The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 3, no. 7 (Apr. 5, 1974)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 9, 1976 called v.4, no. 27 but constitutes v.5, no. 1; issue for July 7, 1989 called v.18, no. 11 but constitutes v.18, no. 13.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44570954
lccn - sn 00229545
ocm44570954
System ID:
AA00014312:00401

Related Items

Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
Jewish Floridian
ffl) OF GREATER FORT LAUDE
Volume 18 Number 11
Fort Lauderdale, Florida Friday, June 9, 1989
FfrfSlMCl(
Price: 35 cents
Argentine's Jews Face New Fears
By ELIEZER STRAUCH
SAO PAULO, Brazil (JTA)
Unpleasant memories of the
era of Juan Peron have been
haunting Argentina's 250,000
Jews since the victory of the
Peronist party candidate, Car-
los Saul Menem, in the May 14
presidential elections.
The parallels between that
era and now are deeply trou-
bling, according to information
gleaned from telephone con-
versations with Jewish figures
in Buenos Aires and talks here
with Jewish officials who have
visited Argentina.
During Peron's presidency,
and that of his widow, Isabel,
who succeeded him, Jews were
scapegoated in Argentina.
Militant anti-Semitic groups
erupted from within the popul-
ist Peronist movement. Nazi
war criminals who found
haven in Argentina emerged
from the woodwork and even
flaunted their pasts.
Menem, 59, who won elec-
tion by an overwhelming
majority, is still an unknown
quantity to Argentine Jews.
His remarks on subjects of
concern to Jews have been
ambivalent at best and have
smacked of opportunism.
Many Jews are nervous over
the fact that Menem is the son
of Syrian immigrants, was
born a Moslem, was married in
a mosque in Damascus and
converted to Roman Catholi-
cism only after entering poli-
tics in a country that constitu-
tionally bars non-Catholics
from running for the presi-
dency.
While some Jews are con-
cerned by rumors that Menem
deep down remains loyal to
Islam and that he has close ties
with the radical ruling circles
in Syria, others see his Moslem
heritage as no threat to Jews.
But these factors, coupled
with Argentina's calamitous
economy, have led many Jews
to believe there is no future for
them in this country.
According to Rabbi Joe Wer-
nik, director general of the
Jewish Agency's Organization
Department in Jerusalem, the
offices of the agency's aliyah
emissaries in Buenos Aires are
literally being stormed by
Jews seeking to emigrate from
Argentina to Israel as soon as
possible.
Wernik, who visited Sao
Paulo recently in the course of
a South American tour, cited
the economic situation and
Menem's election as the main
reasons.
He told the Jewish Tele-
graphic Agency there were
candidates for immigration so
impoverished that they could
not afford to buy luggage for
the trip.
On May 20, some 400 Jewish
communal leaders met at the
Hakoah Country Club outside
Buenos Aires to exchange
views on the situation.
The meeting was inconclu-
sive. While all agreed the pros-
pects for Jews in the near
future are not encouraging, no
action was decided on, except
that the leadership would fol-
low events "closely and with
great concern."
On the other hand, some
Jews chose to vote for Menem
and the Peronist party.
A Jewish source in Buenos
Aires said in a telephone inter-
view that it does no good for
Jews to air at this point what
are only speculations and
fears.
Continued on Page 3


BATTLE SCENE. An Israeli soldier stands guard in Beit Aula in the West Bank where a
firefight recently ensued between troops and Arab villagers. According to Israeli army reports,
Palestinians threw a grenade and fired automatic weapons in the fighting in which an Israeli
soldier and three Palestinian guerillas were killed. This was the first firefight between Israeli
troops and Arabs villagers in the 17-month intifada. (RNS/Photo/Wide World)
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Foreign Minister Moshe
Arens, apparently stung by
U.S. Secretary of State James
Baker's blunt speech on May
22, urged the United States
not to foster illusions among
the Arabs about what they
could achieve in a political set-
tlement.
"Arens Firm on Borders"
Arens spoke at the end of a
Knesset debate, the main sub-
ject of which was Baker's
speech, delivered at the annual
policy conference of the Amer-
ican Israel Public Affairs Com-
mittee in Washington.
In the speech, Baker warned
the Israelis to discard the
"unrealistic vision" of a
Greater Israel, eschew annex-
ation of the West Bank and
Gaza Strip and cease settle-
ment activity in those territor-
ies.
Arens vowed that Israel
would never withdraw to its
pre-June 1967 borders or ever
accept a Palestinian state.
He rebuked Baker for pub-
licly airing Israel's differences
with Washington on the deli-
cate matter of its final bor-
ders. He said a united Israel
would resist all pressure to
pull back to the 1967 boundar-
ies.
The Likud minister also ins-
isted that Jews have the right
to settle anywhere in Eretz
Israel, the term used by some
Israelis to designate a Greater
Israel.
At a recent reception celebrating the State of Israel's Ulst birthday, Broward County Commission
Chairman Nikki Grossman, 2nd left, presents Israeli Consul General Yair Recanati, second right,
with a certificate of appreciation. Also in photograph are Seymour Brief, left, president of
American Red Magen David for Israel (ARMDI), Southeast Region; and Barry Mandelkorn,
president of the Downtown Center Business and Professionals chapter of ARMDI, which is
composed of Fort Lauderdale businessmen and professionals. ARMDI and the B&P chapter
cosponsored the reception.
U. N. Golan
Peacekeepers
Extended
By ANDREW SILOW CARROLL
UNITED NATIONS (JTA) The Security
Council agreed unanimously to a six-month
extension of the United Nations Disengage-
ment Observer Force, the UN peacekeeping
force stationed between the Syrian and
Israeli armies in the Golan Heights. .
In his letter recommending the move to the
Security Council, Secretary-General Javier
Perez de Cuellar said that despite the quiet in
the area, there could be no peace "until a full
settlement was reached."
In 1981, Israel extended civilian law and
administration to the residents of the Golan
Heights areas it captured in the Six-Day War.
The region's final status is still negotiable
under Security Council Resolutions 242 and
338.
UNDOF has been on duty in the area since
1974. Its 1,350 troops come form Austria,
Canada, Finland and Poland.
