircl County
.r>:J2-2(W9
Represented hy Riverside Memorial Chapel. Inc.
New York: (7IH)M8 760O(Jueens Blvd. & 7hth Rd.. Forest Hills. N.Y.
Herman
needs your
old set of
golf clubs.
Or your old powei tools. Or your daughter's bicycle.
Or your old dining room set.
Just call toll-free, and we'll pick them up, at your
convenience, for resale at the Douglas Gardens
Thrift Shops. .
The proceeds will help buy medicine and medical
supplies for Herman and other residents of the Miami
Jewish Home and Hospital for the Aged. And you'll feel
like a million without spending a dime.
Call for free pick-up: __
1-800-876-GIVE
I hi onlv .wlhori/iii Ihnll shops ol the Miami Jewish Home
jnil Hospiullor It* Aged. All Kills udeducible


Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, July 21, 1989
Ask him how
his grades
were last term.
Call Israel.
See if your brother really
spends his free time in the li-
brary. With AT&T International
Long Distance Service, it costs
less than you'd think to stay
close. So go ahead. Reach out
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ISRAEL
Economy Discount Standard
Spm -12am 12am-8am 8am-5pm
$ .89 $1.11 $1.48
AVERAGE COST PER MINUTE
rORAlOMINliTECAI.I.*
Avenge cost per mtnule varies depending on the length of me can
First minute costs more; additional minutes cost less. AH prices are
tor calls dis'ea direct trom anywhere m the continental u S during
the hours listed. Add 3% federal excise tax and appi-.aNe state
surcharges Can for information or if you d like to receive an AT&T
international tales brochure 1 MO VM-MOO.
1988 ATT
AT&T
The right choice.


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