The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 3, no. 7 (Apr. 5, 1974)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 9, 1976 called v.4, no. 27 but constitutes v.5, no. 1; issue for July 7, 1989 called v.18, no. 11 but constitutes v.18, no. 13.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44570954
lccn - sn 00229545
ocm44570954
System ID:
AA00014312:00352

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Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward


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Full Text
jewishFloridian
OF GREATER FORT LAUDE
A(WJ *< V- r I
f fw / 4lMW*rv
OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE
Volume 16 Number 18
Fort Lauderdaje, Florida Friday, July 31, 1987
ft*
Price 85 Cents
1988 Jubilee Year For North Broward
"The celebration of 20
years of Jewish community
united in the principles of
Ahavat Torah and Ahavat
Yisrael gives us a unique
opportunity to Remember-
Rejoice-Renew.' "
And so Sheldon S. Polish,
president, Jewish Federa-
tion of Greater Fort Lauder-
dale, and Ludwik Brodzki,
chairman, Anniversary
Committee and Federa-
tion's first president, an-
nounced that within the
coming months, tens of
thousands of North
Broward County men,
women and children will be
called on to make the 20th
Anniversary year, a time of
dignity, comfort and ac-
complishment, not only
locally, but in Israel and 34
lands around the world.
In a special interview with
the Floridian, the communi-
ty leaders stated that the
major central Jewish
"/ did not find the
world desolate when I
entered it, and as my
fathers and mothers
planted for me so do I
plant for my
children."
Talmud Tanit 23a
organization worked
diligently to support the
vital social welfare and
humanitarian programs
urgent to the well-being of
Jewish people. They said,
"There is an old saying that
hindsight is better than far-
sight, which is obviously
true, but looking back at
one's accomplishments,
which is a form of hindsight,
can also offer a true
perspective of events ex-
perienced, challenges met
and goals accomplished. The
list is complete with the
establishment of the Jewish
Family Service, Samuel and
Helene Soref Jewish Com-
munity Center, David
Posnack Hebrew Day
School, Central Agency for
Jewish Education, Council
for Elderly, Gathering Place
and Kosher Nutrition Pro-
gram, and all in all more
than 50 Federation/UJA
agencies and beneficiaries.
But the 20 years means
more, much more and that is
why we must use this
special time to Remember,
Rejoice and Renew.
REMEMBER
To recall the origins of our
community is to recognize
the accomplishments of
courageous and farsighted
individuals who understood
the necessity of Kehillah
community.
Of 1937 when the Buchen-
wald concentration camp
was opened and on
Displaying the Federation's 20th Anniversary Proclamation
from Florida Governor Bob Martinez are, from left, Brian J.
Sherr, past president; Sheldon Polish, president; Ludwik Brod-
zki, Federation first president; Harold L. Oshry, executive vice
president and general chairman; and Daniel Cantor, Proclama-
tion chairman.
November 9 and 10, 1938,
the Kristallnacht (The Night
of Broken Glass) was
perpetrated. Anti-Jewish
riots in Nazi Germany and
Austria produced the
following statistics 200
synagogues destroyed,
7,500 Jewish shops looted
and 30,000 Jews sent to
Dachau, Buchenwald and
Sachsenhausen.
Or in 1967 when our
Israeli brethren fought to
Continued on Page 2
World Nw
OTTAWA Parliament
adjourned for summer
recess without adopting a
government-sponsored
amendment to the Criminal
Code that would allow the
trial in Canada of Nazi war
criminals regardless of
where their crimes were
committed.
TORONTO B'nai
B'rith Canada has protested
to the government over the
presence of the Canadian
Charge d'Affaires at the
Vatican, L.P. Tardif, at a
diplomatic reception for
Austrian President Kurt
Waldheim following his au-
dience with the Pope.
56th G.A. in Miami, Elaine Cohn Host Chair
In November, more than
3,500 Jewish men and
women across the United
States and Canada will at-
tend six days of meetings,
seminars, workshops and
special receptions when the
Greater Miami Jewish
Federation hosts the 56th
annual Council of Jewish
Federation's General
Assembly, and as part of
this important event, Plan-
tation resident Elaine Cohn
has been named as the Fort
Lauderdale .Federation
Delegates Lounge Host
chairman.
In a meeting with the
Floridian, Federation presi-
Elaine Cohn
dent Sheldon S. Polish an-
nounced that "The Federa-
tion is happy to be a part of
this extraordinary program
which will examine how the
Federation network,
together with Israel and
World Jewry, can most ef-
fectively meet the
challenges facing Jewish life
at home and abroad. With
this in mind, Fort Lauder-
dale's Federation will join
the other South Florida area
Federations and host a
delegate lounge day. Elaine
has already set the wheels in
motion, when leaders and
professionals from
throughout the Gold Coast
Federations attended a
planning meeting in Miami
in preparation for the
events. I know that with her
guidance and that of her
volunteers, our Federation
will provide the hospitality
and other services
necessary to make the
delegates stay an exciting
and interesting time."
Cohn, who has played a
key role in Federation/UJA
campaigning, serves as a
member of the Women's
Division board of directors,
was a member of the Planta-
tion Division, and this year
was the co-chairman of the
Continued on Page 3
In the Viewpoint Issues Spotlight...
The Pope-Waldheim & U.S. Visit Conflict
gWrttWftW:*^^
>
::
Inside
Mission Coupon...
paga3
Datallna: Haifa...
pag4
"D*vaah"...paoa6
Kol Ishah ... paga 7
EVER since his election, Austrian President Kurt
Waldheim has been striving frantically to obtain ac-
ceptance beyond the borders of his own country.
Largely in vain.
Revealed as a liar about his past and a willing ser-
vant of the Nazi war crime apparatus during World
War II, Waldheim has been cold-shouldered in
Europe, except for Germany, declared unwelcome in
the U.S. and'shunned even by foreign dignitaries
who visit Austria.
His record has, on the other hand, endeared him to
some Arab leaders. Gaddafi has invited him to Libya,
and Jordan's King Hussein followed suit after travell-
ing to Vienna, with full royal pomp, though for an
unofficial visit. But those gestures only underlined
Waldheim's isolation in the western world.
Now, of all people, Pope John Paul II has come to
Waldheim's rescue by inviting the embattled Austrian
president to be his-jruest at the Vatican.
Remarsk and Comments from Organizations and
Statesmen. See page 4_____________________
The invitation was made public just after the Pope
returned from his native Poland, where he gave heart
to the Solidarity movement and opponents of tyranny
everywhere, and where, at the site of the Majdanek
death camp, he knelt in prayer for the 1.5 million peo-
ple, most of them Jews, who perished there.
The juxtaposition in timing is grotesque indeed.
One week a prayer for the victims of the Holocaust,
the next an insult to their memory.
However minor a player in the horrendous roster of
Nazi war criminals, Waldheim, by his falsehoods and
dissembling, has come to symbolize all those
operatives with much to hide, who, without repen-
tance, shed their swastikas for business suit and tun-
Continued on Page 7
Come Fly With Us20th Anniversary Mission To IsraelSign Up Today


Page 2 Tha Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, July 31, 1987
i
3
I
Twenty-four Board Members Represent
Fort Lauderdale Residents for Federation
Alan Baer
Rabbi Ballon
Jacob Krodzk
I'aul Uhrt-r
I.udwik Rrodxki Milton Edls(rin Judah Ew
Leonard Farber Steven Fayne
Milton Keiner
Ksjhrr Lerner
In an effort to achieve total
community-area rnprnnanta
" on the Jewish Federation
of Greater Fort Lauderdale of-
ficers and board of directors,
president Sheldon S. Polish an-
nounced that twenty four Fort
Lauderdale residents will hold
key positions.
Ricbard Lev
Among the leadership frorr.
the (Veanside. middle and
west Fort Lauderdale districts
are Alan Baer. past president:
Rabbi Jeffrey Ballon, spiritual
ier. Temple Emanu-El.
rabbinical member; Alan
Becker, assistant secretary;
Jacob Brodzki. past president:
1988 Jubilee Year For North
Broward County Jewish Community
Ludwik Brodzki. past presi-
dent: Milton Edelstein. Ad-
visory Board: Judah Ever:
Leonard Farber. Advisory
Boat n Fayne: Richard
Finkelstein: Milton Keiner.
past president: Paul Lehrer;
Esther Lerner: Richard Levy:
Steve Lewin. vice president;
Samuf I Soref
John Streng;
Bart Weiaman
Barbara Wiener
Caatiaaed fro* P*g 1
defend the Peace and digni-
ty and preserving the
history and traditions of
World" Jewry.
The question in these
years oi the untied Jewish
community was no longer
one of mutual tolerance of
differences, but rather one
of symbiosis how do we
work together for our
mutual Jewish needs and in-
terests" As a result, the
Federation and the Federa-
tion / UJ A came into
stence
REJOICE
To appreciate the
qualitative achievements of
our Jewish community,
locally, mternationally .
udtng the rebirth of the
S .-ice of Israei. on this their
40th Anniversary year: the
'turning rescue of Sovtet
and rebuilding oi Ethiopian
Jewry and the renaissance
of the Jewish soul and
character ... is fan ap-
propriate. The pnde we
share in 'he success oi our
*jjwiago^ues. Temples.
agencies, organizations and
groups is worthy of a
Briefly
UNITED NATIONS A
onfliminary study oi the 500
hies obtained from the
I'tuted Nations War Crimes
Commission archrve on June
'orxfirms that the Nazis
embarked oo the extermina-
tion of Je-ws in the early
stages of WorU War II.
with the active participatwa
to the US disclosed.
Sheheheyanu.
RENEW
To emulate the nobility
and tenacity of those who
started the journey is now
our task. 1967 was a year in
which Israelis and Jews
around the world lived in
fear; 1987-"88 is a time to
enhance and renew the
Jewish spirit.
To accomplish this, we
need Jewish education to
train our future leaders. We
need a secure Israel to pro-
tect our national heritage.
We tieed social services to
preserve our Jewish family
tradition. We need strong
synagogues and temples to
guarantee the essence of
our existence and to
achieve these goals, we need
each other ... as donors.
volunteers and participants.
One of the essential
elements of Judaism is the
act of Tzedakah. From
biblical days to our own
times. Jews have responded
to the needs of their fellow
Jews, neighbors and
strangers with love and
compassion. Lest we forget
our brave family in the early
years who died in vain."
In stressing the impor-
tance of this special time in
the young community's
history, the men urged
everyone to take part in the
two Fall Missions to Israel,
the 20th Anniversary and
the National Presidents.
Oct. 21-Nov. 5. An extraor-
dinary moment will be ex-
perienced in the Halls oi the
Knesset, when the Greater
Fort Lauderdale members
will hold their October
Federation board meeting,
and everyone attending will
become honorary member?
enscrolled in the Israeli
government archives. Brod-
zki also indicated an
outstanding array of func-
tions, meetings, catoiai
events and other happen-
ings will take part during
:re anniversary year. Far-
ther details mil appear in
future Floridians.
Rabbi Lewis Littman, spiritual
leader. Temple Bat Yam, rab-
binical member; Ben Marcus;
Joseph Novick; Anita
Perlman, life member, Lee
Rauch; Samuel Soref, life
member; John Streng, life
member; Bart Weisman; Bar-
bara Wiener.
Polish told the Floridian
that this group of men and
women will plan and lay the
groundwork to help continue
the myriad of social welfare
and humanitarian services
through the community's cen-
tral major Jewish organiza-
tion, maximizing the benefits
to people with the most effi-
cient use of resources. He said,
"This coordinated effort,
originally chartered in 1967,
today supports more than 50
agencies and beneficiaries and
through the work and
generosity of leaders such as
these, this year raised a record
$6.5 plus million for Federa-
tion/UJA's life-giving, life-
enriching work."
Within the coming months,
the board members, many
whom hold leadership cam-
paign positions in the l987-'88
Federation/United Jewish Ap-
peal campaign, will plan for
the October board meeting to
be held in the halls of the
Knesset, as part of the Fall
community Mission to Israel.
^rJiarbor
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TjiI Of llftlfHIMlOn 4 -HMr'/i!"
1-8 00- SPA- SUM
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rVBitf for drinking.
OAOE
696-1333
BROWARD
56&6114