~i


Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, June 9, 1989
nop
Bar Mitzvaljs
ARMDI Chapter Plans Luncheon
JOSHUA GOLDSTEIN
JASON GOLDSTEIN
Joshua Keith Goldstein and
Jason Eric Goldstein, twin
sons of Marleen and Bob Gold-
stein of Plantation, will be
called to the Torah on the
occasion of their B'nai Mitzvah
on June 17 at Temple Beth
Israel of Fort Lauderdale.
BRETT GOLDSTEIN
Brett Allyn Goldstein, son of
Mr. and Mrs. Ira Goldstein of
Fort Lauderdale, will be called
to the Torah on the occasion of
his Bar Mitzvah Saturday,
June J24, at Beth Israel of
Sunrise.
Brett, a student at Pioneer
Middle School, placed first in
the Broward County Mathe-
matics Competition. He enjoys
bowling and other sports.
LEE JUPITER
Lee Jupiter, son of Dean and
Karen Jupiter of Plantation,
was called to the Torah on the
occasion of his Bar Mitzvah
Sunday, June 4, at Beth Israel
of Sunrise.
The American Red Magen
David for Israel the Red
Cross Society of Israel
Hashomer Chapter, will hold a
breakfast board meeting Mon-
day, June 19, at the Aquarius
Coffee Shop, 2751 So. Ocean
Drive in Hollywood, to formu-
late plans for next season and
for the chapter's annual lunch-
eon Sunday, June 10, at the
Diplomat Hotel, Hollywood.
The luncheon will raise funds
to help supply 90 percent of
the blood needed by the civil-
ian population of Israel,
regardless of race, creed or
color; and to help provide for
the disaster relief program.
Reservations for the lunch-
eon are a necessity. For infor-
mation: 921-4787.
Camp Simcha/Chai Lifeline
Camp Simcha, the only
strictly kosher Jewish camp in
the world for children with
cancer and related illnesses, is
accepting applications for its
summer 1989 program.
The two week camp pro-
gram, which is funded by pri-
vate donations, will take place
at Club Getaway in the Berk-
shire Mountains of Connecti-
cut, July 5-19. The camp is
provided free of charge and
transportation costs for the
children are also provided by
Camp Simcha. Founded in
1986 by Chai Lifeline, the
camp is open to Jewish boys
and girls, ages six to 16, who
are either currently under
medical treatment or who have
been in remission for three
years or less.
For information, (800) 777-
5033.
Jason Goldstein
Brett Goldstein
Guests at the celebration will
include Brett's brother, Scott
and grandparents, Ruth and
Larry Ginsberg of Lauderhill
and Ida and Henry Goldstein
of Deerfield.
Joshua Goldstein
Both celebrants are students
at Seminole Middle School and
members of the National
Junior Honor Society. Josh,
who is interested in tackle
football and basketball, has
been selected for the Young
Astronaut's Program; Jason,
whose interests are tennis,
soccer and basketball, has
received a Presidential Aca-
demic Fitness Award.
Attending the celebration
will be their older brother,
Michael; and grandmother
Lonia Goldstein of Farming-
dale, NJ.
Mack Bill Update
Legislation introduced by
Sen. Connie Mack (R-FL) cal-
-ling on the Bush Administra-
tion to hold the Palestine Lib-
s eration Organization to certain
Jguidelines has been unani-
mously passed by the Senate
Foreign Relations Committee.
This amendment to the State
Department Authorization bill
calls on the U.S. to hold the
PLO to concrete actions or
discontinue discussions with
the group. Such actions
include disbanding units
involved in terrorism, publicly
condemning all acts of terror-
ism by Arab groups, calling on
Arab states to recognize Israel
and end their economic boy-
cott of the state, and amending
the PLO's covenant provision
which calls for destruction of
Israel.
Lee Jupiter
A student at Seminole Mid-
dle School, Lee is interested in
guitar.
Present at his special occa-
sion were Lee's grandparents,
Albert Paul of New York City
and Shirley Jupiter of Califor-
nia; and his brothers, Sean and
Derek.
All former campers and staff members are invited to
attend the 50th alumni reunion of Camp Young Judea
in Amherst, NH Sunday, June 25, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Preregi-
stration is necessary. For information: (617) 237-9410 or
CYJ, 81 Kingsbury St., Wellesley, MA 02181.
Factory Authorized Service
On Most Major Brands
Cam Corders
VCRs
Stereo & Hi Fi Equipment
Serving South Florida Over 28 Years.
L

fACTOKY Al/TMQWBglT
ELECTRONICSERVICE
r
1 081 2 NORTHWEST 6tm COURT- MIAMI. FLORIDA 331 68
DadE (SOS) 758-1717
Bkoward (305) 523-7070
Fla Watts 1-800-543-3147
Add a golden
with Golden Brand Blintzes: Cheese,
Blueberry, Apple Raisin, Cherry and
Potato. We make them just the way your
grandmother did-with eggs, luscious
fruit, delicious cheese and other natural
ts We season them perfectly so
all thars left for you to do is heat them up
in your oven or fry them nice and crisp
in a pan.
Pick up plenty of kosher Golden Brand
Blintzes, a treat your whole family will enjoy.
Golden k For the traditional taste of Jewish life.
-./


1
Argentine'8 Jews
Continued from Page 1
For the time being, official
Jewish institutions and their
leaders are keeping a low pro-
file.
David Goldberg, president of
the DAIA, the representative
body of Argentine Jewry, told
reporters that Menem's elec-
tion was "above all a triumph
of democracy, because it will
be the first time in 50 years
that an elected president will
hand over his seat to another
elected president."
Incumbent President Raul
Alfonsin, whose Radical Civil
Union lost in the elections, is
scheduled to turn over the
presidency to Menem on Dec.
10.
Nevertheless, the DAIA,
middle class and staunchly
establishmentarian, already
has had a run-in of sorts witn
Menem.
During the election cam-
paign, he was the only candi-
date who refused a DAIA invi-
tation to visit its headquarters
to discuss his policies with the
Jewish representatives.
According to Paul Wars-
chawsky, a prominent Buenos
Aires lawyer and former direc-
tor of the Latin American Jew-
ish Congress, Menem's advis-
ers who include Jewish
attorney Alberto Cahan con-
vinced him it was not politic to
ignore the Jewish community.
