The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 3, no. 7 (Apr. 5, 1974)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 9, 1976 called v.4, no. 27 but constitutes v.5, no. 1; issue for July 7, 1989 called v.18, no. 11 but constitutes v.18, no. 13.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44570954
lccn - sn 00229545
ocm44570954
System ID:
AA00014312:00353

Related Items

Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

&wishFloridian
W OF GREATER FORT LAUDE

Volume 16 Number 19
Fort Lauderdale, Florida Friday, August 14, 1987
ft*
Price 40 Cents
Coming...
Federations' 56th G.A. November 18-22
South Florida will be the
site of the largest Jewish
leadership delegation ses-
sion to be held in North
American when more than
3,500 leaders representing
all geographic sections of
the United States and
Canada, will attend the 56th
annual Council of Jewish
Federations' General
Assembly, Nov. 18-22, at
the Fontainebleau Hilton in
Miami Beach. The pre-
session will be held on Tues-
day, Nov. 17.
Hosted by the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation,
North Broward County
delegates and members will
attend the six days of
meetings, seminars,
workshops and special
receptions, which will in-
clude addresses by promi-
nent world, national, and
regional featured speakers
in addition to
leaders.
In discussing the General
Assembly, Federation presi-
dent Sheldon S. Polish said,
"How fortunate we in North
Broward are to have the op-
portunity to join with
America's top community
leadership and together
discuss, explore and help
identify new needs, ap-
proaches to priority setting
and formulate guidelines to
strengthen areas of great
political and international
concern. Our North
Broward contingent will be
involved in every aspect of
the day's activities partak-
ing in the knowledge afford-
ed by specialists from the
various areas of community
building, campaign and
long-range/strategic plann-
ing, endowment develop-
ment, office and govern-
Israeli ment grants, Soviet Jewish
resettlement, international
affairs, Israel and the Mid-
dle East, among others."
According to Nancy
Lipoff, 1987 GA chair,
"Miami and South Florida
are proud and honored to
host this extremely impor-
tant program for the Jewish
community's major central
organizations. We on the
Gold Coast will help to make
this a special time by pro-
viding the certain 'extras'
that will provide a smooth
flow of information, opera-
tional procedures and
hospitality provisions."
As part of this effort, each
of the five local Federations
will sponsor one day as
hosts of the Delegates
Lounge at the Fon-
tainebleau. Under the chair
Continued on Pag* 8-
56TH GENERAL ASSEMBLY
NOVEMBER 18-22. 1987
'Portraits9 Exhibit Launches UJA 20th Year
World News
UNITED NATIONS -
Israeli diplomats told the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency
that they expect all of the
former members of the
United Nations War Crimes
Commission will soon sup-
port Israel's request for
opening to the public the
UN files on Nazi war
criminals. Only six countries
out of the 17-member Com-
mission still oppose the
opening of the fifes.
GENEVA A total of
3,092 Jews left the Soviet
Union during the first six
months of 1987, of whom
703 went to Israel, the In-
tergovernmental Commit-
tee for Immigration
reported.
Inside
CAJE Highlight*... pag 3
Ford-Arab Boycott...
Pg4
Mission Views... page 11
\ Opinions... page 16
A story of hatred, isola-
tion and fanaticism view-
ed within the context of
freedom touched by a small
measure of consolation ...
these will be the depths of
emotions that will be ex-
perienced when the North
Broward County communi-
ty has the unique opportuni-
ty to be part of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale/United Jewish
Appeal 20th Anniversary
'Exhibit '88' coming this
December.
Held in conjunction with
Famed Nazi-hunter
Wiesenthal
Simon
the Anniversary community
year-long celebration and
the opening of the 1988
Federation/UJA campaign
to raise record dollars to aid
in the life-saving work of
tens of thousands of Jewish
men, women and children,
at home, in Israel and
around the world people
of all ages will feel the
heartfelt tug of sorrow and
pain when the famous "Por-
traits of Infamy" exhibit is
opened to the public the
week of Dec. 13-20. Official
site location will be an-
nounced in future
Floridians.
Showing in South Florida,
after having been seen by
thousands in New York Ci-
ty, Washington, D.C.,
Chicago and Australia, the
Simon Wiesenthal renown-
ed Nazi hunter display,
depicts in stark fashion how
Soviet anti-Semitism has its
roots in Nazi ideology. Some
25 panels showing more
than 150 crudely anti-
Semitic portrayals of Jews,
Continued on Page 5-
In The Spotlight Reply to American Jewry
Israel Offers You Chance to Shape Life Style
Letter to a Concerned
Friend
By CARL ALPERT
HAIFA A good friend in

Carl Alptrt
New York, for whom we have
the highest respect, wrote us
not long ago, expressing
distress at many of the
policies of the Israel govern-
ment and some of the moods
in the country today. He
grants that as a non-Israeli he
has no right to have a voice in
the determination of impor-
tant questions which face
Israel, but he is deeply unhap-
py because he has "a deep
emotional investment in the
country." Our reply ran to
several pages, of which the
following are the highlights.
More and more these days
Israelis are asking
themselves: Is this the kind of
Jewish state which we had in
mind when we were idealistic
Zionists and sought t
establish a Jewish homeland?
Almost no one would answer
that question in the affir-
mative, and each would be
able to adduce examples of
the many flaws and faults,
defects and drawbacks which
are so obvious in an Israel
which is still adolescent in
terms of the histories of
states.
What was the U.S. like in a
comparable period in its
history. H5-40 years after In-
dependence? The history
books tell us that "the War of
1812 was one of the most
futile of conflicts," more war
with Europe was expected,
and "the former trust in
pacific methods of preserving
national rights was gone."
The fiscal system following
the war was in a state of
"almost indescribable confu-
sion." The judiciary was
generally regarded as defec-
tive and politically controlled.
Jefferson saw his concepts of
democracy distorted by
political polarization. To be
sure. Americans now look
back upon all this and more
from a perspective of over
200 years, but it should
perhaps serve to admonish
them to display tolerance and
even understanding when
they voice criticism, even
justified criticism, of a little
state which is today at the
same stage of development as
the U.S. then.
Yet despite all our faults
(and we within Israel are
more aware of these than any
outsider) if the Zionists of
the 1940's had been offered
such a state as we have today,
with all its blemishes, would
they have rejected it out of
hand? At a time when the
human smoke was still
casting a heavy pall over
Auschwitz and Treblinka,
when the great democracies
of the world, including the
Continued on Page 2


B
._*i*.


Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, August 14, 1987
Record Twenty-Five Tamarac Area Residents on
1987-'88 Federation Board of Directors
Adler
Bernstein
Cantor
Colker
Daren
David
Farber
Furman
Goodman Greenberg
Krantz
Libros
Messing
Nathan Oshry
Schulman Shapiro
Small
Sommer
X
r
3
I
00
Spewak
Stein
Stone
William
Because they believe that no
Jewish community, no matter
how secure, can be truly free
while Jews anywhere in the
world are denied their rights
and vital social and
humanitarian services,
Tamarac area residents have
once again provided the
largest contingent of Federa-
tion officers and board
members.
A record 25 men and women
have been elected to serve in
the prestigious positions on
the 1987-'88 major central
Jewish organization board for
North Broward County, it was
announced by president
Sheldon S. Polish.
Led by executive vice presi-
dent and general chairman
Harold L. Oshry of the
Woodlands, community areas
including the Woodlands
Country Club, Woodmont
Country Club, and Northwest
boundaries sections.
They include: Bob Adler;
Walter Bernstein, assistant
treasurer; Daniel Cantor, vice
& resident; Lou Colker; Gladys
'aren, treasurer; Abe David;
Sid Dorfman; Jack Farber;
Morris Furman; Leo Good-
man, past president; Sen. Sam
Greenberg, life member; David
Krantz; Bernard Libros, ad-
visory board; Charles Locke,
lite member; Leon Messing;
S igmu n d Nathan; Sol
Schulman, secretary; Jean
Shapiro, past president; Mor-
ris Small; David Sommer; Sid
Spewak, life member; Marvin
Stein; Rabbi Kurt Stone, rab-
binical member, spiritual
leader, Tamarac Jewish
Center Temple Beth Torah;
and Gerald William.
Translating their concern in-
to action, the Jewish communi-
ty of Tamarac has been at the
forefront of giving to the
Federation/UJA, this year ac-
counting for more than 1.8
million in total gifts.
"With this kind of support,
the membership of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Report From the President...
Come on Aboard and Join the Federation/UJA Family
By SHELDON S. POLISH
Within the past year, 80,000
new Jewish residents came to
live in Florida, bringing the
concentration of Jews in our
state to more than five percent
of the population, the third
largest in the nation. With
more than 550,000 we repre-
sent a large, important voice,
one to be heard, and reckoned
with, and one that has an im-
portant role to play in the vital
social service and
humanitarian programs.
Here in North Broward
County, an anticipated 20,000
of these newcomers have settl-
ed in our 22-area community,
complete with all the pro-
blems, concerns and other
responsibilities that accom-
pany this transporting and
resettlement of people.
And that my fellow Jews is
where we come in. The Jewish
Federation/United Jewish Ap-
peal is here to lend that help-
ing hand, with our structured
policy-making central
organization complete with
social welfare, social service
and educational institutions.
We can provide that 'special
place' for the senior adult to
meet and greet with his
counterpart who otherwise
would feel lost and beguiled at
the spaciousness of the area;
we can bring about an
awareness to the young
mother and father of the
nut reach and educational pro-
grams for teens and tweens
alike, and more than that, we
can make them alll feel a part
of the Federation family who
perform and accomplish
Alpert-Reply to American Jewry
Continued from Page 1
U.S., refused to open their
gates to the stateless
refugees who sailed the seas
in search of haven at such a
time would not a free and in-
dependent, albeit imperfect
Israel, have made a con-
siderable difference in
modern Jewish history?
With all its imperfections,
that struggling little state has
successfully absorbed well
over two million survivors
from Europe and other
refugees who came from
Arab lands. It has created an
agriculture, an advanced in-
dustry and an educational
system of which it may be
proud. It is an island of true
democracy in an area of
military dictatorships and
medieval intolerance. There
is a flowering of modern
culture as expressed in art,
literature and music which
has earned world attention.
In the larger sense, it is a
great success story, warts
and all.
Israel is more than history,
geography, institutions or a
political framework. In
essence a country is compos-
ed of people. Those who have
come here bringing with
them the influences of their
previous backgrounds and ex-
periences, their phobias and
their complexes, their
philosophies and their stan-
dards, are the ones who have
made it what it is, for better
or for worse. It will take
several generations for the
new, native-born Israelis
gradually to alter the mold
and create one that is in-
digenous, rather than only a
transplant from abroad.
Here we must say
something that many
Americans Jews don't like to
hear. How many American
Jews have come to make their
home in Israel? 50,000? Cer-
tainly less than 100,000 yet
their influence has been enor-
mous, far in excess of their
actual number. When we are
in a pensive mood, we like to
imagine what the nature of
Israel society would have
been like could still be like
- if several hundred thou-
sand more Jews from the
U.S. and other lands of the
free West, were to come here,
with all their political,
cultural and economic
baggage.
Human institutions are not
static. The Israel of 39 years
hence will be quite different
from the Israel of today, just
as the Israel of today is utter-
ly unlike that of 1948. The
best assurance of that is the
Israelis' own self-criticism.
Jews in the free West can
stand back and criticize con-
structively; or they can come
here to live a different and
satisfying Jewish life style
while at the same time, by
their presence, helping shape
that style. How fortunate
they are that, unlike their
brethren m Russia, they have
that choice.
wonderous things for our
Jewish brethren, here in
Greater Fort Lauderdale, in
Israel and worldwide. What a
great feeling!
Where else in this world can
you feel the closeness of fami-
ly, one that cares for all of our
brothers and sisters; taking
great strides forward in every
area of Jewish life: Jewish
education, care for the elderly,
social development programs
for our youth and cultural and
community awareness pro-
grams, to name a few. We con-
tinually strengthen our part-
nership with the State of Israel
and we have built bridges
which span the full spectrum
of the Jewish experience in
North Broward and wherever
Jewish life flourishes. We
must continue to shoulder the
weighty responsibility of
determining which priorities
will be addressed by our com-
munity and which programs
will be implemented and main-
tained to help perpetuate our
people and our ideals. Our ac-
complishments have been
many, and we must now deter-
mine how to use our strengths
and talents to handle the
challenges which lie ahead.
The Federation/UJA way is
the right way to do this; in
many cases, it is the only way
to do this. I have always been
proud of the fact that Jews
have always responded with a
great generosity to help their
fellowman. Today, The
Greater Fort Lauderdale com-
munity stands as a leader
among Jewish Federations
Lauderdale has a concerned
and determined group of direc-
tors in the Tamarac team,"
said Polish. He continued,
"This year in particular, with
the placing of Harold Oshry at
the helm of the Jewish com-
munity's major philanthropy,
and the number of leaders on
the campaign management
team, senior advisory council
and campaign cabinet from the
area."
Some of the planned board
programs include the October
board meeting to be held at the
Knesset in Israel as part of the
Fall Community Anniversary
Mission; Board of Directors
Caucus, Nov. 16; and the
Woodlands UJA Dinner, Dec.
17.
Sheldon S. Polish
having in the past two years
raised funds totaling in the top
10 percent of North America
giving. We have achieved this
because we do accept our
responsibility as givers and as
askers.
We must remember that an
opportunity to give is also an
opportunity to receive. What
we receive is reassurance that
we have met our obligation to
sustain a life which is dignified
for all Jews. It is a simple
premise and it is one which is a
principal tenet of Federation
philosophy. Our collective
sense of commitment to each
other truly defines us as a com-
munity of Jews which prospers
greatly in a 'spirit of unity.'
Let's make our 20th An-
niversary year and Israel's
40th year, one of remarkable
achievement, one of extraor-
dinary success and one that
will place us in the most impor-
tant honor roll the honor roll
of people with a great pride
and dignity. For we are truly
'One People with One
Destiny!'


Friday, August 14, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 3
i-------1
Judaica High School Student
Reports on World Youth Assembly
Central Agency for Jewish Education
mrr Trrf? mnon rrumon
JtWISH FEDERATOIVJ OF GREATEH FOOT LAUDERDALE
Jewish Educators Attend
Huge CAJE Conference
A delegation of principals and
teachers from the Jewish schools
of North Broward and Boca Raton
will attend the 12th annual Con-
ference on Alternatives in Jewish
education taking place from Aug.
23 to 27 at Georgia College, with
more than 2,000 educators from
all over the United States and
Canada scheduled to be in
attendance.
The conference, the largest
gathering of Jewish educators in
the country, will feature hundreds
of workshops, seminars and study
sessions in almost every phase of
Jewish learning. In addition, there
will be an Israeli Fair, entertain-
ment by leading Jewish folk
musical groups, a special Shabbat
experience and major displays in
all areas of text and multi-media
materials for the Jewish school.
Attending from the Fort
Lauderdale area are educational
directors, Stanley Cohen of Beth
Israel; Joy Kahn-Evron, Sunrise
Jewish Center; and Leonard
Kaufman, Temple Emanu-EI. In
addition, local" teachers Natalia
Godin, Arlene Solomon and
Helene Goldwin will participate
together with Rabbi Mark Gross
of Temple Beth Orr. Robin
Eisenberg, Educational Director
of Temple Beth El in Boca Raton,
will participate and lead a session
on Family Education.
Staff members of the Central
Agency for Jewish Education whe
will be involved in the conferenct
include Dr. Abraham J. Gittelson.
Director of Education and Sharon
Horowitz, Judaica High School
Principal and Teacher Center
Director. Mrs. Horowitz will focus
on teenage Judaica programming
as well as attend sessions on the
work of Teacher Centers. She will
describe the work of CAJE's
Teacher Center (established
through a grant from the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale) and distribute copies
of "Kolenu," the Teacher Center
Newsletter which has been widely
welcomed locally by teachers and
principals.
Dr. Gittelson will lead three ses-
sions at the conference including
one on "The Historical
Antecedents of the Holocaust."
Dr. Gittelson noted that "con-
tinued professional growth is the
sign of a committed, forward look-
ing educator. The CAJE Con-
ference offers an exceptional op-
portunity for development in the
skills and knowledge of Jewish
teaching in an atmosphere of col-
legia! sharing and creativity. CA-
JE provides partial scholarship
grants for the Conference as a
reflection of its recognition of the
importance of inservice education
for the Jewish teachers of our
community."
Representing the Fort Lauderdale Jewish Youth Community at
the recent World Assembly in Israel was an exciting experience
for Judaica High School student Michael Frieser, son of Paul and
Carol Frieser of Plantation.
The World Youth Assembly, comprised of teenagers from
around the world and Israel, is designed to unite American and
Israeli youth in an effort to promote mutual and self discovery.
Sponsored by the United Jewish Appeal and American Jewish
Forum, the program was 10 days and dealt with issues in the
American and Israeli youth communities.
Recently, Michael wrote to Federation and the Central Agency
for Jewish Education thanking them for their support and recom-
mendation of the program:
Dear Federation and CAJE,
Thank you very much for the grant you gave me to go to Israel
on the Second World Youth Assembly. From the Assembly, I've
become more aware of the views of Jewish youth in the Diaspora
and in Israel. In addition, to that, I've gained great friendships
with both American's and Israelis. I can't wait to share my ex-
perience with other Judaica high school students. This program in
Israel has given me many insights into our Jewish community.
I encourage you to continue the support you've shown for this
program, as I have learned a great deal from it. Thank you again,
for help making possible an experience I'll never forget.
Sincerely,
MICHAEL FRIESER
Jewish Early Childhood Teachers Attend Institute
"The Wonderful World of Early
Childhood" will be the scene of
the Semi-annual All-Day Profes-
sional Growth Institute of the
Jewish Council of Early Childhood
Educators to be held on Thursday,
Aug. 27 for the teachers in
nursery and kindergarten pro-
grams of synagogue schools, day
schools and JCC's in Broward,
Dade and Palm Beach Counties.
Co-sponsored by the Central
Agency for Jewish Education, the
Institute will feature more than
40 individual seminars and
workshops at three locations at-
tended by close to 400 teachers.
At Temple Beth El in Boca
Raton, teachers from North and
South Broward and Palm Beach
Counties will hear Dr. Debra
Lerer, Director of Special Educa-
tion for the Central Agency for
Jewish Education, deliver the
keynote address, "What Makes a
Good Early Childhood Education
Program.' Individual sessions
will include "Developmental
Needs of the Young Child," "Arts
and Crafts in the Early Childhood
Education Classroom," "The Fall
Holidays: Materials, Sources and
Creative Ideas" and "Room Ar-
rangements and Other Fun."
Additional sessions will feature,
"Dance Into the New Year! Dance
and Movement," "The Insect
Zoo," "Making Science and
Mathematics Come Alive in the
Early Childhood Education
Class" and "Meeting Individual
Needs in the Early Childhood
Education Classroom."
Judy Schwartz, ECE Director
at Temple Beth El will serve as
host for the Institute assisted by
Karen Albert, ECE Director at
the JCC, and Andrea Mossovitz,
ECE Director of the South Coun-
ty Jewish Day School. Overall
chairpersons for the Institutes are
Harriet Spitzer, of Beth Torah
Congregation of North Miami
Beach, and Alida Bunder, ECE
Director of the Hebrew Academy
of Greater Miami.
Workshop leaders will include
Dr. Stuart Langcnthal,
psychologist affiliated with Nova
University, Julie Johnson, Nova
University, Ruth Brin, educator
and author, Jim Powell, consul-
tant, Kaplan Company, and
Shulamit Kievel, dance instructor
formerly with the American
Zionist Youth Foundation. Other
locations for the Institute will be
Temple Beth Am in South Dade
County and the Hebrew Academy
of Greater Miami in Miami Beach.
The JCECE is the professional
Jewish educational organization
seeking to enhance the status and
competencies of the Jewish early
childhood education teacher and
the entire field of Jewish early
childhood education.
The JCECE, in addition to the
two semi-annual professional
growth institutes, conducts,
together with CAJE, in-service
workshops and seminars for
teachers during the year, provides
a scholarship program for profes-
sional growth for its members,
and holds a day long directors'
workshop on major themes in
Jewish early childhood education.
Alida Bunder, Anita Koppele
and Arlene Lasko serve as a
"Trisidium" having recently been
elected to lead the organization
for a second year. Other officers
include the regional vice-
presidents: Ruth Hirsch, South
Dade. Harriet Spitzer, North
Dade, Judy Balletta, Miami
Beach, Marlene Bloom, South
Broward, Linda Harris, North
Broward, Andrea Mossovitz,
Boca/Palm Beach, Judy Kuritz,
Treasurer, Ann Mandelbaum,
Secretary, and Robin Eisenberg,
Immediate Past President.
Nwswlre/Washington
VETERANS REQUIRING medical care at VA facilities will be
reimbursed for travel expenses under legislation approved by
U.S. Rep. Dan Mica (D-Fla.) and other members of the House
Veterans Affairs Committee.
CONGRESSMAN Larry Smith (D-Hollywood, FL) is taking
steps to prevent the Administration from selling Maverick
missiles to Saudi Arabia. Smith introduced a resolution to stop
the sale of 1,600 Maverick AGM-65D anti-tank, air-to-surface
missiles to Saudi Arabia. The $360 million sale is being proposed
by the White House.
THE HOUSE of Representatives overwhelmingly approved an
amendment sponsored by Congressman Clay Shaw calling for
drug testing of State Department employees whose work involves
secret material.
B'NAI B'RITH Women, representing 120,000 Jewish women
throughout the United States, urged rapid passage by Congress
of the 1987 Economy Equity Act which will provide important
protection for women in the workplace and in the family. The bill
also provides a dependent care package that addresses the lack of
affordable, quality child care available in our country today.
Young Business and Professional Division Tarty in the Park'
Participants had to have a sure hand for this
event the infamous egg toss.
It was a beautiful, hot South
Florida summer day as the
Federation's Young Business
and Professional Division held
its Second Annual 'Party in
the Park,' on Sunday, July 12
at T.Y. Park, Hollywood.
Over 100 young people par-
ticipated in relay races,
volleyball and a tag-of-war
followed by a sumptuous
cookout.
According to all who attend-
ed, this annual event has turn-
ed into one of the social
A spirited game of volleyball was one of the day's
events at the Second Annual 'Party in the Park,"
sponsored by the Young Business and Profes-
sional Division of the Jewish Federation.
highlights for the Division.
The next event will be held
on Wednesday, Sept, 16 at 6
p.m. at the Embassy Suites
Hotel. Guest speaker will be
Yussi Yanech, notable Israeli
dance instructor.
Young Business and Professional Division Committee members
Ellen Goldberg, Melissa Martin, Shelly Nachum, Ellen
Magnuson, Shana Safer, Andrea Linn, Risa Waldman, Danny
For information, contact the Kane.- Harvey Rackmil and Mark Florence, chairman of the
Federation at 748-8400. Plcnic-


Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, August 14, 1987
Focus, Viewpoints, Opinions, and Commentaries
A Capitalist Israel?
By GERSHON GREENBAUM
Jack Kemp. A candidate for U.S. president. If you've never
heard of him, you're in good company. Neither have millions of
Americans, but don't forget Jimmy Carter. A year before he
became president, people were still asking "Jimmy who?"
Of the 14 people in the race, why does Kemp the Republican
have a good chance to be the next president? Davka the experts
are predicting that 1988 will be the Year of the Democrats, due to
the Iran affair. True, in the next election, the American people
will be giving a report card on the Reagan years. But I predict
that, despite Iran, the final grade will turn out to be pretty high.
There's another reason why the chances of Kemp the
Republican are good. Ideas. Good ideas play an important role in
winning elections. Reagan won big in 1980 and again in '84 on two
themes: 1) Rebuild America's strength and position in the world.
2) Big government is strangling the economy. Trim it back, cut
taxes, restore incentive and the economy will flourish. Try as they
might, the Democrats have not been able to construct a com-
peting vision with greater appeal.
Where does Kemp fit in? Among Republicans, no candidate is
more closely associated with the ideas of the "Reagan revolution"
than Jack Kemp. On the economy, one can say it was Kemp's
ideas that Reagan adopted. Take the dramatic cut in the top in-
come tax rate, for example. Through the years, Reagan has stub-
bornly defended this achievement, which was a Kemp proposal.
When it comes to the constant bickering of society's organized
groups as they fight to divide up the national pie, Kemp has an
alternative. Make the pit- bigger! This is something that the cen-
tralized solutions of government bureaucracy cannot bring about.
Life is too complex for our experts to control from above. It is the
individual, not the government, who is the creator of economic
growth. Lower the barriers which discourage effort, restore the
individual's initiative and the pie will grow.
But the weak cannot be left behind. They too must be pulled
along. The safety net of public assistance would remain. The goal
however would be to draw people out of it by the enticements of
the work world. "All boats rise with a rising tide." So too with the
bloated public sector. Better opportunities would simply lure peo-
ple away from public jobs.
So what is the connection between Israel and economic Kem-
pism? As president, Kemp will launch an ideological offensive to
export his compassionate brand of free market capitalism. The
electoral appeal of these ideas in England and France is a sign of
the times.
In this atmosphere, a major Israeli party will seriously endorse
free market ideas. They will go to the people with a promise to br-
ing about a capitalist revolution there and will win. The result will
be the most far reaching economic changes since the creation of
the state. These new policies will spark a period of economic
growth and unprecedented prosperity.
Where does Zionism enter the picture? The state of the Jews
will finally have an economic regime that fits the character of the
Jewish people. Yerida (emigration) will subside. Many of Israel's
sons who "voted with their feet" against this socialist garden of
Eden will return home to set up businesses. With opportunity
there, of course they will prefer the homeland.
And aliya? Jewish nationalism does quite a good job integrating
people once they get to Israel. But on its own, it was never strong
enough to attract many |>eople to that country. Economic factors
are an important part of the migration story. And this is true to-
day for Jewish migration. Whether we like it or not, Israel is in
competition with other countries for the bodies and souls of Jews
on the move. A capitalist Israel will be in a better position to com-
pete and more of these Jews will come. I don't claim that "mass"
aliya will result. But for thousands of individual Jews considering
aliya, a "blue and white" free market could tip the scale.
So Jack Kemp, "be strong and of good courage." May your
voice be heard loud and clear. For the good of the free world and
for the good of the Jewish national movement.
The writer who resides in Israel was selected a Mellon Fellow in
politics and modern Jewish society at Brown University.
The views expressed by columnists, reprinted editorials, ~Py *> neceaaarilv
reflect the opinion of uSe Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Uuderdde.
jewfchFloridian o
Of OWEATEK FOeTT lAUDEftOALE
FRED K SHOCHET MARVIN LE VINE SUZANNE SHOCHET
Editor and Publisher Director ol Communications Executive Editor
Published Weekly November through April. Bi Weekly balance of year.
Second Class Postage Paid at Hallandale. Fla USPS 809420
POSTMASTER: Sead address changes to The Jewish Floridian.
P.O. Box 012973. Miami. Fla. 33101
Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood Office: 83SB W. Oakland Park Blvd.. Fort Lauderdata, PL 33361
Phone 748-8400
Plant 120 NE 8th St., Miami. Fla. 33132 Phone 1 373-4805
Member JTA. Seven Arts, WNS. NEA, AJPA. and FPA
Jewish FleridUa Dees Net Cearalee Kasaisla ef Mirrassalii AeVertfcit.
SUBSCRIPTION RATE: 2 Vear Minimum S7.S0 (Local Area (3.95 Annual) or by membership
Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale: Sheldon S Polish, President; Kenneth B. Bierman,
Executive Director: Marvin La Vine, Director of Communications; Lori Ginsberg. Assistant Director.
Ruth Geller, Coordinator, B36B W Oakland Park Blvd., Fort Lauderdale, FL 333S1. Phone (308) 748-8400
Mail for the Federation and The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale should be addressed:
Jewish Federation of Greater Foil Lauderdale, P.O. Box 28810. Tamarac, FL 33320-8810
IMMbm
Dateline: Haifa
Friday, August 14,1987
Volume 16
19 AB 5747
Number 19
FORD AND THE ARAB
BOYCOTT
HAIFA The following is a
factual presentation of informa-
tion with regard to the Arab
boycott of Israel and the Ford
Motor Co.
Mr. Zahir Akil, Commissioner-
General of the Arab boycott
against Israel, granted an inter-
view to the Kuwait newspaper,
Alkabas, on January 26 of this
year. He declared, inter alia, that
the boycott commanded joint
Arab cooperation and was very
successful, despite American
legislation designed to combat the
Arab action. The boycott
authorities, he said, have taken
action which offsets the American
laws.
He was asked specifically: "On
what basis was the ban on import
of Ford Motor Company products
rescinded, despite the fact that
the company is still the proprietor
of enterprises in the conquered
land? Also, what about rumors
that the name of the company has
been removed from the prohibited
(black) list?"
In his reply, Mr. Akil is quoted
as declaring: "The matter of the
Ford Motor Co. was discussed by
the conference of liaison officers
of the regional offices, in which 16
states participated. On the basis
of certified documents which the
company presented, which were
circulated among all the offices,
demonstrating that the company
had, for its part, cut off all connec-
tions with Israel which were con-
trary to boycott regulations in ef-
fect the conference, by a ma-
jority of 15, recommended remov-
ing the ban which had been placed
on relations with the company.
Only the Syrian delegation had
reservations regarding the recom-
mendation, and this because it
was unable to study the
documents. The name of the com-
pany has therefore been properly
removed (from the black list), as
per the regulations, the principles
and the legislation of the Arab
League. As for rumors, we are not
interested in them. We would ask
that anyone who may have
documents indicating that the
company maintains contacts with
Israel, should present them."
We placed this information
before the Ford Motor Company
and received an immediate reply
from Mr. George E. Trainor,
Director of the International
Public Affairs Office.
Our question: Did the Ford
Motor Co. present documents to
the Arab boycott office, as claim-
ed by Mr. Akil, and if so, what was
the nature and content of such
documents?
Reply: Ford Motor Company did
not file any document or
documents with the Arab Boycott
Office, to get off the Arab Boycott
list. Such actions would be in
violation of U.S. law.
Question: Has the Ford Motor
Co. been informed that its name
has been removed from the Arab
boycott list?
Reply: Ford Motor Company
was not advised by the Israel
Boycott Committee that its name
had been removed from the Arab
Boycott List. We did see media
reports emanating from
Damascus, Syria, in July. 1985, to
that effect, reports which later
were confirmed in some kind of a
document received by the
Australian Embassy in
Washington and relayed by
telephone to our Ford colleague in
Australia who passed the word
back to us. We also were told by
the U.S. Department of Com-
merce, in that same time frame,
that one of our embassies in the
Middle East had reported to them
that Ford was off the boycott list.
Question: What is the attitude
of the Ford Motor Co. to the Arab
boycott of American (and other)
firms which do business with
Israel?
Reply: We cannot speak for
other firms, but we found the
boycott to be a very frustrating
experience, principally because
we were never formally notified
why we were blacklisted in
December, 1966. Media reports
and speculation as to why we were
blacklisted were not true, and,
under U.S. law, we were pro-
hibited from responding to
boycott questions from the Cen-
tral Boycott Office. We made it
quite clear that we were not
hostile to the Arab countries or
any of the more than 180 other
countries around the world in
which we do business. As
businessmen we were, and are, in-
terested in maintaining and ex-
panding our business interests in
these countries whenever
possible.
We did not ask about Ford in-
terests in Israel. The so-called
Carl Alpert
Ford plant in Nazareth Hit for
years assembled various models of
the company's cars, and about 10
years ago Henry Ford was pre-
sent at the inauguration of pro-
duction of a line of Ford trucks.
As a matter of fact, Ford neither
owned nor operated the plant. The
automobile parts were imported
by the Ford sales agents in Israel,
who in turn contracted with
Automotive Industries Ltd. to
assemble the cars. The last model
to come off the Ford line here was
the Escort, but about a year ago
production of that was discon-
tinued, and even the Ford name
was removed from outside the
Nazareth plant.
Some eight years ago Henry
Ford evinced his interest in Israel
by agreeing to have his name at-
tached to the Henry Ford
Transportation Fund at the
Technion.
Whether the final disconti-
nuance of Ford production in
Israel was due to boycott pressure
or to economic reasons will re-
quire more intensive research
than we are capable of. In any
event, the Arabs seemed happy to
record it as a victory.
And What About Jewish Aid
With the hoopla concerning the Iran-Contra hearings and all,
the community, along with the rest of the world, has been glued to
reports from the media. But somewhere in the world, there lies an
even important matter to World Jewry and that is the one of how
tens of thousands of our Jewish brethren live in improvised condi-
tions, unaware of their next meals or housing facilities.
Is this possible, that millions of dollars were transferred to aid
in the work of the Contras, from the sale of unofficial military
negotiation with Iran, and our Jewish brethren struggle to pro-
cure clothing remnants and band-aid medical repair?
Yes it is, and so who do these poor but proud people turn to
they turn to YOU!
Yes, you are the one they look to for the simple but life-giving,
lifesaving aid. You are the one that can give them the life-
enriching, life-enhancing service they so desperately need.
Who are these people and where do they live. I could say to you
they live here in North Broward and indeed some do. There are no
official statistics to show the number of families that live below
the poverty line, but there are some grim reminders of the couple
who have a dashboard for a table or a tailgate for a bed; or the
trash bin for a pantry. There are the burnt out young men and
women who adorn the sandy wastelands panhandling for bed and
boartj, or even partaking in leud and lascivious horrendous acts to
procure same.
But what about Israel and the rest of the world? You bet there
are Jews and they do have lives, and here are just some of the
stories among the more than 13 million.
In Rumania, 24,000 who receive their only clothing, bed
linens, blankets, and food rations.
In Tunisia-Egypt-Moslem countries 14.000 Jews, many ag-
ed, ill or mentally handicapped surviving in slums.
Latin America 400,000 plus, thousands of impoverished
families with no religious or educational guidance or training.
In India, Burma and China 10,000 who look to UJA for
food, living expenses and medical needs.
And so the story goes a world of Jewish brethren with no one
to turn to but us. They have the right to ask us, for we are truly
brothers, concerned with the welfare of all Jews. Now they ask
and through the Federation/United Jewish Appeal we respond.
In 1988, the needs are even greater. There,are greater
economic pressures on the government to adjust social welfare
programs in Israel which will reflect on the country's real
economic capabilities. Their help is limited and still other coun-
tries have curtailed whatever little help they did provide.
It has been said many times in many different ways, but "The
buck htops Here and in this case, letTs provide millions of bucks
so there can never be a stop of services! MLV
a.


Friday, August 14, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 5
'Portraits' Exhibit Launches UJA '88
Continued from Page 1
which have appeared in the
Soviet press during the past
20 years, will adorn the
room providing an at-
mosphere of the suffering of
fellow Jewish men, women
and children in a horrendous
time in history.
The exhibition shows how
Soviet caricaturists with
government approval
have utilized Nazi propagan-
da techniques, including the
depiction of Jews as insects
or animals, thus symbolical-
ly removing them from the
human race.
According to Sheldon S.
Polish, Federation presi-
dent, and Ludwik Brodzki,
Anniversary chairman, "We
urge all people of North
Broward County to see this
profound display an ex-
hibit which is disturbing
both for the questions it ask-
ed and those it must, of
necessity, leave
unanswered. It is disturbing
in different ways to people
of different generations and
diverse backgrounds. As
freedom and peace loving
people, we must never
forget what our forefathers
and brethren encountered.
Through the visual stimuli
and the ugly captions of the
graphics, we can fill in what
is left unsaid, the context of
violence, the ordinariness of
the hatred, the dread of the
victims. A dynamic account,
one we should not miss!"
After showing at the Lin-
coln Square Synagogue in
New York, Mayor Edward
I. Koch wrote in part,
Shultz,
Shevardnadze
Due To Meet
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Secretary of State George
Shultz and Soviet Foreign
Minister Eduard Shevard-
nadze will discuss human
rights issues when they meet
in Washington Sept. 15-17, the
State Department said
Department spokesman
Charles Redman said that
although arms control will be
the major topic, "We shall also
use the occasion to press for
further progress on human
rights and humanitarian
issues."
Immigration
Up Sharply
TEL AVIV (JTA) Im-
migration to Israel was up 49
percent during the first six
months of 1987, the Central
Bureau of Statistics reported
this week. In the first *ix mon-
ths, a total of 5,400 persons
2,900 immigrants and 2,500
potential immigrants came
to Israel, the Bureau said.
The number of immigrants
in January-June almost doubl-
ed as compared with the cor-
responding period last year,
and the number of potential
immigrants increased by 16
percent, for an overall growth
in immigr&tfpn of 49 percent.
It*
".. .These "Soviet anti-
Semitic caricatures, which
so clearly trace roots to Nazi
ideology, contain object
lessons both horrifying and
sardonic. The similarities
between Nazi cartoon pro-
paganda and features in the
present-day Soviet press are
self-evident. This exhibit
holds vital significance for
freedom-loving people of all
religions whose watchwords
are 'Never Again.' "
Accompanied by a video
display of the names of the
11,000 Soviet Jews denied
the right to emigrate to
Israel, "Portraits of In-
famy," paints a somber pic-
ture of anti-Semitism as it
existed in Nazi Germany as
it exists now in the USSR.
The exhibit was developed
by the Simon Wiesenthal
Center, the largest institu-
tion in North America
dedicated to the preserva-
tion of the memory of the
Holocaust, through the
cooperation of the Coalition
to Free Soviet Jewry, the
coordinating resource agen-
cy of 85 metropolitan area
organizations and civic
groups working on behalf of
Jews in the Soviet Union.
As Wiesenthal remarked
at the recent U.S. opening,
"Despite denials by Soviet
leaders that there is no anti-
Semitism in the USSR, this
exhibit graphically il-
lustrates the terrible burden
on the two-and-a-half
million Jews who are still
living in the Soviet Union
and who are confronted
with this anti-Semitic pro-
paganda ... the full
ramifications of their usage,
these Portraits of Infamy, is
still to be calculated."
More specifics will be
reported in upcoming Flori-
dian issues.
"DWi"...
"... set out from here to
a land of milk and honey"
(Exodus 33u3)
Deborah Fuller Hahn is cur-
rently in Israel.
Obie Winner to Address Business
Executive Network August 27
Internationally acclaimed direc-
tor and playwright, and a winner
of the coveted Obie Award Vin-
nette Carroll, will be the special
guest speaker at the next meeting
of Federation's Business Ex-
ecutive Network on Thursday,
Aug. 27 from 5:30-7:30 p.m. at the
Broward County Main Library,
100 S. Andrews Ave., Ft.
Lauderdale.
Carroll is a legendary figure in
Twentieth Century American
Theatre and has received
numerous awards including the
Obie, an Emmy, the New York
Outer Circle Critics Award, the
Los Angeles Drama Critics
Award and many others.
Carroll established the Urban
Arts Theatre South in Florida in
1980 and in 1984. the company
became known as the Vinnette
Carroll Repertory Company.
Admission is $5 which includes a
wine and cheese party. A cash bar
will be available.
For information or reserva-
tions, please contact tht Federa-
tion at 748-8400.


Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, August 14, 1987
'Who is a Jew' Revisions Defeated
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
Knesset recently defeated two
controversial bills which would
have given the Orthodox Chief
Rabbinate exclusive right to
approve conversions perform-
ed abroad.
A measure introduced by the
ultra-Orthodox Shas Party
would have amended religious
regulations dating from the
British Mandate in Palestine
by requiring that all converts
to Judaism procure the Israeli
Chief Rabbinate's endorse-
ment in order to be fully
recognized as Jews in Israel.
Despite support from
Premier Yitzhak Shamir, it
was defeated by a vote of 60-56
with four MKs absent.
A proposed amendment to
the Law of Return, sponsored
by the National Religious Par-
ty, would have had the same
effect invalidating conver-
sions performed by non-
Orthodox rabbis in cases of
Jews-by-choice seeking Israeli
citizenship as Jews.
It was defeated 62-53 with
two abstentions and three
absences. This bill has been
defeated each of the many
times it has been brought
before the Knesset in past
years.
Shamir had pledged to the
Shas Party two months ago
that Likud would "do all in its
power" to gain passage of the
Shas measure. He made no
secret that this was to be in ex-
change for Shas support of
Likud efforts to prevent the
Labor Party from dissolving
the Knesset and calling early
elections.
Alliance Shaken
Defeat of the Shas measure
threatened to undo the Shas-
Likud alliance, and there were
recriminations on both sides.
Shas leaders said Likud's
"check has bounced." Haim
Kaufman, chairman of the
Likud Knesset faction, insisted
his party had fulfilled its
pledge to try to pass the
amendment and saw no reason
why the Orthodox faction
should withdraw its support of
Likud.
Kaufman pointed to the nar-
row margin of defeat as proof
that the Likud Knesset whips
"did their job." He blamed
Likud-Liberal MK Sarah
Doron, who crossed party lines
to vote against the bill. But
other Likud figures noted the
deliberate absence of Likud
Herut MK Eliahu Ben-Elissar
and the defection of Likud
allies such as Rafael Eitan of
the opposition Tehiya Party,
who voted against the
measure, and Ometz MK
Yigael Hurwitz, who was
absent.
Supporters of the bill also
claimed it was Arab MKs who
invariably voted against
Orthodox-inspired laws deal-
ing with conversions.
But the main factor thwar-
ting the religious-rightwing
bloc may have been the fierce
opposition of American Jewish
leaders who made it clear that
Israel's relationship with
Diaspora Jewry was at stake.
Only hours before the voting,
the Anti-Defamation League
of B'nai B'rith leadership sent
a message to the government
and Knesset. It urged that
"The government of Israel
should not underestimate the
W&*tt&&ffl^
Federation Cablegrams Israel's
Knesset on Law of Return
Council of Jewish Federations
730 Broadway
New York NY 10003
This is a confirmation copy of the following message:
TDRN New York NY 273/262 07-07 1146A EST
Int The Honorable Yitzhak Shamir Prime Minister of the State of
Israel.
Jerusalem (Israel)
Dear Prime Minister Shamir, once again I wish to convey to you
on behalf of our 200 member federations of North America, which
represent more than 80 percent of organized Jewish life in this
great continent of North America, our position on the issue the
Law of Return. This position was first passed in November 1982
at the General Assembly of the Council of Jewish Federations in
Los Angeles, and reaffirmed at subsequent assemblies of the CJF
and by the Councils Board of Directors.
The CJF Resolution instructs me to convey the following
message to you:
"The level of concern in Jewish communities in North America
is both high and wide spread over the possibility of any change by
Israel in the Law of Return or any legislation that would affect
the current definition of "Who is a Jew." There is general agree-
ment that such action would be highly divisive both in North
American Jewish communities, as well as between Israel and
North American Jewry." It is very important that you unders-
tand and be fully aware of the very strong sentiment prevalent in
the North American Jewish federated communities and I would
ask that you convey such message to members of your govern-
ment and members of your political party. With all good wishes
and warm blessings from North American Jewish communities
for a strong Israel, united and unfaultering in its determination to
keep our Jewish people unified, sincerely,
Shoshana S Cardin President Council of Jewish Federations
COL 200 80 1982
11:48 EST
MGMCOMP
^:-x*:*:v:*wtt^
g
:.
extent of opposition to these
bills among American Jews"
and warned that "passage
would have a serious impact on
American efforts to help
Israel."
Ruth Popkin, president of
Hadassah, urged rejection of
the bills in a message to
Shamir which noted that she
spoke "as head of the largest
Zionist organization" in the
U.S.
Robert Asher of Chicago.
chairman of the American
Israel Public Affairs Commit-
tee (AIPAC), a Washington-
based pro-Israel lobby, warned
of the consequences in an
Israel Radio interview.
Foreign Minister Shimon
Peres, the Labor Party leader,
said that if the religious
measures were passed, Labor
would leave the unity coalition
government. He said the
legislation "endangers the uni-
ty of the Jewish people."
The Time to Start in '87 is Now!
Believe it or not, there's still time to make charitable donations
pay in deductions through our Foundation of Jewish Philan-
thropies. 1987, in fact, will be a good year for starting a charitable
trust, even though the new tax reforms are being phased in.
Charitable deductions will be more valuable this year because
many other deductions were eliminated, the capital gains tax was
boosted, and various popular tax shelters were dismantled.
Tax advisers are stressing the same strategies as last year:
make bigger donations while tax rates remain higher; give ap-
preciated property, such as real estate or securities, instead of
cash (providing that your gift doesn't trigger the alternative
minimum tax); and set up charitable trusts. (Please check with
your tax professional.)
For people who postponed charitable gifts last year because
they actually anticipated a highsr tax rate in 1987, this could be
the time to start.
For further information at no obligation, please contact our
Foundation Director. Kenneth Kent. 748-8400.
T, MIAMI BE
'249
HOTEL
'cun
ON THE OCEAN AT 34TH STREET, MIAMI BEACH I
ROSH HASHANA/
VOM KIPPUR fnmi
Split stays l>ay*/6 Nijthts
11 night packages available
SUCCOTHf^O,
frtHtl %J^J^
H Days/7 Nights
$
249
5 Days/
- Nights from
II and 25 night packages available ^
INCLUDING:
UiMiri.Hi> iHtommoOiiMMV. Icalurinu color TV Mcrni
SJpMSraM lilM kosher meals Ujil>: .mi Muhhal and HolkUis
IraililkMial High Holy l>a\ st kx in our own s> iuuimjik on prvmisv.
conducted h\ a world renowned < jmor
"K-ilt-* Jn |>r pr.milHitU ikii|\iik
Special Low Rain for Group* A OrKanlzttiom.
tatctltnl>Mihitw>a*>
GbttKoslter VERSAILLES Hold
Flood;. M (Max (305) 531-4213 N V SatoOsUx (212) 302-4804
E#Erl**"B,

MrrCtrvDIstsfyLsw"
i.WHnk*lSup^on
high mams $349
ofPT 23-OCT. 4___ p* parson
I
FLORIDA'S 1 SPA VALUE: WEIGHT LOSS GUARANTEED
"GET MORE
FOR FOUR"
4 Days/3 Nites
X ^% !!I! 60 174 roomi
^*jfc lU """'9/3
Package price for 4 full days & 3 nites
>se Weight-Feel Great-Super Rate" at Harbor Island Spa
America's Most Affordable 5pm
3 Nutritionally Balanced Water Ixerclsos
Meals Daily
Pounds Off Now Program
Nutritionist
Massage
Facial or Horbal Wrap
Sauna Steam Jacuzzi
Exercise-Yoga Classes
Spas For Men A woman
Free Tennis A C llnlc
HBO/Cable
Day a Evanlng Activities
NNety Dinner Dancing
Shows A Entortalnmont
Evary Rasort Facility
Also: PAY 7 ~ STAY 11 WITH 4 DAYS FREE
Call for Information & Reservations
1-800-SPA-SLIM
7900 LARRY PASKOW WAY. N BAY VILLAGE. FL 33141
'nc (7 Group Rates: Call Jack Buchsbaum

No one
mothers pasta
like Chef Boyardee
The way Chef Boyardee prepares cheese ravioli and
macaroni shells, you'd think he was a Jewish mother. He
uses only the finest ingredients: rich, ripe tomatoes,
aged cheese and enriched wheat flour. So his pasta is not
only delicious, it's also 95% fat-free, contains complex
carbohydrates and has no preservatives.
So for cheese ravioli and macaroni shells with all the
good things your mother would use, you can thank good-
ness for Chef Boyardee
-L=


Friday, August 14, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 7
Kol I3hah Woman's Voice HIPX *?P
UJA's Women's Division
A History of Commitment
Editor's Note: Adapted and ex-
cerpted from Rachel's Daughters
The Women of the United
Jewish Appeal National
Women's Division by Gerda
Klein.
1945. The cry of six million
unheard. The incinerators had
stopped. But throughout Europe,
there were one-and-a-half million
refugees. Cut off from their
homes by hatred and horror, sur-
vivors doomed to wander again.
There was no place to go.
Confronted by this challenge,
300 women met in St. Louis in
March, 1946, under the leadership
of Adele Levy, and pledged
themselves to work for the sur-
vival of their people. Mrs. Levy
challenged the nation's Jewish
women to respond to UJA, and
understand their power and
responsibility. Within nine mon-
ths, the newly formed National
Women's Division of the United
Jewish Appeal raised nearly 10
percent of UJA's $100 million
campaign for 1946.
Their solidarity with the rem-
nants of our stricken people was a
modern reenactment of the role of
women in Jewish history. The
rapid growth and impact of the
Women's Division recalled the
strength of Rachel ... the vitality
of Sarah Miriam's song .
Deborah's battle hymn.
The rest is history. The untiring
devotion of women, whose
solidarity and determination
parallel the inner strength of the
people of Israel decade after
decade, crisis after crisis. It is a
history of hope and vision among
those who dare to achieve greatly,
of unceasing commitment to
Tzedakah the highest of Jewish
values.
The Women's Division is now in
the forefront of the renaissance in
Jewish life ... of helping provide
the necessities of life for the elder-
ly, young people and children in
Israel, of giving sustenance to
those less fortunate than we
wherever they may be around the
globe. Today we are bearing
witness to our solidarity as Jewish
women with the people of Israel.
Rachel's daughters are forever
entwined in the past and in the
future. It is a special burden which
they carry with dignity and with
love.
And, as long as Jewish women
hear Rachel weeping for her sons,
we must continue to assume our
ancient commitment for the moral
and human well-being of oppress-
ed Jews in need.
To Israel With Love ...
Volunteer for Israel Heartfelt Time
Editor's Note: The following was
written by Federation's assistant
controller Forence Siegel, about
her experiences as a Volunteer for
Israel.
IN THE BEGINNING OF 1987,
the Siegel family, Bernie,
Florence and Vicki, started plann-
ing a trip of a lifetime the Sum-
mer Family Mission to Israel.
After months of planning we ar-
rived. This was the highlight of
my life, a most moving, emotional,
exciting experience. I knew then
that I must return. I HAD to
return!! But how and when?
After much deliberation I knew
what I must do, I must give more
of myself. The people of Israel
give so much that we may have an
Israel, and what have I done?
My decision was made ... I
would volunteer in the army pro-
gram Volunteer for Israel.
After all it is only three weeks out
of my life and this would ease the
burden of an Israeli Reservist.
What a way to use my vacation
giving to Israel.
Again the excitement is
building. Preparation for my
adventure had begun. Everyone is
asking why am I doing this. After
all, the conditions are almost
primitive and I will be giving up
my daily comforts. Why?
One must visit Israel to know
why. Having spoken to many that
have participated in this program,
I was told that the Volunteers for
Israel program (SAR-EL in
Israel) has been in existence for
five years and has increased in
numbers since its inception. So far
a total of 11,000 volunteers have
been stationed around the country
Florence pictured atop an
Israeli land vehicle. One of her
responsibilities was
lubricating the piece of
machinery wrapped in plastic
pictured left of Florence.
v Florence and retired Israeli
General Davidi.
ISRAEL
A Journey to Remember
UJA National Women's Division
Annual Fall Mission
to Romania and Israel
October 28-November 9, 1987
For information contact
the Women's Division
at 748-8400

in 30 different camps. The par-
ticipants come from many dif-
ferent countries including
Australia, Belgium, Canada,
France, Italy, Mexico, Panama,
South Africa, the United States
and Venezuela, to name a few.
The volunteers range in age from
17-70 and from all walks of life.
Working side by side are
mechanics, lawyers, teachers and
even an ex-governor.
My adventure had begun! The
first leg of the journey was
meeting in New York with 39
men, women and young adults, all
very excited and looking forward
to the upcoming weeks. Many are
second and third time volunteers,
all with a common goal, to help
Israel in their own way.
Upon our arrival in Tel Aviv, we
separated into different camps. I
learned that my camp would be an
artillery camp. The accommoda-
tions were not exactly the
Waldorf Astoria but if I wanted
that. I would have chosen that. In-
stead, I chose the way an Israeli
soldier lives and for three weeks, I
would also live that way.
We worked side by side with the
soldiers and ate, side by side. They
tried to teach me Hebrew and I
tried to teach them English. It
was l>eautiful saying 'Boker Tov'
to them in the morning and they
responding, 'good morning.'
Some of our duties were to clean
and lubricate armored vehicles,
paint and package spare parts,
work in the kitchen or do any
chore needed for military prepara-
tion. My job was dismantling,
cleaning and lubricating parts of a
gun and then reassembling it. My
hands took quite a beating but the
feeling of accomplishment was in-
describable. Everyone worked as
a team, the professionals as well
as the non-professionals, side by
side. Brothers together working
for one goal.
Love of the Jewish People.
Love for the State of Israel!
Some called it a summer camp
for adults while others called it
the Jewish Foreign Legion.
This was a small contribution,
on my behalf, three weeks out of
my life, a small price to pay to help
Israel. But I couldn't ha\e done it
without the support of my friends
and family' ano for this I am
grateful T will return.
An Open Letter to the
Women of the Greater
Fort Lauderdale Jewish Community
The Women's Division of the Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale acknowledges with deep ap-
preciation your contribution to the 1987 Federation/United
Jewish Appeal Campaign.
Through the ages Jewish survival has always depended
on Jews taking care of Jews. Through your gift to the
Women's Division Campaign, the continuity of Jewish life
at home, in Israel, and around the world, is able to be
maintained.
Together we are making an impact upon the Jewish
future.
For all of those you have helped, I have the honor of
saying,
Thank you!
ALVERA A. GOLD
1987 Campaign Chairman
P.S. If you have not yet made your 1987 campaign commit-
ment, please take this opportunity to do so. People are
depending upon the services your dollars provide.
SAVE THIS DATE!
Sunday, November 15, 1987
9:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m.
Marriott Cypress Creek Hotel
The First
JEWISH WOMEN'S CONFERENCE DAY
"A Coming Together"
Featuring Guest Speaker
Susan Weidman Schneider
author of
Jewish and Female
Choices and changes in Our Lives Today
For further information please contact the
Women's Division at 748-8400.
Judith A. Levy of Boston, then UJA National Women's
Division Chairman, affixes a mezuzah, hand-crafted in
Israel to the doorpost of the Israel Interests Section
building in Warsaw. With her, is Naphtali Lavie, UJA
Director-General in Israel. The Women's Division Dor
Le Dor (From Generation to Generation) Mission was
present at the ceremony commemorating the opening of
the section which is the first official Israeli presence in
Poland since Poland broke off diplomatic relations with
Israel following the Six-Day War in 1967. Mrs. Levy led
the recent mission to Poland and Israel which raised
$146,989 for the 1988 UJA/Federation Campaign.
Grandmothers, mothers, daughters and sisters par-
ticipated in the mission linking the past to the present
and the future.


Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Frkiay, August 14, 1987
Cohen
Tishberg
Wiener
Gross
Keiner
Campaign '88 Senior Advisory Council
In an unprecedented effort
to raise the record funds need-
ed to support the vital social
welfare and humanitarian pro-
grams for the 50 plus Federa-
tion/UJA constituents,
beneficiaries and agencies,
Harold L. Oshry, Federation
executive vice president and
general chairman announced
the formation of the Senior
Advisory Council.
In making the announce-
ment Oshry indicated that this
group of men and women,
representatives from every
segment of the North Broward
County community will be at
the forefront in policy-making
and decision-planning.
The members include:
Bonaventure Phil Cohen,
Daniel Tishberg, Barbara K.
Wiener.
Fort Lauderdale Barry
Chap-nick, Evelyn Gross,
Milton Keiner, Ben Marcus,
Joseph Novick, Anita
Perlman, John Streng, Bart
Weisman.
Lauderhill Victor
Gruman.
Palm Beach Bren Simon.
Pompano Beach
Seymour Gerson, Irving
Libowsky.
Tamarac Dan Cantor,
Abe David, Jack Farber, Mor-
ris Furman, Leo Goodman,
Aaron Levey, Gilbert Merrill,
David Sommer, Gerald
William.
In reviewing the strategy for
the 20th Anniversary com-
munity campaign, Oshry in-
dicated that this year, "More
than ever, we need the help
and generosity of the entire
community to maintain the
high level responsive service to
our brethren.
As the key members of the
Federation, we are the core of
structure. It is you, your
neighbors, friends and
business associates it is peo-
ple who help people who
provide community' action to
meet local needs. Who at the
same time develop community
leadership, and create an an-
nual campaign to enrich the
quality of Jewish life, here at
home, in Israel and throughout
the world. We must all ensure
that our most wonderful part-
nership continues our pro-
found commitment to sustain
our people."
Oshry, who was among the
National UJA officers and
community leaders that at-
tended the recent leadership
retreat in Chicago, called on
the council to begin prepara-
tion for an outstanding cam-
paign, and various meetings
and sessions have been
scheduled to exchange suc-
cessful ideas and help build a
united and strong campaign
team.
HOLD THE DATE*
Young Business and Professional Division
Wednesday, September 16
Embassy Suites Hotel, 17th St. Causeway
748-8400
tf:-:-:*:*:*:*:*:**^
Federations
56th G.A.
Continued from Page 1
of Plantation's Elaine Conn,
the Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale is
scheduled to do the honors
on Tuesday, Nov. 17, the
pre-GA session, at the
Hotel. Cohn indicated that
the Federation is currently
requesting men and women
to volunteer for the day as
part of special shifts to work
in the Delegates Lounge.
Delegate Lounge Sponsor
Schedule is as follows:
Tuesday, Nov. 17, 11
a.m.-8 p.m. (Fort
Lauderdale)
Wednesday, Nov. 18, 10
a.m.-8 p.m. (Palm Beach
County)
Thursday, Nov. 19, 10
a.m.-8 p.m. (South Broward,
Hollywood)
Friday, Nov. 20, 10
a.m.-3 p.m. (South County,
Boca Raton)
In referring to the
volunteer effort, Cohn
stated that those volunteer-
ing will have the privilege of
being able to spend the day
attending sessions free of
charge as the gift for their
services. All others atten-
ding will pay appropriate
registration fees to attend
the assembly.
This year, the theme of
the GA is "Dor L'Dor: From
Generation to Generation
Building Community and
Continuity Through Peo-
ple," an examination of how
the Federation network,
together with Israel and
World Jewry, can most ef-
fectively meet the
challenges facing Jewish life
at home and aboard.
Among some of the promi-
nent issues to be under-
taken and discussed are:
Connecting the Next
Generation to the Jewish
Community.
Israel and North
America: Sustaining the
Partnership across the
Generations.
Soviet Jewry: Respon-
ding to the New
Possibilities.
The Role of Campaign in
Reaching the Next
Generation.
Jewish Perspectives on
Public Responsibility for
Social Services.
Overlooked and Unin-
volved Populations: Facul-
ty, Students, Singles.
Service New Types of
Jewish Family Structures.
Celebrating the Con-
stitution's Bicentennial: A
Legacy of Freedom and
Responsibility.
The pre-opening session
will begin on Nov. 17 at 1
p.m. with the Seminar for
Leadership Development
Professionals, followed by
the GA meetings beginning
daily at 8 a.m., and the clos-
ing concluding on Sunday,
Nov. 22, at 10:30 a.m.
The Council of Jewish
Federation is the associa-
tion of 200 Federations,
Welfare Funds and Com-
munity Councils. Establish-
ed in 1932, it serves as a na-
tional instrument to
strengthen the impact of
Jewish Federations through
programs of leadership
development, community
organizations, campaign
planning and joint national-
local efforts to meet Jewish
needs. The General
Assembly is the central
meeting place of American
Jewish leadership, which
takes place annually in a dif-
ferent community each
year.
For further information
concerning the GA
volunteer registration and
other information, call
Debra Roshfeld at Federa-
tion, 748-8400.
Newswlre/lsrael
JERUSALEM John Demjanjuk's American lawyer, Mark
O'Connor, said he would continue to serve as chief defense
counsel for the suspected war criminal despite his dismissal by the
Demjanjuk family last month. The Demjanjuk family retained
O'Connor's two associates, Israeli lawyer Yoram Sheftel and
John Gill, an American. Added was another attorney, John
Broadley of Washington D.C., to the defense team.
TEL AVIV The Cabinet is about to discuss a series of pro-
posals to severely curtail economic and cultural ties between
Israel and South Africa, Yediot Achronot reported. Pretoria has
responded by warning Israeli diplomats that approval of the pro-
posed measures could increase anti-Semitic attitudes and actions
on the part of the nationalist-conservative wing of the white
population against South Africa's Jewish community of about
120,000.
TEL AVIV A report surfaced here that Righteous Gentile
Raoul Wallenberg is ali"e and "reasonably well" in the Soviet
Union and would be released from prison shortly. The Soviets
claim he died of natural causes in prison in 1947. Israel- Radio
quoted Yefim Moshinsly, who immigrated from the Soviet Union,
several years ago. as saying he had a letter from a "reliable
BOUrce" in the USSR reporting that Wallenlx'rg is alive.
CJF General Assembly November 17-22,1987 ]
Volunteer Registration j
JEWISH FEDERATION OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE
Name.
Phone(H)
Address.
Organization
VOLUNTEER JOB
Delegates Lounge
Tuesday, November 17,1987
Pleaae sign up for a shift as a host/hostess In the Delegates Lounge.
A.M. P.M.
Tues 11/17 10:30-1:00 12:30-3:00 2:30-5:00 4:30-6:30 6:00-8:00
Return Registration Form To:
Elaine Cohn, Chair
G.A. Delegates Lounge
Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale
P.O. Box 26810
Tamarac, FL 33320-6810
(305) 748-8400


Friday, August 14, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 9
CAMPAIGN Federation/United Jewish Appeal
When the Bills Come Due Who Pays Them ...
Federation's UJA Family Helps a World of Jewish Need
Harold Oshry, Executive vice
president and general
chairman.
From: Harold L. Oshry
General Chairman
Dear Friend,
I have just recently returned
from a meeting of national
leaders representing more
than 200 Jewish Federations
and communities in North
America, and would like to
share with you some of the in-
sights that came from this im-
portant session.
What is American Jewry's
role in the coming years? To:
Provide for needs of Jews
so that they may all live in
dignity.
Strive to help make the
world a better place for all
people.
Help fulfill our obligation
to ALL segments of our
Jewish community.
Work to create a society
where Jews can live freely as
Jews. Simply but realistic and
obtainable One we all have a
vital stake in achieving.
And now let's get down to
the bottom line. AH the words
and rhetoric in the world, as
honorable and sincere as they
may be, will not pay the bills.
What bills you ask?
This is just some of the
payables:
Kosher nutrition meals
and transportation vans for
our senior citizens.
Programs for the frail
elderly and handicapped at the
Gathering Place.
Teens and tweens ac-
tivities at the JCC.
High quality educational
curriculum at Hebrew Day
School and the High School of
Judaica.
Cultural and religious
guidance and enrichment from
the Central Agency for Jewish
Education.
And less we forget, BBYO,
Hillel, and Chaplaincy Com-
mission, to name a few.
But, it does not end there,
because we have our brethren
in Israel who look to us for
hope, comfort and support.
In Israel, the payables
continue:
Absorption centers, tem-
porary housing, medical care,
food, clothing, vocational
training for immigrants.
Youth Aliyah programs for
18,000 youngsters from
economically socially disadvan-
taged families.
Rehabilitation of the disad-
vantaged neighborhoods of our
Project Renewal campaign
partner city, Kfar Saba, to
help make a better life building
; new facilities and providing
hope and dignity.
Around the world, the
statements read
300,000 Jews in Latin
American and 600,000 in
France, to strengthen the
Jewish schools, communal
organizations and leadership.
7,000 Jewish school
children in Moslem countries
and 400 people of all ages at a
Jewish camp in Yugoslavia.
Holocaust survivors in
Eastern Europe for meals-on-
wheels, clothing distributions,
cultural programs, and
medical and religious supplies.
The list goes on, the bills
come due, the work must con-
tinue, and who else can they
turn to? We are knocking on
the conscience of all of our
fellow Jews to help raise the
funds necessary to ke accounts active. As members
of the Federation/United
Jewish Appeal family of proud
contributors, you can help all
of our brethren be assured of a
life of dignity. The "time for
miracles" is now. For the most
wondrous thing of all is the
smile on a child's face, the
Their smiling faces. is the best response to your heartfelt generusity.
peaceful contentment of an
elderly couple or the happiness
of a family unit!
HAPPENINGQ
Business Executive Network,
p.m. Broward County Main.
AUGUST
Aug. 27
5:30-7:30
Library.
SEPTEMBER
Sept. 3 Women's Division. 9:30 a.m.-noon.
Leadership Skills Seminar. At Federation.
Sept. 7 LABOR DAY.
Sept. 8 Women's Division. 9:30 a.m.-noon.
Leadership Skills Seminar. At Federation.
Sept. 10 Business Executive Network.
5:30-7:30 p.m. Embassy Suites.
Sept. 13-15 CJF Quarterly. New York.
Sept. 15 5 p.m. Executive Committee
meeting. 7 p.m. Board meeting. At
Federation.
Sept. 16 Young Business and Professional
Division. 6 p.m. Embassy Suites.
INFORMATION
For further information, contact the Jewish
Federation at 748-8400.
v:;:;:;:;:*:W:*:^^

_J


Page 10 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, August 14, 1987
Waiting to Share With You...
Federation Senior Service Programs

Agency Focus
The Jewish Federation's
Kosher Kitchen participants were
dancing in the aisles with the
freilach antics of good friend,
Leon Rifkin. Once a year Leon
shares his stellar talents with his
friends at the Nutrition site
located at the Jewish Community
Center, This year, as a very speial
treat, he brought Barry Volkman,
the new choral director of
Tamarac Jewish Center, to ac-
company. Both Leon and Barry
left feeling 10 feet tall for the
blessings and appreciation that
were bestowed upon them by the
appreciative audience. If you have
talent and would like to perform
for a wonderful audience, please
call Sandy Friedland, coordinator
Senior Servcies, 797-0331.
Leon Rifkin crooning and dan-
cing with admirer, Sarah
Leibowitz.
The Jewish Federation's Kosher Nutrition par-
ticipants were delighted to welcome back Rabbi
Mark Gross of Temple Beth Orr in Coral Spr-
ings. They shared a very special Shabbat with
Rabbi Gross's melodious voice and wonderful
stories. Rabbi Gross' fondness for the seniors of
our community was very much in evidence by the
rapport he shared with the audience.
Barry Volkman at the piano
with Leon Rifkin singing a
wonderful Yiddish medley.
Hand in Hand Learning From
and Caring For Older Parents
On Monday, Aug. 17, a com-
munity based eduactional and
support program for adult
caregivers will be held at the
Bonaventure Hotel and Spa as
part of Florida's Annual Coun-
cil on Aging Conference.
'Hand in Hand Learning
From and Caring for Older
Parents' will provide in-
terested community organiza-
tions with guidelines for
organizing and implementing
local workshops for adults who
are (or expect to be) primary
caregivers for an aging parent.
The program has been
developed to provide a
framework of support for
adult children by directly ad-
dressing their questions and
Canada Jewish
Congress
Encourages
Pen Pals
The World Jewish Congress
declared 5747 the international
year of Jewish youth. The Inter-
national Jewish Congress has the
addresses of hundreds of boys and
girls, young men and young
women who would enjoy cor-
responding with others their age.
To receive two or more addresses
of youths in over 40 countries
worldwide, send a letter telling us
about yourself, the type of pen
pals you would like to have,
enclose a stamped (22 cents) self-
addressed envelope for the reply,
and send to: Barry Simon, Ex-
ecutive Director, International
Jewish Correspondence, 1590 Dr.
Penfield Avenue, Montreal,
Quebec, Canada H3G IC5.
concern with practical infor-
mation and emotional support.
Objectives of the one day
'Hand in Hand' workshops are
to help adult caregivers:
Gain Knowledge of the ag-
ing process
Acquire knowledge and
greater access to community
resources
Develop greater
awareness through expressing
their feelings about caring for
aging parents
Recognizing that they are
not alone in their situation by
encouraging group interaction
and sharing exercises
Serving as panelists will be
Sandra Friedland, coordinator
of Senior Services for the
Federation and Rabbi Albert
Schwartz, Federation's direc-
tor of Chaplaincy, plus other
leading professionals in the
community on the subject of
aging.
For information contact
463-2823.
WELCOME TO A
MEW EXPERIENCE
in sophisticated Retirement Living
M A N n R O
\
MAN Q~fi
Where Caring Comes naturally
3535 S.W. 52nd Avenue Pembroke Tatk, Florida 33023
A COMPLETE LIFESTYLE
IN A KOSHER ENVIRONMENT
Tastefully Decorated
nursing Supervision 24 hrs.
Physicians on call 24 hrs.
3 meals daily and snacks
Daily activities, arts ftr crafts
Social activities
Transportation provided
Swimming Pool ft Jacuzzi
Beauty Shop
Religious services dally
Easily accessible
WE WELCOME ENQUIRIES TLEASE CALL 961-8111
Sherwin H. Roeenatein. Executive
Director
JEWISH FAMILY SERVICE OF BROWARD COUNTY
LAURIE B. WORKMAN,
MSW
Being male and single
(bachelor) has always been a
positive state in our society.
With the change in our culture
during the last 20 years,
women are now considering
being single as desirable. We
have erased the notion that be-
ing alone is necessarily a lone-
ly position.
Single people have much to
contribute and constitute a
very meaningful segment of
our society. The single life can
be full of self-discovery, adven-
ture, and excitement.
However, the single person,
like everyone else, might need
help to get there. Jewish Fami-
ly Service of Broward County
provides counseling to many
single people who are willing
to work at learning to achieve
this sense of fulfillment.
What happens when so-
meone who has been married
is suddenly alone because of
death or divorce? The loss can
be extremely painful; being
alone can be terrifying, and
the reattainment of the
positive aspects of single life
can appear unreachable. Some
will never forget the loss.
However, one does not have to
forget a loss to carry on. Most
people can go on with their
lives following a death or a
divorce.
For those who may be ex-
periencing difficulties follow-
ing their loss, Jewish Family
Service of Broward County
can provide the support,
reassurance and caring a per-
son may need. We can also
help the individual to get in
touch with his or her own
resources and strengths and,
thereby retrain a sense of self
as a whole and well-
functioning human being.
If you would like to depart
on a self-discovery explora-
tion, give us a call. Jewish
Family Service of Broward
County can be reached at
749-1505 in Fort Lauderdale,
or 966-0956 in Hollywood.
Jewish Family Service of
Broward County is a
beneficiary agency of the
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale, the Jewish
Federation of South Broward,
and The United Way of
Broward County.
IN COMMEMORATION OF
YOM HASHOA, Holocaust
Remembrance Day, the
students of the David Posnack
Hebrew Day School assembled
for a special program.
Students prepared readings
that reflected the heightened
emotions of all who par-
ticipated in this significant
memorial. Pictured is Beth
Armstead, daughter of Theo
Armstead, an eighth grade stu-
dent who presented a special
reading.
BEACH HOTEL
OK nI OCCAM AT H~ (TMIT
OPEN
ALL YEAR
THE PROGRAM INCLUDES:
Remodeled Accommodation*.
Two QLATT KOSHER MEALS
Dally.
Exciting Entertainment.
Retrtger a tor and Color TV In
Every Room.
Family Style Room
w/BIg Screen TV.
RESERVE NOW
FOR HIGH HOLY DAYS
& SUCCOT 9/23 10/4/8 7
12 DAYS/11 NIGHTS
FROM $29000pP/dblocc IU
pp dbl occ & t,i> tip
Olympic Size Pool with
Privileges.
Full Time Social Director with
Dally Activities.
Private Fenced In Beach.
Monthly Trips.
24 Hour Security.
Dally Maid Service.
Individually Controlled A/C.
4i
Under the supervision of
Rabbi Joseph N. Kaufman
FOR INFORMATION
AND OUR BROCHURE
CALL: 531 -2206
YOUR HOSTS: THE GALBUT FAMILY


***
Friday, August 14, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 11
First-Timers on Mission
Find Israel 'Fascinating'
The Summer Family Mission
of the Jewish Federation
always attracts the "younger"
set of the community.
Sometimes the participants
are first-timers, having never
been on a Federation Mission.
In this case, the Tabatchnick
family of Inverrary conquered
two firsts their first Mission
and their first visit to Israel.
"We chose the Summer
Family Mission because we
wanted to be with a group who
had children my son's age,"
stated Meryl Tabatchnick.
"However, the key reason was
that Ian, my son, is of Bar
Mitzvah age and the Mission
offered Ian the opportunity to
celebrate this occasion in a
specific ceremony in Israel."
Meryl, her husband Buzzy
and son Ian were joined by a
group of 28 parents and
children on the 12-day Mission.
"I found the trip to be emo-
tionally draining," she said,
"but very satisfying."
According to Meryl, her
family is not what she calls
"overly religious" but when
she saw all the heritage and
history in Israel, dating back
some 2,000-3,000 years, she
felt a special pride alout her
Judaism.
"It all hit me when Ian
recited the Haftorah on top of
Masada" she said. "It was
especially thrilling for me
because I was able, in a sense,
to become a B'not Mitzvah by
also reciting some verses in
English along with three other
women on the Mission who
have never been B'nai
Mitzvah."
"'There were many
highlights on this trip, from
visiting Kibbutz Kfar Giladi
and sharing home hospitality
with the people, to visiting
Yad Vashem, the Holocaust
I Memorial, and discussing our
I feelings later that day in a
I park. Everyone cried and we
|truly became 'one' that day."
However, the highlight of
IMitvI's trip was the visit to
|(iil<>. Jerusalem where the
Lrandparents of Ian's Soviet
|twin reside.
I nable to contact Ian's
I Soviet twin in Russia. Meryl
found and contacted his grand-
parents in Israel and have
l>een in contact the last few
[months.
"Although thev only wrote
n Russian and Yiddish, we
were able to have the letters
[translated. It was an
lunbelieveable experience to
[meet these people. They
^welcomed us as members of
[heir family, especially Ian,
"~ause they haven't seen
!/ Anniversary \
8
The Tradition Continues
their grandson in 12 years.
Although the language barrier
was hard, their feelings of love
and warmth towards us were
easily understood."
Even though the Mission
was tiring, Meryl stated that it
is the only way to go.
"We got to see and do so
much in the short time we
were there, that if we weren't
on the Mission we would have
missed a lot."
"My advice to anyone plann-
ing a trip to Israel is to first
call the Federation and check
on a Mission it is a trip of a
lifetime."
AMIT WOMEN
Amit Women will hold their
National Convention on Oct.
25-28 at the Hyatt Orlando
Hotel in Orlando, Florida. The
magic of Amit will be
discovered during the four
event-filled days. This Conven-
tion will be bubbling with
challenging and significant ac-
tivities. Amit anticipates over
300 delegates from all parts of
the United States.
Amit Women is proud to an-
nounce that Claude Lanzmann
will be one of the guest
speakers. Mr. Lanzmann is the
Director of the esteemed film,
SHOAH.
Amit Women raises funds to
maintain more than 23 pro-
jects in Israel which house and
educate over 18,000 orphaned
and needy children.
For reservations, Amit
members should contact their
Chapter President or call the
Florida Council office at
651-1444.
N.E. FOCAL POINT
Blood Pressure checks and
Health Screening services are
available Monday through Fri-
day, 8:30-4:30 (except Wednes-
day afternoon) at the N.E.
Focal Point Senior Center
located at 227 N.W. 2nd
Street, Deerfield Beach.
The Senior Center offers
these services at no charge to
persons 60 years old and over.
For further information con-
tact Shirley O'Brien, R.N. at
427-3110.
WIDOWED PERSONS
SERVICE
The Widowed Persons Ser-
vice provides both individual
and group assistance to the
newly bereaved. Old or young,
men and women can call this
free service for assurance and
help. If you are experiencing
the pain of a recent loss, reach
out. Widowed Persons
volunteers have all been there
we understand and we can
help. Call us at 467-7733.
The Widowed Persons ser-
vice is a free community pro-
ject of your Mental Health
Association and AARP.
Successful retirees make
The Court part of
their portfolio...
t The Court at Palm-Airc,
wc understand how hard
you have worked to achieve
your financial success. And
now that you have retired, preserving
your hard-earned assets for the future is a
priority, be it for yourself or your heirs. At
this time, the Court offers a simple rental
plan, which allows you to keep your
assets in tact, without the need for a large
endowment lee. Unlike many residential
retirement communities, no large cash
investment is necessary.
The Court is a special n-sort-likc adult
community, part of the World of Palm
Aire in Pompano Beach, Florida. Hen.-,
residents maintain busy, resourceful
lifestyles, free of the worries of home
upkeep. The Court takc> can- of all house
keeping and linen services. We also pn>-
\ idc up to time meals everyday in our
elegant dining room. And. most impor-
tant ly. the comfort and assurance of
21-hour emergency nursing services is
pnnided for residents should the need
ever arise. All this, plus round the clock
security to protect you and your belong-
ings. The Court offers what ordinary
retirement communities cannot peace
of mind.
You II have your choice of elegant apart-
ment homes, each offering complete
kitchen, sca-cned porch or balcony,
safety-oriented bath, and a total package
of luxury amenities.
An activity -tilled lifestyle is available
to vou at our own on-site facilities and
an Hind the Pompano Beach area, via our
regularly scheduled transportation. '
The Court is managed by Palm Court
Management. Inc.. an affiliate of the
Kaplan Organization, developers of qual-
ity communities for over J5 years.
Call or write today to find out how to
add The Court to your portfolio.
fMAILTO:
2701 N. Course Drive
Pompano Beach. Ft. 33069
(305) 975-8900
atitoun-Airc.
I would like to leorn more about The Court at Palm-Aire. please provide more informotion
Name
Address
Cily 1
State 7ip
Phor*
Dept. JF 814
T)m Court at Palm Atra. 2701 N.CourMOrtv*. Pompano BmcD,FL330M (305)975-8900
J