Friday, July 31,1987/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 3
John & Judie Barrow Lewis & Claire Becks Jacob & Peggy Brodzki Ludwik & Pola Brod-
zki Dan Cantor Gladys Daren Alfred & Setti DeBeer Judah & Susan Ever Don & Anita
Fischer Brian Gaines Alven & Jean Ghertner Erv & Alvera Gold Sam Greenberg Dee
Hahn Nora Howard Jack & Miriam Klaimetz Jean Kletzky Nathan & Jeanette Koplin
Dorothy Kornman Esther Lemer Richard & Marie Levy Steve Lewin Irving & Esther
Libowsky Fred & Cecile Lichtman Mitch Luber Gil & Julia Merrill Harold & Claire Oshry
Shelly & Lois Polish Jerry Rauch Lee Rauch Stuart Reich Brian Sherr Joel & Lisa
Shulman Mc
Steinfeld Je
Tucker Eric
Gloria Witte
Ludwik & Po
Ever Don & <
Greenberg C
Jeanette Ko|
ing & Esther Libowsl-
Claire Oshry Shelly 8
& Lisa Shulman Mori
Marcia Steinfeld Jef
rlette Tucker Eric &
Bill & Gloria Wittent
Brodzki Ludwik & Pol
Susan Ever Don & Ar
Sam Greenberg Dee i
Jeanette Koplin Dorc
ing & Esther Libowsl
Claire Oshry Shelly 8
& Lisa Shulman Mori
Marcia Steinfeld Jef
riette Tucker Eric &
Bill & Gloria Wittent
Brodzki Ludwik & Po
Susan Ever Don & Ar
Sam Greenberg Dee
Jeanette Koplin Dorc
ing & Esther Libowsf
Claire Oshry Shelly *
& Lisa Shulman Mori
Marcia Steinfeld Jef
WHO'S GOING TO ISRAEL
TO CELEBRATE OUR
20th ANNIVERSARY
Join in the festivities. Share in an experience
that will last forever.
As part of a year-long celebration honoring
the Jewish Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale's 20th Anniversary, hundreds of
Jews throughout North Broward will join
together to celebrate 20 years of community-
building and Israel's Fortieth. Celebrate our
achievements during a fabulous once-in-a-
lifetime mission to Israel.
A "MISSION OF
A LIFETIME"
OCT.26-Nov.5,1987
Just Once in a Lifetime. Destiny Calls. Join
Us. For Information, Please Call Federation:
748-8400
Yes!
I'm interested in the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale 20/40 Mission.
Please send more information.
Name__
Address.
City___
Zip.
riette Tucker Eric &
Bill & Gloria V
Brodzki Ludwil
Susan Ever Do
Sam Green ben
Jeanette Kopli..
ing & Esther Libowsl
Claire Oshry Shelly t
& Lisa Shulman Mor
Marcia Steinfeld Jef
riette Tucker Eric &
Bill & Gloria Wittenl
Brodzki Ludwik & Po
Susan Ever Don & Ai
Sam Greenberg Dee
Jeanette Koplin Don
ing & Esther Libowsl
Claire Oshry Shelly I
& Lisa Shulman Mor
Marcia Steinfeld Jef
riette Tucker Eric & Clara Wagner Kurt & Alice Walter Bart Weisman Barbara Wiener
Bill & Gloria Wittenberg John & Judie Barrow Lewis & Claire Becks Jacob & Peggy
Brodzki Ludwik & Pola Brodzki Dan Cantor Gladys Daren Alfred & Setti DeBeer Judah &
Susan Ever Don & Anita Fischer Brian Gaines Alven & Jean Ghertner Erv & Alvera Gold
Sam Greenberg Dee Hahn Nora Howard Jack & Miriam Klaimetz Jean Kletzky Nathan &
Jeanette Koplin Dorothy Kornman Esther Lerner Richard & Marie Levy Steve Lewin Irv-
ing & Esther Libowsky Fred & Cecile Lichtman Mitch Luber Gil & Julia Merrill Harold &
Claire Oshry Shelly & Lois Polish Jerry Rauch Lee Rauch Stuart Reich Brian Sherr Joel
Phone______________________________
Clip and return to:
Sandy Jackowitz
20/40 Mission
Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale
8358 W. Oakland Park Boulevard
Ft. Lauderdale, FL. 33351
>tein Marcia
is Harriette
/iener Bill &
ggy Brodzki
lah & Susan
a Gold Sam
y Nathan &
'e Lewin Irv-
Julia Merrill Harold &
eich Brian Sherr Joel
irvin & Bubbles Stein
lorence Symons Har-
man Barbara Wiener
ecks Jacob & Peggy
Setti DeBeer Judah &
ner Erv & Alvera Gold
Ban Kletzky Nathan &
Levy Steve Lewin Irv-
Julia Merrill Harold &
eich Brian Sherr Joel
irvin & Bubbles Stein
lorence Symons Har-
man Barbara Wiener
ecks Jacob & Peggy
Setti DeBeer Judah &
ner Erv & Alvera Gold
3an Kletzky Nathan &
Levy Steve Lewin Irv-
Julia Merrill Harold &
eich Brian Sherr Joel
irvin & Bubbles Stein
lorence Symons Har-
man Barbara Wiener
icob & Peggy
(BeerJudah&
& Alvera Gold
tzky Nathan &
Levy oieve Lewin Irv-
-J Julia Merrill Harold &
eich Brian Sherr Joel
irvin & Bubbles Stein
lorence Symons Har-
man Barbara Wiener
ecks Jacob & Peggy
Setti DeBeer Judah &
ner Erv & Alvera Gold
3an Kletzky Nathan &
Levy Steve Lewin Irv-
Julia Merrill Harold &
eich Brian Sherr Joel
irvin & Bubbles Stein
lorence Symons Har-
Vinnette Carroll
a
'If You Do
Nothing Else
this Season"
Attend the
August 27
Meeting of
the Business and
Executive
Network
Vinnette Carroll, interna-
tionally acclaimed director and
playwright, will be the special
guest speaker at the Thursday,
Aug. 27 meeting of the
Federation's Business and Ex-
ecutive Network from
5:30-7:30 p.m. at the Broward
County Main Library
Auditorium, 100 S. Andrews
Ave., Ft. Lauderdale.
Ms. Carroll is a winner of an
Obie, an Emmy, the New York
Outer Circle Critics Award,
the Los Angeles Drama Critics
Award, and others.
As artistic director of the
Urban Arts Theatre in New
York, Carroll conceived and
directed such hits as Don't
Bother Me, I Can't Cope and
Your Arm's Too Short to Box
with God.
Ms. Carroll established the
Urban Arts Theater South in
Florida in 1980 and in 1984,
the company was renamed the
Vinnette Carroll Repertory
Company.
There will be a wine and
cheese party plus a cash bar.
Admission is $5.
For further information,
please contact the Jewish
Federation at 7U8-8U00.
56th G.A.
Continued from Page 1
Leadership Gifts Dinner,
which featured world-
renowned journalist Ber-
nard Kalb.
According to Cohn, the
committee announced that
Tuesday, November 17, will
be Fort Lauderdale
Delegate Lounge Host day,
and 25 volunteers will be
needed to provide for the
five shift sessions to be held
at the Fontainebleau Hotel,
in Miami Beach, site of the
GA Headquarters Hotel.
Further details concerning
times and requirements will
appear in future Floridians.
Miami leader Nancy
Lipoff is chair of the '87
General Assembly, Helene
Berger, vice chair, special
events and Myra Farr,
chairman, delegates lounge.
For additional informa-
tion, call Debra Roshfeld at
Federation office, 748-8400.


Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, July 31, 1987
Focus, Viewpoints, Opinions, and Commentaries
vWtffSflffftflSftffl^
The Pope And Waldheim
Israel strongly condemned Pope John Paul IPs decision
to host Austrian President Kurt Waldheim, with the
Foreign Ministry spokesman saying that the move "sur-
prised the Jewish world and the state of Israel."
Prime Minister Shamir said that he viewed the
Vatican's invitation to Waldheim "with great sadness .. .
the invitation is to be condemned."
Foreign Ministry sources said the Vatican should have
been more sensitive than others, in light of the lack of
diplomatic relations with Israel and the special sensitivity
attached to ties between the Catholic Church and the
Jewish people.
The sources added that the decision was especially ill-
timed, coming in the wake of the Pope's recent visit to
Poland and his homage to the destruction of Polish Jewry.
"This is a tragedy for the Vatican and a sad day for
Catholic Jewish relations," said Elan Steinberg, Executive
Director of the WJC.
"We regret deeply that Pope John Paul II saw fit to
meet with Waldheim," said Seymour Reich, head of B'nai
B'rith International. "Such a meeting offered Waldheim a
cloak of respectability that he does not deserve. *
In the Netherlands, Jewish leaders said they had sent a
telegram to the Pope's ambassador to The Hague, express-
ing dismay.
They described the invitation as "an affront to all those
who showed resistance to, or were victims of the Nazis."
France's chief rabbi, Rene Sirat, said the meeting was
"intolerable" and an insult to the memory of the Nazi
victims.
In Italy itself, the president of the Federation of Italian
Jewish Communities, Tullia Zevi, warned that it "could
have negative consequences on relations between Catholics
and Jews."
Sheldon Polish, Federation president
There is much to be done, and in one way Pope John
Paul II hasn't made the task any easier. When he recently
received and praised Austria President Kurt Waldheim, a
suspected Nazi criminal, the Pope alienated much of this
community's good will. In consequence, Jewish leaders
scheduled to meet with the Pope in Miami considered
boycotting the meeting. Some Vatican fence-mending has
ensued, as has much earnest dialogue between local Jewish
and Catholic leaders.
Two Jewish groups have softened their demands about
meeting with the Pope prior to the Miami visit. Good for
them. The Vatican should reiterate promptly its ge-
nuine ecumenism and its abhorrence of Nazism.
The Pope is, after all, on a mission of peace. Turmoil dur-
ing advance planning would seem to say otherwise. It's
time to think about the overall well-being of South Florida
before, during, and after the "popemobile" hits town.
:
Rabbi Gilbert Klaper-
man, president of the
Synagogue Council of
America, said "This is not less
than a whitewashing of an in-
ternational figure who has
been accused of complicity in
the Holocaust. The Pope's
praise of Waldheim's
diplomatic career at the
United Nations as 'dedicated
to the securing of peace' must
be challenged in the light of
the fact that it was during his
tenure that the UN passed the
infamous resolution equating
Zionism with racism."
Abraham Foxman, Inter-
national Affairs Director,
Anti-Defamation League,
said his organization is keep-
ing its option open as to
whether or not it will take part
in Miami. "The ball is now in
the Vatican's court. There are
three months until September.
We are waiting for a gesture
from the Pope. We'll be for-
thcoming if he reaches out."
Foxman added, "We don't
agree with the position of the
AJCongress. We should keep
open the possibility (of
meeting the Pope in Miami)
until 24 hours before the plan-
ned meeting. Once you say you
are not going, that s it."
Archbishop John L. May,
President, NCCB/USCC
Jewish
Floridian o
Of GREATER FORT LAUOERDALE
FRED K SMOCMET MARVIN LE VINE SUZANNE SMOCMET
EditcK and Put****' Director of Communications E >ecutive Edito-
Published Weekly November through April Bi Weekly balance ol year.
Second Class Postage Paid at Hallandale. Fla USPS 8W420
POSTMASTER: 8id *ddrni Chang** to Ttw Jewish Floridian.
P.O. Box 012973. Miami, Fla. 33101
Fort Uudefdale-Hollywood Oftlce: 8358 W. Oakland Par* Blvd.. Fort Lauderdale, FL 33361
Phone 746-0400
Plant 120 NE 6th St. Miami Fla 33132 Phone 1 373 4605
Member JTA Seven Arts. WNS NEA AJPA and FPA
Jeerte* Flertelar. Pees Hi Qaa.swlee KaaHmSn <* Mertftelee AaWWeeav
SUBSCRIPTION RATES 2 Year Minimum $7 SO (Local Area 13 95 Annuall oi by membership
Jewish Federation ot Greater Fort Lauderdale
Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale: Sheldon S. Polish, President; Kenneth B. Blerman.
Executive Director; Marvin La Vina, Director ot Communlcatlona; Lorl Ginsberg, Assistant Director.
Ruth Geller. Coordinator; 8358 W Oakland Park Blvd.. Fort Lauderdale. FL 33351. Phone (306) 748*400
Mall for me Federation and Tht Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale should be addressed
Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Laudefdale, P.O. Box 26810, Tamarac, FL 33320*610.
*redMoc*ef
Preparations for the
meeting in Miami have been
underway for more than a
year, carried forward by
Jewish and Catholic represen-
tatives working together. The
National Conference of
Catholic Bishops is proud of
the dialogue which has taken
place concerning this event. In
fact, we see it as concrete
result of the excellent relations
we maintain with our Jewish
brothers and sisters. The
bishops are pleased that the
Miami meeting will include a
significant statement address-
ed to the Holy Father by a
representative of the Jewish
community and a response by
the Pope.
I pray that the good rela-
tions the Conference of
Bishops has with our Jewish
brothers and sisters in this
country will be strong enough
to overcome any specific dif-
ficulty of the moment. I look
forward to being present with
the Holy Father when he
meets with Jewish leaders at
one of the first events in his
The views expressed by columnists, reprinted editorials, and copy do not necessarilv
reflect the opinion of the Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale.
Second Pastoral Visit to the
United States next
September.
David H. Rush, Chairman of
the board Broward National
Conference of Christians and
Jews, said:
I urge Catholics and Jews
in our area to face the
challenge, posed by recent
events, to seek deeper
understanding of each other
through face-to-face dialogue,
to listen to each other with in-
creased attention and regard,
thereby strenghtening the cor-
dial relationships that we have
achieved. I am convinced that
the inherent good will between
Catholics and Jews, based on
common values and mutual in-
terests, will prevail.
John Cardinal O'Connor, Ar-
chbishop of New York, said:
"I remind all Catholics of
the sin of anti-Semitism. Let
no Catholics believe they are
honoring our Holy Father or
defending our faith if they
engage in verbal attacks on
our Jewish brothers and
sisters.
Dr. Jacqueline Wexler, presi-
dent National Conference of
Christians and Jews,
"I pray and plead with my
fellow Catholics to understand
the deep anger and anquish of
the Jewish people in what ap-
pears to be a retrogression to a
laissez-faire posture of the of-
ficial church in an era of the
Holocaust.
I pray and plead with my
Jewish brothers and sisters
not to slam the doors of
dialogue shut whatever their
frustrations and fears. All
human beings, including
Popes, make mistakes of judg-
ment. I am keenly disap-
pointed that Pope John Paul II
chose to receive Mr. Waldheim
in a state visit and sincerely
hope that the Pope and the
hierachy and Jewish leaders
along with all Jews and
Catholics work together to
reopen and deepen the
dialogue."
Dateline: Haifa
Life in Israel Always Interesting
Friday, July 31,1987
Volume 16
5 AB 5747
Number 18
HAIFA Never a dull mo-
ment here. Even without the
sensational headlines, life in
Israel is effervescent, exciting,
unusual, sometimes tragic,
sometimes humorous
always interesting. For
example:
Out of the Mouths of
Babes. A suggestion by a local
child to solve the vexing pro-
blem of Sabbath observance:
Divide the Shabbat in half.
Morning and noon would
belong to the religious, and the
whole country would be quiet
and at rest; the afternoons
would belong to the secular,
and they could go to the beach
or do as they wish.
The Press Apologizes. In a
correction notice, the daily
paper, Haaretz, declares: In
our report yesterday about
Avner Serussi, there was an
error. Serussi is not suspected
of attacking inspectors from
the Shikin U'Pituah company,
but inspectors of the Pituah
Ramle-Lod company.
Who Asked the Question?
"Why must Arabs go on pay-
ing a price for the Holocaust?"
Was the question asked by
Yasser Arafat, or Khomeini or
the President of Syria or the
King of Saudi-Arabia? None of
them; it was Edward
Grossman, a Jewish member
of the staff of The Jerusalem
Post, interviewing non-Jewish
Peter Grose, editor of Foreign
Affairs magazine.
Signature by Proxy. When
it was suggested that one of
the events marking Israel's
40th anniversary should be a
re-enactment of the signing of
Israel's Declaration of In-
dependence, Ezer Weizmann
proposed that this time the
signature be added of his un-
cle, Chaim Weizmann, who
had not signed the original.
Vanunu, Tax-Free. Are
funds received by Mordecai
Vanunu from the British paper
on account of a book he was to
have written, subject to in-
come tax in Israel? A
distinguished tax lawyer has
proclaimed that the income is
not subject to tax because it
was a one-time income, and
not a result of his employment
or commercial pursuit.
Choosing Sides. A daily
paper in Libya reports that
that country has now cancelled
all teaching of English in their
schools, and has introduced
Russian instead.
Affluent Kibbutz Society.
Large commercial advertisers
are being solicited to present
their commercials on the clos-
ed circuit TV of the kibbutz
movement which reaches
80,000 kibbutz members. Ac-
cording to the prospectus, the
members are purchasers of
fashion goods, stereos, fur-
niture, electrical equipment,
computers, toys, industrial
and agricultural equipment.
High Rise in the Next
World. Overcrowded
cemeteries have caused the
chief rabbis to give considera-
tion to the possibility of effec-
ting burials in layers, either in
high rise mausoleums or in
mounds. The solution is said to
enable burial of 1,500 bodies
per dunam, six times the pre-
sent capacity.
Ventilation No Problem.
Ephraim and Rivka Simantov
sold their tiny flat, borrowed
money, took advances, and
purchased a larger apartment
for themselves and their four
children on the sixth floor of a
building just going up. What
they did not know was that the
building permit was for four
floors only, and at that point
construction stopped, and the
contractor disappeared.
Simantov is left with the
Carl Alpert
blueprints of his airy apart-
ment, but no place to live.
Tax Department Shabbas
Goy. How does the Israel
treasury check up whether
cafes, resorts, public swimm-
ing pools and others who do
business on the Sabbath
faithfully record all their in-
come? Inspectors from the tax
department who work on the
Sabbath are all Moslems,
Christians or Duzes.
Author's autograph.
Author Dahn Ben-Amotz, urg-
ed by his publisher to be
available to autograph his
books for purchasers, charges
a shekel for each signature on
the grounds that if people
want it, it must be worth
money.
A Profitable Business? A
check of Israel Social Welfare
records has revealed that some
20 families who are receiving
welfare grants from the
government on the grounds
that they have no source of
support, should have been in-
vestigated earlier. In each case
the head of the household is
serving a jail sentence for hay-
ing committed terrorist acts in
Israel. On the side, each family
also gets an "appreciation'
grant from the PLO.
Agricultural Pioneers. Last
Continued on Page 7-


Friday, July 31, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 5
Ask him how
his grades
were last term.
Call Israel.
See if your brother really
spends his free time in the li-
brary. With AT&T International
Long Distance Service, it costs
less than you'd think to stay
close. So go ahead. Reach out
and touch someone.
ISRAEL
Economy Discount Standard
3pm-9pm 9pm-8am 8am-3pm
$ JB9 $ Ul % 148
AVERAGE COST PER MINUTE
FOR A 10 MINUTE CALL*
tome* cott par mlnuti vartas dapandktg on ttw iangth of tha cm.
F^mlnuMTOMmoraiackMMy^m^HjtBtooctiMa.AllprtcMan)
for cato daM *ct from anywrtara in tha oontinantai US during
ma hour$ Mad Add 3% facto* axcrta tax and appkcabM Mate
aurcharoa*. Cat lor information or if you'd Ha> to (acarra an ATT
iraarradona)raiaabrocfiurBMaMal .
01M7AW
AT&T
The right choice.