Among other things, they
said, it would project a nega-
tive image abroad, especially
in the United States.
In the end, a face-saving
device was found and Menem
appeared before a packed Jew-
ish audience, Warschawsky
recalled.
He told his listeners that, if
elected, he would remain neu-
tral in the Arab-Israeli conflict
and would not allow the Pales-
tine Liberation Organization
to open an official diplomatic
office in Argentina.
But that promise directly
contradicted what he had told
a pro-PLO Arab audience ear-
lier in his campaign.
Another observer pointed
out that Argentine Jews are in
jeopardy because most are in
business, which is suffering
because of the economic crisis.
Jews and non-Jews alike are
going into bankruptcy. The
inflation rate has exceeded 50
percent a month. There is high
unemployment and the local
currency is devalued almost
hourly.
Finally, Argentine Jews
have only recently experienced
a major trauma.
During the rule of the mili-
tary junta that succeeded the
Perons, at least 30,000 people
were murdered, a dispropor-
tionate number of them Jewish
teen-agers and young adults,
in the name of a crusade
against leftists terrorists.
Support Group
The Mended Hearts, a sup-
port group for all post-surgery
patients, will meet Sunday,
June 11, 2 p.m., at the Florida
Medical Center Auditorium,
5000 W. Oakland Park Boule-
vard, Fort Lauderdale.
All family members and
friends are invited.
Friday, June 9, 1989/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 3
IRS Suggests Planning For Tax Changes *
IRS District Director Merlin
W. Heye in Ft. Lauderdale
urges taxpayers to start plan-
ning for those charges in the
law that will affect their 1989
income tax returns.
On 1989 returns, taxpayers
claiming a dependency exemp-
tion for a child who will be two
years old by the end of 1989
will need a social security num-
ber for the child. Previously
this requirement applied to
children age five or older. A
child's social security number
can be obtained by filing Form
SS-5 with the Social Security
Administration.
Another change in claiming
dependency exemptions con-
cerns full-time students.
Beginning in 1989, a child that
is 24 years old by the end of
1989 and had income over
$2,000 may not be claimed a
dependency exemption, even
though a full-time student.
Previously there was no age or
income limit, if the child was a
full-time student. The IRS sug-
gests that taxpayers affected
by this change may want to
consider adjusting their with-
holding by filing a new W-4
form with their employer.
New rules now apply for
working people who claim the
child and dependent care tax
credit or exclusion for
employer-provided dependent
care assistance as well as for
the child and dependent care
providers. Beginning in 1989,
care providers are required to
give their taxpayer identifica-
tion number (TIN) to any client
who wishes to claim a tax
credit or exclusion. Taxpayers
claiming the tax credit or
exclusion must put the correct
name, address and TIN for the
care provider on their 1989
income tax return. Form W-
10, the Dependent Care Pro-
vider's Identification and Cer-
tification, which should be
used to secure this information
from care providers, is availa-
ble at IRS offices or by calling
1-800-424-FORM.
Taxpayers who are eligible
for Medicare Part A reminded
that a supplemental Medicare
premium must be computed
and paid with their 1989 fed-
eral tax return. According to
the IRS, these taxpayers
Continued on Page 5
teSSauM"'*"*"
all f*oon "T\-i_.
SSSSSST
gOAWWAUf HOTEL
Miami Baach. FL *
FATHER'S DAY
*" JUNE 16-19
4DAYSI3NIGHTS*90
.HCL^FUUtKAlSDAllY^^^'
:
:
OB* OCC
-sSSssr"
jAcoas.owi*^**"".
-m
You VftnditallatPublix,
the store dedicated to superla-
tives. Ourgoalis to provideyou
with the utmost convenience.
greatest variety and best value
around. So whether you have
a taste for something new or
for flavors steeped in years of
tradition, you 'II find we have
the best the world has to offer.
Get it all together with Publix.
Where shoppingisa pleasure.
Whatever Your
Cup Of Tea.
II T-
-
JO...
,


Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, June 9, 1989
Viewpoint
A Global View
The intifada or Arab uprising is in its 18th
month; the State of Israel fights its political
battle on Washington's Capitol steps and in its
foreign aid appropriations as often as it does
at its own Sunday Cabinet meetings; and
diplomatic maneuvering is necessary just to
stay even in the several international courts
where Palestinian interests press to have the
Jewish state delegitimized ..
Without peripheral vision, the focus these
last months has been singularly on Israel's
constant crisis vis-a-vis the Palestine Libera-
tion Organization's efforts to curry the
world's favor for its illegitimate terrorist
priority.
The secretary of state, to a target Jewish
audience whose raison d'etre is lobbying for
Israel's very survival, scolds that the sole
democratic nation-state in the Middle East
should "forswear" its vision of a Greater
Israel and recognize Palestinian political
rights.
With a particularistic eye, the world sees
only urgency and exigency.
Not to minimize the critical period facing
Israel, there needs also to be a global view.
While hardly a simple 'guns or butter' issue,
an economy under the gun these past 41 years
must continually face the dilemma of slighting
its 'consumer' priorities for its life-saving
defense mechanisms.
In spite of the needs dictated by such a siege
system, Israel has, for instance, been able to
develop a cadre of scientists and technologists
whose professional expertise and reputations
rival the West's best.
Sure, there is the proverbial Catch-22 that
faces Israel's private universities forced to
operate on public school type tuitions and
decreasing government subsidy. And, that is
why the General Horevs of Israel are soliciting
Jews of America and Europe to make up the
shortfall for stellar schools like Technion.
But beyond the philanthropic solicitations is
a core goal; to make Israel its infrastructure
increasingly independent technologically
and economically so that it may be stronger
still to fight its particularistic political and
military problems.
Abraham Grunhut
Whether in this country or in Israel, where
he emigrated to then-Palestine in 1933, Abra-
ham Grunhut served his people well.
Following service in the Palmach of the
Haganah as well as with the British Intelli-
gence Corps during World War II, Mr. Grun-
hut came to America and sought to foster the
Jewish state's strength through a variety of
agencies.
Through the Jewish National Fund primar-
ily, which he served as president of the local
office for 25 years, Mr. Grunhut endeavored
diligently to secure the economic growth of his
first adopted homeland.