Page 12 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, August 14, 1987
The Samuel and Helene Soref
Jewish Community Center
Perl man Campus
K50! W. Sunrise Blvd.
Fort Lauderdale. Florida 33313 792-6700
By Muriel Haskell, Director of Public Relations
For further information and fees concerning the events or pro-
grams listed please call the center.
SUPERRAFFLE
SUPERRECEPTION
SUPERLATIVE
Have you taken your chance? A
One Touch of Class Superraffle
ticket is $100. The prices are:
First $10,000, Second $2,500,
Third, Fourth and Fifth Prizes
$500 each.
According to Dr. Jim Phillips
and Stu Tatz, the Superraffle co-
chairmen, tickets are going fast.
If you want to be a winner, if you
have any intention of joining the
Superreceptionists Saturday, Oct.
24 at 8:30 (changed from Sept. 12)
in the Soref Ballroom/Gym, the
time is now to buy your ticket
which entitles bearer to dinner,
for two, and dancing, along with
the rest of the evening's
festivities. You need not be pre-
sent to win but if you are on the
guest list, you're in for a good
time including the excitement
and suspense of watching the win-
ning tickets being picked! You,
too, could be a winner.
Honorary Captains who are sup-
porting JCC's first superraffle
are: David Alperstein, Moty
Banyas, Arnie Berman, Rita
Bernstein, Paul Bloomgarden.
Anne Bratt, Gail Capp, Elaine
Cohn. Bruce Conan. Gil Epstein,
Steven Feller. Ellen Fischer,
Howard Gaines, Alvera Gold, Dee
Hahn, Gary Jacobs, Scott Joseph,
Norman Kline, Caren Kogan,
Harvey Kopelowitz, Andrew
Kruglanski, Esther Lerner,
Hildreth Levin, Preston Levitt,
Marsha Levy, Mark Lipoff, Barry
Mandelkorn, Phil Mirmelli, Allen
Morris, Anita Perlman, Jim
Phillips, Harold Rabinovitz,
Sheldon Ross, Marty Sadkin,
Peter Sarbone, David Schulman,
Marcia Schwartz, Arnold Simon,
Laurence Skolnik, Helene Soref,
Renee Spector, Elliott Starman,
Florence Straus, Jeff Streitfeld,
Stu Tatz, Barbara Tessler and
Robert Tokar.
CELEBRATE
THE END OF SUMMER
POST CAMP! Another five
days for campers to continue their
happy association with the JCC.
From Monday, Aug. 17 through
Friday the 21. More of the same
good times with many of the same
counselors on staff to go on trips
and organize some special .
special events. But this time no
bus transportation and lunch
must be brought from home. And
post post camp it's family
togetherness on the JCC
calendar .
FAMILY WEEK-END
AUGUST 21-23
To the uncrowded beaches and
the calmer waters of the gulf go
many of the JCC families right
after post-camp for a few days of
fun and sun at the Marco Island
Marriott Friday, Aug. 21
through Sunday Aug. 23. Parents
can relax. The childrens activities:
supervised. The accommodations:
superb. The features: Oneg Shab-
bat. Havdallah. Good Meals! Call
for the details.
JCC GOES
TO THE THEATER
"La Cage Aux Folles" Sunday,
Sept. 13 Evening Miami
Theatre of the Performing Arts.
"Singin in the Rain" Sunday,
Nov. 22 Matinee Bailey Hall.
"42nd St." Thursday, Dec. 24 -
Eve Parker Playhouse.
"Broadway Bound" Wednes-
day, Jan. 27 Eve Parker
Playhouse.
Newswlre/U.S.A.
NEW YORK Nathan Perlmutter, national director of the
Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith who was widely cited for
his fight against bigotry and discrimination and dedication to
humanitarian causes, died of cancer at Memorial Sloan-Kettering
Cancer Center at the age of 64.
NEW YORK Several American Zionist organizations have
accused the American Zionist Federation (AZF) of bias and incon-
sistency in the penalties it levelled against their slates in the
recently concluded elections to the 31st World Zionist Congress.
KANSAS CITY Rabbi Meir Kahane, wanted by Johnson
County, Kan. police to answer disorderly conduct charges, has fil-
ed a countersuit for "assault, battery and outrageous conduct"
arising from a scuffle with a Palestinian Arab, Mousa Shukair,
during an appearance by Kahane at the Doubletree Hotel in
Overland Park, Kan., last November 18.
NEW YORK American Jewish leaders are congratulating
the Knesset for upholding religious pluralism and avoiding a
possible rupture between Israel and Diaspora Jewry. The
message, on behalf of major organizations, refer to the Knesset's
votes defeating two controversial bills which would have given
the Orthodox Chief Rabbinate exclusive right to approve conver-
sion performed abroad. The practical effects of those measures
would have been to invalidate conversions by non-Orthodox rab-
bis and, by implication, question the legitimacy of the non-
Orthodox branches of Judaism in Israel.
_
Four of the urinners at the "Fairwind" table during JCC Trivia
Night in July are, from the left: Gail and Al Capp and Jeff and
Linda Streitfeld. The rest of the team at the table who contributed
answers for the evening's best score were Myrna and Ted Sobo,
Judith and Joel Armstrong and Robin and Brian Gallagher.
Trivia Night benefited the Camp Scholarship Fund.
"Shalom '88" Sunday, Feb. 14 -
Matinee Bailey Hall.
The Center has its hands on
good seats for all of the above.
Join the theater parties! For "La
Cage bus transportation to
TOPA included with wine and
cheese, en route. "Lets make it a
good theatrical season," says
Susana Flaum and Laura
Hochman who are Directors of
Adult/Cultural Arts and Senior
Adult Departments respectively.
In addition Senior Adult
Department is scheduling a
matinee/luncheon of "On Your
Toes" Wednesday, October 21,
Royal Palm Dinner Playhouse of
Boca Raton. Transportation in-
cluded. For details of ticket price,
etc. call the Center.
THEATRICAL TROUPE
FORMING AT THE CENTER
In line with the Center's focus
on theater beginning fall '87, JCC
is about to start its own troupe.
Tryouts and spot readings are
scheduled for the afternoon of
Sunday, Sept. 13, for the first pro-
duction a comedy-drama with a
small cast. However, in mind for
later musicals complete with
costumes, song, dance and live
band. Here's a call for par-
ticipants! Wherever your talents
lie let JCC see them, in person!
CHILDREN'S THEATRE
Let's not leave out 'he kids!
Elementary Department head
Cindy Grossman announces two
classes:
THEATRE ARTS
Children age 7 through 10 are
invited to join this eight-week
course beginning the week of
Sept. 7 and concluding the week
of Oct. 30.
Faith Allyson with a degree in
Theatre Arts has been involved in
all aspects of children's theatre
for 12 years. She will teach basics
in theatre terminology, audition
techniques and play production.
Thursdays 4:30-5:30 p.m.
PERFORMANCE WORKSHOP
Boys and Girls 12-17, who have
had little previous experience in
theatre, will be taught stage
techniques, stage combat and the
experience of performance by
Charles St. Clair, a four time Em-
my Award winning Actor/Direc-
tor with over 15 years of.
theatrical experience.
This Sunday class, 3-5 p.m., also
eight sessions, begins Sept. 13.
CHILDBIRTH (Classes)
WITH A JEWISH ACCENT
BEGINS OCTOBER 22
It's never too soon to learn how
to be a good Jewish parent and
JCC presents the ideal opportuni-
ty this fall for mothers-to-be.
What's different about this
class? Together with the helpful
input on the physical aspects of
approaching motherhood, the
modified Lamaze Course, coor-
dinated with CEA (Childbirth
Education''Association) of
1 1 VI
xnn
LV M I ^
JCC Camp's first balloon
release. A note in one of them
was returned from
Philadelphia!
Seymour Glazer comes
regularly all the way from
Coconut Creek to enjoy the
Numbers Game at the JCC.
Kroward County, offers some of
the current Jewish idology on
childbirth-related issues such as
naming, circumcision, and the
suggested Jewish educational en-
vironment for the infant and tod-
dler. These discussions will be led
by Sunrise Jewish Center's
spiritual leader, Rabbi Randall
Konigsburg.
In addition, CEA Instructor
Linda Streitfeld will present all
the latest information on the
stages of labor, delivery,
breathing, physical conditioning
exercises, hospital procedures,
medication, post-partum and
family adjustment.
The course includes six sessions
beginning Thursday, Oct. 22 at
the JCC, continuing for the next
five Thursdays. Time: 7:30-10
p.m.
Because class size is limited, this
special offering is being announc-
ed early with the hope that al) in-
terested mothers-to-be will take
the opportunity to enroll now.
Courses will be ongoing. Call the
Center for fee information and
registration.
Guests at a weekly summer
Tuesday night JCC YES
(Young Energetic Seniors)
meeting seated from the left,
Ida Cohen and Carol Sherman.
Standing. Sylvia Ritter.
Camper Mickey Forrest is all
boxed up in his Independence
Day costume.
SOME PEOPLE LIVE THEIR
ENTIRE LIVES WITHOUT EVER
TASTING WATER. M
Some people have never tasted water that's fresh / \
and pure as a spring. Water without sodium. / \
pollutants, or carbonation Water with nothing added, ^BT^4
nothing taken away. Some people have never tasted
clean, clear Mountain Valley Water from a natural
spring in Hot Springs, Arkansas.
If you re one of those people, try Mountain Valley
Water. You'll be tasting water for the very first time.
MOUNTAIN VALUEY WATER
SPRING WATER FROM HOT SPRINGS, ARK
Purely for drinking.
~3ADJL BROWARD
696-1333 563-6114


From the Anti-Defamation League ...
Friday, August 14, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 13
The Impact of the>Six-Day War
June 1987 being the 20th an-
niversary of the Six-Day War, ar-
ticles have appeared assessing the
long-term impact on Israel and
the Middle East. Often the theme
pf these articles has been that
Israel's victory of 1967 doesn't
ook all that great 20 years later.
This is a myopic view of 20th
tentury Middle East history. In-
peed, problems have arisen as a
result of Israel's stunning victory.
Israeli administration of the West
Sank and Gaza, with its 1.2
tiillion Arabs, benign as it has
keen, still is unwelcome by the
Palestinian population. And there
|ias been a tendency in Israel to
ppend on Arab labor, particular-
in the construction sphere,
i-hereas before '67 the Jewish
filiation were truly the workers
\s well as the governors.
One ought not dismiss the
lignificance of these and other
Iroblems, but in the broader
berspective it is absurd to give
rreater weight to these dif-
ficulties than to the major positive
levelopments which are a direct
futgrowth of June '67.
Above all is the new stronger
Israel that emerged and the im-
pact it had on Middle East peace
mssiliilities and on U.S.-Israel
lelations. Let us remember what
|hings were like in the '60s. The
irab states were talking victory
|ver the Zionists and about throw-
ng them into the sea. And not
lurprisingly, considering the tiny
lize, the fragility of the Jewish
Btate, 9-15 miles wide in its most
populated and industrialized
Ireas. The question of Israel's
iery survival was on the minds of
Israelis and their Arab neighbors,
critically, as long as Arab leaders
believed that a chance existed to
destroy Israel, they had the incen-
tive to plan for it, since none of
these leaders welcome a Jewish
state in their midst.
Now look at 1987. Egypt, the
largest Arab state, is at peace
with Israel. Hussein is looking for
a way to make peace. King
Hassan of Morocco welcomes
Shimon Peres to Rabat. Others
acknowledge that Israel's here to
stay. Only the Assads, Khadaffis
and Khomeinis of the region the
most radical, anti-American and
terroristic continue to talk of
Israel's demise. Why this
progress?
Two reasons stand out, and both
are consequences of 1967. One is
Israel's strength. No longer a na-
tion whose borders were indefen-
sible, the victory over a coalition
of Arab states in six days, the pro-
jector of regional power and in-
fluence, Israel was no more to be
viewed as vulnerable to military
attack. Yes, Sadat and Assad
tried again in 1973 in one
desperate effort to return the
strategic situation back to
pre-1967, but failed. Sadat then
realized that there was no Arab
military option against Israel and
began the process of diplomacy
leading to the peace of 1978. And
others understood too that the
strength of post-1967 Israel had
forever changed the strategic
balance.
Second, is the changing rela-
tionship between the U.S. and
Israel. As Henry Kissinger
recognized in the early 70's, Israel
after the '67 war was not an in-
convenient friend of the U.S. look-
ing for protection; rather it was
Cool Summer Recipes
From Empire Kosher
Turkey or chicken salads make
reat summer meals. When it's
ao hot to cook, save time, and
lalories, with these quick recipe
ieas. Cooked turkey breast is
erfect for each summer "cook-
hg," with a lot of protein per ser-
ring. You may substitute diced
Ihicken (boiled and deboned) in
foual measures for the turkey
Ireast. Serve the salads with
reens as salad platters or on your
avorite bread for wholesome
lummer sandwiches.
:OLORFUL TURKEY SALAD
cups Empire Cooked
Turkey Breast (diced)
p head Romaine lettuce
avocado, peeled and sliced"
grapefruit, peeled/seeded
and sectioned
Tbsps. lemon juice
(or fresh lemon pulp)
navel oranges, peeled, seeded
and sectioned (set juice .
and rind aside for dressing)
red onion, thinly sliced
pressing:
I cup light mayonnaise
I'Tbsps. olive oil
Tbsp. lemon juice
Tsps. Dijon mustard
Tbsps. orange juice
Tbsps. orange peel,
finely chopped
~*h cayenne pepper (to taste)
On large platter, arrange leaves
i washed lettuce, with stalks
oward inside of platter. Arrange
[J^res of avocado and grapefruit in
- ring on outside of platter,
orange and onion slices
I
peel, and pepper to taste. Mix un-
til dressing is well blended and
flows easily. Drizzle half of dress-
ing mixture over chicken platter
and serve remainder in separate
bowl.
Makes 8 6-ounce servings, 315
calories per serving.
i
EGG AND TURKEY SALAD
2 cups Empire Cooked
Turkey Breast
4 ripe tomatoes, seeded
and diced
3 green peppers, seeded
and diced
4 scallions, diced
(including greens)
2 stalks celery, diced
6 eggs
1 cup black olives, drained,
seeded, and coarsely chopped
Vt cup chopped parsley
Dressing
3 Tbsps. lemon juice
Mr cup olive oil
dash pepper to taste
dash chili powder to taste
(optional)
1 Tsp. garlic powder .
Cook eggs until ham-boiled.
Under cold running water,
remove eggshells. Chop eggs
coarsely and place in large bowl.
Add turkey breast, tomatoes, pep-
pers, scallions, celery and olives,
and toss ingredients well. Chill un-
til ready to serve. Before serv-
ings, mix lemon juice, olive oil,
and spices thoroughly in small
bowl. Pour dressing over salad
mixture and toss lightly. Place on
serving platter (or bed of lettuce
smaller ring inside the first >t leaves) and sprinkle parsley over
nK- Sprinkle-lemon juice over .'mixture to garnish. Additional
Add diced turkey breast to
enter of rings. In a small bowl,
ombine mayonnaise, oil and
gnon juice. Stir until well blend-
Add mustard, orange juice,
olive oil may be served wijs salad,
depending on individual taste.
an increasingly important
strategic factor, and a pro-
American, anti-Soviet one at that,
that could be of immense value in
protecting Western interests in
the region. As a result, over the
years the U.S. has provided Israel
with billions of dollars of economic
and military assistance; has
established strategic agreements;
has signed a free trade agree-
ment; and has worked together
with Israel to overcome Israel's
economic difficulties.
In the process not only were
U.S. and Israel ties bolstered to
the benefit of both, but the peace
process as well was encouraged.
Arab states have come to realize
that since the ties between the
U.S. and Israel are indissoluble it
is an illusion to think that the
future will bring a weaker Israel,
one that once again will be
vulnerable to attack.
As for Israel itself, there has
been a well-documented price to
pay for victory. Issues surroun-
ding the West Bank, settlements,
the Palestinians have divided the
country and await resolution. But
the city of Jerusalem is whole
again; the Jewish quarter
restored, access to the Western
Wall regained all while pro-
viding complete protection of
Christian and Moslem holy places.
And Jews are once again able to
live in the biblical home of Judea
and Samaria (the West Bank),
from which they had been barred
during the rule of the area until
1967 by King Hussein.
It is always easy and headline-
grabbing to talk about problems.
The long-range view, however,
points to a Middle East that is
moving toward peace that could
not have been without the Six-Day
War. In the final analysis, events
of June '67 were only a defeat for
those who would have liked inter-
minable war and the destruction
of the Jewish State. For the rest
of us, we have reason to celebrate.
THE STAFF AND PARTICIPANTS of the Jeunsh Federation's
adult day care program. The Gathering Place, want to thank the
generosity of Cheryl and Leonard Weinrub, owners of Bagel Host
Too, 4191 Pine Island Road. Jack Gersten, the gregarious van
driver for The Gathering Place stops at the Bagel Host Too for
breakfast before reporting to work and, in conversation, told the
Weinrubs about the wonderful elderly people he drives to The
Gathering Place. The Weinrubs decided to supply the bagels for
the morning coffee everyday. A sincere and heartfelt thank you to
a very caring couple for their donation of delicious bagels to start
the day off. Shown: Leonard Weinrub with his staff.
Community Calendar
Compiled by
Lori Ginsberg
748-8400.
SATURDAY AUGUST 15
Lauderdale West: 8 p.m.
Movie: "Irreconciliable Dif-
ferences." Cost 50 cents.
Sunrise Jewish Center-Men's
Club: 8:30 p.m. Show featur-
ing Bert Sheldon, Leila Rose
and Jimmy Hobales. Donation:
$5, $4. At Temple. 741-0295.
TUESDAY AUGUST 18
ORT-Coral West Chapter:
11:30 a.m. Luncheon and card
party. Tickets $6.50. Clock
Restaurant, 2700 N. State Rd.
7, Margate. 973-7353.
WEDNESDAY AUGUST 19
Sunrise Jewish Center-
Sisterhood: Noon. Meeting.
Jeanine Rezende will entertain
with a presentation of
"Interior Designs."
SATURDAY AUGUST 22
Lauderdale West: 8:30 p.m.
Body and Soul Revue with
Richard Ryan. Cost $4.
THURSDAY AUGUST 27
Temple Emanu-El: 7:45 p.m.
Board meeting. At Temple.