Page 6 The Jewish Floridiah of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, July 31, 1987
"DVash"...
I
I*
"... set out from here to
a land of milk and honey"
(Exodus33
DEBORAH FULLER HAHN
Teach Them Diligently .
(The Shema)
Moses struggled down from
Mt. Sinai over 4,000 years ago,
carrying the laws of Israel.
Since then, the responsibility
for teaching those rules of
behavior have been handed
down from one generation to
the next. Jewish learning is so
important that it has been
thoroughly ingrained in the
collective psyche of the Jewish
people. It is part of our com-
mon heritage. Parents taught
their children Jewish values
even in the Nazi death camps
of Europe. For many cen-
turies, in Ethiopia, other
Jewish parents showed their
children how they should live
as Jews. During the Spanish
Inquisition, Morano mothers
lit their Shabbat candles in
basements. Their children,
also, learned what it meant to
be a Jew. Our people will en-
dure almost anything so that
each child can have the oppor-
tunity to receive the best
education that is available. In
fact, even when legally
unavailable Jewish wisdom has
been provided more than
occasionally, at great human
cost.
Harold Oshry, Federation's
executive vice president,
recently returned from a fact-
finding mission to the Soviet
Union. He personally spoke to
the family and friends of Jews
who are being imprisoned.
Some are sent into Siberia, all
are treated as criminals. Their
only "crime" is the teaching of
Hebrew. Yet, the instruction
goes on! Hebrew books are
smuggled into their homes, the
shades are drawn and the
teaching of our language,
literature, laws, and history is
absorbed by a new generation.
As American Jews, we
sometimes tend to become
complacent. Too often, we
assume our children will learn
"Jewish" values on their own.
After all, this is a free country.
We do not experience daily
anti-Semitism or even overt
discrimination. If someone
really wants a child to be
educated in a private Jewish
school, fortunately, that right
is available. But that 'right'
can be expensive very ex-
pensive. There are parents in
our own community of Greater
Ft. Lauderdale who face a
variety of problems in attemp-
ting to give their children a
good Jewish education. For
them, the David Posnack
Hebrew Day School has set up
a financial assistance program.
There are many grounds for
a family to receive scholarship
aid. Unfortunately, the
reasons for asking and the
validity of these requests far
exceed the means of the
assistance program. Since
there can be no full scholar-
ships, every parent pays at
least a portion of the tuition.
The guidelines are very clear
and confidentiality is assured.
Since these funds are limited,
the committee must often
display the wisdom of King
Solomon in its decisions. A
family with three or four
children, who cannot afford
the tuition of a non-public
school, will request aid to
enable each child a Hebrew
Day School education. A hard
working single parent, strug-
gling to make ends meet,
might seek help from the
assistance program for a
young son or daughter. Some
families need more financial
help than others, some for a
longer period of time.
Should a family in our own
community be denied a chance
for their children to learn the
Hebrew language because the
father is ill and cannot work?
There are those in this very
predicament. A young mother
is suffering from a debilitating
disease and needs expensive
full time care. Where will they
find money for Jewish educa-
tion? Families have relocated
from northern communities
and envisioned Florida to be
the answer to their unemploy-
ment difficulties. Yet there are
often fewer job opportunities
than presumed. There are
Israeli parents who are trying
to find a niche in our communi-
ty. Some of them had economic
problems in Israel and assum-
ed it would be easier to live in
this country. Unfortunately, it
is less complicated for a person
seeking political asylum to find
a job in the United States than
for those seeking economic
asylum. Gladys Daren
Federation's Treasurer and a
member of the assistance com-
mittee, declared, "All Jewish
children deserve each and
every oppotunity to study in a
Jewish school, if they so
choose. We must do our very
best to help them."
There are parents in our
community who, themselves,
are children of survivors.
Although some may suffer
severe financial hardships,
they still insist on a Jewish
learning environment for their
own youngsters. They yearn
for their children to have a
strong Jewish identity. Cer-
tainly they are convinced that
the Hebrew Day School can
provide their children a better
education than the public
schools. The same educational
guidelines and motivations
displayed by Jews from Russia
to Ethiopia are present in each
of these families in Ft. Lauder-
dale, Florida.
Many children on financial
assistance are from two in-
come families. Generally, both
mother and father are
employed in full time posi-
tions. Therefore, they ap-
preciate the after school pro-
gram in which students are
permitted to remain in the
school for longer hours. Work-
ing parents can be assured
that each youngster is well
cared for until they arrive
home. These parents serve the
school in various other ways.
Many hours are spent in a non-
professional capacity, giving of
their time and efforts
wherever they are needed.
These volunteer activities
range from selling journal ads
to helping at outings with the
student body. Committee
member, Marilynn Levine
noted, "Although each family
pays at least two-thirds of the
cost of tuition, most vow to
repay the entire amount when
financially able."
In a recent interview with a
mother of a seven year old stu-
dent of the school we learned
several interesting points. She
emphasized that the children
are happy. They love going to
school. They love learning and
they are doing it well. Every
child is taught to read and
write Hebrew and English in
first grade. A kindergarten
student can converse in both
languages. Three and four
year olds are working on the
computer. How many adults
can make that claim? The ex-
Q Briefly
ceHent student'teacher ratio is
favorable to individual atten-
tion. No class has more than 18
children, some have even
fewer. The teachers are very
caring and exceptionally
responsive to the needs of each
separate child. If any child
should appear to have a par-
ticular problem or special
situation, it is always handled
on a personal basis. Every
child who attends a Hebrew
Day School receives a better
education, both secular and
Jewish, than can be obtained
in any public institution. Is it
no wonder, therefore, that
students of our own David
Posnack Hebrew Day School
excel in all subjects?
By providing a good solid
Jewish educational facility for
as many children as possible
we maintain our link unbroken
in the golden chain of Judaism
. from Mt. Sinai to South
Florida.
AS PART OF THE LAG
B'OMER celebration students
at The David Posnack Hebrew
Day School participated in an
all school Field Day. The entire
school played organized games,
had refreshments and met with
Aharona Surowitz for Hebrew
songs. Pictured in the Potato
Sack Race is first grader, Beth
Horowitz, daughter of Sharon
and Howard Horowitz. The
David Posnack Hebrew Day
School is a major beneficiary
agency of the Jewish Federa-
tion's Annual United Jewish
Appeal Campaign.
Yeladim Campers, twins Dana
and Evan Garnell, age S'/t,
celebrate Oneg Shabbat.
How to make
yourShabbos dinner Deluxe.
!
!
First, 90 to your botcher and select the
freshest, plumpest chicken.
it's a good start, but if won't make your
Shabbos dinner Deluxe
Next, prepare th% dough for your famous
rwmemadeohmlar
Closer, but 8hAttx* dinner m t Deluxe yet
Now. reach into the freezer and take out the
Bird* Eye Deluxe Vegetables. 'Sugar Snap"
ar^rjea8rjur8tir>gwimgaidBn-freehgorj*iees.
And add whole baby carrots, to sweet and
succulent
-***> done ttt Msur Shabbos dinner is truly
Deluxe.

Birds Eye* Deluxe. Dinner will never be the same.
A


Friday, July 31, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 7
Kol Ishah Woman's Voice TOK >ip
New Leadership
Local Women Named to National Cabinet
Alvera Gold
Alvera Gold, Judy Henry,
Esther Lemer and Charlotte
Padek have been named to
serve on the Council of Jewish
Federations (CJF) National
Women's Division Cabinet.
These appointments were
recently announced by Betty
Lieberman of Milwaukee, who
is the CJF National Women's
Division chairwoman. Accor-
ding to Lieberman, each of
these women has been ap-
pointed to a two year term
which will begin at the 1987
CJF General Assembly in
Miami. The Cabinet will meet
at the spring and fall quarterly
meetings as well as at the
General Assembly.
Each of these women has
earned this prestigious ap-
pointment by virtue of her
leadership position within the
Women's Division of the
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale: Alvera is the
newly installed president of
the Women's Division: Judy
serves as vice president of
Community Relations: Esther
Judy Henry
is the immediate past presi-
dent; and Charlotte is the ex-
ecutive vice president of
Campaign.
For the next two years these
four women will be represen-
tatives of the Fort Lauderdale
Federation's Women's Divi-
sion, serving as a link between
this community and Women's
Divisions throughout North
America. The CJF Women's
Division develops collective
policy and direction, function-
ing as a clearinghouse and in-
itiator of innovative concepts
in leadership, Jewish enrich-
ment and endowment develop-
ment and fund-raising skills.
The council of Jewish
Federations is the national
association of 200 Federations,
Welfare Funds and Communi-
ty Councils which serve nearly
800 communities embracing a
Jewish population of more
than 5.7 million in the United
States and Canada.
Established in 1932, the
Council serves as a national in-
strument to strengthen the
Esther Lerner
Charlotte Padek
work and the impact of Jewish
Federations through leader-
ship in developing programs to
meet changing needs in the
Jewish community; through
establishing guidelines for
fund-raising and operation:
and through joint planning and
action on common purposes
dealing with local, regional,
national and international
needs.
Padek Makes Presentation in Israel
Charlotte Padek, Women's
Division 1988 Campaign
Chairman, has recently return-
ed from Israel where she par-
ticipated in the National UJA
Women's Division Chairmen
and Directors Mission. Padek
was one of only three chairmen
from around the country who
were asked to make presenta-
tions during the mission.
The invitation to speak was
extended by mission chairman
Bobi Klotz, newly installed
Chairman of National UJA
Women's Division. According
to Klotz, the annual Chairmen
and Directors Mission is spon-
sored by National UJA for
Women s Divisions whose
community campaign is over
three million dollars.
Designed as a special study
mission in preparation for the
1988 Federation/UJA Cam-
paign, the mission program in-
cludes many opportunities for
exchange of information and
ideas. Padek's presentation on
the Effectiveness of Face-to-
Face Solicitation was part of a
complete program on suc-
cessful campaign techniques,
and was very well received by
the participants.
Traveling with Padek was
Debbi Roshfeld, Women's
Division director. The two
women, representing the Fort
Lauderdale Federation
Women's Division, ioined
Seated, from left, Charlotte Padek, Penny Warner, Shelia Engels-
tein arid Amy Dean, and standing, Debbie Roshfeld, Judy Arm-
strong, Faye Stoller and Phyllis Gothelf.
Women's Division chairmen
and directors from 30 com-
munities around the country
for a week of workshops,
seminars and site visits
throughout the State of Israel.
In addition to Fort Lauder-
dale, the Women's Divisions of
three other South Florida com-
munities were represented:
Campaign chairman Amy
Dean and director Phyllis
Gothelf of Miami; Campaign
chairman Penny Warner and
director Judy Armstrong of
South Broward; and campaign
chairman Sheila Engeistein
and director Faye Stoller from
Palm Beach.
rusciL
cr
II HIM
III 11 VIII s\
M I
H I
56TM GENERAL ASSEMBLY
NOVEMBER 18-22. 1987
Series for Women
Women's Division President
Alvera Gold has announced the
development of a new and ex-
citing Leadership Skills
Seminar Series. According to
Gold, the young women who
have been invited to par-
ticipate were chosen based on
their commitment and involve-
ment, and their leadership
potential.
The program consists of a
series of five workshops which
will be held during the month
of September. Each of the
workshops will be presented
by trained and experienced
facilitators, among them Na-
tional UJA Women's Division
Board members Judy Swedlow
of Columbus, Ohio and Mikki
Futernik of Miami.
The series was designed to
cover a wide range of topics in-
cluding "What have I Have
Gotten Myself Into?": The
Concept of Volunteerism and
What It Means To Be A
Leader; "Am I Hearing What
I Think You're Saying?": Com-
munications Skills and Basic
Speaker Training; Organizing
The Organization: Group
Dynamics and the Committee
Process: Making the System
Work: The Role of the Federa-
tion in the American Jewish
Community; and The Bottom
Line: Tzedakah and the Mean-
ing of the Campaign.
f
I


I
JERUSALEM Kach Party leader Meir Kahane obe-
diently took the required oath of allegiance to the State of
Israel and regained the full rights and privileges of a
Knesset member. He had been stripped of most of those
rights by Knesset Speaker Shlomo Hillel. Immediately
after the oath was administered by the Knesset Clerk, .
Mapam MK Elazar Granot said he would notify the :|
American judicial authorities of Kahane's pledge of
allegiance, which could lead to forfeiture of his U.S.
citizenship.
TEL AVIV Unknown persons attempted to burn
down a building being renovated as a treatment center for
victims of AIDS in the Jaffa section of Tel Aviv. Police said
a fence was torn down and part of a building was burned.
Neighbors who object to the establishment of an AIDS
treatment center in their area are believed responsible.
:*:*::::*:*:*>ra^
Life in Israel Interesting
Continued from Page 4
summer settlements in the
Negev marketed tasty yellow
watermelons which were all
the rage in Europe. This year's
crop will be even bigger.
Observers cross their fingers,
recalling when red bananas
were also a hit, and then
disappeared.
Gastronomical Gelt.
Treasury inspectors were not
surprised when they found a
stuffed chicken in a dentist's
refrigerator in his home in
Ramat Gan. They were looking
for undeclared income, and
found $2,300 stuffed into a
frozen fowl.
Surplus Merchandise.
Eyebrows were lifted when a
Histadrut sales concern adver-
tised gold water faucets at
about $500 each. Is this what
proletarian Israel is coming to?
Investigation revealed that
they were left over from a pro-
ject to install high class plumb-
ing facilities for the Shah of
Iran, just before he was *1
deposed.
In the Viewpoint Spotlight
The Pope-Waldheim Conflict
Continued from Page 1
nelled into respectability after the war. By becoming
president of his country he and his electors turned the
skeleton in his closet into a national symbol.
That the Pope should choose to ignore all this is
historically and morally shocking. No concern for the
large Catholic community in Austria can justify it. On
the contrary, such concern should be directed at exor-
cising the latent and not so latent anti-Semitism
which continues to infect sectors of the Austrian
people.
Certainly the visit sent a deeply discordant signal
from the Vatican to Israel and the Jewish people, and
at a time when many in the Church and in organized
Jewry are intent on bridging the differences and pre-
judices accumulated over centuries of oppression.
In spiritual terms there could be only one justifica-
tion for this visit; that Waldheim came to the Pope not
as the president of his country, but as a repentant sin-
ner, seeking penitence for his crimes, his lies, and his
indifference to the obnoxious old values his election
has aroused amongst his people.
Unfortunately, there is nothing in Waldheim's
record to suggest such an awakening. Rather he was
seeking the international legitimacy that still eludes
him.
In appearing to grant it, the Pope participated in a
historical injustice.