Professionally as a banker and as a
Zionist, Abraham Grunhut worked in Israel
and, later, for Israel in such a way, that the
people Israel mourn his passing.
Jewish
Of OHCATER FONT LAUOCftOALE
Fnd Short*
FREDSHOCHET
Editor and Publisher
SUZANNE SHOCHET
Executive Editor
JOAN C. TEOLAS
Director of Advertising
Published Bi-Weekly
Main Office S Plant: 120 N.E. 8th St.. Miami. Fla. 33132 Phone 1-373-4808 COLLECT
Heater JTA. Beiea Art*. WNS. NBA. AJPA. mmt TTk.
Jewish FWrieka Dees Net Geanetet ie>i1 ef MiriliiMn Adverts***.
SUBSCRIPTION RATE: 2 Year Minimum 87.50 (Local Area 83.96 Annual)
^ APArtPORfcBOX
JTA
Offer Russian Jews Can't Refuse...
Friday, June 9,1989
Volume 18
6 SIVAN 5749
Number 11
by rabbi barry konovitch
The recent events in the
Soviet Union constitute no-
thing less than a major revolu-
tion in governmental policy.
Not since the Bolsheviks have
we witnessed such an earth-
shaking transformation. Com-
munism mixed with pere-
stroika, (restructuring) seems
to be producing a glasnost that
is "democratizing Russia." A
by-product of this new chemis-
try is a new freedom for Rus-
sian Jews. The proverbial Iron
Curtain has been lifted; some
30,000 to 40,000 Russian Jews
are expected to emigrate this
year alone.
It is imperative that Jewish
philanthropic organizations
prepare financially to help our
brothers and sisters from Rus-
sia resettle in the free world.
But the destination for
Russian Jews in the free world
TheSoviet
Government grants
emigration permits to
its Jewish citizens
with the proviso and
understanding that
they return to their
national homeland,
the State of Israel
must be Israel, and it is to
Israel where all funds for Rus-
sian Jewish resettlement must
be sent.
The Soviet Government
grants emigration permits to
its Jewish citizens with the
proviso and understanding
that they return to their
national homeland, the State
of Israel. Sending Russian
Jews to Brighton Beach or to
Miami, Florida and not to
Israel merely gives the Rus-
sian government a convenient
excuse to stop Jewish emigra-
tion at any time with the claim
that it was organized under a
false pretext.
Certainly Russian jews
have a right to emigrate to the
country of their choice, but for
political reasons they should
first embark at Ben Gurion
Airport. If Israeli life doesn't
agree with them; if they are
not satisfied with the housing,
the job training, employment
opportunities, education for
themselves and their children,
and life in a Jewish country,
then they are free to leave. But
at their own expense; not at
the expense of the Diaspora
Jewish community.
Russian Jews clamored to
leave the Soviet Union for
years because of religious per-
secution. They yearned to be
educated as Jews and to live in
a Jewish atmosphere.
I submit that driving a taxi
cab in Manhattan, disassoci-
ating with the Jewish com-
munity except the representa-
tive of the establishment who
issues the checks, never enter-
ing a synagogue, and even-
Continued on Page 5
Hainan
needs your
old set of
golf clubs.
Or your old power tools. Or your daughter's bicycle.
Or your old dining room set.
Just call toll-free, and we'll pick them up, at your
convenience, for resale at the Douglas Gardens
Thrift Shops.
The proceeds will help buy medicine and medical
supplies for Herman and other residents of the Miami
Jewish Home and Hospital for the Aged. And you'll feel
like a million without spending a dime.
Call for free pick-up:
1-800-876-GiVE
The only authorized thrilt shops of the Miami Jewish Home
aad Hospital (or the Aged. All gifts tax-deductible.


Friday, June 9, 1989/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 5
Russian Jews___
tually assimilating, is not what
we had in mind.
Continued from Page 4
-
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------.__
But neither should we
encourage Russian
Jews to leave Israel by
making them a philan-
thropic "offer they
can't refuse."
IN RUSSIA, THE JEWISH POPU-
lation would have totally
assimilated and disappeared in
another generation. What is
the point of bringing them to
America to do the same? Only
in Israel will they be assured of
a Jewish existence. Only in
Israel will the Russian Jews
become Jewish. With the
exception of some American
day school and yeshiva pro-
grams, Russian Jewish chil-
dren in America are lost.
And if the Russan Jews fail
IRS Suggests
Continued from Page 3
should consider either increas-
ing their federal estimated tax
payments or their withholding
to cover the premium. How-
ever, for 1989, no estimated
tax penalty will be charged
based on underpayments of
the supplemental premium.
Additional information is con-
tained in Publication 934, Sup-
plemental Medicare Premium,
available at IRS offices or by
calling 1-800-424-FORM.
Additional information on
these changes as well as other
rules are contained in Publica-
tion 553. Highlights of 1988
Tax Changes, available at
many IRS offices or by calling
1-800-424-FORM.
IRS May Waive
Interest
Taxpayers can request a
waiver or the interest imposed
on Federal income tax result-
ing from an error or delay by
an IRS officer or employee
performing a ministerial act,
says Merlin W. Heye, district
director of the IRS in Ft.
Lauderdale. A ministerial act
is a procedural or mechanical
one that occurs during the
processing of a taxpayer's
case.
The interest can only be for-
given if the taxpayer is not
responsible for the error or
delay. Based on the facts pro-
vided, the IRS will determine
if there is reasonable cause to
waive the interest.
Individuals must request a
waiver in writing when
responding to the notice pro-
posing the interest. The signed
statement, by the taxpayer or
representative having power
of attorney, must fully explain
the facts for consideration of
abatement and should be filed
with the IRS district director
or the director of the IRS
service center with whom the
return was filed.
Dontflorget!
Send your name Mid address tor the
latest edition of the tree Consumer
Information Catalog. Write today
Department DF
Pueblo, Colorado 81009
to understand this, if the
fabled goldeneh medina gol-
den land beckons so strong-
ly, if independent Israeli life is
too hard for people accus-
tomed to be "taken care of by
a Communist state, then they
are free to go. In good consci-
ence, we who have refused to
make aliyah may not dictate to
others to live in Israel.