Makes 8 6-ounce servings, 340
calories per serving. ^
Who Needs It?
We Do!
ouglas Gardens
Thrift Shops
OTHING f l iUNITURE APPLIA'NC
Helping the Jewish community of South Florida
for more than 40 years.
I A not-for-profit organization
Cad for fret pick-up of your fuSy tax tfsductftte donation:
Dade: 751-3988 Broward: 961-8245
Shop at two convenient locations:
5713 N.W. 27th Avenue, Miami
5829 Hallandala Baach Boulevard, HaUandal*
A division of tha Miami JawiahHoma
ndHoapttaiforthaAgadatDouglaaOontona


Page 14 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, August 14, 1987
Temple News

Sha'aray Tzedek
Names New Educators
Temple Sha'aray Tzedek
(Sunrise Jewish Center) has
named educators Joy Kahn-
Evron and Penny Klombers to
head expanded religious school
and nursery school programs
for the 1987-88 school year.
As Religious School Direc-
tor, Mrs. Kahn-Evron is
responsible for administration
and curriculum design for the
synagogue's Sunday school
(grades K-2), Hebrew school
(grades 3-7) and high school
program (grades 8-12). Mrs.
Klombers, Director of Early
Childhood Education, oversees
the temple's nursery program
for ages two-and-a-half
through five years (pre-
Kindergarten).
"With our new six-hours-
per-week Hebrew school for-
mat, in conformance with
United Synagogue of America
standards, Joy is introducing
creative, hands-on learning
programs to give students of
all ages a greater sense of Yid-
dishkeit," said Sha'aray
Tzedek Rabbi Randall J.
Konigsburg. Monthly current
events breakfast assemblies
for the lower grades and mi-
nyan Torah study breakfasts
with the rabbi for seventh
graders are among innova-
tions for the fall. The
synagogue has full member-
ship in Judaica High School,
offering one- or two-evenings-
per-week classes for grades
8-12.
Registration is underway for
the new school year. For infor-
mation call 741-0295 in
Sunrise.
Kol Ami Elects New
President
William David Matz has been
elected the 6th President of
Temple Kol Ami in Plantation.
Bill has been Treasurer and
BBYO News
BBYO Members to Attend Inter-
national Convention
Some 400 members of the B'nai
B'rith Youth Organization
(BBYO) from seven countries will
deal with a series of issues affec-
ting the teenage population at
their annual international conven-
tion Aug. 18-24, at the B'nai
B'rith Perlman Camp in Starlight,
Pa.
The issues, which include
teenage sexuality and AIDS
prevention, are being addressed
as the youths launch their new
program emphasis for the year on
AIDS education.
The theme of the convention is
"Making a Better World."
According to convention direc-
tor Joe Wittenstein, "We hope to
facilitate a better understanding
of the issues affecting the world
today and how our members, as
teenagers, can use their resources
to impact these concerns."
Keynote speaker for the conven-
tion will be Dr. Sol Gordon, direc-
tor of the Institute for Family
Research and Education at
Syracuse University. Gordon will
address the teens on "How Do I
Know If I'm Really In Love."
An innovative teen drama group
from Philadelphia will perform a
series of vignettes highlighting
teenage issues. The group, known
as The Connection, will encourage
audience participation throughout
its performances.
Delegates to the convention,
who represent the United States,
Canada, Great Britain, France,
Israel, Australia, and South
America, will elect international
officers for both AZA and BBG,
the male and female components
of the organization. They will also
take part in the presentation of
the Sam Beber Distinguished
AZA Alumnus Award to Dr.
Sidney Clearfield, international
director of BBYO.
BBYO is a beneficiary agency of
the Jewish Federation receiving
funds through the annual United
Jewish Appeal Campaign.
Diversified Jewish Quiz
By RABBI
DAVID W. GORDON
1-What is the attitude of
Judaism towards using drugs
(heroin, etc)?
2- Give the meaning of the
term "Queen SabbathT'
3- Who are the three persons
that slander kills, according to
the Talmud?
4- By what title is Moses
known?
5- Name the first Prime
Minister of Israel.
6- How many times a year
did Rabbis deliver sermons
during the middle ages?
7- Name the grandfather,
the father and the son of Yid-
dish literature.
8- Where is the Museum of
American Jewish History
situated?
9- What was the prime goal
of the Ethiopian Jews?
10-Which two books
authored by Elie Wiesel
presents extraordinary por-
traits of the great Chassidic
Rabbis?
Answers
1-Anything that is
dangerous to life and limb is
strictly forbidden.
2- The Sabbath, the weekly
day of rest is welcomed as a
Bride and a Queen on Fridays
at sunset and observed until
nightfall (not sunset) on
Saturday.
3- The slanderer, the listener
and the maligned.
4-Not that of Liberator.
General or Leader par ex-
cellence but rather as "Moses
our Teacher."
5-David Ben-Gurion
(1886-1973)
6- Three. Sabbath before
Passover (Shabbat Hagadol),
the Sabbath before Rosh
Hashanah and the Sabbath
before Yom Kippur (Shabbat
Shuvah).
7- Mendele Moycher
Seforim, Yitzchak Leibish
Peretz and Sholom Aleichem.
8-Philadelphia, Penn-
sylvania next door to the
Chapel of the Mikveh Israel
Congregation.
9- According to their Chief
Rabbi, "return to Jerusalem."
10-"Shuls On Fire" (Ran-
dom) and its sequel
"Somewhere A Master"
(Summit)
Matz
Schneeweiss
Financial Secretary of Temple
Kol Ami for the past six years.
He is on the Board of Directors
of the Ann Storck Center, a
home for developmentally
disabled children and young
adults. Bill presently serves as
Co-Chairman of the City of
Plantation Comprehensive
Planning Board and is Presi-
dent of Hollywood Appliances
International, supplier of ap-
pliances to builders and
dealers throughout the
Caribbean.
Beth Torah Appoints
Youth Director
Seymour Wildman, Presi-
dent of Temple Beth Torah-
Tamarac Jewish Center, is
pleased to announce the ap-
pointment of Neil Schneeweiss
as Youth Director. He suc-
ceeds "Uncle Al" Nirenberg,
who passed away on June 7.
Mr. Schneeweiss, a resident
of Sunrise, has been the Senior
Advisor of the Tamarac
Recruits Youth Group for the
last four years. He has been in-
volved in United Synagogue
Youth program as a member
and advisor since 1977.
Neil is a graduate of Piper
High School and received his
Associate of Arts degree from
Broward Community College.
He is presently enrolled at
Florida Atlantic University,
working toward a Bachelors
Degree in Education. Future
plans include the possibility of
studying law.
The Tamarac Jewish Center
Youth group was founded by
Al Nirenberg at the request of
Rabbi Kurt F. Stone and has
enjoyed amazing growth. Mr.
Schneeweiss said, "We expect
to maintain the high standards
set by Uncle Al and hope to
continue the pattern of
growth."
For additional information
contact: Arthur Knopfmacher,
Executive Director
721-7660.
^-.
Aug. 14
Aug. 21
Aug. 28
Sept. 5
7:37 p.m.
7:31 p.m.
7:24 p.m.
7:16 p.m.
Benediction upon Kindling
the Sabbath Lights
BORUCH ATTO AD-ONAI
ELO-HEINU MELECH HO-
OLOM ASHER KID-
SHONU BEMITZ-VOSOV
VETZI-VONU LE-HAD-
LIK NEYR SHEL
SHABOS.
Blessed art Thou, O Lord our
G-d, King of the universe who
hast sanctified us by thy com-
mandments and commanded
us to kindle the Sabbath light.
With Rhyme
and Reason
Some Thoughts
From Ecclesiastes
Eat your bread in gladness and
Drink your wine in joy,
Keep your clothes in
cleanliness,
The better to enjoy ..
Have your head anointed in
All your fleeting days,
Bask in glowing happiness,
And love to love always .. .
To every thing there is a time;
To be bom and die,
A time to mourn, a time to
dance,
A time to laugh and
cry...
Let generations come and go,
The earth will yet abide ..
And all remains but vanity
Throughout each changing
tide .. .
Though riches may not crown
your work
And fame comes not in sight,
What lies in your power now
Do with all your might.
Jack Gould
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL
Andrew Levine, son of Mar-
tha and Steven Levine of
Sunrise, will celebrate his Bar
Mitzvah at the Saturday morn-
ing, Aug. 22 service at Temple
Beth Israel, Sunrise.
Synagogue Directory
CONSERVATIVE
CONSERVATIVE SYNAGOGUE OF COCONUT CREEK. (975-4666) Lyons
Plaza, 1447 Lyons Road, Coconut Creek 33066. Services: Daily 8 a.m.. 4:30 p.m., Fn
day 8 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m.. 5 p.m. Rabbi Avaron Oraiin. Cantor Irvin Bell.
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER (721-7660), 9101 NW 57th St., Tamarac. 33321.
Services: Sunday through Friday 8:30 a.m., 6 p.m. Late Friday service 8 p.m. Satur-
day 8:45 a.m. Rabbi Kurt F. Stone.
TEMPLE BETH AHM (431-5100). 9730 Stirling Road, Hollywood, 33024. Services
daily 8 a.m.; Sabbath 8 p.m., Sabbath morning 8:45 a.m. Rabbi Avraham Kapaek.
Cantor Stuart Kanaa.
TEMPLE BETH AM (974-8650), 7205 Royal Palm Blvd., Margate, 33063. Services:
Monday through Friday 8:30 a.m., 5 p.m. Friday late service 8 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m.,
5 p.m.; Sunday 8 a.m., 5 p.m. Rabbi Paul Plotkin. Rabbi Emeritus. Dr. Solomon
Geld. Cantor Irving Grossman.
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL (742-4040), 7100 W. Oakland Park Blvd., Sunrise. 33313.
Services: Monday through Friday 8 a.m.,. 6:30p.m.; Friday 8 a.m., 5 p.m., 8 p.m.;
Saturday 8:45 a.m.. 7:45 p.m. Sunday 8:30 a.m. Rabbi Howard A. Addison. Cantor
Maurice A. Nm.
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL OF DEERFIELD BEACH (421-7060), 200 S. Century
Blvd., Deerfield Beach, 33441. Services: Sunday through Friday 8:30 a.m.. 5 p.m.
Friday late service 8 p.m.; Saturday 8:45 a.m., and at candlelighting time. Rabbi
Joseph Laagner. Cantor ShabUI Ackemua.
TEMPLE B'NAI MOSHE (942-5380). 1434 SE 3rd St., Pompano Beach. 33060.
Services: Friday 8 p.m. Cantor Jehndah HeUbraaa.
TEMPLE SHA'ARAY TZEDEK 741-0296), 4099 Pine Island Rd., Sunrise, 33321.
Services: Sunday through Friday 8 a.m., 5 p.m.; Late Friday service 8 p.m.; Satur-
day 8:45 a.m., 5 p.m. Rabbi Randall Konlgabarg. Cantor Barry Black. Cantor
Emscitas Jack Marehant.
TEMPLE SHOLOM (942-6410). 132 SE 11 Ave., Pompano Beach. 33060. Services:
Monday through Friday 8:45 UaV, evenings: Monday through Thursday at 5 p.m.,
Friday evening at 8. Saturday and Sunday 9 a.m. Rabbi Samuel April. Cantor
Ronald Graaar.
CONGREGATION BETH HILLEL OF MARGATE (974-3090). 7640 Margate
Blvd.. Margate. 33063. Services: Sunday through Friday 8:16 a.m., 5:30 p.m. Late
Friday service 8 p.m. Saturday 8:46 a.m., 5:30 p.m. Rabbi Nathan Zoloadek. Can-
tor Jori Cohen.
HEBREW CONGREGATION OF LAUDERHILL (733-9560). 2048 NW 49th Ave.,
Lauderhill. 33313. Services: Sunday through Friday 8:30 e-m.. 5:30 p.m.; Saturday
8:46 a.m. Rabbi Israel Hainan.
CONGREGATION BETH TEFILAH (formerly North Lauderdale Hebrew Con-
gregation) (722-7607), 6436 W. Commercial Blvd., Tamarac. FL 33319. Services:
Friday at 6 p.m., Saturday at 8 a.m Charles B. Fyier, President.
ORTHODOX
TEMPLE OHEL B'NAI RAPHAEL (733-7684), 4361 W. Oakland Park Blvd..
Lauderdale Lakes, 33313. Services: Sunday through Thursday 8 a.m.. 6 p.m., Friday
8 a.m., 7 p.m., Saturday 8:45 a.m., 7 p.m.
SYNAGOGUE OF INVERRARY CHABAD (748-1777). 4661 N. University Dr..
Lauderhill. Services: Sunday through Friday 6:45 a.m, 8 a.m.. 5:15 p.m., Saturday 9
a.m., 5:30 p.m. Study group": Men. Sundays following services: Women,
Tuesdays 8 p.m. Rabbi Aroa Lieberman.
YOUNG ISRAEL OF DEERFIELD BEACH (421-1367), 1880 W. Hillsboro Blvd..
Deerfield Beach. 33441. Services: Sunday through Friday 8 a.m. and sundown.
Saturday 8:45 a.m. and sundown. Joseph M. Reiner. President.
YOUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD-FORT LAUDERDALE (966-7877). 3291
Stirling Rd.. Fort Lauderdale, 33312. Services: Monday through Friday 7:30 a.m..
and sundown; Saturday. 9 a.m., sundown; Sunday 8 a.m.. sundown. Rabbi Edward
Davis.
CONGREGATION MIDGAL DAVID 726 3583), 8575 W. McNab Rd.. Tamarac.
33321. Services: Daily 8 a.m.; mincha 5 p.m.; Saturday 8:45 a.m. and 5:15 p.m. Rab-
bi Chaim Schneider. Congregation president: Herman Fleischer.
RECON8TRUCTIONIST
RAMAT SHALOM (472-3600). 11301 W. Broward Blvd., Plantation, 33325. Ser-
vices: Friday, 8:15 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. Rabbi Elliot Skiddell. Cantor Bella
Milim.
REFORM
TEMPLE BET TIKVAH (471 8088). 8890 W. Oakland Park Blvd.. Sunrise. 33321.
Services: Friday 8 p.m. Rabbi Dennis Wald.
TEMPLE BETH ORR (753-3232). 2151 Riverside Dr.. Coral Springs. 33065. Ser-
vices: Friday 8 p.m.: Saturday 10 a.m. Rabbi Mark W. Cross.
TEMPLE B'NAI SHALOM OF DEERFIELD BEACH (426-2532). Services at
Menorah Chapels, 2305 W. Hillsboro Blvd., Deerfield Reach. 33441. Friday 8 p.m.
Rabbi Nathan H. Fish. Cantor Morris Laviaaoa.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL (731-2310). 3245 W. Oakland Park Blvd.. Lauderdale Lakes.
33311. Services: Friday 8:15 p.m.; Saturday, only on holidays or celt-brat ion of Bar-
Bat Mitzvah. Rabbi Jeffrey Ballon. Cantor Rita Shore.
TEMPLE KOL AMI (472-1988), 8200 Peters Rd.. Plantation. 33324. Services: Fri
day 8:15 p.m.. Saturday 10:30 a.m. Rabbi Sheldon J. Harr. Cantor Frank
Birnbaum.
LIBERAL JEWISH TEMPLE OF COCONUT CREEK (973-7494). Services: Fri
day night services twice monthly at Calvary Presbyterian Church, 3950 Coconut
Creek Parkway Rabbi Brace S. Warshal. Cantor Barbara Roberts.
TEMPLE BAT YAM (928-0410). McGaw Hall. 1400 N. Federal Hwy. (adjacent to
Second Presbyterian Church). Ft. Lauderdale, 33304. Service: Weekly on Friday
evenings at 8 p.m. Rabbi Lewis Littman.