.>


Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, July 31, 1987
Sharing Our Dollars With Our Brethren in Need...
The Challenge At Home In Israel Worldwide
By HAROLD L. OSHRY
Executive Vice President
and General Chairman
We're on the verge of great
happenings in Greater Fort
Lauderdale.
IN 1987, our community has
raised in excess of $6.5 million
to help us continue to lead a
viable Jewish social service
and humanitarian program.
Together, we confronted the
rising costs of vital life-
enriching, life-enhancing
philanthropic organizations,
and the soaring inflation in
Israel's economy, and once
again showed that North
Broward County 'guys and
gals' provide a leadership
response that placed us in the
top 10 percent of campaign
dollars raised by major Jewish
Federation/United Jewish Ap-
peal campaigns in the United
States and Canada.
Needs vs Dollars
This coming year will be one
of great planning and organiz-
ing as we strive to achieve a
record $7 plus million dollars
on our way to $10 million by
the end of the decade. We now
must all ponder the various
aspects of how to implement a
priority-setting process aimed
at bringing about much needed
and increased campaign funds.
We need more resources to
serve our more than 150,000
Jewish men, women and
children in our 22 area
metropolis. We in North
Broward are faced with an
area versus people problem.
From the beginnings some 20
years ago, Federation sprung
on the scene with some 300
Jeyish residents based in East
Fort Lauderdale and Pompano
Beach and pockets in Margate
and Deerfield Beach, to what
now spreads more .than 300
developed square miles from
A1A to U.S. 27, and from Grif-
fin Road to Hillsboro Beach
Boulevard. The needs exist
everywhere. On the ocean,
east and west of 1-95, in the
Broward-University corridors,
and Atlantic-University cor-
ridors on the grounds of
Bonaventure-Weston; and in
the communities of near and
far suburbs. We must care for
our frail elderly, we must pro-
vide kosher nutrition lun-
cheons, we must help needy
parents send their children to
quality day school programs,
and not put their children's
Jewish education "on hold."
We must help single Jews
who make up nearly one-third
of our total population with
ongoing programs to help
them meet other Jewish
singles. We must care for the
young and old alike and allow
the members of the community
who want to join the Jewish
Community Center and not
turn our backs on teenagers in
trouble with drug and alcohol
abuse. Or the college youth,
many of them away from home
for the first time with
counselors to talk to, and
guidance from B'nai B'rith
Hillel.
There is no question that the
need is indeed here, but can we
answer this need the way it
should be with quality pro-
grams? Yes, we can, but it
takes your heartfelt generosi-
ty to make this happen, and in
1988, we need your help more
than ever.
Greater Fort Lauderdale
vs. Israel
In the last two years, our
Federation has given more
than 52.3 percent to Israel and
overseas needs, more than
$3.3 million and of that we
should all be proud.
After rescuing more than
10,000 Ethiopian Jews and br-
inging them to Israel and pay-
ing for clothing, food, Hebrew
Language training, schooling,
the Israeli government absorp-
tion money was exhausted.
But the need continues, these
people need jobs and suppor-
tive services. They must live
near established centers of
population, precisely where
housing is in short supply. The
children require special educa-
tional programs and accom-
modations. For all these
reasons, there is a desperate
need for additional funds. We
can't expect Israel to bear this
burden alone.
And then there is the
"economic war."
Inflation in Israel is now 1
percent a month figures
considered disastrous here in
the U.S.
The government of Israel
had to slash social services and
reduce programs that help
people suffering from
economic pressures the most.
Rural settlements in
Israel's frontiers are on the
brink of bankruptcy.
Many Israeli hospitals
don't have enough funds to
operate.
The threat of terrorism
has devastated Israel's largest
industry of tourism, and free
high school education has been
cut back to the ninth grade.
And for children of disadvan-
taged families who need
v special education programs
and access to vocational oppor-
tunities in engineering and
high-tech areas, there are no
funds.
In Morocco
Shown at the piano is music teacher Arlene Solomon with teacher
Maya Gabrieli and Hebrew Day School second graders.
The elderly participants of the Jewish Federation's Kosher
Nutrition program having their questions about legal matters
answered by Lawyer Lloyd B. Silverman, who volunteers his
time and knowledge.
Students at Judaica High School listening attentively to guest
speaker.
Can we deny Israel's next
generation the opportunity to
break out of the cycle of
poverty?
Israel is now going through
an "economic Ybm Kippur
War." But in this "war," we
can contribute side-by-side
with Israelis. We have always
responded with funds during
times of emergency. Can we
do any less now?
North Broward vs. World
Need
Be it Tamarac, Tel Aviv or
Tunisia, we all have a stake in
helping our Jewish brethren.
There are no places in this
world where need does not ex-
ist, in one form or another and
there will always be a respon-
sive Jewish community ready
and able to help and provide
the life-giving, life-saving
needs.
At a seder in Algiers, where
for the first time, the only time
they formally met on Yom Kip-
pur, this group of seniors who
otherwise would have no
semblance of Judaism, or for
daily care of elderly in Moroc-
co, Tunisia and Algeria, and
the meals-on-wheels and
medical assistance in
Bucharest, Rumania. These
are just some of the heartfelt
services you helped to con-
tribute in the.welfare of your
fellow Jew. Are you proud to
have made this happen? Let
me share with you a poem that
was written by a fourth grade
student in Casablanca which
best sums up the feelings for
American Jewry.
"Joint Representatives,
Great Happiness is your
Share.
Your work is glorious and
your charity great.
Dear Beloved American
Jews, the children of Israel are
close to your hearts to teach
them the beloved Torah
That contributed in a
generous spirit.
Wondrous Schools, sprang
up in every hamlet,
Thanks to the generous per-
sons, that have been sent to us.
Leaders of the Joint arrived
in the West,
and the Land of Morocco
appeared,
Concerned with healthy
bodies and souls.
A gift of best religious
education; they brought us.
Our hearts turn to you with
thanks for your help
and support, and thank you
again and may you be blessed a
thousandfold."
What words can better
describe the value and worth
placed on your contribution to
the Federation/UJA than from
the mouths of babes and in this
case, our brethren in a land
faraway.
Let's not wait for the fund-
raising or volunteer chairman
to call on you for your '88 gift
in the Fall. Plan ahead with us
and decide now on what you
will pledge and do in our 20th
Anniversary year campaign.
Remember, we are the one and
only way to help tens of
thousands of Jewish men,
women and children, at home;
in Israel and 34 other lands!
What better way to share the
value of your dollar and reap
the compassion and plaudits of
your brethren!
In France
In Algeria.


__

M
mm


Friday, July 31, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 9

ffi CAMPAIGN 1 Federation/United Jewish A]
'88 Campaign Management Team in Action
u*.
Becker
Finkelstein Padek
Reinstein
Miller
Polish
Ten Prominent North
Broward County community
leaders have been named to
the new 1987'88 Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale/United Jewish Ap-
peal Campaign Management
Team which will determine in
the coming months among
other items, the goal-setting
process campaign evaluation,
assignments, strategy, and
operational procedures.
The men and women, all
members of the Federation
board of directors, include,
from:
Boca Raton: Alvera A.
Gold, Brian J. Sherr.
Deerfield Beach: Samuel
K. Miller.
Fort Lauderdale: Alan
Becker, Richard Finkelstein,
Charlotte Padek.
Plantation: Sheldon S.
Polish, Joel Reinstein.
Tamarac: Harold L. Oshry,
Morris Small.
Oshry, general campaign
chairman, indicated that these
leaders will join with fellow
Federation area community
residents, representating the
22 locales on the Senior Ad-
visory Council, and Campaign
Cabinet that will help to lead
the record-breaking Jewish
community major philan-
thropic campaign to achieve
the most in Federation's 20
year history.
He indicated that, "This
group of concerned and caring
individuals will together
establish the process that will
involve thousands of
volunteers in determining the
quantifiable needs of our com-
munity. Our share of overseas
needs, our giving capacity and
the amount of money that can
and must be raised. This pro-
cess involves not only cam-
Sherr
paign and Federation leader-
ship, but also the 'grassroots'
that includes men, women and
youngsters living from AIA to
1-75, from Griffin Road to
Hillsboro Beach Blvd. We have
an area encompassing 300
square miles, and with the
population growing at a rate of
700 daily in South Florida,
many settling in our area,
Greater Fort Lauderdale has a
great task ahead. That is why
we are starting at this time to
plan for the '88 drive."
Oshry stated that come
September, a goal setting day
Oshry
has been placed on the calen-
dar for the leaders which will
among other items, include
review of '87 fund-raising,
evaluate local needs presented
by the agencies and
beneficiaries, discuss overseas
needs, re-examine locale vs.
UJA allocations, and set
preliminary minimum goals
and estimate the community's
capacity to meet that goal.
There will be a review, discus-
sion and strategy session
following the morning meeting
and a special selected top giver
luncheon.

Your UJA Dollars at Work in Israel...
Retaining Jewish Presence in Israel's Galilee
By BILL CLARK
UJA Press Service
SFAD, ISRAEL Large
maps pinned to the walls in the
Jewish Agency's Jerusalem
headquarters look like battle
plans for a campaign in the
Galilee. And, indeed, they are.
Colored grids and pins on
those maps reveal that the
population of the Galilee is
now evenly divided between
Arabs and Jews and the
Arabs are experiencing a
natural increase nearly double
that of the Jewish population.
With each passing year, the
Jewish character of Israel's
northern tier is being
submerged deeper beneath a
rapidly expanding Arab
community.
In some regions, such as the
mountains around Sfad, Arabs
outnumber Jews two-to-one. A
national minority gaining a
clear numerical majority in
one region almost guarantees
a separatist movement.
Cyprus has been torn by such
Greek-Turkish strife; Kurdish
and Armenian regions have
been in a state of nearly
perpetual civil war in Iraq;
Iran, Turkey, and Lebanon
have been shattered by fac-
tional strife.
Demographic changes here
in Galilee, Israeli's north, are
one of the most serious groups
of problems Israel faces. So,
the Jewish Agency,. which
receives most of its funds from
American Jews through their
the UJA/Federation Cam-
paign, has launched a major
campaign to restore the
Galilee character. It is an enor-
mous challenge, and success is
by no means assured.
"In the short term, we can
do very little about changing
the numerical balance unless
there is an enormous aliyah,"
says Talma Duchan, chief of
the Jewish Agency's planning
Xv::::::::::::-^^^
Q Briefly I
(BEERSHEVA, ISRAEL,
JULY 1987) SPLASH IN
THE DESERT. A Ben-Gurion
University of the Negev
students plays swimming in-
structor to an Ethiopian child
at the university pool. Students
serve as companion and tutors
to children of an estimated
6,000 Ethiopian settlers in the
Negev. (Photo: Amir Weinberg)
sMSH9smwmRHHHIIIll0i
team for the Galilee, referring
to Jewish immigration to
Israel. So the Agency is using
a combination of short-term
tactics and long-term
planning.
Tactics involve supporting
the Galilee's current Jewish
population to prevent further
emigration. At the same time,
the Jewish Agency is setting
down the infrastructure for
long-term goals, such as the
"Region 2000" which may br-
ing 100,000 more Jews to the
Galilee.
Mechanization has made
Israeli agriculture so produc-
tive that fewer people are
needed to run farms, and this
has resulted in serious
unemployment in the Galilee's
predominantly agricultural
Jewish communities. To
counter this, United Jewish
Appeal/Federation Campaign
resources are being used to set
up a variety of small industries
and tourism projects.
UJA/Federation funds are
also being used to establish
new settlements at strategic
Galilee locations.
A great deal of Arab expan-
sion in the Galilee is illegal,
Ms. Duchan said. "Israeli Taw
applies. Everyone Jews and
Arabs alike must have
building permits and build ac-
cording to the master plan,"
she added. Nevertheless, there
are today, about 10,000 illegal
Arab dwelling units in the
Galilee.
"In some cities, the
municipality would demolish
such buildings," she said. "But
in the Galilee, it becomes a na-
tional problem with strong
political implications. So
demolition of illegal structures
is not being done."
Thus, maps of the Galilee
have .become chess boards of
sorts, with Jewish Agency
, planners trying to second-
guess the next step of illegal
expansion in the Arab sector.
CONSTRUCTION UNDERWAY IN ISRAEL'S NORTH.
Many projects are underway in Israel's Galilee region, the nor-
thern area within Israel's pre-1967 borders construction that
depends in part, on American Jews through the UJA/Federation
Campaign. UJA Press Service Photo.
Major Progress Report
Major Federations
Atlanta
Baltimore
Bergen County
Boston
Central NJ
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbus
Dallas
Denver
Detroit
Fort Lauderdale
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Kansas City
Los Angeles
Metro-West NJ
Miami
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
New York
North Jersey
Oakland
Palm Beach Co
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Rhode Island
Rochester
San Diego
San Francisco
Seattle
South Broward
South County
St. Louis
St. Paul
Tulsa
Washington. DC
1987
Current Raised Value
$8,760,000
16,113,000
8,554,000
22,677,000
3,819,000
36,000,000
3,847,000
23,854,000
6,025,000
6,691,000
6,413,000
23,588,000
6,557,000
8,296,000
7,300,000
3,708,000
3,724,000
39,622,000
16,588,000
' 19,174,000
8,262,000
10,731,000
99,998,000
2,483,000
2,853,000
8,223,000
24,308,000
4,010,000
9,142,000
4,297,000
3,337,000
4,594,000
14,005,000
4,310,000
5,860,000
5.651,000
' 737,000
-.524,000
1,628,000
17,283.000

-




Page 10 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, July 31, 1987
Hebrew Day School
Goes to Washington, D.C....
1
Over 60? Why Not Visit
Federation's Kosher Nutrition Program
Included in the myriad of activities at the Kosher Nutrition pro-
gram is a weekly exercise class. Leading the class is Sam Bot-
winick with exercisers Tillie Folk, Bea Botwinick, Edith Gordon
and Gert Comoro.
Immigrant Group Arrives
Top Row: from left, Samantha Candiotte, Ellen Novoseletsky,
Beth Armstead, Mrs. Cynthia Zwerner, Mrs. Rachel Keller, Con-
gressman Larry Smith, Mrs. Cookie Gordon and Bottom Row,
Shira Caswell, Robert Rochman, David Shulman, Jennifer
Gruvman.
The 8th grade of the David
Posnack Hebrew Day School
visited Washington, D.C. as a
culminating activity for their
study of American government.
Congressman Larry Smith
greeted the class at the Capitol.
He gave them a personal seminar
on the workings of the govern-
ment. The 8th grade class was
then escorted into the Gallery to
watch the House conduct their
meeting.
The 8th grade spent three days
touring Washington, and saw all
the highlights of the Capitol. The
David Posnack Hebrew Day
School's graduating 8th grade
class enjoyed their camaraderie
and savored this educational ex-
perience. As a beneficiary agency
of the Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale, the
David Posnack Hebrew Day
School participates in challenging
trips as an extension of their
classroom learning.
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
largest single group of Soviet
Jewish immigrants to arrive
here in five years landed at
Ben-Gurion Airport Sunday
night. The 42 men, women and
children came on a flight from
Moscow via Vienna, unan-
nounced. The size of the group
surprised Jewish Agency per-
sonnel waiting at the airport.
It included several former ac-
tivists for Jewish and Zionist
rights in the USSR.
The newcomers are from
Leningrad, Minsk, Moscow,
Novosibirsk, Moldavia and
Soviet Georgia. They reached
Vienna Sunday and transfer-
red immediately to a flight to
Tel Aviv. Most Soviet Jews
travelling via Vienna stop-over
there to apply for visas to the
U.S. or other Western coun-
tries. Only a minority have
gone on to Israel.
Meanwhile, Soviet Jewry ac-
tivists continued to picket the
Tel Aviv Hilton Hotel Monday
where a three-man Soviet con-
sular delegation and their staff
are staying.
Before the nutritious daily
kosher lunch is served, Harry
Hammer is pictured making
hamotzie. For information
contact Sandy Friedland at
797-OSSL
Fogel Elected
EAST ORANGE, N.J. -
(JTA) Claudia Fogel, direc-
tor of the Jewish Vocational
Service Work Center on Aging
here, has been elected presi-
dent of the Association of
Jewish Vocational Service
Professionals, a North
American organization.
MORRIS B. ABRAM, chair-
man of the conference of
Presidents of Major American
Jewish Organizations, will
deliver a major address at the
30th National Biennial Con-
vention of Na'amat USA
(formerly oneer Women
Na'amat), be held August
9-12 at the century Plaza in
Los Angeles.
KKOSHER
When you're looking for cereals that provide
your family with great taste and good nutrition,
POST* is the natural choice. POST* Grape-
Nuts* cereal, Grape-Nuts* Flakes, Natural
Bran Flakes and Natural Raisin Bran give you
all the goodness nature intended. No artificial
colors, artificial flavors or preservatives are
ever added.
All four cereals are fortified with at least
eight essential vitamins and they're absolutely
Kosher.
So look for POST* the natural choice.
fe(ffi Where keeping Kosher is a delicious tradition.