But neither should we
encourage Russian Jews to
leave Israel by making them a
philanthropic "offer they can't
refuse."
Our money for the resettle-
ment of Russian Jews should
be sent directly to the State of
Israel. And we hope and pray
that an infusion of Russian
Jews into Israel will enrich the
country with a major aliyah
movement, and will at the
same time preserve the great
heritage of the Russian Jewish
people.
Barry J. Konovitch is rabbi of Cuban
Hebrew Congregation of Miami
Temple Beth Shmuel. He wrote this
article for The Floridian.
$
tbi Barry Konovitch
.....J l '. '. ,' ,' l
Gracious Retirement Living
Where earing comes naturally.
In Broward s first Kosher Retirement Center
Licensed A.C.L.F. 24 Hour supervision
3 delicious Kosher meals daily
Daily activities Swimming pool & jaccuzi
Beauty shop Religious services daily
If you are looking for a safe, comfortable
environment for your loved one,
call 961-8111.
Orange Blossom Manor
3535 S.W. 52nd Ave., Pembroke Park, FL 33023
JZ/eTfa/te/i (QoaMwt
A HEALTHY IDEA FROM

c
**8-S,
i "'
Margariae
The neort time you want to make something
special, try this delkus recipe for Chicken
Kiev. Its made with Reischrnanns, Margarine
and Hetechmanns Egg Beaters* so it not only
tastes greet, its lew fo cholesterol.
jj ITstachmannb Margarine Is made from 100%
jf axnc*,r0%<*wles*erolandislowin
saturated tat
One bite and youl agree: 7?wb's never
been a bettor time for the great taste of
| Rektchmenn's.
| FLEISCHMANN-S GIVES EVERY MEAL
o A HOLIDAY FLAVOR.
CHICKEN KIEV
,A P""0s boneless* 6 2*E<* Bf ATf HS
w,svschmans ter*-''"**
sweet Unsatteo Mar- u f W ^Muct
.W^ne softened nZZZ"**" "**
mJ*cmc**1 "* egg tdiaS^ST
nr~~i
SAVE15<
When you buy miv pedngeof
00% Margarine
63mm
KttlUft. Om mw prpwdaM Ipnt-
Cimmu VMiUwJ,
nMnjrfM, mMnnM. ihm nr fiwicnM
OM u S A. A.MU art fPO.% m
Ml mmiam yw tm tot <** K
ImMmj. mM you me M cwaaaw
MonMM>iMlllKlTC CMkMM
vnc ttfmsco manos wofnw
ansQnxAS
>"'2
101 niT


Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, June 9, 1989
m^^
Synagogue News
JNF's Grunhut Dies
TEMPLE KOL AMI
On Friday evening, June 9,
services will begin at
8:15 p.m., under the leadership
of Rabbi Sheldon J. Harr and
Cantor Seymour Schwartz-
man. At this time, the temple's
new board of directors will be
installed and outgoing officers
thanked.
On Saturday morning, June
10, services will begin at 10:30
a.m. Daniel Simner, son of
Debra and Barry Simner, and
Leigh Sorgen, son of Renee
and Fred Sorgen, will be called
to the Torah in honor of their
B'nai Mitzvah.
The confirmation class cele-
brated their confirmation at
the Shavuot service Thursday
evening, June 8. The members
of the class include Joel
Augen, Kenneth Augen, Ste-
phanie Bortz, Melissa Engar,
Deena Beth Fischer, Leslie
Carole Friedman, Adam Ger-
onemus, Rachel Goldenberg,
Lisa Goldschein, Elizabeth
Harr, Todd Iglehart and David
Krieger. Also Stephanie Laz-
arus, Ayal Lebow, Caroline
Lerner, Jennifer Levine,
Joshua Levitan, David Lopa-
tin, Brian Pearlman, Allison
Pomerantz, Heather Rubin-
chik, Heidee Sinowitz, Tara
Slomsky, Jeremy Slusher,
Lawrence Stanley and Carrie
Tempkin.
On Friday evening, June 16,
services will begin at 8:15 p.m.
under the leadership of Rabbi
Harr and Cantor Schwartz-
man. Craig Gordon, son of
Beth and Michael Gordon, and
Jordan Harris, son of Ellen
and Simon Reichbaum and
Christy and Gary Harris, will
be called to the Torah in honor
of their B'nai Mitzvah.
Temple Kol Ami is located at
8200 Peters Road, Plantation.
For information: 472-1988.
TEMPLE BETH EL
Shavuot services will be held
Friday morning, June 9, 9 a.m.
Shabbat services, with a B'nai
Torah Confirmation Cere-
mony, will take place at 8 p.m.
On Saturday, June 10, the
second day of Shavuot, Shab-
bat services and Yiskor begin
at 9 a.m. Sunnie Lader will
celebrate her Bat Mitzvah and
an Auf Ruf for Michael David
Grosswirth will also be held.
Mincha/Ma'ariv service begins
at 5 p.m.
On Wednesday, June 15, at
the 8:30 a.m. weekday service,
Michael Abravaya, son of Jef-
frey and Randy Abravaya of
Coral Springs, will celebrate
YOUR CAR IH ISRAEL
e/dan
^RENT-A-CAR
FROM
mti.
23i-rmu)n
AUTOBIWtCH
FIAT UNO
SUBARU We~
FR0ESCRT11A/C
SUBARU 11 A*
AUTOMATIC CARS. AC
RESERVAT. A PRPYUHT.
1-800-533-8778
IN NY: 21 2-629-6090
BFN GURION INTt AIRPORT EllAT
HFR/IIYA HAIFA JERUSALEM
flSHKFI ON NFTANTA TEl AVIV
his Bar Mitzvah.
The closing late Friday night
service of the season will be
held June 16. Shabbat services
will begin at 8 p.m. and Jen-
nifer Levitan, daughter of
Michael and Lynn Golder of
Tamarac, will celebrate her
Bat Mitzvah.
On Saturday, June 17, Shab-
bat services begin at 9 a.m.
and Eric Nudelman, son of
Martin and Gloria Nudelman,
and Marc Specter, son of
Richard and Phyllis Specter,
will be called to the Torah for
their B'nai Mitzvahs.