Friday, August 14, 1987/The Jewish Floridiari of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 15
CJF Launches Satellite Teleconferencing Network
NEW YORK, NY Hailing
it as a way to bridge the com-
munication gap, reduce travel
costs and save time, the Coun-
cil of Jewish Federations is
about to launch its own two-
way satellite teleconferencing
network.
The culmination of nearly a
decade of study by Federation
professionals and lay commit-
tee members, the CJF
Satellite Network will begin
operating this summer. Nine-
teen Federations have already
agreed to participate, with
several others actively pro-
cessing the proposal.
The Network will enhance
communication between
Federations, between CJF and
Federations and between CJF
and its lay leadership. Federa-
tions will benefit from reduc-
tions in travel expenses and in
the amount of time that staff
and lay leaders must spend
away from home.
In announcing; the start of
V
V -
Terrace retainer walls developed by the Jewish National Fund at
the experimental farm in Sataf (above) are helping a team of
farmers examine the agricultural technology used during the
time of King David which enabled Jerusalem to prosper with its
poor soil and limited rainfall. Hillsides are terraced tvith re-
tainer walls made of stone. Runoff rainwater, which is not ab-
sorbed by the hard soil, travels down the hills and is captured in
thi w terraces. The water then trickles down through the stones to
each level, where it is absorbed by softened soil or channeled
through hand-carved irrigation trenches directly to individual
rows of vegetables. The staff at the Sataf farm now grows a large
enough crop to feed and sell its surplus to the local Jerusalem
markets.
Newswire/Florida
IN THE final hours of the 1987 Legislative Session the Florida
House of Representative passed a bill sponsored by Rep. .lack N.
Tobin (D-Margate) which will allow the world famous Cleveland
Clinic to open a facility in Broward County. The Cleveland Clinic
in Ohio is rated in the top one percent of hospitals in the U.S. ac-
cording to case mix complexity and was the first medical facility
m the U.S. to be designated by Congress as a National Referral
Center.
The Clinic in Florida will be a multispecialty group practice of-
fering a comprehensive diagnosis and treatment of major medical
problems including cardiovascular disease, cancer treatment,
neurosensory disorders, and musculoskeletal disorders. It will
also become a center for applied medical research. At the present
time Broward and Palm Beach counties have no major medical
research facilities.
The Clinic plans to open a 300 bed hospital within the next five
years.
THE BOARD of Directors of the Miami Chapter of the
American Jewish Committee voted to cooperate with a project in-
itiated by Archbishop Edward A. McCarthy. Heeding the,Ar-
chbishop's call for people to donate $5 per person to help the poor
through the charity of their choice, Committee will call on its
members to do that.
AJC President Michael Bander said, "the Board agreed that the
visit of the Pope should have a broader message as indicated by
the Archbishop. We will collect this money and form a committee
to choose an organisational recipient. It falls well within
American Jewish Committee's view of the Jewish obligation of
Tzedekah (creating justice through charity) and our view of our
role in this society."
Committee will undertake the drive on a regional basis as well,
said Regional Director Bill Gralnick. While not linked to the cur-
rent controversy over Kurt Waldheim, the project does
demonstrate our longstanding commitment to community rela-
tions in general and Catholic-Jewish relations in particular.
the CJF Satellite Network,
Shoshana S. Cardin, President
of CJF, cited its numerous
potential uses including
regional meetings of Federa-
tions: campaign-related
events; briefings on current
national or overseas develop-
ment; rapid mobilization and
information-sharing in
emergencies; training pro-
grams to supplement existing
Continuing Professional
Education courses; meetings
of national CJF committees;
and use by other organizations
such as UJA, JDC, or United
Way.
The Federations which have
agreed to install antennas are:
Detroit, St. Louis, Chicago,
Pittsburgh, New York, Buf-
falo, Cleveland, Milwaukee,
MetroWest (NJ), Los Angeles,
San Francisco, Seattle,
Washington, Dallas,
Baltimore, Dayton, Toronto,
Boston and Providence.
Participation in the Network
Scientists Plead for Lerner's
Safe Exit from Soviet Union
By SUSAN BIRNBAUM
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Hundreds of computer scien-
tists meeting in Seattle for the
Sixth National Conference on
Artificial Intelligence appealed
to Soviet authorities to allow
their colleague. Prof. Alex-
ander Lerner of Moscow, to
emigrate, according to the
Committee of Concerned
Scientists.
Lerner, 73, a cyberneticist,
is one of the longest-term
refuseniks, first applying to
emigrate in 1971. He was
refused that year, and many
times subsequently, on the
basis of knowledge of "state
secrets," although prior to
1971 he had traveled to the
West for scientific symposia
with testimony by his highest
supervisor to the KGB that
Lerner was not privy to state
secrets.
Lerner and his late wife,
Judith, who died in 1981, had
two small daughters before
World War II who were killed
at Babi Yar with their grand-
parents. Lerner had taken the
girls, ages three and five, to
his native Vinnitsa in 1941 for
vacation with their grand-
parents, two weeks before the
German invasion on June 22.
After the war, the Lerners
had two other children, Sonya
and Vladimir. Vladimir is cur-
rently a Moscow refusenik and
Sonya Lerner Levin lives in
Rehovot, Israel. Lerner was
among eight people cited
earlier this year by the Soviets
as never to be permitted to
emigrate on grounds of "na-
tional security."
The petition on behalf of
Lerner was circulated by
.ludoa Pearl, a professor of
computer science at UCLA
and a member pf the Commit-
tee of Concerned Scientists,
is under active consideration
by Federations in Montreal,
Atlanta, Cincinnati, Colum-
bus, Miami, Phoenix and Cen-
tral New Jersey.
The Network enables par-
ticipants at any designated
receiving site to view pro-
grams and ask questions or
make comments. Everyone
participating in the session will
hear the remarks of others.
Programs will originate
primarily from a television
studio in New York or from
studios located in other cities
in North America or around
the world.
According to Alan H. Mar-
cuvitz, Chairman of CJF's
Communications Committee,
"The uses for this Network are
limited only by our imagina-
tion and creativity. We expect
that the Network will lead us
into the era of high-tech com-
munication and the 21st
century."
The Network is being built
for CJF under the terms of an
agreement with International
Satellite Network Corp., a
New York City-based linn.
Using the Network will
enable Federation lay and pro-
fessional leaders to increase
their involvement in Federa-
tion matters and national
agency issues and to keep
abreast of fast-breaking
events and developing trends.
"The CJF Satellite Network
will strengthen the concept of
the Federation as the 'central
address' for Jewish concerns
in each community since other
groups using the network, as
well as program participants,
will do so at a receiving site in
a Federation building," com-
mented Carmi Schwartz, Ex-
ecutive Vice President of CJF.
Warsaw Ghetto Survivor Offers
A Stark and Chilling Reminder
Shielding the Flame: An In-
timate Conversation with Dr.
Marek Feldman, the Last Sur-
viving Leader of the Warsaw
Ghetto Uprising. By Hanna
Krall; translated '>.'/ Joatna
St'asinska ami Lawrence
W'csrhler. Henry //"/' uml Cmii-
pany, Stl Fifth Avenue, New
Yoti, NY ioi7:>. tux<>. XIII. w,
page*. $13.95.
Reviewed by Judith Herschlag
Muffs
Past and present merge in this
unusual and sometimes confusing
interview with Dr. Marek
Edelman, a cardiologist living in
Lodz and one of the five leaders of
the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising.
"Together, all of us, we were 110
years old." The book is stark,
chilling, tense, painful, elliptical
and at times surrealistic. We are
in the ghetto in 1942 and then sud-
denly, without warning, we are
with Edelman the doctor talking
about his heart patients, their
medical and non-medical pro-
blems, and able to glimpse a bit of
today's Poland. And we see
Kdclman's commitment to life.
Let's listen to him al>out the
Ghetto. After several of the
resistance lenders bad committed
suicide: " for a symbol.'"
After learning that the deporta-
tions from the Ghetto were not to
resettlement labor camps but to
death camps, Czerniakow, the
leader of the Warsaw Ghetto
Judenrat, committed suicide.
Edelman: "We reproach him for
having made death his own
private business. At that time
every- man was needed. One
should die only after having called
other people into the struggle."
"The majority of us favored an
uprising. After all, humanity had
agreed that dying with arms was
more beautiful that without "
arms."
"Listen, my dear. Do you have
any idea what bread meant at that
time in the ghetto? Because If you
don't, you will never understand
how thousands of people could
voluTitarfly.come for the bred and
go with this bread to the camp at
Treblinka. 'Have you gone in-
sane?,' people would say when we
were trying to convince them that
they were not being taken to
work. 'Would they be sending us
to death with bread? So much
bread would be wasted!' '
It is an urgent and an un-
finished story.
Judith Herschlag Muffs is the
uitthur of The Holocaust in
Books and Films: A Selected,
Annotated List, and associate
director of interfaith affairs for
the Anti-Defamation League in
New York. .
WRITE FOR YOUR 20 YEAR PERSONAL YAHRZEIT CALENDAR.
I [JC ''"' MM
m llemtew mkw imM ul
Jnimr pemtetllmm 4 m mm Jet *f mm J
img m/ hihAmA m ike Jmnh
Hmdmmm i> uemln mmt <>l ike erne
mmd rryvr* /ue Ike tdemh we ml
Smnmni PwluJr **/ /. Ik,
Immuh m*J /.- Ike emmmmemUr
FOREST HILLS
ROCKVILLE CENTRE
BROOKLYN
MONTICELLO
sronx
wooobury
miami beach
TAMARAC
Blasberg Parkside
FUNERAL CHAPELS. Inc
8136 Wetl McNab Road Tamarac, Florid. 33321 (306) 726-1777
INVESTIGATE OUR PRE NEED FUNERAL ARRANGEMENTS THROUGH THE ASSUREO PLAN"
TRANSFERS TO ANY FUNERAL HOME IN NORTH AMERICA AND ISRAEL
LARRIES. BLASBERG MICHAEL C. BLASBERG
FUNERAL OIRECTOR FUNERAL DIRECTOR
PAST PRESIDENT ._
JEWISH FUNERAL DIRECTORS IRA M. BLASBERG
OF AMERICA FUNERAL DIRECTOR
BLASBERG PARKSIDE FUNERAL CHAPELS, INC., 8135 WEST McNAB ROAD. TAMARAC. FLORIDA S3321
PLEASE SEND 20 YEAR PERSONAL YAHRZEIT CALENDAR TO:
NAME:
ADDRESS:
CITY
APT.
NAME OF OECEASEO
DATE OF DEATH
. 1t.
BBS


Page 16 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, August 14, 1987
Israelis Bar Redefining of a Jew, Posing Threat to Rule by Shamir
Editor's Note: Reprinted from
The New York Times; by Thomas
L. Friedman.
JERUSALEM Parliament
narrowly rejected three bills
recently that were aimed at
redefining the official Israeli posi-
tion on who is a Jew. The bills
would have effectively denied the
legitimacy of Reform and Conser-
vative Judaism.
Votes by five Arab members of
Parliament and one Druse were
critical in defeating, by 62 to 53,
the most important of the three
bills, which was an amendment to
the Law of Return.
That law currently provides
that any Jew in the world can
come to Israel and obtain im-
mediate citizenship. For the pur-
poses of that law, the Government
defines a Jew as anyone born of a
Jewish mother or converted to
Judaism. The defeated amend-
ments, which was introduced by
religious parties, would have add-
ed the words converted to
Judaism "according to the
Halacha," or Jewish law.
A Blow to Shamir
Government
Since Israel's state-appointed
Chief Rabbis, who come from the
Orthodox stream of Judaism, do
not recognize Reform and Conser-
vative rabbis as authentic agents
of Jewish law, anyone converted
by such rabbis would not have
been considered a Jew in Israel or
eligible for automatic citizenship
if the amendment had been
approved.
The fact that the three bills
were defeated by a combination of
Labor and small leftist and Arab
parties was viewed as a political
blow to Prime Minister Yitzhak
Shamir. Even though he carried
out his part of a bargain with the
religious parties, one of them,
most likely Shas, a rigidly Or-
thodox one, may try to bring down
his Government in anger in com-
ing weeks.
Secular Parliament Criticized
"The critical role played by the
Arab members of Parliament in
defeating these bills just points up
how absurd it is that a secular
Parliament should be legislating
on who is a Jew," said Rabbi
Richard Hirsch, head of the inter-
national Reform movement, with
headquarters in Jerusalem.
"What it came down to was six
Arabs sitting in Jerusalem deter-
mining who is a Jew in New York,
Melbourne, London and
Johannesburg."
All three of the defeated bills
were inspired by Israel's small
religious parties and supported by
the Likud bloc, led by Mr. Shamir.
Likud's backing was given in
return for the smaller parties'
support of Mr. Shamir against
Foreign Minister Shimon Peres,
the Labor Party leader, and his ef-
forts to bring down the Govern-
ment or to organize an interna-
tional peace conference on the
Middle East.
The 120-seat Parliament also
defeated, by 69 votes to 40, a bill
that would have pardoned all the
still imprisoned Jewish terrorists
who were involved in attacks on
Palestinians in the West Bank in
1985. Eight of the original 28
Jewish terrorists are still in jail
three of them serving sentences
for murdering Arabs.
Shamir Backs Pardon
In an unexpected move, Mr.
Shamir voted in favor of the
blanket pardon of the convicted
terrorists, while Mr. Peres and his
party voted with the majority
against.
When the sponsor of the pardon
bill, Avraham Verdiger of the
Morasha Party, declared on the
floor of Parliament that his law
had a broad base of public sup-
port, a left-wing legislator, Yossi
Sarid, jumped up and shouted:
"Lie! Lie!"
Up until the last votes were cast
on the three bills, it was not clear
what the outcome would be.
Leaders of the American Reform
and Conservative movements, as
well as the United Jewish Appeal,
which raises money in America
for Israel, had flooded Parliament
with phone calls and telegrams
urging members to reject the bills.
American Jews Are Voicing Their Disquiet
Editor's Note: Reprinted from
The New York Times, The Week in
Review.
By THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN
TEL AVIV In the months
since the revelations about Israeli
espionage in Washington, Israel's
role in the Iran arms affair, and
numerous embarrassing squab-
bles in the Israeli Government, of-
ficials here have been closely
monitoring American opinion
polls to see if these episodes have
affected Israel's standing.
According to several American
polling experts now visiting
Israel, the findings have been
rather surprising: Israel's stan-
ding with the American public re-
mains high, largely untouched by
the recent scandals. But at the
same time, its standing with
American Jewish leaders has, to
some extent, been negatively
affected.
"What frightened American
Jews most about the Pollard affair
was what it said about Israel's
judgment," said Steven Spiegel of
the University of California at Los
Angeles, an expert on American
attitudes about the Middle East.
"It is not that American Jewish
leaders came away saying, 'By
golly, we should back away from
Israel.' They said, 'By golly, what
is wrong with the Israelis? They
have a scandal a week.' "
The conclusion of many
American Jewish leaders. Pro-
fessor Spiegel said, was that they
should become more actively in-
volved with Israeli policymaking
and speak out, critically when
necessary, on the assumption that
"Israel is too important to be left
to Israelis."
The mood was clearly echoed
during recent meetings of the
Jewish Agency Assembly, an um-
brella organization that links in-
ternational Jewish fund-raising
and immigration-promoting
groups with Israeli institutions.
Among the organizations is the
American United Jewish Appeal,
which last year sent $350 million
to Israel. Many of the American
delegates to the meetings called
for greater accountability by
Israel on how donated money is
spent, particularly to insure that
it goes to projects that reflect
American values of religious
tolerance, democratic education
and pluralism.
Moreover, a delegation led by the
national chairman of the United
Jewish Appeal, Martin Stein,
delivered an unusually vigorous
warning to Prime Minister Yit-
zhak Shamir. They told him that if
Mr. Shamir and the Parliament
accept ultraorthodox party
demands to change the official
definition of who is a Jew, a step
that could effectively aelegitimize
the Reform and Conservative
branches of Judaism, the change
would have a major negative im-
pact on American Jewish dona-
tions to Israel. The issue is one
that produces a visceral response.
among American Jews, Mr. Stein
reportedly told Mr. Shamir.
American Jews may indeed be
getting freer with their advice, an
Israeli official said, "but I doubt
that this will have much impact
here. The power is with those who
are here and American Jews just
are not here. You cannot come
over three times a year and expect
to have your advice taken serious-
ly." According to Professor
Spiegel, American Jewish leaders
are increasingly willing to talk
tough to their Israeli counter-
parts, partly because they feel
that Americans have become so
sympathetic to Israel that the old
hesitancy about washing dirty
linen in public has slightly
diminished.
'Motherhood' Values
For example, in a Washington
Post-ABC News Poll last year,
after Israeli spying in Washington
had been revealed, 54 percent of
Americans rated Israel as "a
reliable ally." The approval vir-
tually matched an identical poll
just before the Israeli invasion of
Lebanon in 1982. And in a Roper
poll this year, only 5 percent blam-
ed Israel for the Iran-Contra
affair.
"Support for Israel has been
strong, steady and durable," said
Gary Orren, an expert, on opinion
surveys at Harvard University.
"Even when it goes down, it
always seems to bounce back." He
offered several reasons. First,
Americans identify more closely
with Israelis than with most other
foreigners. "Whenever you ask in
polls, 'Why do you like Israel?' the
answer that always comes up is:
'They are like us,' Mr. Orren
said.
Second, Israel is perceived as
reflecting certain desirable "apple
pie and motherhood" values.
Americans, he said, are apt to
regard Israel as "principled," an
"ally in the face of Soviets," and
most of all, "strong" and "suc-
cessful." Americans, especially
the young, identify with strength
and winners, Mr. Orren said, and
Israel's American support is
highest among young people.
While Israel has recently behav-
ed in ways that might have seem-
ed inconsistent with some of the
motherhood values, it has been in-
sulated by the general ignorance
of foreign news in the United
States. A recent New York
Times/CBS Poll found that only
18 percent knew that Jonathan
Jay Pollard, a United States Navy
intelligence analyst, had spied for
Israel.
Israel has also benefited enor-
mously because its behavior has
been overshadowed by such Arab-
related anti-American incidents as
the hijacking of the Italian cruise
ship Achille Lauro in the Mediter-
ranean and Libyan- and Syrian-
sponsored terrorism, Mr. Orren
said.
Finally, and prhaps most im-
portantly, President Reagan has
set a positive tone about Israel
and has been tolerant of its ex-
cesses, probably more so than any
previous President. Because of
the influence of the President on
the News and the issues that are
debated, his attitudes have en-
joyed a wide echo in American
public opinion, an effect that could
change with a n
Administration.
e w
Rabbi Chaim Druckman, of the
right-wing Morasha religious par-
ty, took the podium and argued in
favor of the amendments defining
who is a Jew, declaring that even
the kibbutz Degania had banned
foreign workers because of all the
intermarriage that was taking
place there. But he was shouted
down by members of the left-wing
Mapam Party, who declared that
the kibbutz Degania banned
foreign workers "not because
they worried about assimilation
but because they were worried
about AIDS."
Most Likud members said
privately that they were against
all the bills, because approval
might split the Jewish world, but
said they had to vote for the
measures because of the agree-
ment between Mr. Shamir and the
leaders of the rigidly Orthodox
Shas party.
Aside from the bill amending
the Law of Return, the two other
bills proposed to grant Israel's
two Chief Rabbis total authority
over determining who can be
registered as a Jew in Israel. At
the moment, that power is vested
in bureaucrats who do not ex-
amine whether someone con-
verted to Judaism was converted
by an Orthodox, Reform or Con-
servative rabbi as the Chief
Rabbis would.
The Likud version of that bill
was rejected 63 to 51 and the Shas
version 60 to 56. The difference
had to do with the fact that some
Likud members were not afraid to
vote against their own bill, but
were afraid to vote against Shas
because of the deal Mr. Shamir-
had struck with them.
How tofind a doctor
who cares about your
health. And about you.
When you wake up
with a sore throat, or a
funny twinge in your back.
Or eyes that really sting
Or anything else that
doesn't seem quite right,
you need to see a doctor.
But how do you
find one?
It's simple. All you
need is this number.
1-800-CARE NOW The
AMI Physician Referral
Service.
With our free com-
puterized system, we can
instantly match you with
physicians who meet your
needs, no matter what
the specialty
And we'll give you
the names of at least two
doctors close to your
home or office. Physicians
who are affiliated with the
AMI Hospitals in Dade or
Broward.
The next time you need to find a doctor,
remember your phone. And this number.
1 -800-CARE-NOW The AMI Physician Refer-
ral Service. Available from ftOO am. to 9:t)0
pm, Monday through Friday And if you
need to leave a message after hours, we'll be
sure to get back to you the very next day
At AMI, we want to help you find the right
doctor. Because we know your good health
depends on it.
4?
Physician Referral Service
1-800-CARE-NOW
Dad* AMI Kendall Regional Medical Center AMI Palmetto General Hospital AMI Parkway Regional
Medical Center AMI Southeastern Medical Center Broward AMI North Ridge Medical Center
Our doctors make the difference.
* 1997 Armi ic* i Medea* intof national


Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EZ2T07VBS_FAH8LN INGEST_TIME 2013-06-28T22:22:31Z PACKAGE AA00014312_00353
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES


Page 12 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, August 14,1987
The Samuel and Helene Soref
Jewish Community Center
Perlman Campus
ti501 W. Sunrise Blvd.
Fort Lauderdale. Florida 33313 792-6700
By Muriel Haskell, Director of Public Relations
For further information and fees concerning the events or pro-
grams listed please call the center.
SUPERRAFFLE
SUPERRECEPTION
SUPERLATIVE
Have you taken your chance? A
One Touch of Class Superraffle
ticket is $100. The prices are:
First $10,000, Second $2,500,
Third, Fourth and Fifth Prizes
$500 each.
According to Dr. Jim Phillips
and Stu Tatz, the Superraffle co-
chairmen, tickets are going fast.
If you want to be a winner, if you
have any intention of joining the
Superreceptionists Saturday, Oct.
24 at 8:30 (changed from Sept. 12)
in the Soref Ballroom/Gym, the
time is now to buy your ticket
which entitles bearer to dinner,
for two, and dancing, along with
the rest of the evening's
festivities. You need not be pre-
sent to win but if you are on the
guest list, you're in for a good
time including the excitement
and suspense of watching the win-
ning tickets being picked! You,
too, could be a winner.
Honorary Captains who are sup-
porting JCC's first superraffle
are: David Alperstein, Moty
Banyas, Arnie Herman, Rita
Bernstein, Paul Bloomgarden,
Anne Bratt, Gail Capp, Elaine
Cohn, Bruce Conan, Gil Epstein,
Steven Feller, Ellen Fischer,
Howard Gaines, Alvera Gold, Dee
Hahn, Gary Jacobs, Scott Joseph,
Norman Kline, Caren Kogan,
Harvey Kopelowitz, Andrew
Kruglanski, Esther Lerner,
Hildreth Levin, Preston Levitt,
Marsha Levy, Mark Lipoff, Barry
Mandelkorn, Phil Mirmelli, Allen
Morris, Anita Perlman, Jim
Phillips, Harold Rabinovitz,
Sheldon Ross, Marty Sad kin.
Peter Sarbone, David Schulman,
Marcia Schwartz, Arnold Simon,
Laurence Skolnik, Helene Soref,
Renee Spector, Elliott Starman,
Florence Straus, Jeff Streitfeld,
Stu Tatz, Barbara Tessler and
Robert Tokar.
CELEBRATE
THE END OF SUMMER
POST CAMP! Another five
days for campers to continue their
happy association with the JCC.
From Monday, Aug. 17 through
Friday the 21. More of the same
good times with many of the same
counselors on staff to go on trips
and organize some special
special events. But this time no
bus transportation and lunch
must be brought from home. And
post post camp it's family
togetherness on the JCC
calendar .
FAMILY WEEK-END
AUGUST 21-23
To the uncrowded beaches and
the calmer waters of the gulf go
many of the JCC families right
after post-camp for a few days of
fun and sun at the Marco Island
Marriott Friday, Aug. 21
through Sunday Aug. 23. Parents
can relax. The childrens activities:
supervised. The accommodations:
superb. The features: Oneg Shab-
bat, Havdallah, Good Meals! Call
for the details.
JCC GOES
TO THE THEATER
"La Cage Aux Folles" Sunday,
Sept. 13 Evening Miami
Theatre of the Performing Arts.
"Singin in the Rain" Sunday,
Nov. 22 Matinee Bailey Hall.
"42nd St." Thursday, Dec. 24 -
Eve Parker Playhouse.
"Broadway Bound" Wednes-
day, Jan. 27 Eve Parker
Playhouse.
Four of the winners at the "Fairwind" table during JCC Trivia
Night in July are, from the left: Gail and Al Capp and Jeff and
Linda Streitfeld. The rest of the team at the table who contributed
answers for the evening's best score were Myrna and Ted Sobo,
Judith and Joel Armstrong and Robin and Brian Gallagher.
Trivia Night benefited the Camp Scholarship Fund.
Newswlre/U.S.A.
NEW YORK Nathan Perlmutter, national director of the
Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith who was widely cited for
his fight against bigotry and discrimination and dedication to
humanitarian causes, died of cancer at Memorial Sloan-Kettering
Cancer Center at the age of 64.
NEW YORK Several American Zionist organizations have
accused the American Zionist Federation (AZF) of bias and incon-
sistency in the penalties it levelled against their slates in the
recently concluded elections to the 31st World Zionist Congress.
KANSAS CITY Rabbi Meir Kahane, wanted by Johnson
County, Kan. police to answer disorderly conduct charges, has fil-
ed a countersuit for "assault, battery and outrageous conduct"
arising from a scuffle with a Palestinian Arab, Mousa Shukair,
during an appearance by Kahane at the Doubletree Hotel in
Overland Park, Kan., last November 18.
NEW YORK American Jewish leaders are congratulating
the Knesset for upholding religious pluralism and avoiding a
possible rupture between Israel and Diaspora Jewry. The
message, on behalf of major organizations, refer to the Knesset's
votes defeating two controversial bills which would have given
the Orthodox Chief Rabbinate exclusive right to approve conver-
sion performed abroad. The practical effects of those measures
would have been to invalidate conversions by non-Orthodox rab-
bis and, by implication, question the legitimacy of the non-
Orthodox branches of Judaism in Israel.

......

JCC Camp's first balloon
release. A note in one of them
was returned from
Philadelphia.'
"Shalom '88" Sunday, Feb. 14 -
Matinee Bailey Hall.
The Center has its hands on
good seats for all of the above.
Join the theater parties! For "La
Cage bus transportation to
TOPA included with wine and
cheese, en route. "Lets make it a
good theatrical season," says
Susana Flaum and Laura
Hochman who are Directors of
Adult/Cultural Arts and Senior
Adult Departments respectively.
In addition Senior Adult
Department is scheduling a
matinee/luncheon of "On Your
Toes" Wednesday, October 21,
Royal Palm Dinner Playhouse of
Boca Raton. Transportation in-
cluded. For details of ticket price,
etc. call the Center.
THEATRICAL TROUPE
FORMING AT THE CENTER
In line with the Center's focus
on theater beginning fall '87, JCC
is about to start its own troupe.
Tryouts and spot readings are
scheduled for the afternoon of
Sunday, Sept. 13, for the first pro-
duction a comedy-drama with a
small cast. However, in mind for
later musicals complete with
costumes, song, dance and live
band. Here's a call for par-
ticipants! Wherever your talents
lie let JCC see them, in person!
CHILDREN'S THEATRE
Let's not leave out 'he kids!
Elementary Department head
Cindy Grossman announces two
classes:
THEATRE ARTS
Children age 7 through 10 are
invited to join this eight-week
course beginning the week of
Sept. 7 and concluding the week
of Oct. 30.
Faith Allyson with a degree in
Theatre Arts has been involved in
all aspects of children's theatre
for 12 years. She will teach basics
in theatre terminology, audition
techniques and play production.
Thursdays 4:30-5:30 p.m.
PERFORMANCE WORKSHOP
Boys and Girls 12-17, who have
had little previous experience in
theatre, will be taught stage
techniques, stage combat and the
experience of performance by
Charles St. Clair, a four time Em-
my Award winning Actor/Direc-
tor with over 15 years of.
theatrical experience.
This Sunday class, 3-5 p.m., also
eight sessions, begins Sept. 13.
CHILDBIRTH (Classes)
WITH A JEWISH ACCENT
BEGINS OCTOBER 22
It's never too soon to learn how
to be a good Jewish parent and
JCC presents the ideal opportuni-
ty this fall for mothers-to-be.
What's different about this
class? Together with the helpful
input on the physical aspects of
approaching motherhood, the
modified Lamaze Course, coor-
dinated with. CEA (Childbirth
EducatidW^Assoeiation) of
Seymour Glazer comes
regularly all the way from
Coconut Creek to enjoy the
Numbers Game at the JCC.
Broward County, offers some of
the current Jewish idology on
childbirth-related issues such as
naming, circumcision, and the
suggested Jewish educational en-
vironment for the infant and tod-
dler. These discussions will be led
by Sunrise Jewish Center's
spiritual leader, Rabbi Randall
Konigsburg.
In addition, CEA Instructor
Linda Streitfeld will present all
the latest information on the
stages of labor, delivery,
breathing, physical conditioning
exercises, hospital procedures,
medication, post-partum and
family adjustment.
The course includes six sessions
beginning Thursday, Oct. 22 at
the JCC, continuing for the next
five Thursdays. Time: 7:30-10
p.m.
Because class size is limited, this
special offering is being announc-
ed early with the hope that all in-
terested mothers-to-be will take
the opportunity to enroll now.
Courses will be ongoing. Call the
Center for fee information and
registration.
Guests at a weekly summer
Tuesday night JCC YES
(Young Energetic Seniors)
meeting seated from the left,
Ida Cohen and Carol Sherman.
Standing, Sylvia Ritter.
Camper Mickey Forrest is all
boxed up in his Independence
Day costume.
SOME PEOPLE LIVE THEIR
ENTIRE LIVES WITHOUT EVER
TASTING WATER.
Some people have never tasted water that's tresh
and pure as a spring. Water without sodium,
pollutants, or carbonation Water with nothing added,
nothing taken away Some people have never tasted
clean, clear Mountain Valley Water from a natural
spring in Hot Springs, Arkansas.
It you're one of those people, try Mountain Valley
Water. You'll be tasting water for the very first time.
MOUNTAIN VALLEY WATER
SPRING WATER FROM HOT SPRINGS. ARK
DADE
696-1333
Purely for drinking.
BROWARD
563-6114


\From the Anti-Defamation League ...
Friday, August 14, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 13
The Impact of the>Six-Day War
June 1987 being the 20th an-
niversary of the Six-Day War, ar-
ticles have appeared assessing the
ong-term impact on Israel and
Middle East. Often the theme
If these articles has been that
Israel's victory of 1967 doesn't
ook all that great 20 years later.
This is a myopic view of 20th
[entury Middle East history. In-
deed, problems have arisen as a
esult of Israel's stunning victory,
sraeli administration of the West
Sank and Gaza, with its 1 2
lillion Arabs, benign as it has
leen, still is unwelcome by the
Palestinian population. And there
[as been a tendency in Israel to
epend on Arab labor, particular-
< in the construction sphere,
i'hereas before '67 the Jewish
lopulation were truly the workers
}s well as the governors.
One ought not dismiss the
lignificance of these and other
Iroblems, but in the broader
lerspective it is absurd to give
rreater weight to these dif-
ficulties than to the major positive
levelopments which are a direct
pitgfOWth of June '67.
Above all is the new stronger
Israel that emerged and the im-
l;n I it had on Middle East peace
lossihilities and on U.S.-Israel
Relations. Let us remember what
flings were like in the '60s. The
Lrab states were-talking victory
iver the Zionists and about throw-
ng them into the sea. And not
lurprisingly, considering the tiny
lize, the fragility of the Jewish
fctate, 9-15 miles wide in its most
lopulated and industrialized
Ireas. The question of Israel's
lery survival was on the minds of
Israelis and their Arab neighbors.
critically, as long as Arab leaders
believed that a chance existed to
destroy Israel, they had the incen-
tive to plan for it, since none of
these leaders welcome a Jewish
state in their midst.
Now look at 1987. Egypt, the
largest Arab state, is at peace
with Israel. Hussein is looking for
a way to make peace. King
Hassan of Morocco welcomes
bhimon Peres to Rabat. Others
acknowledge that Israel's here to
stay. Only the Assads, Khadaffis
and Khomeinis of the region the
most radical, anti-American and
terroristic continue to talk of
Israel's demise. Why this
progress?
Two reasons stand out, and both
are consequences of 1967. One is
Israel's strength. No longer a na-
tion whose borders were indefen-
sible, the victory over a coalition
of Arab states in six days, the pro-
jector of regional powe;- and in-
fluence, Israel was no more to be
viewed as vulnerable to military
attack. Yes. Sadat and Assad
tried again in 1973 in one
desperate effort to return the
strategic situation back to
pre-1967, but failed. Sadat then
realized that there was no Arab
military option against Israel and
began the process of diplomacy
leading to the peace of 1978. And
others understood too that the
strength of post-1967 Israel had
forever changed the strategic
balance.
Second, is the changing rela-
tionship between the U.S. and
Israel. As Henry Kissinger
recognized in the early 70's, Israel
after the '67 war was not an in-
convenient friend of the U.S. look-
ing for protection; rather it was
Cool Summer Recipes
From Empire Kosher
Turkey or chicken salads make
reat summer meals. When it's
jo hot to cook, save time, and
alories, with these quick recipe
leas. Cooked turkey breast is
berfect for each summer "cook-
pg," with a lot of protein per ser-
ving. You may substitute diced
[hicken (boiled and deboned) in
}ual measures for the turkey
keast. Serve the salads with
peens as salad platters or on your
avorite bread for wholesome
lummer sandwiches.
:OLORFUL TURKEY SALAD
cups Empire Cooked
Turkey Breast (diced)
2 head Romaine lettuce
avocado, peeled and sliced
grapefruit, peeled, seeded
and sectioned
Tbsps. lemon juice
(or fresh lemon pulp)
navel oranges, peeled, seeded
and sectioned (set juice ,
and rind aside for dressing)
red onion, thinly sliced
Messing:
i
nSip light mayonnaise
[ITbsps. olive oil
Tbsp. lemon juice
Tsps. Dijon mustard
Tbsps. orange juice
Tbsps. orange peel,
finely chopped
h cayenne pepper (to taste)
n large platter, arrange leaves
washed lettuce, with stalks
ward inside of platter. Arrange
'ces of avocado and grapefruit in
* ring on outside of platter.
ge orange and onion slices
smaller ring inside the first h
I- Sprinkle lemon juke over .
s- Add diced turkey breast to
"* of rings. In a small bowl,
lb'ne mayonnaise, oil and
Ju'ce- Stir until well blend-
Add mustard, orange juice,
peel, and pepper to taste. Mix un-
til dressing is well blended and
flows easily. Drizzle half of dress-
ing mixture over chicken platter
and serve remainder in separate
bowl.
Makes 8 6-ounce servings, 315
calories per serving.
i
EGG AND TURKEY SALAD
2 cups Empire Cooked
Turkey Breast
4 ripe! tomatoes, seeded
and diced
3 green peppers, seeded
and diced
4 scallions, diced
(including greens)
2 stalks celery, diced
6 eggs
1 cup black olives, drained,
seeded, and coarsely chopped
V cup chopped parsley
Dressing
3 Tbsps. lemon juice
Vi cup olive oil
dash pepper to taste
dash chili powder to taste
(optional)
1 Tsp. garlic powder .
Cook eggs until ham-boiled.
Under cold running water,
remove eggshells. Chop eggs
coarsely and place in large bowl.
Add turkey breast, tomatoes, pep-
pers, scallions, celery and olives,
and toss ingredients well. Chill un-
til ready to serve. Before serv-
ings, mix lemon juice, olive oil,
and spices thoroughly in small
bowl. Pour dressing over salad
mixture and toss lightly. Place on
serving platter (or bed of lettuce
leaves) and sprinkle parsley over
'mixture to garnish. Additional
olive oil may be served with salad,
depending on individual taste.
an increasingly important
strategic factor, and a pro-
American, anti-Soviet one at that,
that could be of immense value in
protecting Western interests in
the region. As a result, over the
years the U.S. has provided Israel
with billions of dollars of economic
and military assistance; has
established strategic agreements;
has signed a free trade agree-
ment; and has worked together
with Israel to overcome Israel's
economic difficulties.
In the process not only were
U.S. and Israel ties bolstered to
the benefit of both, but the peace
process as well was encouraged.
Arab states have come to realize
that since the ties between the
U.S. and Israel are indissoluble it
is an illusion to think that the
future will bring a weaker Israel,
one that once again will be
vulnerable to attack.
As for Israel itself, there has
been a well-documented price to
pay for victory. Issues surroun-
ding the West Bank, settlements,
the Palestinians have divided the
country and await resolution. But
the city of Jerusalem is whole
again; the Jewish quarter
restored, access to the Western
Wall regained all while pro-
viding complete protection of
Christian and Moslem holy places.
And Jews are once again able to
live in the biblical home of Judea
and Samaria (the West Bank),
from which they had been barred
during the rule of the area until
1967 by King Hussein.
It is always easy and headline-
grabbing to talk about problems.
The long-range view, however,
points to a Middle East that is
moving toward peace that could
not have been without the Six-Day
War. In the final analysis, events
of June '67 were only a defeat for
those who would have liked inter-
minable war and the destruction
of the Jewish State. For the rest
of us, we have reason to celebrate.
THE STAFF AND PARTICIPANTS of the Jewish Federalism *
adult day care program, The Gathering Place, want to thank the
generosity of Cheryl and Leonard Weinrub, owners of Bagel Host
loo, mi Pine Island Road. Jack Gersten, the gregarious van
driver for The Gathering Place stops at the Bagel Host Too for
breakfast before reporting to work and. in conversation, told the
Weinrubs about the wonderful elderly people he drives to The
Gathering Place The Weinrubs decided to supply the bagels for
the morning coffee everyday. A sincere and heartfelt thavk you to
a very caring couple for their donation of delicious bagels to start
the day off. Shown: Leonard Weinrub with his staff.
Community Calendar
Compiled by
Lori Ginsberg
748-8400.
SATURDAY AUGUST 15
Lauderdale West: 8 p.m.
Movie: "Irreconciliable Dif-
ferences." Cost 50 cents.
Sunrise Jewish Center-Men's
Club: 8:30 p.m. Show featur-
ing Bert Sheldon, Leila Rose
and Jimmy Hobales. Donation:
$5, $4. At Temple. 741-0295.
TUESDAY AUGUST 18
ORT-Coral West Chapter:
11:30 a.m. Luncheon and card
party. Tickets $6.50. Clock
Restaurant, 2700 N. State Rd.
7, Margate. 973-7353.
WEDNESDAY AUGUST 19
Sunrise Jewish Center-
Sisterhood: Noon. Meeting.
Jeanine Rezende will entertain
with a presentation of
"Interior Designs."
SATURDAY AUGUST 22
Lauderdale West: 8:30 p.m.
Body and Soul Revue with
Richard Ryan. Cost $4.
THURSDAY AUGUST 27
Temple Emanu-El: 7:45 p.m.
Board meeting. At Temple.
Who Needs It?
We Do!
ouglas Gardens
ft Shops
Jnion
'-.'.
Makes 8 6-ounce servings, 340
calories per serving. ,^
r
H6 OTHINC, FMUNITURE APPLIANC
Hewing the Jewish community of South Florida
for more than 40 years.
, A not-fof-prom organization
Cafl for fhM pick-up of your fuKy tax deductible donation:
Dade: 751-3988 Browafth 981 -8245
Shop at two convenient locations:
5713 N.W. 27th Avenue, Miami
5829 Hallandale Beach Boutevart, Hallandale
A division off tha Miami Jawith Horn*
and Hoapttal lor tha Aoad at Dougtaa Gardana