Friday, July 31, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 11

Uncle Sam and the Foundation
Will Send You Income for Life
AIDS Drug Revealed
Usually, when you contribute to
a non-profit organization, you get
a tax deduction, but you no longer
get the income you used to earn.
Now you can have both the
deduction and the income.
HERE'S HOW IT WORKS:
You make a current gift to the
Foundation.
A Charitable Remainder
Trust Agreement will be prepared
for you to sign.
Depending on the ages of you
and your spouse and the income
you desire from your Fund, you're
entitled to an immediate income
tax deduction.
FOR EXAMPLE:
- Husband and wife are in their
FOUNDATION
H |f WISH PHII AMHROPIf t
80's. They give $50,000 to the
Foundation. A Charitable Re-
mainder Trust is established
which provides that $4,000 or 8
percent will be returned to the
donors for their lives.
- They're entitled to a $30,000
income tax deduction.
Organizations
WEST BROWARD
PHILHARMONIC
GUILD
The West Broward Philhar-
monic Guild is offering bus ser-
vice to Wednesday night
subscribers at $2 per concert
this fall. The bus will leave
from Plantation Towne Mall.
For $20 you may use the bus
for all 20 concerts. For infor-
mation call Mrs. Arvo Niemi,
president, at 581-8430.
HASHOMER HATZAIR
SOCIALIST ZIONIST
YOUTH MOVEMENT
There will be a reunion of
former members of the
Hashomer Hatzair Socialist
Zionist Youth Movement this
summer at Camp Shomria,
Liberty. N.Y. on Aug. 8. All
former shomrim are encourag-
ed to attend. For information
contact Sharsheret, The
Hashomer Hatzair Link in
North America, 150 Fifth
Ave.,Suite 911, New York,
| N.Y. 10011.(21)255-8760.
BNAI ZION
BNAI ZION SOUTHEAST
I REGION recently elected its
I Officers for the 1987-88 year,
lannounced Regional Executive
JDirector Arthur Y. Klein. Sam
lAboulafia will continue as the
President for the next year.
[Vice Presidents are: Hilda
"Srandinger, Pnina Brecher,
[Sidney Brounstein, Felix
..ooper. Carl Fisher, David
Traenkel, Walter Freitag, Lee
goldsmith, Milton Goldsmith,
i-tta Hirsch, Alfred Jacobs,
Lorraine Jacobs, Erika Klein,
lagda Korda, Pauline Lieb-
nan, Rhonda Linet, Alex
-ustig, Magda Lustig,
Vilhelm Mund, Robert Reti,
lartin Shayo, Herman
Phreiber, Dr. Aurelia Thau,
Pavid Thau, Anna Weigman,
Pr Steven Weisel, William
feitz, Adelle Wolman. Other
peers are: Seymour Rubin,
[rustee; Treasurer, Max
Veiss; Recording Secretary,
pillie Kiff.
I Honorary Vice Presidents
>e: Commissioner Col. Phil
Iphen, Hallandale; Coun-
lilman Ben Dantzker,
fauderhill; Peter Deutsch.
Florida State Representative;
Commissioner Ben Z. Grenald,
Miami Beach; Martin I. Lip-
nack, and Commissioner Barry
D. Schreiber, Metro Dade
County.
For further information con-
tact 456-1999 or 456-2016.
If appreciated property is us-
ed to fund the trust, they will pay
no capital gains tax (assuming
that the Alternatie Minimum Tax
is not applicable) nor will the
Foundation.
You save on income taxes,
estate taxes, and you get income
for life. Please call Kenneth Kent
at the Foundation at 748-8400 for
further information and always
keep your tax advisor informed.
Foundation
FOUNDATION FACT: Alter-
native Minimum Tax:
In 1987, gifts of appreciate pro-
perty may be subject to the Alter-
native Minimum Tax. But
whether or not subject to the
AMT, donor will always pay less
in taxes by making gifts versus
not making them.
FOUNDATION FACT:
Capital Gains Tax:
In 1987, Long Term Capital
Gains will be taxed as ordinary in-
come. Therefore a donor in the
maximum tax bracket will pay
38.5 cents for each dollar of
capital gain. In 1988, this will be
28 cents. In 1986, the tax on these
gains was 20 cents. Giving capital
gains property to charity makes
even more sense under Tax
Reform.
TEL AVIV (JTA) Bar
Ilan University scientists have
developed a new drug which
may prolong the lives of vic-
tims of AIDS (Acquired Im-
mune Deficiency Syndrome)
and cancer sufferers. Accor-
ding to Prof. Shmuel Salzberg,
head of the university s
science faculty, the drug
AS101 was used to treat AIDS
patients in Mexico, whose con-
dition appeared to have im-
proved a year later.
Salzberg said the drug
stimulates the immune system
to produce lymphocytes to
fight infections.
feZmrucoK'**""
ML
Cotor TV *****?'
Fu?AJrCondton^
Ssssr
S0AMWAU HOTEL
>sh Str* CotHn Ave
HIGH HOLY DAYS $349
SEPT. 23-OCT. 4 pp^on
305-538-5721 owo-r4
:
Eat in Good Health
With Fleischmann's Margarine
P.oQ^
OMM
ia
*8&
*%>*
**V*2.
cv*E
Sweet UNSALTED
Fleischmanns^
^5lOO% com oil
JJeischman
corn on
tfs
a**
*!*>
Margarine
***-
aime

Now its easy to make delicious, low cholesterol Challah
French Toast. Start with your own low cholesterol Challah
(see recipe below) and make sure Fleischmann s Margarine
and Fleischmann s Egg Beaters- are part ol the recipe
Fleischmann s Margarine is made Irom 100"corn oil has 0%
cholesterol and is low in saturated fat
So, it you want to enjoy good eating and good health one
thing's tor certain There's never been a belter lime tor the
great taste at Fleischmann s
LOW CHOLESTEROL CHALLAH m**;io*s
LOW CHOLESTEROL CHALLAH FRENCH TOAST
Mites wvmgs
V, cup EGG BEATERS
Cholesterol Free 99% Real
Egg Product
W teaspoon vanHIa extract
Vi teaspoon ground cinnamon
4(hHnchthtck)slicesLow
Cholesterol Challah (recipe follows)
1 tablespoon FLEISCHMANN'S
Sweet Unsalted Margarine
Syrup. iam or confectioner's sugar
6 cups all-purpose flour
2 tablespoons sugar
2 teaspoons salt
Dash powdered saffron, optional
1 package FLEISCHMANN'S'
RaptdRise'" Msast
1cuphotwater(125*to130T)
V? cup FLEISCHMANN S Sweet
Unsalted Margarine, softened
1 cup FLEISCHMANN'S EGG
BEATERS Cholesterol Free 99%
Real Egg Product, at room
temperature
Sesame or poppy seed
In shadow dish, beat FLEISCHMANN S Egg Beaters. vanMa and cin-
namon Dip challah into mixture, turning to coat well In skHtet. over
medium hot. met FLEISCHMANN S Sweet Unsalted Margarine Add
Chalah; cook tor 3 to 5 minutes on each side or until golden brown
Serve with syrup, jam oi confectioner's sugar
H ', .
Fleischmann's gives even meal a holidav flavor.
The Tradition Continues
Set aside 1 cup flour lp large bowl, mix remaining flour, sugar, salt,
saffron and FLEISCHMANN'S RapidRise Yeast, stir in hot water and
FLEISCHMANN'S Sweet Unsalted Margarine. Mix in tt cup
FLEISCHMANN'S Egg Beaters and enough reserved flour to make soft
dough Knead until smooth and elastic, 8 to 10 minutes Cover; let rest
10 minutes.
Otvide dough in half divide one half into 2 pieces, one about hot dough
and the other abouttt of dough Divide larger piece into 3 equal pieces;
rol each into 12-inch rope Brad the ropes, seal ends Divide smaller
piece into 3 equal pieces, roll each into 10-inch rope Braid ropes, place
on top ol large brad Seal together at ends Place on greased baking
sheet Repeat with remaining dough Cover; let rise in warm draft-free
place until doubled m sub. about 1 hour
Brush loaves with remaining Egg Beaters; sprinkle with seeds Bake at
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cool on wire racks
15c
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*..
Page 12 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, July 31, 1987
The Samuel and Helene Soref
Jewish Community Center
Perlman Campus
501 W. Sunrise Blvd.
Fort Lauderdale. Florida 33313 792-6700
By Muriel Haskell. Director of Public Relations
For further information and fees concerning the events or pro-
grams listed please call the center.
children who are three and
four year olds.
Week-ends and after the
camp day is over, Jill turns her
attention to her friends in JCC
Singles.
"Theres such a great need
for Singles programming in
this area," Jill says. "More
and more young people in their
twenties and thirties are settl-
ing here."
Jill hopes the committee will
grow. All sorts of plans are in
the offing, including lectures,
home parties, dances, bar-
b-q's, camping trips, cruises,
aerobics classes and for the
more athletic-more co-ed Soft-
ball and Volleyball.
Says Jill, "With the wonder-
ful facilities here at the JCC,
we think the Center is the
perfect place for Singles to be
heard and seen!"
JILL-COORDINATED
SINGLES PROGRAMS
Young Singles have two
August dates to keep! The first
is on the 10th, in Soref Hall, 8
o'clock in the evening at
which time a CO-ED Aerobics
session will take place. The
team of licensed instructors,
"Lauren and Mark" will put
participants through the paces
with a peppy exercise routine.
Following: Socializing over a
cool drink!
The next, a Pool Party/Bar-
B-Q, Volleyball afternoon on
the 16th, 1-4 p.m. JCC's pool
parties accompanied with grill-
ed hot dogs and active co-ed
JILL MUSHIN HONORED
Named JCC's June
Volunteer of the Month for
outstanding service in the
Center's Singles Department,
Jill Mushin is a senior
counselor in Camp Katan this
summer. She began her strong
attachments to JCC as a CIT
in 1981. This is her fifth sum-
mer on campus.
s Becoming acquainted with
more of the Center's Singles
activities earlier this year, Jill
became involved. And with the
help of a small committee she
organized and ran a nice
number of successful pool par-
ties, bar-b-q's and get-
togethers for JCC Young
Singles ages 21-35.
A young "Single" herself,
Jill is a 1985 graduate of the
University of South Florida at
Tampa, with degrees earned in
Early Childhood and Elemen-
tary Education. Before and
after camp, Jill is a
Kindergarten and Pre-First
Grade Teacher at Banyan
Elementary School.
Although well-qualified, Jill
still feels very fortunate,
"fresh out of school," to get
just the perfect job in the
Broward School system
right in her hometown!
Jill moved down to South
Florida from Maryland with
^ her family 15 years ago as a lit-
tle girl, and so she considers
herself a native. She has joined
many activities the Center of-
fers such as Israel In-
dependence Days and Holiday
celebration. As is evident, she
enjoys being around kids all
ages.
For most of her previous
summers at camp she has been
counselor/confidant/pal to
campers in Chalute, eight and
nine year-old girls. But this
- year, she is counselor/confi-
dant/pal to campers nearer the
ages of her Early Childhood
specialty namely Katan
volleyball have become
famous! For details on both
call the Center.
CAMPERS SIGNING UP
FOR JCCAD
Stacey Zabinsky, third year
JCC summer camp counselor,
inspired 14 of her "Bagel
Babies" campers in Camp
Chalutz to present a unique
program for Members of the
JCCAD (Jewish Center
Association of the Deaf).
On stage, Thursday after-
noon, July 16, in Building "C,"
the eight- and nine-year-old
girls, all dollfaces and dressed
in white, sang songs like
"Somewhere Out There" -
"That's What Friends Are
For" "We Are The World"
told some funny jokes and
made all the right signs in a
new language they learned.
Results: A beautiful chorus of
hands-smiles-and twinkling
eyes!
The audience, comprised of
members of the JCCAD and a
good representation of
parents, were overwhelmed.
The JCCADers were so sur-
prised and simply delighted.
The parents were proud and
thrilled and emotional. The
"Bagel Babies" debut deserv-
ed and got rave reviews.
It seems that Stacey, a
senior at U. of Florida at
Gainesville, going for a degree
in Elementary Education, took
up sign language at school two
years ago, just to acquire the
skill and to be able to com-
municate with hearing han-
dicapped people. She's pretty
good at it now, she says.
Always on the lookout for
something new (and service
oriented) for her campers,
Stacey engineered this project
of special entertainment for a
ready made audience who
come to the JCC campus every
Thursday.
The girls were willing to
learn and along with Lori
Wynn, Junior Counselor, and
Lisa Wolgin, CIT, they learn-
ed, in less than three weeks.
After their initial nervouness,
they grabbed on to signing
with great enthusiasm.
"Some of the girls want to
learn more," says Stacey.
"They'd like to become fluent
as signers." How lucky for
some of those they'll be able to
"talk to" later in life!
WELCOME TO A
NEW EXPERIENCE
in sophisticated Retirement Living
-. MAN Q~-R 0'
-----Where Caring Comes naturally'
3535 S.W. 52nd Avenue Pembroke rath, Honda 33023
A COMPLETE LIFESTYLE
in A KOSHER ENVIRONMENT
Tastefully Decorated
nursing Supervision 24 hrs.
Physicians on call 24 hrs.
3 meals daily and snacks
Daily activities, arts ft crafts
Social activities
Transportation provided
Swimming Pool ft Jacuzzi
Beauty Shop
Religious services daily
Easily accessible
WE WELCOME ENQUIRIES fLEASE CALL 961 8111
BAGEL BABIES
Anglia Begley, Jessica
Bloomgarden, Jaime Ciminelli,
Jennifer Cynamon, Tamara
Ettinger, Jeanine Faine, Lind-
say Glassman, Dana Kustan,
Julie Levine, Susie Millheiser,
Joy Quittner, Jessica Roof,
Jacqui Scharf, Michelle
Sheiman.
Not present: Lauren Ganet,
Barie Arliss.
FAMILY POOL PARTY
ON SUNDAY
Third one coming up August
9th. JCC families are making it
a habit! Everyone in the family
has a great time swimming
and splashing in the spacious
pool, relaxing on the pool deck,
playing games, enjoying
barbeque and all that goes
with. A fine Sunday in the
park like JCC campus.
Susana Flaum says "You're all
invited! We hope families will
register well in advance so we
can have plenty of foodstuffs
on hand to go around."
The JCC is a major
beneficiary agency of the
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale, receiving
funds from the annual United
Jewish Appeal campaign.
Jessica Bloomgarten, Dana
Kustan, Jeanine Faine.
From the left: Susie Millheiser,
Julie Levine.
From left, Lindsay Glassman, Anglia Begley,
Jessica Roof, Jennifer Cynamon. Michelle
Sheiman.
BEACH HOTEL
on n* oA ai !# traccT
OPEN
ALL YEAR
THE PROGRAM INCLUDES:
Remodeled Accommodations.
Two QLATT KOSHER MEALS
Dally.
Exciting Entertainment.
Refrigerator and Color TV in
Every Room.
Family Style Room
w/Big Screen TV.
Olympic Size Pool with
Privilege*.
Full Time Social Director with
Dally Activities.
Private Fenced in Beach.
Monthly Trips.
24 Hour Security.
Daily Maid Service.
Individually Controlled A/C.
RESERVE NOW
FOR HIGH HOLY DAYS
& SUCCOT 9/23-10/4/87
12 DAYS/11 NIGHTS
FROM $290 pp/dbl occ A t.i t,,,
4x
Under the supervision of
Rabbi Joseph N. Kaufman
FOR INFORMATION
AND OUR BROCHURE
CALL: 531-2206
YOUR HOSTS: THE GALBUT FAMILY