Temple Beth Am is located
at 7205 Royal Palm Boulevard,
Margate. For information:
974-8650.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
OF GREATER
FORT LAUDERDALE
Temple Emanu-El will hold
its annual Service of Confirma-
tion Friday, June 9, 8 p.m.
Mitchell Abraham and
Amanda Cowan will be con-
firmed in the faith of Israel.
Adam Weissinger, son of
Roberta and Allan Weissinger,
was called to the Torah in
honor of his Bar Mitzvah dur-
ing morning services Satur-
day, June 3.
Temple Emanu-El is located
at 3245 West Oakland Park
Boulevard, Fort Lauderdale.
Banker Abraham A. Grun-
hut, who was president of the
Greater Miami Jewish
National Fund (JNF) for a
quarter of a century, died May
25 at the age of 73. A resident
of Miami Beach, Grunhut came
to the Miami area 28 years ago
with his wife and son. A native
of Germany, he had emigrated
to Palestine in 1933 and served
in the Haganah, the Palmach
and, during World War II, the
British Army's intelligence
corps.
Vice president of Washing-
ton Federal Savings and Loan
and a member of the board of
directors of Jefferson National
Bank, Grunhut stayed active
in causes that supported the
Jewish community and the
State of Israel. Beside the
JNF, Grunhut was active in
the Central Agency for Jewish
Education, the Technion
Society, Hebrew University,
State of Israel Bonds, Temple
Menorah and Temple Emanu-
El.
He was an active supporter
of the cultural arts in Dade
County and on the board of
directors of the Miami Beach
Safety Committee.
He is survived by his wife,
Cecilia; son, Ron (Carmen); sis-
ters, Margalit Jacobson of
Israel and Hedi Weinstock of
Australia; brother-in-law,
Louis Roffort of Miami; and
sister-in-law, Jennie Phillips of
West Palm Beach. Funeral
services were held at Blasberg
Chapel, followed by interment
at Mount Nebo Cemetery.
Cruise To
Nowhere
Bnai Zion, southeast region
and the Raoul Wallenberg
chapter 186 are cosponsoring a
one-day cruise to nowhere
aboard the "Sea Escape"
Tuesday, June 27.
A bus will pick up passen-
gers at 8 a.m. and return them
at 4:30 p.m.
The $31 per person fare
includes two meals, casino
play, games and a cabaret
show.
For reservation information:
456-1999 or 458-4111.
THE WAY WATER IS
SUPPOSED TO TASTE. A
Imagine water that tastes fresh and clear as a spring
Water without sodium, pollutants, or carbonation Water
with nothing added, nothing taken away That's water the
way it should taste. That's fresh, pure Mountain valley
Water from a natural spring in Hot Springs, Arkansas
Taste it. You'll be tasting water for the very first time
MOUNTAIN VALLEY WATER
SPRING WATER FROM HOT SPRINGS, ARK
Purely for drinking.
DADE
696-13S3
BROWARD
764-1234
TOGETTHISGREArTASTE^
YOU'LL HAVETOGIVEUPCHOLESTEROL.
A small price to pay. Who wants ail that
cholesterol in their diet anyway? Nobody.
That's why all Mazda* products, are made
from 100% pure com oil, so they're choles-
terol-free.
Whether it's Regular, Diet, or Unsalted
Margarine; Com Oil or No Stick Cooking Spray,
all Mazola products are not only good, they're
good for you, too. And they
all carry the Union of Ortho-
dox Jewish Congregations'
symbol on their packages.
i
I 1966 B..1 Foodi. CPC UNHnattonal mc


iil MM
Candlelighting
June 9 7:54 p.m.
June 16 7:56 p.m.
June 23 7:58 p.m.
June 30 7:59 p.m.
Benediction upon Kindling
the Sabbath Lights
BORUCH ATTO AD-ONAI
ELO-HEINU MELECH HO-
OLOM ASHER KID-
SHONU BEMITZ-VOSOV
VETZI-VONU LE-HAD-
LIK NEYR SHEL
SHABBOS.
Blessed art Thou, 0 Lord our
G-d, King of the universe who
hast sanctified us by thy com-
mandments and commanded
us to kindle the Sabbath light.
Area Deaths ^^^^""
JACOBOWITZ
Sibonia, of Sunrise, died at the age of 86.
Services were held in New York, with
arrangements handled by Levitt-
Wein8tein.
DOCTEROFF
I'incus, of Deerfield Beach, died at the
age of 79. Services were held May 19;
arrangements were by Levitt-Weinstein.
KASHDIN
Sarah, of Lauderhill, died at her home
after a long illness. The 74-year-old
woman was born in Syracuse, where she
lived until she moved to South Florida in
1975. She was active in B'nai B'rith, the
Lighthouse for the Blind and the Lau-
bach Literacy Fund. She is survived by
her husband of 46 years, Alexander; five
children and six grandchildren. Arrange-
ments were by Star of David.
ROSS
Arnold, of Coconut Grove, died at the
age of 65. Services were held in Illinois,
with arrangements by Levitt-Weinstein
Chapels.
Friday, June 9, 1989/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 7
Synagogue Directory
CONSERVATIVE
CONSERVATIVE SYNAGOGUE OP COCONUT CREEK (975-4666) Lyons Plasm,
1447 Lyons Road, Coconut Creek 33068. Services: Sunday through Friday, 8:00
a.m.; Saturday through Thursday, 4:30 p.m.; Friday evening, 8*0 p.m.; Saturday
morning, 9:00 a.m. Rabbi WUliasi Marder. Caator Yebada Heilbraaa.
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER (721-7680), 9101 NW 67th St., Tamarac 33821.
Service*: Sunday through Saturday 8:30 a.m., Sunday through Friday 5 p.m. Late
Friday service 8 p.m. Rabbi Kart P. Staac.
TEMPLE BETH AHM (481-6100), 9730 Stirling Road, Hollywood 83024. Services:
daily 8 aft) Monday Thursday 7:30 p.m.; Sabbath 8 p.m., Sabbath morning 8:46
am., Jr. Cong. 10 a.m.Rabbi Avrabaai Kaaaak. Csatse Erie Liadeabaaa.
TEMPLE BETH AM (974-8650), 7206 Royal Palm Blvd., Margate 88068. Services:
Monday through Friday 8:30 a.m., 5 p.m. Friday late service 8 p.m.; Saturday 9
a.m., 6 p.m.; Sunday 8:30 a.m., 5 p.m. Rabbi Paal Pletkia. Rabbi Esseritas. Dr.
SolosKoa Geld. Caator Irviag Grossaaaa.
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL (742-4040), 7100 W. Oakland Park Blvd., Sunrise, 38313.
Services: Monday through Thursday 8 a.m., 6:80 p.m.; Friday 8 a.m., 5 p.m., 8 p.m.;
Saturday 8:45 a.m., 5 p.m. Sunday 8 a.m. Rabbi Howard A. Addis. Caator
Maurice A. Ne.
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL OF DEERFIELD BEACH (421 7060), 200 S. Century
Blvd., Deerfield Beach 33441. Services: Sunday through Friday 8:30 a.m 6 p.m.
Friday late service 8 p.m.; Saturday 8:46 a.m., and at candlelighting time. Caator
Sbabtai Acke
SUNRISE JEWISH CENTER, TEMPLE SHA'ARAY TZEDEK (741-02%), 4099
Pine Island Road, Sunrise 33351. Services: Sunday through Friday 8 a.m., 5 p.m.;
Late Friday service 8 p.m.; Saturday 9 a.m., Candle lighting time. Rabbi Berakard
Premier. Caator Barry Black, Caator Eawritus Jack Marcaaat
TEMPLE SHOLOM (942-6410), 132 SE 11 Ave., Pompano Beach 33060. Services:
Monday through Friday 8:46 a.m., evenings: Monday through Thursday at 5 p.m.,
Friday evening at 8. Saturday and Sunday 9 a.m. Dr. N. Baal Goidaaaa, Rabbi.
Caator Niasiaj Berkowiti.
CONGREGATION BETH HILLEL OF MARGATE (974-3090), 7640 Margate
Blvd., Margate 33063. Services: Sunday through Friday 8 a.m., 6 p.m. Late Friday
service 8 p.m. Saturday 8:45 a.m.; 6 p.m. Rabbi Avroat Drazia. Caator Joel Cobra.
HEBREW CONGREGATION OF LAUDERHILL (733-9560), 2048 NW 49th Ave.,
Lauderhill 33313. Services: Sunday through Friday 8:30 a.m.; 6:30 p.m.; Saturday
8:46 a.m. Rabbi Israel Halpern.
CONGREGATION BETH TEFILAH (forsaariy North Leader ask Hebrew Coa-
grefatioa) (722-7607), 6436 W. Commercial Blvd., Tamarac, FL 33319. Services:
Sunday to Friday at 7:46 a.m. Friday at 5 p.m.; Saturday at 8:46 a.m. Charles B.
Fylar, Presideat.
B'NAI AVIV (889-4780) at Weston/Bonaventure. Services: Friday. 8 p.m., at
Country Isles Elementary School, Weston. Rabbi Laaa Flak.
ORTHODOX
CHABAD LUBAVITCH COMMUNITY SYNAGOGUE (844-4856) 9791 W. Sample
Road, Coral Springs 33065. Services: Monday and Thursday 6:46 a.m. Tuea., Wed. A
Friday 7 a.m. Saturday 9 a.m., Sunday 8 a.m. Rabbi Yossie Denbarg.
KURTZMAN
Seymour, of Plantation, was the husband
of Bertha; father of Irene Jackson and
the late Rae Raskin; father-in-law of Dr.
Michael Raskin; grandfather of Phillip
and Jennifer Raskin; and brother of Lean
David, Muriel Weinstein and Henry
Kurtzman. Services were held May 15 at
Star of David Chapel, No. Lauderdale,
with arrangements handled by Levitt-
Weinstein.
FLAYDERMAN
Shirley, of Ft. Lauderdale, died at the
age of 83. Services were held May 18.
Arrangements by Levitt-Weinstein
Chapels.
EBB
SMITH
Leon I., of Seminole, died May 22. A
former resident of Fort Lauderdale, he is
survived by sons, Dr. Allan Smith and
Stephen Smith; sisters, Marcia Malkin
and Lottie Polakoff; and six grandchil-
dren. Graveside services were held.
Arrangements by Beth David Chapel.
ZUCKERMAN
George, of Deerfield Beach, died at the
age of 88. Services were held in New
Jersey; arrangements by Levitt-
Weinstein Memorial Chapels.
TOVAH FELDSHUH: ON UNIQUENESS
One of the great
motivating forces in my
life is uniqueness. As an
actress uniqueness is impor-
tant, because acting is
more than just role-playing.
It requires being able to
expose a quality that is
uniquely you.
In other areas of my
life, I look for uniqueness.
Even in my decaffeinated
coffee. Sanka* Brand
Decaffeinated Coffee is
unique, because it's the only
leading, national brand that
is naturally decaffeinated
with pure water and
nature's own sparkling
effervescence. So, not only
is Sanka smooth-tasting,
but it addresses my
SanW Sonw s**1

KOSHER
concerns about caffeine
and food that is naturally
processed.
All of us have the poten-
tial to be unique. All we
need is to experience that
part of us that's different
and enjoyable. For me, it
can be a challenging role in
a new play, or something
as simple as relaxing with
acupof Sanka Uniqueness
...there are so many
ways to enjoy it!
FOODS
TEMPLE OHEL B'NAI RAPHAEL (733-7684), 4361 W. Oakland Park Blvd.,
Lauderdale Lakes 33313. Services: Sunday through Friday 7:30 a.m. (Pellium) t
8 a.m., 5 p.m., Saturday 8:45 a.m., 6 p.m.
SYNAGOGUE OF INVERRARY CHABAD (748-1777), 4661 N. University Dr.,
Lauderhill 33861. Services: Sunday through Friday 6:46 U. 8 a.m., 6:16 p.m..,
Saturday 9 a.m., 5:30 p.m. Stady graaai: Mea, Saadays fodowiag services;
WoBMa. Taeadays 8 b.bl Rabbi Araa llikirana
YOUNG ISRAEL OF DEEFIELD BEACH (421-1867), 1880 W. Hillsboro Blvd.,
Deerfield Beach 33441. Services: Sunday through Friday 8 a.m. and 6:80 p.m.