Friday, July 31, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 13
From Destruction and Tragedy to Hope and Redemption I
*
From:
Dr. Abraham J. Gittelson,
Director, Central Agency
for Jewish Education
Perhaps more than any
other aspect of Judaism, the
Jewish calendar reflects the
supreme moments of joy and
spiritual ecstasy on one hand,
and the remembrance of
despair and destruction on the
other.
To ignore the tragic times in
our history would be false to
the sweep of Jewish existence
and to forget the lessons that
can be derived from such ex-
periences. Tisha B'Av, the
ninth day of the Hebrew
month of Av, which this year
falls on Tuesday, Aug. 4, is the
paradigm of defeat and
destruction, of sadness and
mourning, yet of future
redemption as well.
Tisha B'Av commemorates
the major tragedies of Jewish
life the razing of the First
Temple in 586 BCE by the
Babylonians, and of the Se-
cond Temple more than 500
years later in 70 CE by the
Romans. Tradition also
assigns to Tisha B'Av that day
on which the generation of
Israelites which had left Egypt
were decreed to die out in the
wilderness, while a new
generation of free men would
enter the Promised Land.
Tisha B'Av marks as well
the fall of the fortress of Betar
to the Romans in the year 135
CE, symbolizing the crushing
of the revolt of Bar Kochba
against Roman domination.
Nor did tragedy cease in the
centuries that followed. The
prayers of mourning said on
Tisha B'Av, the kinot, refer to
the burning of 24 cartloads of
the Talmud in Paris in 1242,
and the destruction of scores
of communities during the
Crusades. Tradition dates the
expulsion of the Jewish com-
munity of Spain in 1492, to the
day of Tisha B'Av.
In the nine day period im-
mediately preceeding Tisha
B'Av it is customary to avoid
meat and wine. Indeed the
very last meal on the -eve of
Tisha B'Av is one of austerity
and deprivation.
On the eve of Tisha B'Av the
curtain of the Ark is removed,
as if the very countenance of
God were veiled and hidden
and the universe empty of His
presence. The synagogue is
usually in semi-darkness, lit
only by candles. The book of
Lamentations recounting the
destruction by the Babylonians
is changed in dirge-like fashion
by the worshippers seated on
low benches or the floor itself.
Fasting and mourning, the
At the Cored Springs C
Jewish Heritage program
recently held, the last in a
%"* of three, shown, Stan
JJ^'M chairman, and Dr.
"!* yittelson. Federation's
erector of education, Central
"laencyfor Jewish Education.
J"- fittleson was the guest
2~?**r Wore an overflowing
^Mjwtic audience at the
^^ Springs City HoU.
tragedy of our people is re-
experienced and re-lived as if
it were happening to
ourselves.
At the morning service, the
worshippers do not don the
tallit or tefillin, which are con-
sidered as ornaments of pride,
beauty and glory. The Book of
Lamentations is read once
again, and moving elegies are
chanted. The to rah portions
deal with despair and exile.
As the day wanes, the
elements of hope and redemp-
tion begin to emerge. The tallit
and tefillin are worn at the
afternoon service, prayers of
comfort are said, and as the
fast day ends with the evening
service, the prayer of sanc-
tification of the new moon is
recited, which in mystical
Jewish literature, reflects the
hope for the coming of the
Messiah and the belief that all
of nature and history will be
restored to wholeness and
perfection.
In some synagogues the
longing for redemption is link-
ed with the renewed ties with
the land of Israel through con-
tributions to the Jewish Na-
tional fund.
Thus, the essential element
of Tisha B'Av is the re-
enactment of past tragedy as if
we ourselves had experienced
its overwhelming impact.
Remembrance becomes the
secret of redemption. The re-
enactment stimulates us to
seek greater spiritual heights.
The days of tragedy sensitize
us to the historical sacrifices of
our people, to the needs of
those who still suffer in our
own day, and the necessity of
individual responsibility that
leads to communal redemp-
tion. The crescendo of
catastrophe is transformed in-
to a paean of faith, deeds of
loving kindness, and a seeking
of return and repentance as
the Days of Awe draw near.
Successful retirees make
The Court part of
their portfolio...
t The Court at Palm-Airc,
we understand how hard
you have worked to achieve
your financial success. And
now that you have retired, pa-serving
your hard-earned assets for the future is a
priority, he it for yourself or your heirs. At
this time, the Court offers a simple rental
plan, which allows you to keep your
assets in tact, without the need for a large
endowment fee. Unlike many residential
retirement communities, no large cash
investment is necessary.
The Court is a special resort-like adult
community, part of the World of Palm-
Airc in Pompano Beach. Florida. Here,
residents maintain busy, resourceful
lifestyles, free of the worries of home
upkeep. The Court takes care of all house-
keeping and linen services. We also pro-
vide up to three meals everyday in our
elegant dining room. And, most impor-
tantly, the comfort and assurance of
24-hour emergency nursing services is
provided for residents should the need
ever arise. All this, plus round the clock
security to protect you and your belong-
ings. The Court offers what ordinary
retirement communities cannot peace
of mind.
You'll have your choice of elegant apart-
ment homes, each offering complete
kitchen, screened porch or balcony,
safety-oriented bath, and a total package
of luxury amenities.
An activity -filled lifestyle is available
to you at our own on-sitc facilities and
around the Pompano Beach area, via our
regularly scheduled transportation.
The Court is managed by Palm Court
Management, Inc., an affiliate of the
Kaplan Organization, developers of qual-
ity communities for over 35 years.
Call or write today to find out how to
add The Court to your portfolio.
<*&*'
Ss5$>"
MAIL TO:
%cQurt
at' I \Um Aiiv
2701 N. Course Drive
Pompano Beach. Fl. 33069
(305)975-8900
? I would like to learn more about The Court at Polm-Aire. please provide more inlormalion
Nome_______________________________________________________
Address.
City_
State.
Zip.
Phone.
DeptJF731
The Court at Palm-Alre, 2701 N. Course Drive, Pompano Baach, FL 33069 (305) 975-8900



Page 14 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, July 31, 1987
Sherwin H. Roaenstein. Executive
Director
JEWISH FAMILY SERVICE- OF BROWARD COUNTY
IS THERE A STRANGER
LIVING IN YOU HOUSE
By LAURIE B. WORKMAN,
MSW
Is there a stranger living in
your house? If you are the
parent of an adolescent, the
answer is most probably, yes.
Adolescence is the time in
one's life of changes, both
physically and emotionally. It
is much like being on "an emo-
tional seesaw." During
adolescence, one is seeking in-
ward and searching outward.
It is a time of awakening to
love and beauty at the same
time experiencing loneliness
and despair. It is also a time of
being "a free spirit" in a fan-
tasy and idealistic world while
realizing reality is full of
disillusionment and disgust.
Adolescence is when we do
most of our growing. At times
it is often difficult for the
parents and for the children.
At the beginning of
adolescence, children are
dependent upon parents, try-
ing to be adults while living in
a child's body and world, and
not sure of what the future
holds for them. By the end of
adolescence, the childrewn will
be more responsible for
themselves, their personalities
in place, and a better idea as to
their future.
Adolescence is when we do
most of our growing. At times
it is often difficult for the
parents and for the children.
At the beginning of
adolescence, children are
dependent upon parents, try-
ing to be adults while living in
a child's body and world, and
not sure of what the future
holds for them. By the end of
adolescence, the children will
be more responsible for
themselves, their personalities
in place, and a better idea as to
their future.
Firstly, stay away from
"parenting-by-comparison."
We all would rather be directly
criticized rather than hearing
the infamous "When I was
your age. ." Teens are no dif-
ferent. We must not forget
that teens are people Too!
Secondly, on helping your
teenager make decisions
don't do it for them. Focus on
the decision-making process,
be a consultant. Making deci-
sion is a part of gaining one's
independence.
Thirdly, together with your
child, define limits. Firmness,
fairness, explicitness and con-
sistency are important. They
will give adolescents structure
and relieve some stress that
parents feel. Teens to unders-
tand the limits on behavior as
well as the need to understand
privileges and responsibilities
within the family.
Last, but not least, recognize
and appreciate your
teenager's special talents. For
one to develop a healthy
psyche, we must experience
failure, defeat and frustration.
We all learn by trial and error.
If all else fails, it might
behoove the family to seek pro-
fessional help. Parent/Child
counseling and family counsel-
ing are two of the many ser-
vices Jewish Family Service of
Broward County provides. For
more information, we can be
reached at 966-0956 in
Hollywood or 749-1505 in Fort
Lauderdale.
Jewish Family Service of
Broward County is a
beneficiary agency of the
United Way of Broward Coun-
ty, the Jewish Federation of
South Broward, and the
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale.
Menorah Speaks Out
Pre-Need Planning Important
Part Of Estate Planning,
Expert Advises
Today, pre-need funeral arrangements are as Impor-
tant a part of estate planning as drafting, a will or buying life
insurance.
According to CPA and financial planner Barry Gurland,
pre-need planning is an excellent way to avoid both the
emoUonal and Inanctal burdens of at-need cirrangernents.
Rrst of aM, pre-need arrangements diffuse the tendency
to overspend on final expenses as a result of emotional
stress. Second pre-ptannlnq is consistent with the modem
trend of afowing indMduols to make their own choices
and set their own priorities in terms of type and cost of final
cnangements. Pre-need planning, most of a*, is a thought-
ful, considerate and economically sound way to "freeze"
the cost of Anal arrangements without the adverse effects
of InAatlon on the surviving family.
Pre-need planning. A smart way to show you care.
Making a difficult time easier.
Afenoilfo
North Miami Beach 935-3939 Sunrise 742-4000
Margate 97W0H Deerlletd Beoch 427-4700
west Palm Beach 627-2277
Cemeteries Funend Chapel* Mausoleum Pre-Need Planning
Temple News
MICHAEL J. SCHARF,
Chairman of the Board and
Chief Executive Officer of
Edgcomb Corporation and
Edgcomb Metals Company,
was elected president of the
Boys Town Jerusalem Founda-
tion of America at the Founda-
tion's annual meeting. For fur-
ther information on Boys
Town, contact 91 fifth Ave.,
Suite 601, New York, N.Y.
10003 (212) 242-1118.
With Rhyme
and Reason
All About Faith
Faith is the start of
enterprise,
The light that must not fail.
Without the grace of faith, all
else
Will come to no avail...
Faith is the canvas of the soul
That pictures heavenly
things.
It takes us through the dark to
G-d
'Neath its magic wings ...
Faith is knowing He is there,
That He is kind and just,
Believing He is our true shield,
The One that we can
trust. .
Faith is the power in our lives
That has to be divine,
Progenitor of all good works
That can be yours and mine.
The root of noble glory when
The hopes we have run
high .
So let us keep our faith yet
strong
In everything we try ..
Jack Gould
July 31
Aug. 7
Aug. 14
Aug. 21
7:47 p.m.
7:37 p.m.
7:31 p.m.
7:24 p.m.
Benediction upon Kindling
the Sabbath Lights
BORUCH ATTO AD-ONAI
ELO-HEINU MELECH HO-
OLOM ASHER KID-
SHONU BEMITZ-VOSOV
VETZI-VONU LE-HAD-
LIK NEYR SHEL
SHABOS.
Blessed art Thou, 0 Lord our
G-d, King of the universe who
hast sanctified us by thy com-
mandments and commanded
us to kindle the Sabbath light.
Rabbi Aron Lieberman of
the Synagogue of Inverrary-
Chabad of Lauderhill, recently
met with Florida's Governor
Bob Martinez and presented
him with a book entitled, "Let
There Be Light." Martinez
signed a proclamation during a
special ceremony paying
tribute to Rabbi Menochem
Mendel Schneerson, leader of
the Chabad Lubavitch move-
ment, on the occasion of his
85th birthday.
Present at the proclamation
signing with Martinez was
Rabbi Lieberman and State
Rep. Peter Deutsch, himself a
participant in a study group of
professionals conducted by
Rabbi Lieberman.
The book presented to Mar-
tinez tells the story of three
special projects Tzivos
Hashem, an educational
organization for young boys
and girls under Bar/Bat Mitz-
vah age: "Colel Tifereth
z'Keinim" a study group for
all senior citizens of all levels
of education and knowledge:
and outreach centers all over
the world which offers a
Jewish experience to all
visitors.
Community Calendar
Compiled by
Lori Ginsberg
Federation 748-8400.
THURSDAY AUGUST 6
B'nai B'rith Women-
Tamarac Chapter: 11:30 a.m.
Card Party. Donation $5.
Italian-American Hall, 6535
W. Commerical Blvd.
581-0769.
SATURDAY AUGUST 8
Lauderdale Oaks: 8p.m.
Cabaret Nite featuring Gino
Sargi Trio and Gina Conti.
Auditorium, 3060 NW 47
Terr., Laud. Lakes. 733-9338
or 739-3150.
THURSDAY AUGUST 13
Temple Emanu-El: 7:45 p.m.
Executive Committee
meeting. At Temple.
Synagogue Directory
CONSERVATIVE
CONSERVATIVE SYNAGOGUE OF COCONUT CREEK. (975-4666) Lyons
Plaza, 1447 Lyons Road, Coconut Creek 33066. Services: Daily 8 a.m., 4:30 p.m.; Fri-
day 8 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m., 5 p.m. Rabbi Avaron Drazia. Cantor Irvin Bell.
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER (721-7660), 9101 NW 57th St., Tamarac, 33321.
Services: Sunday through Friday 8:30 a.m., 5 p.m. Late Friday service 8 p.m. Satur-
day 8:45 a.m. Rabbi Kurt F. Stone.
TEMPLE BETH AHM (431-5100), 9730 Stirling Road, Hollywood, 33024. Services
daily 8 a.m.; Sabbath 8 p.m., Sabbath morning 8:45 a.m. Rabbi Avraham Kapnek.
Cantor Stuart Kana*. ,
TEMPLE BETH AM (974-8650)' 7205 Royal Palm Blvd., Margate, 33063. Services:
Monday through Friday 8:30 a.m, 5 p.m. Friday late service 8 p.m.; Saturday 9 a.m.,
5 p.m.; Sunday 8 a.m., 5 p.m. Rabbi Paul Plotkin. Rabbi Emeritus. Dr. Solomon
Geld. Cantor Irving Grossman.
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL (742-4040), 7100 W. Oakland Park Blvd., Sunrise, 33313.
Services: Sunday through Thursday 8 a.m.. 5:30 p.m.; Friday 8 a.m., 5 p.m., 8 p.m.;
Saturday 8:46 a.m., 7:45 p.m. Rabbi Howard A. Addison. Cantor Maurice A. Nen.
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL OF DEERFIELD BEACH (421 7060), 200 S. Century
Blvd., Deerfield Beach, 33441. Services: Sunday through Friday 8:30 a.m.. 5 p.m.
Friday late service 8 p.m.; Saturday 8:45 a.m., and at candlelighting time. Rabbi
Joseph Langner. Cantor Shabtal Ackerman.
TEMPLE B'NAI MOSHE (942-5380), 1434 SE 3rd St.. Pompano Beach, 33060.
Services: Friday 8 p.m. Cantor Jehudah Heilbraun.
TEMPLE SHAARAY TZEDEK 741-0295), 4099 Pine Island Rd.. Sunrise, 33321.
Services: Sunday through Friday 8 a.m 5 p.m.; Late Friday service 8 p.m.; Satur-
day 8:45 a.m., 5 p.m. Rabbi Randall Konigsborg. Cantor Barry Black. Cantor
Emeritus Jack Marchant.
TEMPLE SHOLOM (942-6410). 132 SE 11 Ave., Pompano Beach, 33060. Services:
Monday through Friday 8:45 a.m.. evenings: Monday through Thursday at 5 p m
Friday evening at 8. Saturday and Sunday 9 a.m. Rabbi Samuel April. Cantor
Ronald Graner.
CONGREGATION BETH HILLEL OF MARGATE (974 3090). 7640 Margate
Blvd., Margate. 33063. Services: Sunday through Friday 8:15 a.m., 5:30 p.m Late
Friday service 8 p.m. Saturday 8:45 a.m., 5:30 p.m. Rabbi Nathan Zolondek. Can-
tor Joel Cohen.
HEBREW CONGREGATION OF LAUDERHILL (733 9560). 2048 NW 49th Ave
Lauderhill 33313. Servieea: Sunday through Friday 8:30 a.m., 5:30 p.m.; Saturday
8:45 a.m. Rabbi Israel Halpern.
CONGREGATION BETH TEFILAH (formerly North Lauderdale Hebrew Con-
gregation) (722-7607). 6435 W. Commercial Blvd., Tamarac, FL 33319 Services:
rnday at 6 p.m., Saturday at 8 a.m. Charles B. Fvier, President.
ORTHODOX
TEMPLE OHEL B'NAI RAPHAEL (733-7684). 4351 W. Oakland Park Blvd
Lauderdale Lakes, 33313. Services: Sunday through Thursday 8 a.m., 6 p.m Friday
8 a.m., 7 p.m., Saturday 8:45 a.m., 7 p.m. I
SYNAGOGUE OF INVERRARY CHABAD (748 1777), 4561 N. University Dr.
Lauderhill. Services: Sunday through Friday 6:45 a.m, 8 a.m., 5:15 p.m., Saturday 9
am. 5:30 p.m. Study groups: Men. Sundays following services; Women.
Tuesdays 8 p.m. Rabbi Aron Lieberman.
YSGJ,!RA?L F DEERELD BEACH (4211867). 1880 W. Hillsboro Blvd
Deerfield Beach, 33441. Services: Sunday through Friday 8 a.m. and sundown
Saturday 8:45 a.m. and sundown. Joseph M. Reiner, President.
,UNG ISRAEL < HOLLYWOOD-FORT LAUDERDALE (966-7877) 3291
Starling Rd.. Fort Lauderdale. 33312. Services: Monday through Friday 7:30 a.m
andsundown; Saturday, 9 a.m., sundown; Sunday 8 a.m., sundown. Rabbi Edward
gPWgJ"Wi* DAVID 726-3583), 8675 W. McNab Rd.. Tanwac.
321. Services: Daily 8 a.m.; mincha 5 p.m.; Saturday 8:45a.m. and 5:15 p.m. Rab-
bi Chaim Schneider. Congregation president: Herman Fleischer.
RECONSTRUCTIONS
RAMAT SHALOM (472-3600), 11301 W. Broward Blvd.. Puuitation, 33325. Ser-
MiHm """ ; S-turd*y' 10 *" R*kk* EU,c4 Skiddell. Cantor Bella i
REFORM
TEMPLE BET TIKVAH (471-8088), 8890 W. Oakland Park Blvd.. Sunrise. 38821
Services: Friday 8 p.m. Rabbi DennU Wald. Cantor Richard Brown.
TEMPLE BETH ORR (753-3232). 2151 Riverside Dr.. Coral Springs, 33065. Ser-
vices: Friday 8 p.m.; Saturday 10 a.m. Rabbi Mark W. Gross. ^^
TEMPLE B'NAI SHALOM OF DEERFIELD BEACH (42-2532). Services at
ssftSft s usafcssr -* ^ ^~"
HSW EMANU-EL(781-2310) 3246 W. Oddand Park Blvd., Lauderdale Lakes.
R^ MhwTS^Ii^Ss!: i' **"**<* on ho,jd"y celebration of Bar
Bat Mitzvah. Rabbi Jeffrey Ballon. Cantor Rita Shore.
TEMPLE KOL AMI (472-1988), 8200 Peters Rd., Plantation. 33324. Service* Fri-
B*rnbaumPm' S'tUrd*y 10:30 "m RabW SM* >- CantorFrank
LIBERAL JEWISH TEMPLE OP COCONUT CREEK (97*7494) Service. Fri
rtL^L86'0^ t.T-CDmontly11?t C^!HX f*?* Church. 3950 Coconut
Creek Parkway. Rabbi Brace 8. Wsrshal. Cantor Barbara Roberts
IEM^Ln BAT YAM<2cV0410). McGaw Hall. 1400 N. Federal Hwy. (adjacent to
Second Presbyterian Church), Ft. Lauderdale, 33304. Service: Weekly onFrid.y
evenings at 8 p.m. Rabbi Lewis Littman. y y


Friday, July 31, 1987/Thc Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 15
Summer Funat the Gathering Place NeWSWlre/Washlngton

- i
A wonderful day was had by all recently at a
visit to South Beach Park. The day included a ------
barbeque lunch swimming, table games and fun Perfect Beach weather as the ladies head for the
in ^ m^y^rnT^thTn9v^e Zat^^ ^' ^nie Silver, GeH MJowe,
members from left, Sara Gilbert Izzie Yellen, Mary Kerensky, Clemence Karp and volunteer
Gert Maslowe, Bessie Lieberman, Rebecca Krxm, Lilian Sperber.
Clemence Karp, Goldie Lass and Rose Noble.
A dip before lunch just the
thing to perk the appetite.
Many thanks to the Gathering
Place volunteers who made the
day so special. From left,
Agnes Lubbe, Jerry Yellen and
Lilian Sperber.
Part of the summer fun at the Gathering Place lunch at
Sarah's Kosher Dairy Restaurant and a ride on our new vans
from Deer field Beach up to Highland Beach along AIA. The food
was great and the view of the ocean was breathtaking. Pictured
are Kitty Kandel, Bea Karasick, Bessie Lieberman, Clemence
Karp, Rebecca Krim, Frances Sykes, David Harkavey and Ben
Schwartz.
LT COL. Oliver North said under oath that he told israei
in January 1986 that proceeds from Israel's sale of U.S.
missiles to Iran were used to fund the Administration-
backed Nicaraguan rebels known as the Contras. North
also said that he believed Israel may have originated the
idea of using the profits from the sale of arms to Iran to
support the Contras.
THE STATE DEPARTMENT indicated that the United
States would like to see Arabs in Jerusalem participate in
municipal elections. "The United States strongly supports
government through the democratic process," Phyllis
Oakley, a department spokesman said. "In that spirit, we
believe all the people of Jerusalem should decide how to run
their municipal affairs for themselves."
Nowswlre/Florida
SYLVIA LEWIS has been appointed director of the
Palm Beach County office of the American Committee for
the Weizmann Institute of Science. The new branch office
is located at 2300 Palm Beach Lakes Blvd., Suite 109, W.
Palm Bch. FL 33409. The telephone number is 689-0726.
CONGRESSMAN CLAY Shaw (R-Fla.) asked the
Justice Department and the General Accounting Office to
begin separate investigations of International Medical
Centers Inc., the giant health maintenance organization.
Shaw cited the company's escalating financial problems, in-
cluding at least $33 million in unpaid debts, as one reason
for the investigation.
SEN. PETER Weinstein (D-Coral Springs) announced
passage of a bill through the legislature that will fund
Foster Grandparent and Retired Senior Volunteer Pro-
gram services for high-risk and handicapped children in
Florida.
Diversified Jewish Quiz
ever snow in
By RABBI
DAVID W. GORDON
1-Does if
Jerusalem?
2- What are Judaism's basic
sins?
3- Is there a fourth cardinal sin?
4- Who introduced the theory
that the American Indians were
descendants of the lost ten tribes?
5-Name the British Ar-
chaeologist who confirmed the ac-
curacy of many accounts in the
Bible.
6- Is it permissable for animals
"! uiu'(]ual strength to be harness-
< 7- What is the coined word
formed from the initials of the
three parts of the Bible?
8- How many proverbs are at-
tributed to King Solomon?
9- What colony in Israel, is
famous for its wine?
10- What is Judaism's attitude
towards the sport of swimming?
Answers
1- Usually every seven or eight
years.
2,- Idolatry, adultery and
murder.
3- Rabbi Yochanan ben Torta
added "Groundless Hatred" or
blind prejudice.
4- Rabbi Menasseh ben Israel of
Amsterdam.
5-Sir Flinders Petrie
(1853-1942).
6- It is considered cruelty to
animals (Tsar Baaley Chayim).
7- Tanach (Torah-Pentateuch),
Neviyim (Prophets), Ketuvim
(Writings).
8- 3,000
9- Rishon Le-Zion.
10-The Talmud makes it
obligatory for a father to teach his
son to swim.
How to find a doctor
who cares about your
health. And about you.
Students Participate in
"A World of Difference" Programs
Students and teachers from
hundreds of Dade,. Broward
and Monroe county junior and
senior high-schools have par-
ticipated in "A Word of Dif-
ference" programs and ac-
tivities during the 1986-87
school year. "A World of Dif-
ference," a campaign against
prejudice, is a cooperative ef-
fort of the Anti-Defamation
league of B'nai B'rith,
greater Miami United, Cen-
Trust Savings and Channel 10.
The centerpiece of the
school-based portion of the
campaign is a 350-page "A
world of Difference"
leacher/Student Study Guide
'or grades 7 through 12 which
covers a broad range of
multicultural issues, including
Prejudice, discrimination,
democratic values and
France, A special 80^page
South Florida section, written
by a team of area educators,
covers local and regional in-
tergroup relations issues. The
guide was distributed to 800
area Social Studies teachers,
many of whom attended
special workshops for training
in the use of the guide and in
the development of curriculum
and activities. The guide, en-
dorsed by the school boards of
Dade, BrOward and Monroe
counties, is in 350 middle and
secondary schools, the Dade
County Main Library, all bran-
ches of the Broward County
Library System and with
numerous religious and
secular organizations in the
tri-county area. The guide is,
also, one of the textbooks in a
human relations course at
Florida International Univer-
sity's College of Education.
When you wake up
with a sore throat, or a
funny twinge in your back.
Or eyes that really sting.
Or anything else that
doesn't seem quite right,
you need to see a doctor.
But how do you
find one?
It's simple. All you
need is this number.
1-800-CARE-NOW The
AMI Physician Referral
Service.
With our free com-
puterized system, we.can
instantly match you with
physicians who meet your
needs, no matter what
the specialty.
And well give you
the names of at least two
doctors close to your
home or office. Physicians
who are affiliated with' the
AMI Hospitals in Dade or Broward.
The next time you need to find a doctor,
remember your phone. And this number.
1-800-CARE-NOW The AMI Physici&n Refer
ral Service. Available from 9:00 am to 9KX)
pm, Monday through Friday. And 9:00 am.
to 5:00.p.m. Saturday and Sunday And if you
need to leave a message after hours, we'll be
sure to get back td you the very next day
At AMI, we want to help you find the right
doctor. Because we know your good health
depends on it
tf
Physician Referral Service
1-800-CARE-NOW
Broward AMI North Ridge Medical Center Dade AMI Kendall Regional Medical Center
AMI Palmetto General Hospital AMI Parkway Regional Medical Center AMI Southeastern Medical Center
Our doctors make the difference.
< 198'Ame

_


Page 16 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, July 31, 1987
In Any Corner of the World, Wherever a Single Jewish Soul Cries Out for Help...
Federation/UJA is There for Them
Editor's Note: Following
are reports from field reps, of
the American Jewish Joint
Distribution Committee, UJA
beneficiary agency.
IN MOROCCO:
"Everywhere (in the Jewish
schools) one sees the emphasis
on the celebration of the
Jewish holidays and Shabbat.
There is almost a childlike
pleasure and pride in recoun-
ting how one celebrated
Purim, or how the childrn
made their own Hagadot this
year, etc. Teachers will spend
hours of extra time so that
children might have pleasure
from the Jewish holidays.
"The children in general are
relaxed, very much at ease in
their schools, comfortable,
having a great time. Most of
the Classes are as good as
anything one can find in
France ... A pride in being
Jewish, a joy in celebrating
Judaism, a knowledge of
songs, prayers, games turning
around Hebrew is exemplary."
IN DELHI AND BOMBAY,
INDIA:
"This visit to Delhi became a
rich experience of viewing
first-hand the tiny Jewish com-
munity in the capital city (25
members) and its impact on
the general community. The
stature of Mr. (Ezra) Kollet
(president of the local Jewish
community) has made all the
difference, and his interest,
dedication, and scholarship
have created a solid basis of ac-
complishments, unique in this
country and difficult to
replicate elesewhere. The
building erected with a sizable
contribution of the JDC,
serves as rallying point and is
fully utilized by many groups
in addition to Jewish ones,
much on the model of better
community centers in the
United States...
"(In Bombay) the Shepardic
Center is involved at many
levels and with many things
with the purpose of
strengthening Jewish life and
fostering Aliyah, particularly
for the young Because of
the peculiar Indian situation,
the long-standing lack of Rab-
binical supervision, extensive
intermarriage and missing
documents required by the
Rabbinical authorities before
emigration can be con-
templated, continuing move-
ment to Israel is limited. This
does not mean, however, that
strong attempts are not made
to overcome the problems. The
Israel alternative is still a
possibilty which can be
strengthened by scholarships,
visits, and basic community
organization work.'
IN MOROCCO:
At the volunteer program
with the Senior Citizen Kollel
program at Ozar Hatorah. Ap-
proximately 20 to 30 seniors
and youth attend each morn-
ing for a study program. One
of these attendees escort the
participating residents from
the (old age)) "home" each
morning to assist with the ex-
ercise classes and games. .
Another volunteer program
involves the ORT hairdressing
students. We have been going
to ORT bi-weekly for hairstyP
ings, dyes, etc., but there are a
number of young girls who
have volunteered to come to
the "Home" on Friday after-
noons to give manicures, apply
make-up, etc....
"Finally I would like to men-
tion one very special volunteer
who has been assisting me on a
regular basis with all activities
and outings since Succoth. He
is a very responsible youth
who works delightfully well
with all the residents and ap-
preciates the importance of
the involvement of the Home
with other community
organizations and of the con-
tinuity of this work."
BUCHAREST, RUMANIA:
On Saturday, January 24,
Leon (Iieiberg, County direc-
tor for Rumania) walked the
icy streets, under the snow.
There were very few buses or
trolley-cars because of the
weather. We saw many per-
sons in line for bread, milk,
vegetables, etc.
"We passed close to a but-
chery which was empty, so we
went inside to give a look:
There was no meat at all ex-
cept for some salami and car-
tons of Bulgarian fish.
"Schools, public offices and
many homes are not heated. ..
"We visited the canteen and
ate there. The dining room is
simple but clean enough.
There are tables where four
persons can comfortably sit. .
"The food is good and abun-
dant. We saw people eating at
the canteen using small con-
tainers in which they put some
soup (served in soup bowls),
They also put some bread in
their bags. The majority of the
persons at the canteen were
old but those responsible said
that many students usually
come in later, when courses at
the University end." .
IN NICE:
"Keren Menachem, the
Lubavitch Kindergarten, is
well organized, thanks to the
tireless efforts of Rabbi and
Mrs, Pinson. The Pinsons are
now parents of seven young
children and yet both find time
to work around the clock in the
school. Mrs. Pinson does not
want to settle for less than
best in anything and her
tireless efforts are paying
off...
"The teacher of four-year-
olds is experienced, entirely
dedicated to her job,
understanding of children, and
has a purpose in her work
which clearly comes through
she wants children to enjoy
their Jewishness, to learn hoW
to cooperate with each other,
to learn the precepts of the
Torah, and to put it to work in
their daily lives. Toward that
end, she is calm, patient,
understanding A gem...
"The community of Larissa
is one of the oldest and most
well known Greek Jewish com-
munities where about 1200 us-
ed to live and about 800 surviv-
ed. The reason for a smaller
percentage of loss in that city
is because it is situated in a
mountainous area where
strongholds of the guerillas
were and where many Jews
were able to escape by joining
them. JDC was active in that
area in the postwar years,
reestablishing the community
and financing the building of
' houses to shelter the homeless
Jewish population after an ear-
thquake which ruined the city.
"On April 2, a monument
and a square was dedicated to
the 'Jewish Martyr' of the Se-
cond World War. This was a
joint venture of the municipali-
ty of Larissa Jewish communi-
ty. The municipality gave the
square and covered the largest
part of the cost. It was a very
touching ceremony and well
represented by the local and
Jewish-Greek and foreign
authorities.


Full Text
.
Page 12 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, July 31, 1987
The Samuel and Helene Soref
Jewish Community Center
Perl man Campus
6501 W. Sunrise Blvd.
Fort Lauderdale. Florida 33313 792-6700
My Muriel Haskell. Director of Public Relations
For further information and fees concerning the events or pro-
grams listed please call the center.
children who are three and
lour year olds.
Week-ends and after the
camp day is over, Jill turns her
attention to her friends in JCC
Singles.
"Theres such a great need
for Singles programming in
this area," Jill says. "More
and more young people in their
twenties and thirties are settl-
ing here."
Jill hopes the committee will
grow. All sorts of plans are in
the offing, including lectures,
home parties, dances, bar-
b-q's, camping trips, cruises,
aerobics classes and for the
more athletic-more co-ed Soft-
ball and Volleyball.
Says Jill, "With the wonder-
ful facilities here at the JCC,
we think the Center is the
perfect place for Singles to be
heard and seen!"
JILL-COORDINATED
SINGLES PROGRAMS
Young Singles have two
August dates to keep! The first
is on the 10th, in Soref Hall, 8
o'clock in the evening at
which time a CO-ED Aerobics
session will take place. The
team of licensed instructors,
"Lauren and Mark" will put
participants through the paces
with a peppy exercise routine.
Following: Socializing over a
cool drink!
The next, a Pool Party/Bar-
B-Q, Volleyball afternoon on
the 16th, 1-4 p.m. JCC's pool
parties accompanied with grill-
ed hot dogs and active co-ed
JILL MUSHIN HONORED
Named JCC's June
Volunteer of the Month for
outstanding service in the
Center's Singles Department,
Jill Mushin is a senior
counselor in Camp Katan this
summer. She began her strong
attachments to JCC as a C IT
in 1981. This is her fifth sum-
mer on campus.
" v, Becoming acquainted with
more of the Center's Singles
activities earlier this year, Jill
became involved. And with the
help of a small committee she
organized and ran a nice
number of successful pool par-
ties, bar-b-q's and get-
togethers for JCC Young
Singles ages 21-35.
A young "Single" herself,
Jill is a 1985 graduate of the
University of South Florida at
Tampa, with degrees earned in
Early Childhood and Elemen-
tary Education. Before and
after camp, Jill is a
Kindergarten and Pre-First
Grade Teacher at Banyan
Elementary School.
Although well-qualified, Jill
still feels very fortunate,
"fresh out of school," to get
just the perfect job in the
Broward School system
right in her hometown!
Jill moved down to South
Florida from Maryland with
^. her family 15 years ago as a lit-
tle girl, and so she considers
herself a native. She has joined
many activities the Center of-
fers such as Israel In-
dependence Days and Holiday
celebration. As is evident, she
enjoys being around kids all
ages.
For most of her previous
summers at camp she has been
counselor/confidant/pal to
campers in Chalute, eight and
nine year-old girls. But this
-. year, she is counselor/confi-
dant/pal to campers nearer the
ages of her Early Childhood
specialty namely Katan
volleyball have become
famous! For details on both
call the Center.
CAMPERS SIGNING UP
FOR JCCAD
Stacey Zabinsky, third year
JCC summer camp counselor,
inspired 14 of her "Bagel
Babies" campers in Camp
Chalutz to present a unique
program for Members of the
JCCAD (Jewish Center
Association of the Deaf).
On stage, Thursday after-
noon, July 16, in Building "C,"
the eight- and nine-year-old
girls, all dollfaces and dressed
in white, sang songs like
"Somewhere Out There"
"That's What Friends Are
For" "We Are The World"
told some funny jokes and
made all the right signs in a
new language they learned.
Results: A beautiful chorus of
hands-smiles-and twinkling
eyes!
The audience, comprised of
members of the JCCAD and a
good representation of
parents, were overwhelmed.
The JCCADers were so sur-
prised and simply delighted.
The parents were proud and
thrilled and emotional. The
"Bagel Babies" debut deserv-
ed and got rave reviews.
It seems that Stacey, a
senior at U. of Florida at
Gainesville, going for a degree
in Elementary Education, took
up sign language at school two
years ago, just to acquire the
skill and to be able to com-
municate with hearing han-
dicapped people. She's pretty
good at it now, she says.
Always on the lookout for
something new (and service
oriented) for her campers,
Stacey engineered this project
of special entertainment for a
ready made audience who
come to the JCC campus every
Thursday.
The girls were willing to
learn and along with Lori
Wynn, Junior Counselor, and
Lisa Wolgin, CIT, they learn-
ed, in less than three weeks.
After their initial nervouness,
they grabbed on to signing
with great enthusiasm.
"Some of the girls want to
learn more," says Stacey.
"They'd like to become fluent
as signers." How lucky for
some of those they'll be able to
"talk to" later in life!
WELCOME TO A
MEW EXPERIENCE
in sophisticated Retirement Living
MAN 0~~R ^
Where Caring Comes naturally
3535 S.W. 52nd Avenue Pembroke Tatk, Honda 33023
A COMPLETE LIFESTYLE
in A KOSHER ENVIRONMENT
Tastefully Decorated
nursing Supervision 24 hrs.
Physicians on call 24 hrs.
3 meals daily and snacks
Daily activities, arts 8f crafts
Social activities
Transportation provided
Swimming Pool Ar Jacuzzi
Beauty Shop
Religious services daily
Easily accessible
WE WELCOP1F. ENQUIRIES TLEASECALL961 8111
BAGEL BABIES
Anglia Begley, Jessica
Bloomgarden, Jaime Ciminelli,
Jennifer Cynamon, Tamara
Ettinger, Jeanine Faine, Lind-
say Glassman, Dana Kustan,
Julie Levine, Susie Millheiser,
Joy Quittner, Jessica Roof,
Jacqui Scharf, Michelle
Sheiman.
Not present: Lauren Ganet,
Barie Arliss.
FAMILY POOL PARTY
ON SUNDAY
Third one coming up August
9th. JCC families are making it
a habit! Everyone in the family
has a great time swimming
and splashing in the spacious
pool, relaxing on the pool deck,
playing games, enjoying
barbeque and all that goes
with. A fine Sunday in the
park like JCC campus.
Susana Flaum says "You're all
invited! We hope families will
register well in advance so we
can have plenty of foodstuffs
on hand to go around."
The JCC is a major
beneficiary agency of the
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale, receiving
funds from the annual United
Jewish Appeal campaign.
Jessica Bloomgarten, Dana
Kustan, Jeanine Faine. From the kft-'Susie Millheiser,
Julie Levine.
From left, Lindsay Glassman, Anglia Begley,
Jessica Roof, Jennifer Cynamon. Michelle
Sheiman.
BEACH MOTEL
On TMC OCCAM AT *~ tTMIt
OPEN
ALL YEAR
THE PROGRAM INCLUDES:
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Two QLATT KOSHER MEALS
Dally.
Exciting Entertainment.
Refrigerator and Color TV in
Every Room.
Family Style Room
w/Brg Screen TV.
Olympic Size Pool with
Privilege!.
Full Time Social Director with
Daily Activities.
Private Fenced in Beach.
Monthly Trips.
24 Hour Security.
Dally Maid Service.
Individually Controlled A/C.
RESERVE NOW
FOR HIGH HOLY DAYS
& SUCCOT 9/23 10/4/8 7
12 DAYS/11 NIGHTS
FROM $290 pp/dbt occ A ta./tip
4i
Under the supervision of
Rabbi Joseph N. Koofman
FOR INFORMATION
AND OUR BROCHURE
CALL: 531-2206
YOUR HOS75: THE GALBUT FAMILY


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FILES


Friday, July 31, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 13
From Destruction and Tragedy to Hope and Redemption I ~
the land of Israel through con- V
tragedy of our people is re-
experienced and re-lived as if
it were happening to
ourselves.
At the morning service, the
worshippers do not don the
tallit or tefillin, which are con-
sidered as ornaments of pride,
is reaa once
again, and moving elegies are
chanted. The torah portions
deal with despair and exile.
As the day wanes, the
elements of hope and redemp-
tion begin to emerge. The tallit
and tefillin are worn at the
afternoon service, prayers of
comfort are said, and as the
fast day ends with the evening
service, the prayer of sanc-
tification of the new moon is
recited, which in mystical
Jewish literature, reflects the
hope for the coming of the
Messiah and the belief that all
From:
Dr. Abraham J. Gittelson,
Director, Central Agency
for Jewish Education
Perhaps more than any
>ther aspect of Judaism, the
jjewish calendar reflects the
[supreme moments of joy and
spiritual ecstasy on one hand, beauty and glory. The Book of
nd the remembrance of Lamentations is read
Idespair and destruction on the
|other.
To ignore the tragic times in
lour history would be false to
Ithe sweep of Jewish existence
land to forget the lessons that
lean be derived from such ex-
Iperiences. Tisha B'Av, the
[ninth day of the Hebrew
[month of Av, which this year
falls on Tuesday, Aug. 4, is the
Iparadigm of defeat and
[destruction, of sadness and
[mourning, yet of future
[redemption as well.
Tisha B'Av commemorates
Ithe major tragedies of Jewish
life the razing of the First
[Temple in 586 BCE by the
[Babylonians, and of the Se-
Icond Temple more than 500
|years later in 70 CE by the
(Romans. Tradition also
(assigns to Tisha B'Av that day
Ion which the generation of
(Israelites which had left Egypt
were decreed to die out in the
(wilderness, while a new
generation of free men would
I enter the Promised Land.
Tisha B'Av marks as well
Ithe fall of the fortress of Betar
to the Romans in the year 135
CE. symbolizing the crushing
of the revolt of Bar Kochba
| against Roman domination.
Nor did tragedy cease in the
(centuries that followed. The
| prayers of mourning said on
I Tisha B'Av, the kinot, refer to
the burning of 24 cartloads of
the Talmud in Paris in 1242,
land the destruction of scores
of communities during the
Crusades. Tradition dates the
expulsion of the Jewish com-
munity of Spain in 1492, to the
| day of Tisha B'Av.
In the nine day period im-
I mediately preceeding Tisha
B'Av it is customary to avoid
meat and wine. Indeed the
very last meal on the -eve of
Tisha B'Av is one of austerity
| and deprivation.
On the eve of Tisha B'Av the
Icurtain of the Ark is removed,
as if the very countenance of
God were veiled and hidden
and the universe empty of His
(presence. The synagogue is
(usually in semi-darkness, lit
only by candles. The book of
(Lamentations recounting the
destruction by the Babylonians
(is changed in dirge-like fashion
(by the worshippers seated on
low benches or the floor itself.
I Fasting and mourning, the
of nature and history will be
restored to wholeness and
perfection.
In some synagogues the
I syn
reder
longing for redemption is link-
ed with the renewed ties with
the land of Israel through con-
tributions to the Jewish Na-
tional fund.
Thus, the essential element
of Tisha B'Av is the re-
enactment of past tragedy as if
we ourselves had experienced
its overwhelming impact.
Remembrance becomes the
secret of redemption. The re-
enactment stimulates us to
seek greater spiritual heights.
The days of tragedy sensitize
us to the historical sacrifices of
our people, to the needs of
those who still suffer in our
own day, and the necessity of
individual responsibility that
leads to communal redemp-
tion. The crescendo of
catastrophe is transformed in-
to a paean of faith, deeds of
loving kindness, and a seeking
of return and repentance as
the Days of Awe draw near.
Mtthe Coral Springs'
\rTS} ?"W program
\r*ntly held, the last in a
ln8 of three, shown, Stan
Yr^Jffl' chairman, and Dr.
u? ,lttelson. Federation's
\ltor f edveation, Central
^erwyfor Jewish Education.
bittleson was the guest
"wxer before an overflowing
r~0Ttic audience at the
m sPrings City Hull.

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