Saturday 8:46 a.m. and sundown: Joseph M. Reiser, PriaUaat.
YOUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD-FORT LAUDERDALE (966-7877). 3291
Stirling Road, Fort Lauderdale 88312. Services: Monday and Thursday 6:16 a.m. a
7:16 a..m. & Sundown. Tuesday, Wednesday A Friday 6:15 a.m. k 7:80 .m. and
sundown; Saturday, 7:16 9 a.m., A sundown; Sunday 8 a.m. A sundown.
Rabbi Edward Davis.
CONGREGATION MIDGAL DAVID (726-3688), 8675 W. McNab Road, Tamarac
33321. Services: Daily 8 a.m., mincha 6 p.m.; Saturday 8:45 a.m and 5:16 p.m.
Rabbi Cbaiai Stbasiasr.
RECONSTRUCTIONS
RAMAT SHALOM (472-3600), 11301 W. Broward Blvd., Plantation 33325.
Services: Friday, 8:15 p.m.; Saturday. 10 a.m. Rabbi Ellis* Skiadell. Caator Bell.
REFORM
TEMPLE BET TIKVAH (741-8088). 8890 W. Oakland Park Blvd., St*. 302, Sunrise
33861. Services: Friday 8 p.m. Scalar Rabbi Morris Gordoa, Assistaat Rabbi
Stevea Perry. Caator Ron Graaer.
TEMPLE BETH ORR (753-3232), 2151 Riverside Dr., Coral Springs 33066.
Services: Friday 8 p.m. except last Friday of month at 7:30 p.m.; Saturday 10 a.m.
Rabbi Mark W. Gross.
TEMPLE B'NAI SHALOM OF DEERFIELD BEACH (426 2532). Services at
Msnorah Chapels, 2806 W. Hillsboro Blvd., Deerfield Beach 33441, Friday 8 p.m.
Rabbi ARoaM. Wiatar. Caator Maabs Leviaaaa.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL (781-2310), 3246 W. Oakland Park Blvd., Greater Ft.
Lauderdale 88811. Services: Friday 8:00 p.m.; Saturday, only on holidays or
celebration of Bar-Bat Mitzvah. Rabbi Edward M. Maliae; Caatarial Setsist Kiai
OUbaaaky.
TEMPLE KOL AMI (4721988), 8200 Peters Road, Plantation 33324. Services:
Friday 8:15 p.m.. Saturday 10:80 a.m. Rabbi Sheldoa J. Harr. Caator Ssyssaar
Schwartasaaa.
LIBERAL JEWISH TEMPLE OF COCONUT CREEK (978-7494) Services:
Friday night aervices twice monthly at Calvary Presbyterian Church, 3960
Coconut Creek Parkway 33066. Rabbi Brace 8. Warsbal. Caator Jacob Barkis.
TEMPLE BAT YAM (928-0410), 6161 NE 14th Terr., Ft. Lauderdale 33334.
Service: Friday 8 p.m. Saturday 10:30 a.m. Rabbi Lewis Littaua.
IBllimilll,
JFS Forms New AIDS Support Group
A recently formed People
with Aids (PWA) support
group meets every Wednes-
day, 7 p.m., at the Jewish
Family Service, 4517 Hollyw-
ood Boulevard, Hollywood.
The group is jointly spon-
sored by Jewish Family Ser-
vice (JFS) and the Jewish Fed-
eration of South Broward
Chaplaincy Division. Vicki
Schulman, caseworker for
JFS, and Rabbi Harold Rich-
ter, chaplain, Jewish Federa-
tion of South Broward, who
lead the group, have experi-
ence counseling PWAs and
their families. One of the
group's main goals is to focus
on strengthening ties with
family members and signifi-
cant others.
The PWA support group is
open to anyone, regardless of
race or religion. There is no fee
and participation is strictly
confidential.
Those interested should call
the offices of Jewish Family
Service, 749-1505 or 966-0956,
and leave their first name and
telephone number.
Jewish Family Service is a
beneficiary agency of the Jew-
ish Federation of South Brow-
ard, the Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale and
United Way of Broward
County.
LTHfllBl
Discover the new Assisted Living program at The
Court at Palm-Aire. It's uniquely designed to offer the
welcome privacy of spacious studio, one-bedroom, and
two-bedroom homes, instead of a small, single room.
Personal care is available at all times with assistance in
eating, dressing, bathing, medications and ambulauon.
And, all residents receive priority access to our on-site long
term skilled nursing center.
The Court at Palm-Aire is Broward County's best
full-service retirement community offering seniors
independent residential homes as part of its Lifecare
program, an on-site skilled nursing center, and now a new
comprehensive Assisted Living program.
Receive the Assisted Living care you need while
mamtaining your valued independence and dignity. And,
it's available now! We're located within The World of Palm
Aire. Drop by for a complete tour or call 305/975-8900,
for additional information.
for mart mfomaam, fill out and mam tto coupon
\or call 3*S-97S-i*$.
Assisted Ltvtng Program
2701 N. Come Drwe
Pompano Beach, FL 33069
30S-975S900
Another Kaplan Organization
Lifecare Community
NAME
I
I
I
| CITY
h
ADDRESS
STATE
ZIP
_L
PHONE
J.F. ?-**


Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, June 9, 1989
Ask him how
his grades
were last term.
Call Israel.
See if your brother really
spends his free time in the li-
brary. With AT&T International
Long Distance Service, it costs
less than you'd think to stay
close. So go ahead. Reach out
and touch someone.
ISRAEL
Economy Discount Standard
5pm-12am 12am-8am 8am-5pm
$ .89 Jill $1.48
AVERAGE COST PER MINUTE
FOR A 10 MINUTE CALL"
Average cos! par minute vanes depending on the length of the call
First minute costs more; additional minutes cost less. All prices are
lor eaHs dialed direct Irom anywhere m the continental US during.
the hours i-steo Add 3% federal excise tax and applicable state
surcharges Can lor information or it you'd like to receive an ATeT
international rates brochure 1 MO tT4-40O0.
' 1988 ATAT
AT&T
The right choice.



Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID ENE184MPS_NNVHM3 INGEST_TIME 2013-06-28T22:41:23Z PACKAGE AA00014312_00401
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES