The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 3, no. 7 (Apr. 5, 1974)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 9, 1976 called v.4, no. 27 but constitutes v.5, no. 1; issue for July 7, 1989 called v.18, no. 11 but constitutes v.18, no. 13.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44570954
lccn - sn 00229545
ocm44570954
System ID:
AA00014312:00327

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Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward


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Full Text
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jewishFloridian o
OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE
Volume 15 Number 25
Fort Lauderdale, Florida Friday, August 15, 1986
FfW
Price 35 Cents
Providing Services Regardless of Race, Creed, Color or Religion .
Jewish Family Service of Broward County
Jewish Family Service of Broward County, established in 1963, is now one of the top
social service agencies in the United States. Highly recommended Jewish Family Service
is widely used as a referral source by leading lawyers, doctors, psychologists, judges,
schools, major business corporations, mental health clinics, and other social service agen-
cies. The staff is constantly engaged in programs that expand their skills thus offering a
wide range of treatment methodology which enhances service to our clients.
The range of Jewish Family Service clients consist of those people who have dif-
ficulty affording treatment in the private sector to those clients willing to pay "top
dollar" and are secure in the knowledge that ongoing education and supervision of-
fered to Jewish Family Service professionals is the best assurance of quality care.
This service is offered on a sliding fee scale adjusted to one's ability to pay. In-
surance is accepted as both partial and on occasion full payment. Jewish Family Ser-
vice of Broward County offers the following programs to all residents of the county
regardless of race, creed, color or religion. We are truly an agency who seeks to be
"our brother's keeper."
Not only is Jewish Family Service committed to promoting and strengthening sound
family life, but the agency also assumes a responsibility to the social welfare of both the
Jewish and general community by participation in community planning, group education
Continued on Page 12
Maria Gale, center, supervisor, Jewish Family Service,
conducts a mock discussion group with other JFS profes-
sionals. Group discussions are just one program offered by
the Jewish Family Service, a major beneficiary agency of
the Jewish Federation, receiving funds from the annual
United Jewish Appeal campaign.
Inverrary Plans '87 UJA Campaign Events
^^^PiSj 1


' 1 W\ \ \ N

World News
BONN West German
neo-Nazi Karl-Heinz Hoff-
mann was sentenced in
Nuremberg to nine and a
half years imprisonment for
various offenses concerning
his political activities. But
Hoffmann was cleared of
the prosecutor's main
charge that he allegedly
masterminded the 1980
murder of the Jewish
publisher Shlomo Levin and
his female companion, Frida
Poeschke.
NEW YORK The
Syrian Defense Minister,
Mustafa Tlas, is being ac-
cused of authoring an anti-
Semitic book said to be
widely distributed in Syria
which revives and gives
credence to the ancient
blood libel accusations of the
Middle Ages.
PARIS A new
synagogue was inaugurated
in Hungary to be operated
by the Central Board of
Jewish Communities. It is
located in the city of Siofok
near Lake Baloton. The
Hungarian News agency,
MTI, reported that high
ranking government of-
ficials as well as represen-
tatives of the Budapest
Jewish community attended
the ceremonies.
The 1987 Federation/UJA
rocketed into action in the
heat of July as the Inverrary
Division held its first plann-
ing session at Federation
headquarters.
More than hUBSwiI lftVer1'
rary activists gathered to
outline a tentative battle
plan and put in place some
leadership shifts.
Max E. Buck, chairman
of the Inverrary Division,
announced that Ed Kabat,
head of the golf tourna-
ment at Inverrary, has
been named overall chair-
man of the event; Selig
Marko. longtime chief of
the Inverrary Golf Fund-
raiser, has stepped down
to take on other major
responsibilities at Inver-
rary UJA and will assist
Kabat in running the
tournament.
Pictured planning the 1987 Federation/UJA campaign for the In-
verrary Division are UJA leaders, front frvm left, Victor
Gruman; Sid Wachsberger; Natalie Graham, campaign
associate; Max Buck, InverrarylUJA chairman; and Hy Hoff-
man. At rear, from left, Steve Kramer, Joe Sorkin, Buzzy Tabat-
chnick and Selig Marko.
Sam Stone and Maury
Levine, major figures in the
Inverrary Drive and who
served as co-chairmen for
Inverrary last year, will
resume their responsibilities
in the upcoming campaign.
After a highly-successful
Pacesetter Dinner last year,
Buzzy Tabatchnik has again
taken charge of the dinner
for 1987. It is scheduled for
the Hilton Inn at Inverrary
on Jan. 14.
The professional staff
guiding the Inverrary cam-
paign has been strengthen-
ed by the addition of
Natalie Graham, longtime
Federation campaign
associate, who will take a
hands-on position in the
campaign. Kenneth Kent,
associate campaign direc-
tor, will continue his
lengthy association with
the Inverrary workers on a
regular basis.
Two traditional events
have been rescheduled:
The traditional buffet and
cocktail party at the Hi-
Greens with Bill Kramer
Continued on Page 15
Spotlight on Jewish History
TISHA B'AV From Tragedy to Redemption
By DR. ABRAHAM J. GITTELSON
Federation Director of Education
Perhaps more than any other aspect of Jewish
life, the Jewish calendar reflects the striving of
the Jew to reenact In his own individual life the
peak historical experiences of the Jewish people.
The Exodus from Egypt, for example, is, in the
Jewish world view the paradigm of the Pro-
a-;^
Destruction of the Temple
vidence of God and the promise of ultimate
redemption for all mankind. The Exodus from
slavery to freedom is therefore a thread that is in-
terwoven among the holiday observances of
Fassover, Shavuot and Sukkot, and the Shabbat
as well. At the Seder, in the Sukkah, around the
Shabbat table, the Jew remembers, relives and
re-enacts that event so as to internalize the
historical values embodied in it.
There are tragic events in the Jewish past as
well, and to ignore them would be false to the
sweep of Jewish history and to the lessons that
can be learned from it. Tisha B'Av, the ninth day
of the Hebrew month of Av, which falls this year
on Thursday, Aug. 14, is the supreme example of
defeat and destruction, of sadness and mourning,
and yet, of future redemption as well.
Tisha B'Av commemorates the major tragedies
of Jewish history the destruction of the First
Temple in the year 586 BCE by the Babylonians,
and of the Second Temple by the Romans more
than 500 years later in 70 CE. Tradition also
assigns to Tisha B'Av that day on which the
generation of Israelites which had left Egypt
were decreed to die in the wilderness of Sinai,
while a new generation of free people, born in the
desert, would be privileged to enter the Promised
land.
Continued on Page IS


Page 2 The Jewish Flopdian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, August 15, 1986
Scorecard of Giving -
Honorees Anita Perlman, Evelyn Gross and
Ethel Waldman at the Major Gifts event.
Irving Libowsky, PalmrAire Division chairman
and Honoree, Mrs. Esther Libowsky, and Myron
Ackerman, dinner dance committee member.
At the home of Anita Perlman, second from
right, the $10,000 Woman of Valor Ruby "10"
luncheon. From left, Barbara Wiener, Women's
Division campaign chairperson; Brian J. Sherr,
Federation president; and John Streng, general
campaign chairman.
Bernard Canarick,
Plantation Division
co-chairman.
Year in Review
The 1986 Federation/UJA An-
nual Campaign, chaired by John
Streng and a team of dedicated
leaders have worked diligently to
raise what to date is the largest
amount of funds recorded in
North Broward County.
As the Fbridian goes to press,
a total of $6,103,800 has been
pledged for the regular campaign
and an additional $237,859 for
Project Renewal. The Project
Renewal campaign is under the
chair of Alvera A. Gold who an-
nounced that the funds raised for
the sister city of Kfar Saba, Israel,
has helped to bring about a strug-
gling ghetto to a thriving
neighborhood, although much
work needs to be done.
In discussing the campaign,
Streng stated that "Our corps of
volunteer workers and lay leader-
ship proved that 'Miracles Can
Happen' by their hard work and
diligence in raising this record-
breaking dollar amount to provide
for the vital social services and
humanitarian programs locally, in
Israel and worldwide."
The scorecard of giving record
to date includes:
MAJOR GIFTS successful
program featured tributes to
Federation leaders Evelyn Gross,
Anita Perlman and Ethel
Waldman at the Marriott Harbor
Beach Resort and has recorded
$1.69 million in gifts.
Lee Rauch, Oceanside Division
chairman.
OCEANSIDE DIVISION
Chairman Lee Rauch announced
that the $1.24 million mark has
been reached of which the
Women's Division raised
$332,000. The highlight included
the dinner honoring general cam-
paign chairman John Streng held
in February.
WOODLANDS DIVISION is
Continued on Page 3
Norman Ostrau,
Plantation Division
co-chairman.
Inverrary chairman Max Buck, left. Federation
past president Victor Gruman, and Joseph
Kaplan, Division honoree.
Bonaventure Major Gifts chairman Harold
Kaufman, left; Jan Kaufman; Michael
Pelavin, guest speaker; Natalie Pelavin, and
chairmen Phil and Toots Sacks at the $1,000
cocktail party.
At the Century Village Plus Giver Luncheon,
from left, Rabbi Frank Plotke; Samuel K.
Miller, Condominium Cabinet chairman;
Evelyn Denner, chairperson; Frances
Nusbaum; Prof. Gideon Peleg, and Cantor
Morris Levinson,
William Katzberg, right, Margate Area Division chairman, at a
Federation/UJA breakfast. From left, Morris Kirschbaum,
chairman; Sam Elkins, honoree; and Elsie EUcins.
"4
^ At a Wynmoor Village brunch, from left,
^ honorary chairmen Lou Schneider and Judge
- Leo Brown; Barney Yaphe; Mildred Yaphe,
honoree; honorary chairmen Sol Press and
Ted Thomas; and Charles Rubenstein, Wyn-
moor/UJA chairman.

Vice president of Jewish Federation and Condominium Division
chairman Samuel K. Miller, second from left, with committee
chairmen, from left, David Krantz, Tamarac Division UJA
chairman; Nathan Pearlman, Sunrise Lakes Phase II chairman,
SunriseJewish Center/Sunrise Area UJA Area chairman; and
Irving Specter, Water Bridge UJA chairman and new Sunrise
Area Condominium committee chairman.
Dan Klein, left, Woodlands
Division UJA chairman, and
Leon Messing, Honoree.
Woodmont co-chairmen Moe Wittenberg, Lou Colker, honorary
chairman Dan Cantor, co-chairman Walter Berstein, and David
Sommer, fund-raising chairman.
mine
Commitment, it's what
makes us Jews. That's
why we're beside you
when you need us
most. After all, Our
Red Involvement is
with the Living.
GUARDIAN PLAN -
Riverside
Memorial Chapd
AHr*d Ootdan. PrMidwK
LioHid>,EaK.V.P
W*mF.Suon.VP
DouglMlaanaV.R.F.D.
AlanQ Bmttn.F.0.


Friday, August 15, 1986/The Jewish Floridiah of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 8
CAMPAIGN '86 Federation/United Jewish Appeal
Scorecard of GivingYear In Review
David Schulman
Dr. Marc Schwartz
Summer Shirt Sleeves
Seminar August 21
Participants of the Jewish
Federation's Second Summer
Shirt Sleeve Seminar will be
treated to a barbecue dinner and a
tour of the Federation's
beneficiary agencies, located on
the Perlman Campus of the
Helene and Samuel Soref Jewish
Community Center, on Thursday
Aug. 21, beginning at 5:30 p.m.
A tour of the 16-acre campus
will include the new Farber
Aquatics Center and the newly-
renovated gymnasium. Also,
there will be a visit to the Hebrew
Day School, and other Federation
agencies all housed on the
campus.
Included in the evening pro-
gram will be an address given by
David Schulman, newly-elected
JCC president and Dr. Marc
Schwartz, Hebrew Day School
president.
The Summer Shirt Sleeve
Seminar is an extended program
of the Business Executive Net-
work, which meets the first
Thursday of the month, from Oc-
tober through May. Reserve the
date for the next Business Ex-
ecutive Network, which will be
Oct. 2 and will feature noted
world-wide theatrical producer
Zev Bufman.
For information contact the
Federation at 748-8400.
Continued from Page 3
now at $1.27 million of which
$299,000 is pledged by the
Women's Division according to
chairman Daniel Klein and Major
Gifts Chairman Harold Oshry,
who said a record turnout came
for the tribute to Leon Messing.
PALM-AIRE DIVISION
Chairman Irving Libowsky was
the honoree at the annual lun-
cheon held in December. Also
honored at the January dinner-
dance were Nathan Denenberg
and Dr. Maurice Menah. The divi-
sion has pledged $681,000 which
includes $159,000 for the
Women's Divison.
WOODMONT DIVISION
highlighted their drive with a din-
ner dance in February featuring
international businessman Jerome
Gleekel and has raised $613,000 of
which the Women's Division total
is $72,000. Division co-chairmen
are Walter Bernstein, Lou Colker,
Moe Wittenberg and honorary
chairman Daniel Cantor.
INVERRARY DIVISION
dinner honoring UJA leader
Joseph Kaplan drew a huge
response helping the division
achieve gifts of $347,000, of which
$72,000 was by the Women's Divi-
sion, according to chairman Max
Buck.
DEERFIELD BEACH/CEN-
TURY VILLAGE DIVISION ac-
counted for $250,000 at a number
of events and rallies under the
chair of Evelyn Denner.
BONAVENTURE DIVI-
SION UJA campaign rallied for
$140,000 including the $42,000
from the Women s Division at
events which included a $1,000
cocktail party. Phil and Toots
Sacks are division chairs.
MARGATE recorded
$205,140 at UJA functions and
events held city-wide according to
campaign chairman William
Katzberg.
PLANTATION has played a
key role in the drive for the
Jewish community's major philan-
thropy and accounts for $840,605
including $60,000 from the
Women's Division. Norman
Ostrau and Bernard Canarick are
campaign co-chairmen.
WOMEN'S DIVISION has
achieved $1,141,000 for the UJA
campaign and $51,834 to Project
Renewal. According to Barbara
Wiener, campaign chairperson,
the division held a number of
events, including the $10,000
Woman of Valor Ruby "10" lun-
cheon at the home of Anita
Perlman; the $5,000 Lion of
Judah and an array of Play-A-Day
golf and tennis tournaments held
at the country clubs.
CONDOMINIUM DIVISION
has achieved a $1 million plus in
the campaign according to chair-
man Samuel K. Miller, who said
that each of the committees have
worked hard to achieve this
outstanding total at fund-raising
events.
WYNMOOR VILLAGE
DIVISION stands at $176,053.
The division has held a number of
functions in city-wide areas to
achieve gifts. Wynmoor Village
Division chairman is Charles
Rubenstein.
The year in review proved to be
very successful for North
Broward County, but the work
still lies ahead and is a 12-month a
year task!
Committed To Quality The Federation Way.
Young Business And Professional Division
You're young, you're Jewish,
and you're ready to meet and
socialize with many other talented
young, Jewish people. It's time for
you to get involved with the ex-
citing Young Business and Profes-
sional Division (YB&P). The
YB&P Division of the Greater Ft.
Lauderdale Jewish Federation
was founded during the fall of
1985 by a handful of eager and
concerned individuals. The
primary objective was to establish
a high quality organization which
provides young, Jewish profes-
sionals with meaningful programs
to meet their cultural and social
needs.
Gradually an initial membership
list was formed through personal
input and world-of-mouth contact.
A quality core group was
established and through the year
committees were formed and
cultural/educational events were
scheduled.
The members of YB&P are in
their 20s and 30s, are single or
married, and are primarily in an
entry level position with tbeir in-
volvement in Federation and
other Jewish agencies. The long-
term goal for the group is leader-
ship development in order to
perpetuate existing Jewish agen-
cies with high quality members
and leaders.
Nancy Rosenfeld, chairperson,
further describes the goals as
"enhancing personal development
and growth as a person and as a
Jew." In addition to Rosenfeld as
the Steering Committee chairper-
son, the subcommittee chairper-
sons are: Shana Safer,
Cultural/Educational; Norman
Blinder, Membership; and Lori
Bereman. Harvey Rackmil with
Special Social/Fund-raising
Programs.
Recent attendance at
Cultural/Educational functions
held at the Marriott Harbor Beach
exceeded 75 people. The first
social event in late June was a suc-
cessful "Party in the Park" with
athletic events and Barbecue. Up-
coming events include a casual
"Happy Hour" in late August and
a Jewish humorist in September.
Another Cultural/Educational
event will be held in October and
the first social/fund-raising pro-
gram will be in early December.
If you want to get involved in
YB&P, or know of someone past
college age through thirties who is
interested, please call Melissa
Martin at 7488400.
1986
CAMPAIGN PLEDGES
TO DATE
as of 8/4/86
$6,103,800
$6,000,000
$4,000,000
$2,000,000
Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale
United Jewish Appeal Campaign
John Streng
General Campaign Chairman
At a recent Young Business and Professional group outing at TY
Park tn Hollywood, from left, Harvey Rackmil, co-chairman,
7V^J^rama; Etim Mai***on, membership subcommittee';
Leslie Gerber, special programs committee; and Mindy Stein
cultural education committee.
The rainy day didn't dampen
their spirits while the Young
Business and Professional
group engaged a tug of war.
Judge IRWIN A. BERKOWITZ
PROVEN JUDICIAL ABILITY
Wtikftft*
_
^


Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, August 15, 1986
We Must Never Forget The Bravery of Our Fellow Jews ...'
Forty Years Later: Into The Kingdom Of Night
By HERBERT SAFRAN
Editor'8 Note: Herbert Safran
is a retired high school English
department chairman and is the
former editor of The Humanities
Journal. He resides with his wife,
Lillian, in Alexandria, Virginia.
I am not certain when I sensed
the urgency to travel to Germany
to see the infamous Dachau. Yet,
at some point in my life, both as a
Jew and as a human being, I need-
ed to tread on that hallowed
ground where so many of our
Family were put to death during
that horrible night of the
Holocaust. I had to see the bar-
racks, the roll call area, the elec-
trified fence. Inexplicably, I felt
the need to walk inside a death
chamber. I even knew I had to
hold in my hands the earth atop
the mass graves. But, first, I had
to transport my body, as well as
my mind, to that time 40 years
ago and 4,000 miles from
Washington, D.C., my present
home. Could I do this? I had to ask
myself this question before I could
accept the possibility of being
psychologically capable of travel-
ing to Germany, to the source of
the bureaucratic, systematic,
near-annihilation of our people.
Should I go? Why? What good
would it do to go there? Why must
I experience the trauma involved?
Neither reason nor cautious ad-
vice from some family and friends
would prevail. I was drawn inex-
orably to Dachau. And so, I travel-
ed ... into the past, into the
kingdom of night.
I flew to Munich the day after
Yom Kippur, curiously enough.
And on that day of arrival, ex-
hausted, as any traveler knows,
by the flight and jet lag, I took the
train and bus to Dachau to begin
my odyssey. I found that it isn't
necessary to think much, if one
doesn't care to, when visiting this
place only to feel. But, I came
to do both and found it necessary
to put my impressions into words.
It is sterile, this KZ Dachau. To-
day, in 1985. But, from March,
1933, when it was the very first
camp set up, it was on the grounds
of a former ammunition factory.
Jews, political opponents, clergy,
and other "undesirable elements"
were to be isolated here as
enemies of the Nazi regime.
Enlarged in 1938 from a planned
5,000 persons, it expanded to hold
over 200,000 registered prisoners
from 1933-45. This does not in-
clude the many sent there "tem-
porarily" who were not registered
and who were not heard from
again.
As I enter the only gate to the
camp, I envision the slogan,
Arbeit macht frei (work makes
one free) painted on its portal and
in all camps, but it is no longer evi-
dent here. Following the pathway
first to the left, then right, I
notice hundreds of yards of open
space ahead. According to the
diagram given me, this is the roll
call area. One sees an administra-
tion building on one side and a
barracks on the other. I don't
understand why, but I first want
to see the barracks on the far side.
It takes some minutes to get there
over the hard-packed earth and
stones. My shoes become dusty
while crossing the open expanse.
The day is cool, but I begin to
sweat just a little. I stop in front
of an open door to the barracks,
and hesitate before entering. Do I
dare enter? That's what I came
for, isn't it? To see this and
everything else around here, I re-
mind myself. What do I expect to
see? Others stand and wait behind
me. I didn't think there would be
so many people. Where was the in-
terest 40 years ago? Why, they
aren't even Jewish; in fact, most
are foreigners. What am I think-
ing? I'm a foreigner, too. Idiot. It
is only the tens of thousands of
dead who are indigenous. I enter
the barracks.
Visions of haunting eyes sunk
into skulls leap into my mind from
pictures I have seen. I blink a few
times as I enter. Nothing. Just
bunks. Bunks for hundreds of vic-
tims, upwards of 1,600 prisoners
to a single barracks built to hold
200, according to my printed
guide. How many were there to a
bunk? The pictures conjure up so
many. I hurry outside. Where
now? I look at the diagram in my
sweating hand. It shows the
Jewish memorial a quarter-mile
distant.
To get there, I have to pass
more open ground. But I feel so
closed in. How is that possible?
Once I entered the gate to this
place, I think I lost a bit of my
sanity. I begin to sweat even more
now. Wait. This isn't just open
ground on either side of a road-
way. There are rectangular, con-
crete foundations filled with
gravel.
And each foundation has a
number; yes, it must be a barracks
number. So many barracks, 30 or
more, it seems. So many victims
filled each one. So many tortured
souls. Each a story. Each a life.
Now dead. And forgotten by so
many. Died again.
Horrible visions of the ex-
perimental station in Block 5
come to mind stimulated by the
description in my printed guide.
This is where bio-chemical and ex-
posure experiments were practic-
ed on the defenseless inmates.
Nearby, the morgue was per-
manently crammed with corpses.
I hurry on to the Jewish memorial,
some 100 yards away.
At the iron gate of the
memorial, I mumble the Kaddish.
As I touch the Star of David, I
ask, why? Out loud, I do this. I
shake my head slowly side to side
and again ask the gate, why?
Since when can one expect an
answer from a gate? I cannot
believe my emotional state. I tell
you, I think this place has upset
me more than I thought possible.
I have become irrational in this
aseptic hellhole because of what I
have seen.
Significantly, silence answers
tHe
jewishFloridian o
________________________________________OF GREATER FORT LAUDCROALE
FREOK SMOCMET MARVIN LE VINE SUZANNE SMOCMCI
Editor end Pubhener ". Director of Communications Executive Edilo'
Published Weekly Mid September through Mid May Bi Weekly balance of year
Second Class Postage Paid al Haliandale, Fla USPS 899420
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Jewish Federation ot Greater Fort Lauderdale
Jewish Federation ol Greater Fort Lauderdale: Brian J. Sherr. President, Kenneth B Blerman. Exec
utlve Director; Marvin La Vine. Director ot Communications; Lorl Ginsberg, Aaalatant Director Ruth
Geller. Coordinator S36S vV Oakland Park Blvd., Fort Lauderdale, FL 33321 Phone (306) 748JJ400 Mall
for the Federation and The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale should be addreaaed: Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale, P.O. Box 26610. Tamarac, FL 33320-6610
'fttftaecftef
Friday, August 15,1986
Volume 15
10 AB 5746
Number 25
my question just as it engulfed
everything 40 years ago. An indif-
ferent quietness now, like an indif-
ferent world them. It was a silent
world that watched, shrugged,
and hardened itself by not accep-
ting the tragic facts, not wanting
to realize what was, indeed, hap-
pening. My mind, seemingly func-
tioning without direction,
wanders to a scene at my uncle's
home sometime in 1942 .. .
I recalled his telling me that the
correspondence between him and
our relatives in Berlin and Vienna
had suddenly ended. "No more
letters from them," he repeated,
every time I asked if he had heard
anything. Being young and naive,
I didn't think too much about it. It
didn't grasp the importance of
what was taking place then. In
fact, I am not certain I can com-
prehend fully the enormity of that
Nazi crime even now, 40 years
later. But I do recall my parents
and relatives saying again and
again: "Nothing like that could
happen not now in the 20th cen-
tury. It must be more of that
British propaganda like the
Belgian baby atrocity stories of
the First War. No, nothing like
the wholesale slaughter of Jewish
people could be taking place,
especially in such places as Vien-
na; it's the center of opera and
drama. Not in Germany, with its
philosophers and culture. After
all, the Jews had contributed so
much to these countries and to
their well being. Not even in
Poland; yes, there were pogroms
there, as in Russia, but with it be-
ing the center of Jewish culture
and three and half million of our
people, so many murders could
not be possible. After all, Jews are
integral members of society a
society which needs them, doesn't
it?" they asked plaintively. And
they used to look to one another
for support of their statements.
Each one in turn nodded agree-
ment. Each one believed this tale.
For who in his wildest nightmares
could have thought otherwise?
The victims knew. And some
like my uncle knew, but who
would listen? And those
Americans who did hear the cries,
how did they respond? Yes, the
Madison Square Garden rallies
were well-attended in 1943. But
who heard those voices? There
was a war to be fought and won.
Who heard the victims cry? They
were certain that if the free world
heard, the murders would stop.
Well, the world heard, and it re-
mained silent. But, then, the
reader knows this all too well. To-
day. Forty years later. Forty
years too late.
If being silent to the cries of the
victims in the camps were not
shameful enough, what did we do
to warn the still, untouched in-
nocents in Romania and Hungary?
This silence was the greatest com-
panion of the butchers. Even in
late 1943, when told of the
atrocities occurring at that
railroad siding in southwest
Poland, the Romanian Jews ex-
claimed naively: "The people here
need us. Besides, business is so
good, and we have-placed so many
orders for inventory and new fur-
niture. Why would anyone,
especially our neighbors and
business associates, want to harm
us? We can hear the Russian ar-
tillery getting closer. For us, the
war is practically over." How
prophetic.
Indeed, as late as the spring of
1944, the Hungarian Jews, as
well, had no inkling of Auschwitz
before they, themselves, were
herded onto cattle can. Still, no
one was telling the victims. But
why were Jews victims then? Why
are we victims of terrorism even
today? (The murders of the
yachtsmen in Cyprus; the killing
on the Achille Lauro, etc.) Simply
because we are Jews. No more.
No Less. Ever the scapegoat for
anything and everything that goes
wrong in a society. This has been
the attitude for centuries. The
reader knows this. The reader
knows we are the Chosen people.
The Crusades. The pogroms.
Kristallnacht. The fateful con-
ference at Wannsee in January,
1942, where the "Jewish ques-
tion" was to be resolved once and
for all time by the building pro-
jects at Treblinka, Chelmno,
Ravensbruck, and hundreds of
other sites devoted solely to our
destruction. Yes, that is known.
That's our history. World History
101. But, is that reason enough to
despair? Here, dear reader, it is
reason to despair. The older
among us who scanned the New
York Times in 1943-44 saw the
details about the elimination of
the ghettos, the wholesale
transfer of Jews from their
homes. Where to? Only silence
was reflected in our silent in-
quiries once they were moved.
And what did we do even after
reading? Indeed, what? Yes, an in-
different and silent world then. If
the reader doubts these accounts,
he has only to look at the
microfilm in his local library and
read the accounts for himself.
I am shaken from my thoughts
about the past by a young man
who wishes to take a picture of the
memorial. I am blocking the Star
of David. Would I please move? I
apologize and shuffle away, look-
ing at the brochure in my hand,
and puzzling as to what it is. Ah,
yes, now I remember. This shows
my state of mind. I look at the
diagram again. It indicates that
the location of the gas chamber is
to the left of the memorial. I am
pulled there by the fascination of
seeing what I have read about for
40 years. Could it still be that hor-
rible so many years later?
It is easy to find. So many are
walking slowly toward it. The poe-
ple are of different nationalities,
mostly young, and probably have
a multiplicity of reasons for being
here. They are remarkably quiet
as they enter. A few whisper as
they point both to the ceiling and
the walls. I notice the odor, no, the
stench, which seems to pervade
my senses. All are silent now,
staring, not knowing what to say,
to do. They shrug, shake their
heads, and move along. Seems to
be a microcosm of the world 40
years ago, doesn't it? But, I am
different. I see things differently.
Now, I feel the urge to scream,
yell, curse, pull my hair, rip my
clothes. I feel like punching, scrat-
ching the walls, anything.
Anything, just to rebel against the
peaceful, quiet, almost serene at-
mosphere there. But, I, too, re-
main silent. Staring. I, too, am
impotent.
I don't know what it is I smell,
but it's disgusting. Is it real, or am
I imagining it? It can't be the
Syklon B gas in the air after so
long a time. Besides, I sigh, there
on the wall is a plaque which in-
dicates this gas chamber was
never used. Maybe I am wrong.
Ha! Maybe there is no odor. No
crematorium. No barracks. No
roll call area. No museum. No
electrified fence. No Dachau. And
yet, I hear the screams, the silent
screams in my head.
Maybe the Holocaust never did
happen, as some try to get us to
believe today. Let these naysayers
come to Dachau. To Terezin. To
Mauthausen. And let them speak
to our martyrs, to the ashes of our
six million who burned in the
flames of that horrible night. Let
these revisionists tell the rem-
nants of our vanished Family and
our near-extinct Yiddish culture.
And then let them burn in hell for
their blasphemy.
It does stink in here.
Outside. At last I struggle to
get outside. Looking around to
get my bearings, I notice a path
along which no one seems to be
walking. I step slowly onto it and
proceed along its quiet tree-
shaded avenue. What is this? It's a
different world. I must be
hallucinating, for I see manicured
lawns and beautiful flowers set
atop what does that sign say?
Oye! It. It's a mass grave. The
sign in German and English (why
English?) indicates such a gory
tale, and it states plainly: "A ditch
of running blood." It elaborates
for the observer that this is the
spot where people were executed
by pistol shots to the back of the
head. Horror of horrors. It is, in
fact, an open chamber of horrors,
but I must look upon it. I see, I see
a cement wall which seems to be
replastered (why? from shots gone
astray or worse, or the passage of
time?). Could the murderers have
missed at such close range? It is
possible, but it makes no dif-
ference. Once taken to this spot,
the victims, the innocent, were
slaughtered. Thousands of them.
Here. And Bergen-Belsen. Lodz.
Riga. Babi Yar. In Greece and
Austria. Murdered by butchers.
All over civilized Europe. And
Continued on Page 13
NO NVORfc /v\QNKY BUSINESS %
ty FATAH
Wm


Friday, August 15, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 5
In The Federation Spotlight...
TWENTY-THREE TAMARAC LEADERS
A distinguished group of men
and women from the communities
in Tamarac have been elected to
serve on the Jewish Federation
Board of Directors. The an-
nuoncement was made by Federa-
tion president Brian J. Sherr
following the recently held An-
nual Meeting at the Samuel and
Helene Soref Jewish Community
Center.
The members are:
Officers: Daniel Cantor, vice
president; Sidney Spewak,
treasurer; Gladys Daren, assis-
tant treasurer.
Board Members: Robert Adler,
Walter Bernstein, Abraham
David, Richard Entin, Jack
Farber, Morris Furman, David
Krantz, Leon Messing, Sigmund
Nathan, Harold Oshry, Sol
ochulman, Morris Small, David
Sommer, Marvin Stein and M.
Morris Wittenberg.
Life Members: Sen. Sam
Greenberg and Charles Locke.
Advisory Committee: Bernard
Libros.
Past Presidents: Leo Goodman
and Jean Shapiro.
Sherr indicated that these com-
munity members are the heart of
what makes the Federation work.
He said, "What has been done this
year and what remains to be ac-
complished could not be achieved
without the time and energies
they graciously give to our com-
munity. We at the Federation will
continue our creative efforts to in-
volve and encourage committed
Jewish leadership and look for-
ward to serve ss a strong link in
the history of the North Broward
Jewish community."
Each of the board members
have totally committed
themselves to the work of the
Federation and Federa-
tion/United Jewish Appeal cam-
paign and have served in
chairmen, and prominent key divi-
sion leadership roles.
Latest on
Embassy
The State Department opposes
a provision of the Senate-passed
Embassy Security Act of 1986
which calls for construction of a
new American embassy in Israel
on a site within five miles of the
Knesset, excluding any location in
east Jerusalem. Robert Lamb,
director of State's Bureau of
Diplomatic Security, told
reporters last month "there is no
chance" the Reagan Administra-
tion will budget funds for a
Jerusalem embassy. Lamb said
that "we very much need a (new)
embassy in Tel Aviv. We're wor-
ried about the safety of the people
there."
He added that State is discuss-
ing the Israeli embassy provision
of the legislation with members of
Congress. The section, originally
sponsored by Sens. Jesse Helms
(R-N.C), Rudy Boschwitz (R-
Minn.), Paula Hawkins (R-Fla.),
and Chic Hecht (R-Nev), prohibits
the spending of any funds on con-
struction of a new embassy not in
west Jerusalem within the truce
lines ss they existed before June,
1967. It does not require new con-
struction "if the Secretary of
State determines and reports to
the Congress that the physical
security of personnel to be
employed at that faculty cannot
be adequately guaranteed."
State considers the present em-
bassy, located along the Tel Aviv
beachfront, close to other
buildings and among narrow, busy
streets, to be vulnerable to attack.
Lamb asserted that s new em-
bassy in Tel Aviv wss necessary
for security reasons
The Israeli embassy provision
adopted by the Senate is not part
of toe House version of the em-
bassy security legislation.
Momi Furman
David KranU
Leon Keating
Sigmund Nathan
Harold Oahry
Sol Schulman
Morrii Small
David Sommer
Marvin Stain
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Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort UuderdiWFriday, Augoat 15, 1986
Jewish Early Childhood Teachers
Hold Professional Growth Institute
CAJE Holds Kohl Jewish
Teacher Center Worshop
A special workshop for the
synagogue and day school
teachers of South Florida will be
conducted by the Kohl Jewish
Teacher Center on Thursday,
Aug. 28 from 9 a.m. to noon and 1
to 4 p.m., at Temple Beth Torah,
9101 N.W. 57 St., Tamarac.
The Kohl Center is considered
to be the outstanding Jewish
Teacher Center in the country,
Agency Focus
with branches in Jerusalem and
Be'er Sheva in Israel. Scheduled
by the Central Agency for Jewish
Education of the Jewish Federa-
tion of Greater Fort Lauderdate
as part of its in-service program
for the teachers of the communi-
ty, the workshop will provide a
multi-faceted exhibit of games, ac-
tivities, simulations, and displays
and will then guide the teachers in
preparing materials for their own
individual classrooms.
The workshop is the first of a
series of courses, seminars and
workshops that will be conducted
by the Institute for Jewish
Teachers of CAJE in cooperation
with the Council of Educational
Directors of North Broward.
Dr. Abraham Gittelson, director
of Education for the Jewish
Federation noted that "We are"
delighted to bring the Kohl
Workshop to our community so as
to provide our teachers with the
opportunity of designing in-
dividualized materials for their
classrooms. The potential and
dedication of the religious school
teachers of our area are truly
unlimited."
Trudy Brodsky and Mara Tep-
per, Kohl Center resource leaders,
will conduct the workshop with
more than 100 teachers expected
to attend from schools in Boca
Raton, North Broward and Dade
County.
The teacher center movement
began a number of years ago with
the goal of providing teachers
with the opportunity to create
materials and develop their own
skills and potential specifically for
the needs of their individual
classes. Through a special grant
from the Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale, a
Teacher Center, under the direc-
tion of Sharon Horowitz, has been
established at CAJE. Teachers of
the community have been able to
utilize the resources at the Center
for their own curricular subject
areas.
The Center has a wide range of
audio-visual equipment including
a video cassette recorder,
slide/tape projector, laminator,
duplicator, film projectors and
others.
For the coming year, through a
grant from the Jewish Federa-
tion, the Teacher Center will in-
crease its resource holdings in all
areas of the Jewish school cur-
riculum so as to be able to provide
materials for teachers on all grade
levels and in all subjects.
The Center will provide a wide
variety of workshops for the
teachers of the community both at
the CAJE and on the grounds of
each school.
y 4 Days/3 Nites
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Social activities Dinner dancing Ail-Star htt shows
Information A Reservations
1-800-SPA SLIM
7400 HARBOR ISLAND, NORTH BAY VILLAGE FL 33141
"The Early Childhood Educator
A Precious Treasure" will be
the theme of the semi-annual all
day Professional Growth Institute
of the Jewish Council of Early
Childhood Educators of South
Florida taking place on Wednes-
day, Aug. 27, from 8:30 a.m. to
3:30 p.m., at Temple Israel of
Greater Miami, 137 N.W. 19th
Street, Miami.
Nursery and kindergarten
teachers in the eight early
childhood programs in the
synagogues, day schools and
Jewish Community Centers of
North Broward will attend the
program, highlighted by five ma-
jor workshops dealing with
critical areas in early childhood
education. Overall, more than 300
teachers are expected to par-
ticipate in the Institute.
Linda Harris, ECE director at
Ramat Shalom and Regional Vice-
President of the JCECE, noted
that "the All Day Institute pro-
vides the early childhood educator
with the opportunity to sharpen
her professional skills through at-
tendance at outstanding
workshops. In addition, it enables
the teachers to meet in collegial
fellowship and to share ideas prior
to the beginning of the school
year."
The Institute, co-sponsored by
the Central Agency for Jewish
Education, will be highlighted by
the Kohl Jewish Teacher's Center
of Chicago, considered to be the
outstanding Jewish teacher
center in the country.
Trudy Brodsky and Mara Tep-
per, Kohl resource leaders, will ar-
range a multi-faceted exhibit of
games, activities, simulations and
displays and will then guide the
teachers in preparing materials
for their own individual
classrooms.
Another workshop will feature
Anthony Galie, a trainer and
resource leader in motivational
psychology. His theme will be
"Goal Setting and Motivation for
Personal and Professional
Growth," with emphasis on those
elements that impact on personal
and professional skills and en-
courage motivational success.
William Janiak, a writer of
childrens' songs, recording artist
and record producer will lead
three workshops on "We Learn
By Doing Through Music." He
will stimulate total involvement
on the part of the teachers in lear-
ning new songs for their
classrooms, together with ac-
tivities that complement the
music.
46 My great-
grandfather
invented
Gulden's'Mustard
Vegetable Fritters
V* cup butler or margarine.
meted; or as needed
Vt cup finely chopped rucchini
Vi cup finely chopped
mushrooms
CHARLIE GULDEN
Vi cup shredded carrots
W cup chopped onto*
V, cup dairy sour cream
3 tablespoons Guldens Spicy
Bran Mustard
2 beaten esp
3 taWespoons cornstarch
Saite vegetables I uatespooa butler, remote from teea. Mu
sour cream, mustard mi esp Gnsassy best Is cornstarch
Stir is wtetastes Met I tablespoon butler m skmet Spoon
2 tablespoons frsler batter w tbhet lightly brown on both
Add butler lo skmet as needed Makes III fritters
It's his recipe
that makes
these recipes
so delicious!**
Spinach-Stuffed Mushrooms
I pound fresh spinach (or I package
III on. | (roses chopped spinach.
thawed, wen Erased)
I pound (rest mushrooms (about It
nemum sited)
) UCietpooni butter, meted
I cup ricotta cheese
4 teaspoons Gulden* Smcy Brown Mustard
finch crushed oreawo
Vtsh. dean spinach, steam mi coucred
skmet fr* mswtes Remow, drain and
chop. Remote mushroom stems and finely
chop. Saute Menu and spinach m one
tablespoon butter Combine sssntch
mature with refuMwuj mfredients
Spoon into caps Mace on cookie sheet,
brush with remamini butler bake JSCT
li mantes or untj sealed through Makes
Marlene Lee, Director of the
Children's Division of the South
Regional Library of the Broward
County Library System will focus
on "The World of Storytelling"
utilizing dramatics, the
chalkboard, the flannel board and
puppets. Bonnie Edwards, in-
structor in the Early Childhood
Department of the Miami Dade
Community College will lead a
session on "Make It and Take It,"
a hands-on workshop using a wide
variety of creative ideas in various
media designed to enhance the
ECE program.
In addition, the program will in-
clude displays by leading vendors
of educational material for early
childhood programs as well as the
election and installation of the of-
ficers of the JCECE for the com-
ing year.
The JCECE, the professional
organization of the Jewish early
childhood educators of South
Florida was founded in 1964 and
serves to enhance the professional
status of the early childhood
educator and to elevate Jewish
early childhood programs. Its
membership includes over 400
teachers in over 50 schools from
South Miami through West Palm
Beach.
Israeli Denial
Israel sharply denied allega-
tions that it had been involved in
the illegal export of U.S.
technology to manufacture cluster
bombs (first reported by CBS
Television, July 8). Later news
reports said that federal sub-
poenas and search warrants had
been issued for several employees
of Israel's Military Purchasing
Mission in New York and for three
U.S. firms.
A statement by Israel's em-
bassy on July 9 said that a
Defense Ministry check "has
made it clear that the allegations
published by the media are un-
founded." It added that the affair
related to equipment for produc-
tion of gun shells developed in-
dependently by Israel and
asserted that "the Ministry Mis-
sion has, according to procedure,
applied for export licenses from
the U.S. Department of State .
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Frjday, August 15,J986/The Jewisfr Floj-idian .of Greater Fort J^auderdale .Page 7
Memories From '66 to '86 ...
Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Editor 'a Note: The following in-
formation is compiled with the
help of Federation's first presi-
dent Ludurik Brodzki.
May, 1968, and the phones were
ringing throughout North
Broward County when the two-
year-old Jewish Federation laun-
ched their annual 'Telethon' to
help their fellow Jews in Israel,
Europe, North Africa and the
Middle East.
According to Federation presi-
dent Ludwik Brodzki, more than
$3,500 was raised for the UJA
campaign, and when the final
tallies were recorded at the end of
June, following a second
'Telethon,' the community com-
bined campaign had raised
$51,044 toward the '68 goal of
$75,000. Brodzki praised the hard
work for the achievements to his
dedicated corps of volunteers
representing residents of Fort
Lauderdale, Margate, Pompano
Beach and surrounding areas.
Swinging into the action with a
number of fund-raising events and
programs, the '68 Women's Divi-
sion group set a fast pace for
record gifts led by chairperson
Carol Levy. The headlines in the
Fort Lauderdale News "All About
Women" highlighted the women's
achievements including the
organizational meetings at the
home of Pola Brodzki on N.E.
33rd St., which featured Mrs.
Morton Silberman, National
Woman's Division board member
and regional president of
Hadassah. One of Israel's first
chief women's officers, Major
Shulamit Legum, described the
plight of Israel's brave people
when she addressed the women
from throughout North Broward
at a luncheon held at Fort Lauder-
IN THE BEGINNING NATIONAL board member of the
Women's Division, Jewish Federation, Mrs. Morton Silberman,
right, chats with Carol Levy, left, and Mrs. Benjamin Abel. Mrs.
Silberman, who is also regional president of Hadassah, was
speaker at the organizational meeting of North Broward
Women'8 Division, Jewish Federation in the home of Mrs. Lud-
wik Brodski. (Staff photo by John Foster).
dale's Round Table.
The response was gratifying
from throughout the county the
concerned members of the Jewish
community set about to raise the
life-saving, life-giving gifts for
their brethren in need. Some of
the key campaign leaders included
Dr. Stanley Goodman, chairman,
Health Division; Dr. Saul
Geronomus, chairman, Israel's
20th Anniversary Dinner; and Ira
Boris, Pompano Beach chairman.
When the 1967 Honor Roll An-
nual Report was released in
January, 1968, the North
Broward Jewish Federation
Statements of Allocations in-
dicated that more than $53,000
was distributed to Federation
agencies and beneficiaries which
at that time included, among
others, United Jewish Appeal,
Israel Emergency Fund, Jewish
Family Service of Broward Coun-
ty. Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith, Bureau of Jewish
Education in Miami, Chaplaincy
Program and Mount Sinai
Hospital.
And once again, the Jewish
Federation received the plaudits
of the national United Jewish Ap-
peal in a scroll signed by Max
Fisher, general chairman, which
read in part, ". For fulfilling its
responsibilities to the beleaguered
people of Israel through the Israel
Emergency Fund during that
memorable period in June, 1967,
and for the generosity of your
leaders and the people of your
community, the unshakable foun-
dations of Jewish communal life,
our heartfelt thanks."
And the people of Greater Fort
Lauderdale Jewish community
were on the way to establishing
and laying the groundwork for
what is now the 24th largest fund-
raising Federation in North
America. Federation has come a
long way!
Christians Nix
Auschwitz
Convent
BRUSSELS, Belgium (JTA) -
Some 900 Belgians Christians
have signed a petition asking the
Catholic church and the civil
authorities in Poland to abandon
plans to build a Carmelite convent
at the site of the Auschwitz death
camp.
The signers said that Jews feel
the project is an unjustifiable in-
trusion at a place of mourning for
the millions of Jews who perished
at Auschwitz during World War
II.
The petition was initiated by
ecumenical circles in Namur who
said they want to contribute to im-
proving Christian-Jewish rela-
tions strained by the installation
of a nunnery at Auschwitz.
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Studies tn the development of the Zionist move-
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Instructor: Dr. Jeremiah Unterman
An analysis of the thought of such ancient and
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instructor: Dr. Yehuda Shamir
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Why does the Talmud say It is good that God gave humans the evil Inclination?
How and why did secular love poetry get Into the Bible?
Why does Hanukah last 8 days? (NOT because of a cruse of oil!)
Generous financial aid available for qualified students! 50% discount to auditors.
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT THE JEWISH STUDIES PROGRAM AT 758-3392, Ext 524. OR SEND
IN THE ATTACHED COUPON.
Barry University, Department of Jewish Studies, 11300 N.E. 2nd Ave., Miami, FL 33161
NAME
ADDRESS
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HOME PHONE
OFFICE PHONE

T" *1


Page 8 The Jewish Floridian ojf Greater Fort Laudenkle/Fridy, August 16, 1986
'. ?. A Special Kinship For Our Jewish Brethren Existed...'
Summer Family Ten-Day Mission To Israel
Editor's Note: Florence Siegel,
assistant controller of the Jewish
Federation, her husband Bernie,
and daughter Vicki, were par-
ticipants on the recent Federa-
tion/UJA Summer Family Mis-
sion to Israel. Below is an account
of her 10-day mission.
"The journey begins at the El Al
counter in New York," Florence
stated. "The day of fulfillment of
a lifetime is finally here."
Florence, her husband Bernie
and daughter Vicki were joining
150 participants from around the
country for the UJA Summer
Family Mission to Israel.
While boarding the plane,
Florence took note of the tight
security El Al has been noted for.
"I felt so safe," she commented.
She also observed that about 90
percent of her fellow travelers
were young. "They're our
future," she remarked.
Her first encounter with the
homeland she's read and heard so
much about was upon landing.
Hearing the Hebrew music and
the pilot announcing, "Welcome
to Israel," brought tears to her
eyes.
The first stop was the Jewish
National Fund Forest, where
Vicki planted a tree. Then on to
the Tel Aviv Hilton, and a view of
the Mediterranean Sea.
Their first day kicked off with a
visit to a nursing home sponsored
by the Federation/UJA major
beneficiary, the Joint Distribution
Committee. Trying to capture
every memorable moment in her
mind, Florence decided that from
this day, her theme would be "We
are our brothers' keepers." Later
when visiting a kibbutz, her theme
was brought to her mind again.
"We shared so much with the
Israeli fmaily we met on the kib-
butz. They educated us in their
lives and loves and showered us
with admiration." A walk through
Old Jaffa concluded an eventful
day. "Seeing all the Israelis smil-
ing and happy, never complaining
about their life or lifestyle and
never knowing what the future
Fatah Closures
As part of an escalating strug-
gle for influence among the
Palestinian Arab residents of the
West Bank and Gaza Strip, King
Hussein's government ordered
the closing of all 25 Fatah offices
in Jordan (New York Times, July
8). Fatah is headed by Yasir
Arafat and is the largest consti-
tuent group of the PLO.
Jordan has increased efforts to
regain influence among West
Bankers since King Hussein's
February cancellation of a
diplomatic "joint initiative" with
Arafat.
holds, really touched my heart,"
she said.
Rising sometime before the sun,
Florence and her family, as she
calls all the 150 on the mission,
visited an absorption center
where newly arrived Ethiopian
Jews are housed. She witnessed
the remarkable progress made by
these people and noticed the look
of thanks and hope in the dark,
black eyes of the young.
Highlighting the next few days
was a tube ride down the Jordan
River, which brought "a feeling of
togetherness, everyone helping
everyone," to Florence along with
some bumps and bruises. "That
day in particular," Florence said,
"truly made me understand the
UJA theme, 'One People, One
Destiny.'"
An uneasiness existed during
the tour of the Golan Heights
area, just three miles from Syria.
Participants were briefed by
Israeli soldiers, both men and
women, sang Israeli songs, and
left feeling a certain kinship for
these "fighters of freedom."
Before entering Jerusalem, Mis-
sion participants stood on Mount
Scopus, recited the Schechanu
and sang Hebrew songs, linked
arm in arm.
"My first impression of
Jerusalem was that it was clean
and bright," she stated. "It was
also sad because we found out
about the death of two Israeli
soldiers who were killed defen-
ding the borders. One was a close
friend of our bus driver. "This is a
part of everyday life," the driver
said between tears.
"The Western Wall was truly
the magnificent sight everyone
said it was. Throngs of people
praying. It made me realize that
for once, I was in the majority, not
the minority," Florence said. A
fabulous Shabbat dinner followed,
which included Israeli songs sung
by the Chief Cantor of the Israeli
Army.
In the next few days, the par-
ticipants visited Zion Square, the
Old City, the Arab, Christian and
Moslem Quarters, the Knesset,
and for Florence and her family,
the highlight, the trip to Kfar
Saba, Federation's Project
Renewal neighborhood.
"It was such a special feeling for
me to see the many buildings and
centers donated and dedicated by
my Fort Lauderdale neighbors.
Seeing so many familiar names on
the walls and doors, truly made
me feel like we've accomplished so
much." The high point of the visit
was dinner with an Israeli family
who live in Kfar Saba. Words of
thanks and gratitude were not
enough from this family who
treated the Siegels as royalty. All
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The wide-eyed and happy faces of the children at Kfar Saba.
Florence Siegel, Federation
assistant controller, recently
returned from the 10-day UJA
Summer Family Mission to
Israel. Florence proudly
displays a menorah made by
the children of Kfar Saba,
Federation'8 Project Renewal
city in Israel.
the residents of Kfar Saba ap-
preciate and are most grateful for
all that has been done by Fort
Lauderdale, and the remarkable
work of Fort Lauderdale's Project
Renewal chair, Alvera A. Gold.
"Kfar Saba has a nursery, doc-
tor's office, recreation centers for
young and old alike and many
new, polished buildings, where
there only stood patches of land,"
Florence stated.
The next day featured a visit to
Masada, which the Siegels chose
not to climb but rather take the
cable car and climb the last steps.
Atop Masada, Florence and Ber-
nie became B'nai Mitzvah, along
with 33 others. "What an
experience!"
The afternoon turned somber as
they visited Yad Vashem, the
memorial to the Holocaust as well
as the Military Cemetery, where
tombstones beared the ages of the
fallen soldiers, some as young as
10 years old.
The Mission ended with a
caucus at Hebrew University. A
lot of soul-searching took place as
participants stood up and tried to
put their feelings about Israel and
their Mission into perspective. All
sang, swayed arm in arm and
dedicated their lives to the sur-
vival of the Jewish state and their
belief in Judaism.
Florence and Bernie Siegel
standing in front of the com-
munity center at Kfar Saba.
It lets vou
be your best.
KCwHtMKMlMr


Friday, August 15, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 9
Women Hold the Key.
Women's Aiotee
By DEBORAH FULLER
HAHN
Publicity Chair
THE MAGIC CARPET
It was an ordinary morning
about 38 years ago, the shop had
opened early and Menachem was
sewing a blanket. At home, the
family was going about its usual
activities. Suddenly, the woman
from the United Jewish Appeal
came and told Menachem that all
Jews had to leave the area, secret-
ly, within the hour. They were on
their way to the Promised Land,
away from the barbaric oppres-
sion of the Imam. He left his shop
open so the local peole would think
he was still inside, and hurried
home to get his wife, Rinay, and
their four children. Joining them
were both grandmothers. Within
the hour the family was on its
way. Jews were once again on the
move. The new State of Israel had
heard of the plight of the Jews of
Yemen and welcomed this new im-
migration, despite its own strug-
gle for survival. The United
Jewish Appeal sent emissaries to
all over Yeman to inform the Jews
that they would be taken to the
Land of Israel. They were to meet
across the border in the neighbor-
ing country of Aden.
The odyssey began for the fami-
ly of Menachem Yaish, that morn-
ing, when he left his blanket shop
and returned home. Hurriedly, he
took some money and went out to
buy a third donkey. Meanwhile,
Rinay Yaish gathered the two
boys and two girls, together with
both grandmothers, and gave
them final instructions for their
perilous journey. She collected her
jewelry and reluctantly prepared
to leave her home. The house must
also look as if the family was still
in residence. The Imam's spies
were everywhere, always ready to
arrest Jews. One of the donkeys
was saddled with a basket on each
side ready to carry the two older
women. One grandmother was a
very small person and the other
much larger. They did not balance
the donkey very well and would
argue all the way. The second
donkey carried Rinay and the two
small girls. The boys were older
and able to walk with their father.
As instructed, they had taken no
household furniture. The third
animal's baskets contained some
clothing and Kosher food for the
travel. This strange caravan con-
tinued to walk off the main roads
and out of sight as much as possi-
ble. Although they carried as
much non-perishable food as
possible in the donkey's baskets,
and sold pieces of jewelry for
drinking and washing water, the
journey was dangerous and dif-
ficult. The children especially had
a very hard time. The oldest boy
had developed pneumonia before
they left home and the other
caught it. Both sons died during
those three weeks. The littlest girl
also became ill and died several
weeks later, only Malka survived.
The family encountered an un-
forgettable scene upon arriving at
their destination. Jews from all
over the country were streaming
into the designated meeting area.
Most of them arrived on foot, car-
rying their meager possessions.
Anything that was not easy to
carry had to be left behind.
Everyone believed that the
Messiah had come to take them to
the Land of Israel on the wings of
a huge white bird. It had been
foretold in the Bible. On the tar-
mac, right in front of them was a
large silver El Al airplane. None
of these Yemenite Jews had ever
seen a plane, certainly not one
with the Star of David on the
wing. This surely was the magic
Esther Yaish Hahn in her
Yemenite wedding dress.
Menachem Yaish, father of the
bride, in Tel Aviv.
bird that signaled the coming of
the Messiah.
With great hope and anticipa-
tion Rinay and Menachem climbed
up the steps of the plane with
their mothers and two surviving
babies. They had buried two sons
along the way and had left their
home of many generations but
they were on the way to a new
home.
Once aboard the plane everyone
was assigned seats and settled
down to prepare for the great
event. The men said their daily
prayers and the women started to
prepare each family's food. Of
course, they used the method of
cooking they had used for genera-
tions in Yemen. They began to
build a fire and cook their meal, in
the aisle of the plane. Of course,
the El Al crew was unprepared
for this turn of events. To their
credit, they never showed the
panic they felt to their
passengers. But during a hasty
conference between pilot and
crew they decided on the most
diplomatic approach. No one
wanted to offend these future
citizens of Israel. Nevertheless,
the situation was soon under con-
trol and the first plane dubbed
"Operation Magic Carpet" was on
it way.
Operation Magic Carpet was the
term used by the United Jewish
Appeal in the rescue of Jews who
could now escape the tortuous
anti-Semitism of Yemen. It was a
monumental undertaking that
began in 1948 and lasted several
years until virtually all of the
Yemenite Jewish community was
airlifted to Israel.
Rinay and Menachem Yaish,
their two small daughters and
both mothers arrived in Israel on
that flight. The youngest girl died
shortly afterward. In the next few
years Rinay gave birth to three
more healthy Sabra children. To-
day, they reside in Herzlia.
Menachem still makes a blanket
occasionally for a new grandchild.
The elderly grandmothers spent
their final years in the land of
their prayers. Malka, the only
child to survive that long journey
is now a nurse's aide at the
hospital in Kfar Saba. Malka's
oldest daughter just completed
her army service on August 7.
This story was told to me by my
daughter-in-law, Esther Yaish
Hahn, exactly as her parents told
it to her.
FOUNDATION OF JEWISH PHILANTHROPIES
HISS W OAKIANOPARK BLVD. I! LAUDERDAU. fl IM2I UOSl 748-H401I
The Taxwise Giver
Planning For Retirement
Editor's Note: Another in a
series of Foundation of Jewish
Philanthropies informative
reports. Jacob Brodzki, chairman.
Careful planning for retirement
is an important topic that we are
all concerned about. An individual
may be relying on a pension plan,
profit sharing, IRA, etc., to pro-
vide the financial resources for his
retirement years. Many in-
dividuals would like to save more
for their retirement through
various tax deferred techniques,
but find that they cannot do so
because of a complicated group of
laws commonly known as ERISA.
A life income plan called a
"charitable remainder unitrust"
may permit you to escape the
ERISA requirements while pro-
viding for substantial retirement
benefits for yourself, your family
or a trusted employee.
Here's how it works. You create
a trust, paying the income to the
individual you wish to benefit
(including yourself) for a term of
years or life, and the remaining
principal at the end of the term
passes to the Jewish Federation.
By doing this, you or your com-
pany receive an immediate income
tax deduction based on tables sup-
plied by the IRS.
The following example il-
lustrates how an individual may
benefit by such a plan.
Example: Mrs. Donor is 60
years old, in the 50 percent tax
bracket and owns her own
business. She is concerned about a
sufficient income for her retire-
ment but she cannot increase the
contributions to her retirement
plan because of the ERISA re-
quirements. She purchased XYZ
stock several years ago for
$20,000 that has now increased to
$100,000. The stock pays a small
dividend and she would like to use
it to enhance her current and
retirement income by selling it
and purchasing higher yielding
securities. However, the sale of
the stock will cause a capital gains
tax of $16,000.
Mrs. Donor seeks the help of her
professional tax advisor who
recommends she establish a
charitable remainder unitrust.
She places the $100,000 of XYZ
stock in the trust which will pay
her 6 percent per year of the cur-
rent market value of the fund for
the rest of her life. By creating the
trust, she receives the following
benefits:
1. She receives an immediate in-
come tax deduction of $41,198,
saving her $20,599 in taxes.
2. She bypasses the capital
gains tax of $16,000. This brings
her total tax savings to $86,599.
3. She will receive income for
the rest of her life, starting out at
$6,000 the first year. It is possible
that the amount of income may in-
crease because the trust may earn
more than 6 percent payout, and if
the principal grows so will her in-

MHJNDAIION
Ot IIWtSH PMUANIMtOmS
come, for example, if the trust
earns 9 percent a year, the excess
retained earnings will cause Mrs.
Donor's income to increase to
$8,063 in 10 years, $10,837 in 20
years and $14,564 in 30 years.
4. Mrs. Donor has the satisfac-
tion of establishing a substantial
endowment fund during her
lifetime that will provide for die
future well-being of our Jewish
community.
This is just one example of the
possible planning uses of a
unitrust. The trust may enable
you to accomplish many of your
estate and tax planning goals
while you provide for the future
well-being of our Jewish com-
munity. You should consult with
your professional advisors to
determine the tax and finnffo|t
consequences of any gift
For more information, contact
Janice Salit, Foundation director
at 748-8400.
Your Federation/UJA Dollars At Work ...
Plantation Student Letter From Israel
Editor's Note:
The following is excerpts of a let-
ter written by Stacey Conn of
Plantation, a student at Nova
High School and Federation's
Judaica High School, who is cur-
rently in Israel studying at the
Alexander Muss High School.
Stacey is the daughter of Elaine
and Alan Cohn and the grand-
daughter of living and Esther
Libowsky ofPompano Beach. Irv-
ing is secretary of the Federation
and chairman of the Kosher
Nutrition and Gathering Place,
and has served for a number of
years as campaign chairman of
the FederatumJUJA drive, Palm-
Aire Division.
Thursday, July 3,1986
Dear Mom, Dad and Warren,
"... Our class starts at 8 a.m.
and we go non-stop to 10:15 when
we take a three-quarter hour
break, then back to the books
from 11 to 12:45 p.m. and classes
are over.
My usual schedule is I have a lot
of homework (4-5 hours), go to
town for lunch which is 10
minutes away by foot, and work
the rest of the day. If I have a lit-
tle homework, I go to Tel Aviv or
the beach. So far my schedule has
been a lot of homework, but I have
to say it seems to be worth it. The
classes are so amazingly long, but
for some incredible reason, they
seem to be interesting and the
homework isn't so bad when we're
all doing it. My teacher is Mr.
Baurch and he's really a nice man,
but very strict. The class is a lot of
fun and I enjoy it. The homework
is hard and so long it's like
nothing I ever dreamed of, but it's
almost fun. It's one of the funniest
things in the world to see 25 kids
spread out on the couches in the
student lounge with two or three
books, notebooks, and working for
three hours. It's really neat'
Stacey
Stacey is one of the many North
Broward County area students
that are recipients of the special
Alexander Muss High School pro-
gram because of the funds raised
by the annual Federation/UJA
campaign. Thanks to you, she has
the opportunity to learn of her
special heritage and the culture of
the Jewish homeland first-hand.
A combination of learning and fun
Judge IRWIN A. BERKOWITZ
PROVEN JUDICIAL ABILITY
Pd Pol Adv.


mt'*m
-i
Page 10 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, August 15, 1986
.-. ,- il u irfT
Where Do Your Dollars Go..,
Your Federation/UJA Gift Helps Care For Our Elderly
People touching people here in
North Broward County and
thanks to your support, hundreds
of senior citizens can look to the
Jewish Federation agencies and
beneficiaries funded by the
Federation/United Jewish Appeal
campaign to ensure the quality
and dignity of their autumn years.
At the helm of one of the
Federation's most important com-
mittees is Irving Libowsky,
Federation secretary, and chair-
man of the Kosher Nutrition Pro-
gram and the Gathering Place.
Irv, who devotes countless hours
to this important aspect of our
community is also the chairman of
the Palm-Aire Division for the '86
campaign, which as of this date
has raised more than $681,000 for
the Jewish community's major
philanthropy.
Relating the case of the impor-
tance of the Federation/UJA con-
tribution and how the dollars
translate into care, Libowsky told
the Floridian about the case of an
elderly man, who was unable to
help his 82-year-old sister, a re-
cent widow with severe arthritis,
failing memory and in deep
depression. The man turned to the
TAe (fathering
cpiace
An Adult Day Care Center
Jewish Family Service, a major
agency of the Federation and
through a series of interviews
with the aged-services social
worker, the long-term program
was set into action.
This included a daily hot kosher
lunch, homemaker assistance,
along with weekly counseling and
evaluation. Within several weeks,
the sister became socially ad-
justed, attending sessions at the
Gathering Place, at the Jewish
Community Center on West
Sunrise Blvd., where she became
a part of the discussion groups,
and participated in a variety of ac-
tivities which provided both men-
tal and physical stimulation. Soon,
she was talcing part in the Kosher
Nutrition program, where she
joined with some 200 other men
and women who daily were served
hot kosher lunches at one of two
sites, one at the JCC and the other
at the Lauderhill Mall on State
Road 7.
Libowsky stated, "All residents
of North Broward County aged 60
and over, and who are in need of a
structured environment, may be
eligible for the program. An in-
take interview is required for
determining whether one is ap-
propriate to the group. This is
how vital your Federation/UJA
gift is ... it can mean the dif-
kosher
Nutritiori
Shown from left are Sandra Friedland, director of Kosher Nutri-
tion, and Irving Libowsky.
Rabbi David Gordon, left, member of the Chaplaincy Commis-
sion, and Irving Libowsky are shown giving greetings before the
Hebrew Day School second graders at a Passover program.
THE ELDERLY PARTICIPANTS of the Jewish Federation's
Kosher Nutrition program had their questions about legal mat-
ters answered by Lawyer Lloyd B. Silverman, who volunteers his
time and knowledge.
Jewish War Veterans:
and Ladies Auxiliary
OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
CENTURY VILLAGE POST 265
DEERFIELD BEACH, FLORIDA
Introducing
35 Day Tour of Israel and Spain
TUES.OCT.21,1986
$2299**DBL.OCC.
AIRFARE TRANSFERS 2 MEALS DAILY
1st CLASS, 4 STAR HOTEL
TEL AVIV NETANYA JERUSALEM KIBUTZ
MADRID, COSTA DEL SOL
PARTICIPANTS OF THE FEDERATION'S two Kosher
Nutrition Sites and The Gathering Place enjoy the singing of the
Hebrew Day School children, prior to a Seder in SorefHau at the
Jewish Community Center. The Kosher Nutrition program, The
Gathering Place and the Hebrew Day School are all beneficiary
agencies of the Jewish Federation receiving funds from the an-
nual United Jewish Appeal campaign.
ference of being forlorn,
desperate and lonely, or a vital,
energetic part of this wonderful
community. If you have not made
your pledge in '86 or have com-
pleted your payment, take the
time now to help the elderly in our
community. Remember, "People
who don't cherish their elderly
have forgotten whence they came
and whither they go."
For further information about
the Federation/UJA campaign,
call 748-8400, and details on the
Gathering Place and Kosher
Nutrition can be obtained by call-
ing Sandra Friedland, Kosher
Nutrition director at 797-0331 or
Bonnie Krauss, Gathering Place
Director, at 797-0330.
Organizations
BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY
NWC
The Ft. Lauderdale/Pompano
Chapter of Brandeis University
National Women's Committee is
collecting books for its annual Us-
ed Book Sale. Paperbacks, tex-
tbooks, records, etc. are needed.
For pick-up information please
contact 974-8653 or 974-2044.
AMERICAN RED CROSS
The Broward County Chapter
of the American Red Cross, 2120
W. Broward Blvd., is presently
looking for volunteers to handle
the switchboard and act as a
receptionist. The hours are 8:80
a.m.-12:30 p.m. or 12:30-4:30 p.m.
For details call the American Red
Cross at 581-4221, ext. 13.

IF YOU'RE SICK TODAY...
YOU'LL BE SEEN TODAY"
NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY WALK RIGHT IN
MINOR EMERGENCY CARE
REASONABLE COST (Much Less Than Hospital Emergency Room)
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MEDICARE ASSIGNMENT ACCEPTED
SCHOOL, SPORTS & CAMP PHYSICALS $15
CHIROPRACTIC CARE AVAILABLE ,laud lakes only k. mintz dc>
MODERN X-RAY & LAB FACILITIES
IMMUNIZATIONS AVAILABLE TB TINE $6
PRE-MARITAL BLOOD TESTS $10
Saul Heller'
427-6158
Bob Bushman
421-2064
ISRAEL NEEDS TOURISM. COME WITH US ON THE
ORIGINAL 35 DAY LEISURE TOUR AT THE LOWEST
PRICE THAT IS AVAILABLE
$100,000 FREE FLIGHT INSURANCE
LAUDERDALE LAKES
JURA SHOPPING CTR
Corner at S Rd 7
& Oakland Pk Blvd
Next to Carters
733-8666
MARGATE
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5221 Coconut Ck. Pkwy.)
('4 Mi. East ot 441)
Between Sear* A Zayre't
975-8666
i.'.


............
Friday, August 15, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 11
The Samuel and Helene Soref
Jewish Community Center
Perl man Campos
6601 W. Sunrise Blvd.
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33313 792-6700
By Muriel Haskell, Director of Public Relations
For further information and fees concerning the events or pro-
grama listed please call the center.
VOLUNTEERS
WHO SAY YES
Continuing its policy of
evaluating the records of its
numerous volunteers after every
season, JCC staff names the
"Volunteers of the Month" for
this past February. Two YES
(Young, Energetic Seniors) in the
Senior Adult department have
won the citations!
ELIZABETH HODKIN
Elizabeth Hodkin, recognized
this past spring as a volunteer to
be honored for her countless hours
of service to the Center, moved to
Florida 15 years ago from Pat-
chogue, Long Island.
HIGH STYLE
Hodkin has chaired "The Total
Look for the Mature Woman" pro-
gram for the Senior Adult Ac-
tivities Department this past spr-
ing with such audience approval
that it has been established as an
annual event and produced a nice
number of keen-age fashion-plates
on campus!
Highlight of the program was
the fashion show featuring the
latest in contemporary clothing
modeled by some of the best look-
ing members in the department
including chairlady Hodkin!
Much of the day's appeal
resulted from the careful planning
which produced an elegant
"home-catered" gourmet lunch
offered a multitude of door prizes
and the "how-to" seminars led by
the popular professionals in the
beauty and style fields, according
to Laura Hochman, Adult Ser-
vices supervisor.
OTHER INTERESTS
AND AFFILIATIONS
Hodkin is an enthusiastic
member of JCC's Yiddish class
taught by Max Drucker. She is a
"regular" at the Tuesday evening
YES (Young, Energetic Seniors)
meetings, joins most of the day
trips to local attractions and
theaters and attends the Center's
Great Books Course led by Dr.
Abe Gittelson.
"I like to join anything that
stimulates thinking and doing,"
she says.
In Patchogue, Hodkin worked
with her late husband who was in
the feed and oil distribution
business. She was a founder of the
local Hadassah chapter, a member
and board member of numerous
organizations, including the
sisterhood in her local temple.
Hodkin's family include two
sons, two daughters and nine
wonderful grandchildren!
PAT FRIEDMAN
Cited for her many hours of
volunteering in JCC's Senior
Adult program this past spring,
Friedman comes to Fort Lauder-
dale from New Jersey via
Sarasota. She immediately
became involved in the Center's
Pat Friedman
Senior Adult activities when she
moved to this area in 1982, becom-
ing one of its most dependable
volunteers and interested
participants.
"TOTAL" INVOLVEMENT
This last spring Friedman was
"right hand" to the committee
responsible for the success of
"The Total Look for the Mature
Woman," "how to look your best"
seminars described above help-
ing with arrangements and pro-
gram. She is a regular attendee at
the Tuesday evening YES
(Young, Energetic Seniors) pro-
grams, works for the Center's
WECARE Volunteer Services of-
fering aid to the blind, has joined
the Current Events "rap" group
sessions, the Great Books Course
led by CAJE's Abe Gittelson and
has recently returned from a
California excursion by bus guided
by Laura Hochman, JCC head of
Adult activities.
UP NORTH
In New Jersey, Pat and her late
husband "served" in the world of
Tennis teaching it and
operating a Tennis Equipment
Distributorship. They were in-
strumental in furthering the work
of the Scholarship fund belonging
to the Eastern Lawn Tennis
Association which encompassed
the areas of New Jersey, New
York and Delaware. Youngsters
who showed the potential of
becoming tennis stars, but who
could not afford lessons, were
sought out by the Friedmans to be
recipients of funds offered by the
Scholarship program.
MORE AND DIFFERENT
Other admirable activities pur-
sued by Friedman include driving
a Red Cross Motor Coach during
World War II as a dedicated
member of the American
Women's Volunteer Service.
Subsequently, she drove Cancer
patients for the Red Cross and has
participated in hospice programs.
"My mission in life is to help
people," she says.
Pat Friedman is a graduate of
N.Y.U. with a degree in Liberal
Arts.
Federation Agencies and Beneficiaries ...
North Broward County Board Members
Representing Greater Fort
Lauderdale in the administration
and organization of the B'nai
B'rith Hillel Broward/Palm Beach
Unit Board for 1986-87 are Hank
Meyer, Fort Lauderdale, vice
chairman; Dr. Murray Zedek,
Fort Lauderdale; Rabbi Elliot
Skiddell, Plantation; Larry
Shuvall, Fort Lauderdale; and Ir-
ving Disraelly, Tamarac, board
members. Other members include
Ms. Jo Ann M. Levy, Boca Raton,
and Al Golden, Miami Beach.
Golden, Federation board
member, is also vice chairman of
the B'nai B'rith Hillel Founda-
tions of the United States.
The Foundation is a beneficiary
of the Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale through
its annual United Jewish Appeal
campaign.
The funds raised by the annual
UJA campaign are used to pro-
vide social welfare and
humanitarian programs in
Greater Fort Lauderdale, in Israel
and in more than 30 lands around
the world.
For further information about
Hillel, contact Nancy Tobin
Berlin, director, at 652-5672
(Dade), 393-3510 (Boca), or
661-8549 (Miami).
Jack Gordon plans to save
$6000 this year by living
at a Forum Group Retirement
Community
(These are excerpts from an actual recorded interview with
Mr. Jack Gordon, a resident at The Lafayette, Forum Group's
rental retirement community in Philadelphia, PA)
"One of the most devastating things that can happen to older peo-
ple is to have to put a large sum of money up front to move into a
retirement community. Here, we're on a strictly rental basis. That's
the big attraction. We can earn interestup to $6000 a yearon the
money we would have to pay to buy a place, at some other community."
Introducing The Park Summit of Coral Springs, Forum
Group's newest full-service rental retirement community.
The Park Summit is conveniently located in the model city of Coral
Springs, a well-planned and impeccably maintained community.
The Park Summit offers beautifully designed studio, one- and two-
bedroom apartments, as well as an attached skilled healthcare
center. It is open, with model apartments available far previewing
at 8500 Royal Palm Boulevard.
To learn more about The Park Summit, call (305) 752-9500 for
an appointment, or return the coupon today.
ComliSprmgs
8900 Royal Palm Boulevard, Coral Springs, Florida 33065
(305) 752-9500
JDL FORUM GROUB INC
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For more information, return the coupon or call:
(305) 752-9500.
Mail to: The Park Summit of Coral Springs
8500 Royal Palm Boulevard
Coral Springs, Florida 33065
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Address
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Zip
Phone Age
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JFFL081

_ -i




Pagelg__The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, August 15,1986
Jewish Family Services Certificates
Jewish Family Service of
Broward County awards Cer-
tificates of Appreciation to the
following volunteers for their help
with the First Annual Member-
ship Campaign mailing: Ann
Abadinsky, Ben Abadinsky,
Stacey Abraham, Mollie Berman,
Nikki Cowand, Hollie Edelstein,
Elaine Eichler, Renee Eichler, K.
Eigg, Estelle Farin, Cindy Felds-
tein, Roz Ginsberg, Carrie Gor-
don, Doris Greenberg, Deborah
Hahn, Blanche Halpern, Ariel
Hantin, Cheryl Hantin, Aaron
Harel, Mark Horowitr, Rena
Horowitz, Rose Jolley, Andrea
Kaufman, Cheryl Klein, Roz
Klein, Elsie Kravitz, May
Kriegsman, Ida Laasoff, Ruth
Lerner, Henrietta Littleman,
Nancy Lucas, Frances Mantel,
Leo Mantel, Louis Marchetti, Bar-
bara Mazur, Mary Munsey,
Josephine Natoli, Chuck Ness,
Shirley Odulio, Tomiko Odulio,
Hilde O'Mara, Ellen Rice, Rose
Rosen, Ben Rosenstein, Joshua
and Michael Rowles, Carole Sher-
man, Phil Sherman, Sherri
Steinberg, Leah Sugarman, Ida
Vitale, Francis Wennenberg,
Seven Agencies Receive
United Way Funding
Seven Broward County human
service agencies begin receiving
first time funding from Broward's
United Way this month. This is
the largest number of new agen-
cies to receive allocations from the
United Way in recent memory
and brings the total number of
agencies currently funded to 57.
The seven include: Broward Han-
dicapped Meals on Wheels,
Epilepsy Association of Broward
County, Hospice Care of Broward
County, Nova University Com-
munuity Mental Health Clinic, Oc-
tober Center, Turning Point
(House of Ichthus) and United
Hearing and Deaf Services.
United Way of Broward County
funds 57 local health, human ser-
vice and youth agencies, provided
services to one in every three
families in Broward County.
The Jewish Family Service, a
major beneficiary agency of the
Jewish Federation also receives
funds from the United Way.
B'nai B'rith Convention
August 24-29
Discussion by world authorities
on major issues confronting Jews
and Judaism, the election of a new
organization president, and
special entertainment will
highlight B'nai B'rith Interna-
tional s biennial convention Aug.
24-29 in Las Vegas.
About 1,800 delegates and their
spouses, representing 43 coun-
tries, are expected to attend B'nai
B'rith's first convention in the
Western U.S. since 1915, when it
was held in San Francisco.
Among the speakers will be the
United States ambassador to the
United Nations, Vernon Walters;
Israeli Ambassador to the United
States Meri Rosenne; Aryeh
Dulzin, chairman of the Jewish
Agency and World Zionist
Organization; Alan Keyes, assis-
tant secretary of state for interna-
tional organizations; Nathan
Perlmutter, national director of
the Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith; and Edgar Bronf-
man, president of the World
Jewish Congress.
Germany
Investigating
Reparations
BONN, West Germany (JTA) -
The Bundestag has asked the
Bonn government for detailed in-
formation about groups or in-
dividuals who have received
reparations for their losses and
suffering under the Nazi regime.
The government wants to know
exactly how much was paid and
whether any group of persecution
victims has been excluded in ad-
vance from receiving reparations.
Since the end of World War II,
West Germany has paid more
than 100 billion marks in repara-
tions to Israel and several Euro-
pean countries for material losses.
Broward County's Newest Treatment Center
FOOD ADDICTION
BULIMIA. COMPULSIVE OVEREATING
For the first time, an OUTPATIENT treatment facility modeled from
the nationally recognized Naples Research and Counseling Center's
inpatient program.
Outpatient Program Services offered:
Two Phase Program of Recovery
Growth Groups
Body Awareness/ Body Acceptance Groups
Adult Children of Addicts
Intervention and Consultation Services
Private, Confidential and Individual/
Group Treatment
Twelve Step Program of Recovery
NRCG
OUTPATIENT SERVICES
^ i
OF BROWARD
(305) 791-6001
CaH tor a complimentary cob* ol our newest publication,
to Food Addiction'
Call (of complete conhdeniiaficMofmation on our outpatient treatment
NRCC OUTPATIEIfT SERVICES OF BROWARD
150 NW 70tti AvenuWSuMe 10 Plantation, Florida 33917
A Mm.-Guide
Napin I
E An AWilnM et
cn CounMiine Center. Naptn FKmde 33?
Joann Wineglass, Miriam
Wineglass, and Marian Wrubel.
The Membership Campaign
known as "Friends of Jewish
Family Service" hopes to raise at
least $30,000. The funds will be
used to augment the 1986-87
budget which is being threatened
by budget cutbacks of the tradi-
tional funding sources. The
"Friends of Jewish Family Ser-
vice" support the existing pro-
grams and hope to expand with
new and vitally needed services.
"... If any little care of mine
May make a friend's the fleeter,
If any little lift of mine may ease
The burden of another,
G-d give me love and care and
strength
To help my failing brother."
(author unknown)
For further information about
"Friends of Jewish Family Ser-
vice" or any of our programs,
please call our office in
Hollywood, 966-0956, in Fort
Lauderdale, 759-1505, and in
Deerfield Beach, 427-8508.
Jewish Family Service of
Broward County is affiliated with
Jewish Federation of South
Broward, Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale, and the
United Way of Broward County.
JFS Serves Broward County's Needs
Continued from Page 1
and professional training and education.
Our professional staff is comprised of graduate MSWs, licensed and accredited
clinical social workers and psychologists. Additionally, Jewish Family Service is a train-
ing facility for graduate students from Barry University, Florida International Universi-
ty, St. Thomas University, and the University of Miami. We offer training programs and
skill workshops to other professionals in the community.
Jewish Family Service provides the following services:
COUNSELING Our core service provided to individuals, families and groups of all
ages seeking help with personal and family problems, such as: parent and child relation-
ships, interpersonal relationships, depression, marital relationships, divorce, remarriage,
grief and bereavement. We offer a wide range of counseling services to the elderly in-
cluding: help in coping with life cycle changes, illness, marital relationships, parent and
adult child relationships, and retirement.
FAMILY LIFE EDUCATION A preventative and educational outreach program
which provides support and enhancement of healthy family and individual functioning.
Programs are offered to a variety of social, religious, business and educational organiza-
tions in the community.
CHAI.. COMPREHENSIVE HELP FOR ADULT INDIVIDUALS Provides
services for elderly individuals whose families are geographically unable to give them the
assistance they need and deserve. Requested by the family, we assess and evaluate the
needs of the elderly individual. The necessary services are obtained by the agency and
closely monitored, thus insuring that proper care is being received.
RESPITE CARE Provides temporary relief for the primary caregiver of a home-
bound individual. Trained aides are able to assume the short-term care of the homebound
individual freeing the caregiver to attend to his/her personal needs.
FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Financial counseling and assistance is offered on a
short-term emergency basis to individuals or families in financial stress. It is hoped that
this temporary assistance will enable the family to function independently within a short
period of time.
ADOPTION AND FOSTER CARE We are a licensed child placement agency of-
fering both foster care and adoption, as well as homestudies for foreign adoptions.
DEFORMATION AND REFERRAL The sharing of information regarding
where and how to get help for those programs not offeredT)y the agency. We are con-
stantly updating our resources so that we can be of further assistance. Included is our ex-
tensive knowledge of living facilities for the elderly. We attempt to explore the nature of
the request as fully as possible to make sure the appropriate resource is recommended.
MEDICARE INFORMATION SERVICE Trained volunteers are available to
answer questions and concerns about Medicare, HMOs and related areas.
RESETTLEMENT Readjustment of new American families coming to Broward
County who are referred by HIAS. We offer assistance with housing and employment,
medical care, financial aid and acculturation.
In the past year over 9,000 people were served by the agency. Broward County is the
home of the eighth largest Jewish community in the United States and Jewish Family
Service stands ready to provide high quality comprehensive help to this growing com-
munity. We maintain offices in Fort Lauderdale, Hollywood and Deerfield Beach.
Jewish Family Service is funded in part by the Jewish Federation of Fort Lauder-
dale, the Jewish Federation of South Broward, and the United Way of Broward County.
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October 15 to October 29,1986 (Right .ftwYomKippuD
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Friday, August 15, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 13
Forty Years Later
Continued from Page 4-
especially Eastern Europe. It was
no accident of planning that the
major killing centers were located
in Poland, which had a history of
anti-Semitism. After alljt wasn't
the cultural center of Europe like
Germany and Austria. But, then,
these countries got in their share
of murders, too.
How neatly the mass graves are
kept. How remarkably beautiful
are the living flowers placed to
commemorate the dead. How
orderly and structured is the en-
tire camp, in fact. Today. And
yesterday. Ah, yes, of course. It is
the Aryan efficiency. I walk quick-
ly from that pathway and return
to the administration building and
the 20-minute film at 11 a.m.
about Dachau. It is to be shown in
English. How convenient.
On the way, I begin to stare
once again at the visitors. So
many of them. And so many dif-
ferent languages being spoken.
What is curious, too, is the
preponderance of young people.
Why? What could they care about
this tragedy which took place 40
years ago? To them, it must be an-
cient history.
But they do seem to care, and
that is one redemptive quality I
sense about my fellow observers.
Perhaps dawn does follow night.
Perhaps man can learn from his
uncivilized past. And yet, on the
one hand, events since 1945 in
Biafra, Uganda, Cambodia, South
Africa and actions against the
Baha'is in Iran and the Miskito In-
dians of Nicaragua can lead one to
despair. For, as Elie Wiesel so
poignantly phrased: "Despair
leads only to despair." On the
other hand, just reading about
these mass murders and seeing on
television that people from other
countries are outraged and have
demonstrated against these
atrocities, this, in itself, must lead
one from despair to hope. And this
is our salvation.
One must see the goodness in
man or else one would only want
to kill him for his innate madness
his inhumanity, his cruelty.
Voices are raised today.
Vociferous actions objecting to
uncivilized behavior are taking
place. There is hope. There is
noise. Beautiful noise. Silence is
no longer acceptable to our young
and future leaders. Today. Forty
years later. Forty years too late
for our Family.
A few days later in Hamburg, I
stopped a young woman to ask her
to translate the wording on a war
memorial. She looked at it a mo-
ment and responded by telling me
it was a tribute to the local Ger-
man dead of World War 1.1 asked
her if there were memorials to the
dead of the Second War. Her ten-
tative, almost embarassed reply:
"We do not have memorials for
anything to do with the Third
Reich. We are ashamed of this
period." Ah. I am beginning to
feel vindicated about my decision
to travel to Germany. Maybe I
was right in coming in trying to
LOroward
Qaper a
Qackaging
0ROWARD
fdAPER *
(Packaging
erase somewhat the images of an
evil place and time.
The agony over the trip to Ger-
many, the cost in mental anguish,
seems to be worth it, thanks, in
part, not only to this young per-
son, but also to the many young
people I witnessed visiting
Dachau and other similar sites;
and those snippets of conversation
I overheard and could translate,
convinced me that perhaps man
has changed for the better. That
he no longer can or will remain
silent in the face of bureaucratic
and banal cruelty to others,
whoever they might be. Young
people are analyzing world
events; they are asking important
questions. And, when they see
obscenities being forced upon in-
nocent victims, they are taking ac-
tion. Ah, noise. Wonderful.
Of course, one still reads about
attempts at genocide. But, one
also reads about the increased
demonstrations taking place in
order to call attention to these
destructive and murderous acts.
It is the young people who take
the initiative, while too many of us
older onps still watch in silence, as
we did so many years before, so
long ago.
Ah, as I ruminate upon these
thoughts, night wanes and day
brightens.
A visit to Anne Frank's hiding
place turns out to be an emotional
experience, as well, thanks to the
slide presentation (in Dutch) and
its illustrations and descriptions.
Especially notable are cutouts of
movie stars on her walls just as
any young teen might enjoy doing.
This attempt at normalcy in the
midst of the maelstrom is almost
incomprehensible. (I become a bit
"unsettled" just by visiting
Dachau in 1985.) That a 15-year-
old whose writing could touch so
many people throughout the
world is a ray of light upon man.
What a waste of potential literary
talent. What a tragic loss to all of
us. And let us never forget about
the loss of the other six million.
Each a tale. Each with the poten-
tial to contribute something
positive to mankind. Who can
estimate what loss occurred to
each of us by their deaths? Scien-
tists to cure diseases. Writers. Ar-
tists. Mothers. Fathers. Children.
We lost one million Jewish
children killed in the flames of
night. Children who, in time,
beget children. How many future,
yet never-to-be-born Anne Franks
were there in those flaming pits,
in those ashes? Jews were leaders
in so many fields of medicine, and
so many died. So many. So much
to offer all men. So much wasted
talent. Died? No. Murdered.
And yet, she held out hope for
the goodness of man to prevail.
She, too, saw the dawn breaking
and the sun beating back the
"kingdom of night." If she, as a
teenager, could sense this, can I
do any less? Can the reader not
believe in this hope, as well? We
have this obligation.
Today, our people and nation
are constructing the U.S.
Holocaust Memorial Museum in
Washington, D.C. to remind
future generations about the cost
of silence. Let each, in his own
way, take an active roll in calling
attention to the purveyors of
night and to the victims they war
against. For, we must believe that
evil, too, can be silenced, even as
the unbelieving and naive were
silenced 40 years ago. Therefore,
let us recite the Kaddish and
chant the Ani Maamin. We must
remember the past; we can make
amends. Forty years later.
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SHOULDN'T YOUR WATER
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DANISH
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where shopping is o pleasure 7 days a week
Summertime Party Special!
Available at Publix Stores with Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
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50 Puff Pastry Hors d'Oeuvres
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$-1095
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and Danish Bakeries.
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With the Purchaaa of a 3-Tiar or
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FREE!
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Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
For the Health Conscious
100o/o Whole
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Joaff %J
Available at all Publix Stores
and Danish Bakeries.
Strawberry Cheese
Coffee Cake
$179
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Available at Publix Stores with
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A Delicious New Item
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Prices Effective in Dade, Broward, Palm Beach, Martin, St. Lucie and Indian
River Counties ONLY. Thursday, August 14 thru Wednesday, August 20, 1986.
Quantity Rights Reserved.


Page 14 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, August 15,1986
Rabbi Ballon of Emanu-El Goes
on Unique Retreat to Ireland
A Diversified Jewish Quiz

Rabbi Jeffrey L. Ballon of Tem-
ple Emanu-El of Greater Fort
Lauderdale, has just returned
from Dublin, Ireland where he
took part in an international inter-
faith retreat with the Mastery
Foundation. The five day
workshop was designed for people
who minister whatever their
religious tradition. Rather than
dealing with the theological
perspectives, traditional dif-
ferences, or areas of ministry, it
focuses the participants on a com-
mon task: empowering
themselves as leaders of people of
God. "Making A Difference: A
Course For Those Who Minister"
offers the possibility of shifting
the work of ministry from a realm
in which it is constantly
dissipating to a realm in which
ministry not only increases in ef-
fectiveness, but makes a greater
difference in the lives of those it
touches.
Rabbi Ballon, when asked why
he went to such extent and
distance to attend this workshop
indicated two reasons. First he in-
dicates the theme of his intent and
his workshop would enable him to
ask and answer the question
How can any work in the rab-
binate make a real and lasting dif-
ference in a way that frees and
empowers me to produce results
never thought possible before. His
second major intention was to in-
vigorate a sense of spirituality
about the way Rabbis and con-
gregants shoulder the respon-
sibility of faith. Rabbi Ballon
observed that frequently those
who minister say they find
themselves standing in the way of
their own effectiveness or
operating within a vicious circle
between the undeniable ex-
perience of the power of their
religious beliefs, teachings and
traditions and the circumstances
of their ministries. By going to the
Dublin Workshop, Rabbi Ballon
learned some tools which provided
the means and freedom to move
outside that circle and generate
new and creative possibilities for
ministry that were not present
before.
Community Calendar
Compiled by Lori Ginsberg,
Federation 748-8400.
SATURDAY AUGUST 16
Temple Beth Torah-Men'n Club:
8:80 p.m. "Your Kind of Show."
Donation $6, $4. At Temple.
721-7660.
Suniae Jewish Center-Menu
Club: 8:30 p.m. Show featuring
Ruth McMahon, Renato Renzi,
and Marty Bell. Donation $6, $4.
At Temple. 741-0295.
Lauderdale Oaks: 8 p.m. Cabaret
night featuring Gino Sorgi Trio.
Clubhouse, 3060 NW 47 Terr.
733-9338.
SUNDAY AUGUST 17
Hsdauah-Henl Bermuda Club
Chapter: National Convention
through Aug. 20. Fontainebleu
Hilton Hotel.
TUESDAY AUGUST 19
Hadassah-L'Chayim Plantation
Chapter: Luncheon and card par-
ty. Deicke Aud., 5701 Cypress Rd.
473-2698.
WEDNESDAY AUGUST 20
Sunrise Jewish Center-
Sisterhood: Noon. Meeting.
Shalom Dancers of Margate will
entertain. At Temple.
THURSDAY AUGUST 21
Jewish Family Service: 7:30 p.m.
Board Meeting. Hollywood.
BUST: 7:30 p.m. Meeting. New
Covenant Church, Pompano
Beach. 565-9953.
Hadassah-Ilana Chapter: 12:30
p.m. Meeting. Laud. Lakes City
Hall.
SATURDAY AUGUST 23
Onega: 8:30 p.m. Show featuring
Vivian Lloyd and Paul Lombard.
Donation $4. Clubhouse, 7200 NW
17 St 791-4268.
SUNDAY AUGUST 24
Temple Emanu-El: 4 p.m. Open
house for new members.
MONDAY AUGUST 25
WLI-Tamarac Chapter: Lun-
cheon and card party. $8.50.
Italian-American Club, 6535 W.
Commercial Blvd. 722-7039.
1986-87 Jewish Book Review Series
Planning is under way for the
1986-87 schedule for the Treasury
of Jewish Books Series sponsored
by Broward County Libraries,
The Pompano Beach City Library,
and the North Broward Midrasha
of the Central Agency for Jewish
Education of the Jewish Federa-
tion of Greater Fort Lauderdale.
In cooperation with the librarians
of the various libraries and coor-
dinated by Harriet Buchbinder of
the West Regional Library, Dr.
Abraham J. Gittelson, Director of
Temple News
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
Rabbi Stanley Davis, chairman
of the National Rabbinic Cabinet,
State of Israel Bonds and newly
elected spiritual leader of the
UArfC congregation Central
Synagogue of New York City, has
announced that Rabbi Jeffrey
Ballon, spiritual leader of Temple
Emanu-El, has been asked to
serve as a National Vice Chairman
for the development corporation
for Israel. A select number of rab-
bis from across the United States
are asked to become actively in-
volved on a national basis for the
campaign.
HADASSAH
cordially invites you to be part of its
72nd National Convention
Join
AMBASSADOR
BENJAMIN
NETANYAHU
Israel's Permanent
Representative
to the United Nations
as he "MEETS THE PRESS" in a
free question-and-answer session with
SANDER VANOCUR
ABC News Senior Washington Correspondent
WOLF BLITZER
Washington Bureau Chief, The Jerusalem Post
MICHAEL PUTNEY
Commentator, WTVJ Miami
8:30 RM. TUESDAY AUGUST 19, 1966
GRAND BALLROOM
FONTAINEBLEAU HILTON HOTEL MIAMI BEACH
iple of South Flond.i t>v
HADASSAH the Women s Zionist Organization o( Amend Inc
Education and Helen Weisberg,
Administrator of the North
Broward Midrasha, plans are pro-
gressing nicely.
The books chosen for review for
the coming season will be:
November "A Certain People"
by Charles Silberman, December
"World's Fair" by Doctorow,
January "The Siege" by Con-
ner Cruise O'Brien, February
"My Father His Daughter" by
Yael Dayan, March "From
Time In Memorial" by Joan
Peters, April "The Book of
Abraham" by Marek Halter. The
reviewers will be qualified com-
munity leaders, rabbis, and
educators. The names of the book
reviewers will be announced at a
later date. For further informa-
tion call the Central Agency for
Jewish Education, 748-8400.
r-"N
Candlelighting Times
Aug. 15 7:38 p.m.
Aug. 22 7:32 p.m.
Aug. 29 7:25 p.m.
Sept. 5 7:16 p.m.
BcMdktion upon Kindling the
Sabbath Lights
BORUCH ATTO AD-ONAI ELO-
HEINU MELECH HO-OLOM
ASHER KID-SHONU BEMITZ
VOSOV VETH-VONU LE-H AD
LIK NEYR SHEL SHABOS.
Blessed art Thou, 0 Lord our G-d,
King of the universe who hast
sanctified us by Thy command-
ments and commanded us to kin-
dle the Sabbath light.
By RABBI
DAVID W. GORDON
1- What does it mean to have a
"Jewish Heart"?
2- Into how many Sidrot (Por-
tions of the Week) are the Torah
divided?
3- What do we call the combina-
tion of Mishna (Oral Law) and its
Commentary the Gemara
(completion)?
4- Who was the most noted false
Messiah?
6- Name the President who ap-
pointed the first Jew (Louis Dem-
bitz Brandeis) to the Supreme
Court.
6- Which modern Jewish
Philosopher brought about a
revival of interest in Chassidism
among non-Jews?
7- Name the only woman who is
mentioned in the Talmud as saint-
ly and scholarly.
8- What is the minor Festival
which occurs every month with
the exception of one?
9- Enumerate the "Great
Triumvirate" of modern Hebrew
Poetry.
10- Define "Oneg Shabbat."
Answers
1- To be imbued with
"Rachamanut" an extra measure
of compassion and mercy for one's
fellow man. One who is callous of
heart cannot be a good Jew.
2- 54 sections of Weekly sequen-
tial readings in the Synagogue.
3- The Talmud (study) an ab-
breviation of Talmud Torah.
4- Shabbetai Zevi of Smyrna,
Turkey in the 17th Century.
5- Woodrow Wilson in 1916.
6- Martin Buber.
7- Beruria, the wife of Rabbi
Meir in the 2nd Century.
8- Rosh Chodesh (the beginning
of the Hebrew month).
9- Chaim Nachman Bialik; Saul
Tchernichovsky and Zalman
Schneour.
10- "Pleasure of the Sabbath"
alludes to a social gathering
highlighting the Sabbath through
discussion, song and repast.
Synagogue Directory
CONSERVATIVE
CONSERVATIVE SYNAGOGUE OF COCONUT CKEEK, meeta Broward
Federal Saving!, Lyons Road and Coconut Creak Parkway. Coconut Creek. Ser-
vice!: Friday at 8 p.m. and Saturday at 9 a.m. Castor Sydney GeUsabe.
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER (721-7660). 9101 NW 57th St, Tamarac, 38821.
Services: Sunday through Friday 8:30 am., 5 p.m. Late Friday service 8 p.m. Satur-
day 8:46 a. m. RabM tart P. Staae. Caster P. HUM Ihsir.
TEMPLE BETH AHM (481-6100). 9780 Stirling Road, Hollywood, 38024. Services
daily 8 a.m.; Sabbath 8 p.m., Sabbath morning 8:46 a.m. Rabbi Avraham Kapnek.
Cantor Stuart Kanas.
TEMPLE BETH AM (974-8660), 7206 Royal Palm Blvd., Margate, 33063. Services:
Monday through Friday 8:30 a.m., 5 p.m. Friday late service 8 p.m.; Saturday 9 a.m.,
6 p.m.; Sunday 8 a-m., 6 p.m. RaaM Paal Pletkia. Rabbi EsMritas. Dr. Ssloisa
Gel*. Canter Irviag Greasaaaa.
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL (742-4040), 7100 W. Oakland Park Blvd., Sunrise. 88818.
Services: Sunday through Thursday 8 am., 6:80 p.m.; Friday 8 am., 6 p.m., 8 p.m.,
Saturday 8:46 am., 7:46 p.m. RaaM Howard A. Adehsoa. Caator Maarice A. Nee.
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL OP DEERFIELD BEACH (421-7060), 200 S. Century
Blvd., Deerfleld Beach, 88441. Services: Sunday through Friday 8:30 am, 6 p.m.
Friday late service 8 p.m.; Saturday 8:46 a.m., and at candlelighting time. RaaM
Cantor Saabtsl Aekenaaa.
TEMPLE B'NAI MOSHE (942-5380), 1484 SE 3rd St.. Pompano Beach, 33060.
Servieea: Friday 8 p.m. Caater Jeeedaa Heilbraaa.
TEMPLE 8HAARAY TZEDEK 741-0296), 4099 Pine Island Rd., Sunrise, 38821.
Services: Sunday through Friday 8 a.m., 6 p.m.; Late Friday service 8 p.m.; Satur-
day 8:46 a.m., 6 p.m. Castor Jack Marcaaat.
TEMPLE SHOLOM (9424410), 182 SE 11 Ave., Pompano Beach, 38060. Services:
Monday through Friday 8:46 a.m., evenings: Monday through Thursday at 6 p.m.,
Friday evening at 8. Saturday and Sunday 9 a.m. Rabbi Same! April. Caater
ReaaMGraaer.
CONGREGATION BETH HILLEL OP MARGATE (974-3090), 7640 Margate
Blvd., Margate, 38063. Services: Sunday through Friday 8:16 a.m., 6:30 p.m. Late
Friday service 8 p.m. Saturday 8:46 a.m., 6:80 p.m. RabM Nathaa Zsteadek. Caa-
ter Jeel Cohen.
HEBREW CONGREGATION OF LAUDERHILL (788-9660), 2048 NW 49th Ave.,
Lsuderhill, 38813. Services: Sunday through Friday 8:30 a.m., 6:80 p.m.; Saturday
8:46 a.m. RabM Israel Helpers.
NORTH LAUDERDALE HEBREW CONGREGATION (722-7607 or 722-2722).
Services: at Banyon Lakes Condo Clubhouse, 6060 Bailey Rd., Tamarac, Friday at 6
p.m., Saturday 8:46 a.m. Charles B. Pyier, Presideat.
ORTHODOX
TEMPLE OHEL B'NAI RAPHAEL (738-7684), 4361 W. Oakland Park Blvd..
Lauderdale Lakes, 33313. Services: Sunday through Thursday 8 am., 5 p.m., Friday
8 a.m., 6 p.m., Saturday 8:46 a.m., 6 p.m. Cantor Pan! Stuart.
SYNAGOGUE OF INVERRARY CHABAD (748-1777), 4661 N. University Dr.,
Lsuderhill. Services: Sunday through Friday 6:46 a.m, 8 a.m., 5:15 p.m., Saturday 9
a.m., 5:30 p.m. Stady groups: Men, Sundays following ssrviees; Woatea,
Tuesday! 8 p.m. RabM Aron Lieberaua.
YOUNG ISRAEL OF DEERFIELD BEACH (421-1367), 1880 W. Hillsboro Blvd.,
Deerfield Beach, 33441. Services: Sunday through Friday 8 a'.m. and sundown.
Saturday 8:46 a.m. and sundown.
YOUNG I8RAEL OF HOLLYWOOD-FORT LAUDERDALE (966-7877), 3291
Stirling Rd.. Fort Lauderdale, 33812. Servieea: Monday through Friday 7:30 a.m.,
and sundown; Saturday, 9 a.m., sundown; Sunday 8 a.m.. sundown. Rabbi Edward
Davis.
CONGREGATION MIDGAL DAVID 7264688), 8676 W. McNab Rd., Tamarac.
33821. Services: Daily 8a.m., mincha 5 p.m.; Saturday 8:45 a.m. and 5:16 p.m. Rab-
bi Chain Schneider. Coagregatioa presideat: Herman Fleischer.
RECONSTRUCTIONS
RAMAT SHALOM (472-8600), 11301 W. Broward Blvd., Plantation, 33326. Ssr-
viees: Friday, 8:16 p.m.; Saturday. 10 a.m. RabM EUiet Skidddl. Caater Bella
Milia.
REFORM
TEMPLE BETH ORR (763-3282), 2161 Riverside Dr.. Coral Springs, 38066. Ser-
vices: Friday 8 p.m.; Saturday 10 a.m. RabM Mark W. Grass.
TEMPLE B'NAI SHALOM OP DEERFIELD BEACH (426-2682). Ssrviees at
Maaorah Chapels, 2906 W. Hillsboro Blvd.. Deerfield Beach, 38441. Friday 8 p.m.
RaaM Nathaa B. Flak. Caater Merris Lntasaa,
TEMPLE EMANU-EL (781-2810). 8246 W. Oakland Park Blvd., Lauderdale Lakes,
33811. Services: Friday 8:16 p.m., Saturday, only on holiday! or celebration of Bar-
Bat Mitsvah RabM Jeffrey Bailee. Caater Rita Shan.
TEMPLE EOL AMI (472-1988), 8200 Peters Rd, Plantation, 88824
day 8:16 p.m., Saturday 10:30 a.m. RabM thlllll J. Harr.
Fri-
Fraak
LIBERAL JEWISH TEMPLE OP COCONUT CREEK (973-7494). Ssrviees: Fri-
day night ssrviees twice monthly st Calvary Presbyterian Church, 8960 Coconut
Creek Parkway. RaaM Brace 8. Warshal. Caater Barbara Roberts.
TEMPLE BAT YAM (561-6808), McGsw Hall, 1400 N. Federal Hwy. (adjacent to
Second Presbyterian Church), Ft Lauderdale, 88804. Service: Weekly on Friday
evenings at 8 p.m. Rahsl Lewis Ltttataa.
_


.^ffirO fj
Friday, August 15, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 16
Tisha B' AvFrom Tragedy to Redemption
Continued from Page 1
Tisha B'Av marks as well
the fall of the fortress of
Betar to the Romans in the
year 135 CE, effectively en-
ding the continued revolt of
the Judeans against Roman
domination. The day recalls,
as well, the events of the
following year, when the
Romans plowed over the
Temple Mount and erected
a Roman temple on that
site.
Nor was tragedy to cease
in the centuries that follow-
ed. Many of the prayers of
mourning said on Tisha
B'Av, the 'kinot,' refer to
the burning of twenty four
cart loads of the Talmud in
Paris in 1242, and to the
destruction of scores of
Jewish communities during
the Crusades. Tradition also
dates the expulsion of the
Jewish community of Spain
in 1492, after centuries of a
'Golden Age' of Jewish life
and culture in that country,
to the day of Tisha B'Av.
Traditional Jewish law
and custom concretize the
feelings of foreboding and
anguish that intensify dur-
ing the three week period
preceeding Tisha B'Av.
From the 17th day of the
Hebrew month of Tammuz,
to Tisha B'Av, the three
week period is marked by
the avoidance of joyous oc-
casions such as weddings,
and of those acts that would
require the 'she-he-chiyanu'
blessing over something
new and enjoyable.
The prophetic portions,
the haftorot, read in the
synagogue during those
three weeks, speak of the
moral degredation that-in-
filtrated the actions of the
people, and of the punish-
ment that would inevitably
follow. In the nine days im-
mediately preceeding Tisha
B'Av, it is customary to
avoid meat and wine. In-
deed the very last meal on
the afternoon of Tisha B'Av
is one of austerity and
deprivation.
On the eve of Tisha B'Av,
the curtain of the Ark is
removed, as if the very
countenance of God were
veiled and hidden, and the
universe empty of His
presence. The synagogue is
usually in semi-darkness, il-
luminated only by candles or
flashlights. The book of
Lamentations recounting
the destruction by the
Babylonians is chanted in
dirge-like fashion by the
worshippers seated on low
benches or on the floor
itself. The symbolism is that
of an individual mourner
grieving over the loss of a
loved one. In fasting and in
mourning, the tragedy of
the people, is relived as if it
were happening in contem-
porary times.
At the morning service,
the worshippers do not don
the tallit or tefillin, which
are considered as or-
naments of pride, beauty
and glory. The Book of
Lamentation is read once
again, and moving elegies
recounting the persecutions
and oppressions of the cen-
turies are recited. The
Torah portions that are read
are those dealing with
despair and exile.
As the day continues,
however, the elements of
hope and redemption begin
to emerge. The tallit and
tefillin are worn at the
afternoon service, prayers
of comfort are said, and as
the fast day concludes after
the evening service, the
prayer of sanctification of
the moon is recited. In
mystical Jewish thought,
the increasing fullness of
the moon as it reaches the
middle of each Hebrew
month, reflects the hope for
the coming of the Meshiach,
and the belief that all nature
and all humanity will be
restored to wholeness and
perfection. In many
synagogues the longing for
redemption is linked with
renewed ties with the land
of Israel through contribu-
tions to the Jewish National
Fund.
In essence then, Tisha
B'Av is the reenactment of
past tragedy as if each in-
dividual Jew had experienc-
ed its overwhelming impact.
The reenactment stimulates
each one to seek greater
spiritual and national
heights. Remembrance
becomes the secret of
redemption.
The days of tragedy sen-
sitize us to the historical
sacrifices of our people, to
the needs of those who still
suffer in our own day, and
to the necessity of individual
responsibility that leads to
communal redemption. The
crescendo of catastrophe is
transformed into a peaen of
faith, into deeds of loving
kindness, and into a seeking
of return and repentence as
the Days of Awe draw near.
JERUSALEM Minister of Commerce and Industry Ariel
Sharon announced that Israel will send a commercial attache to
Hong Kong within the coming year. Israel already has commer-
cial attaches in Japan and Singapore. Sharon's announcement in a
speech to the Israel-Asia Chamber of Commerce indicated a
growing interest in the Asian market. He said his ministry hopes
to increase Israel's exports to East Asia four-fold in the next 3-5
years. ____
JERUSALEM Premier Shimon Peres has appointed Anette
Dulzin his advisor on human rights, a voluntary position with an
honorarium of one Shekel a year. She is the wife of Leon Dulzin,
chairman of the World Zionist Organization and Jewish Agency
Executives.
Inverrary U J A
'87 Campaign
Continued from Page 1
and Betty Feldman
directing.
The International Village
cocktail party is set for Jan.
22, with Maurice and Honey
Axelrod hosting.
Also discussed were new
and recurring events.
A fresh edition of the
highly successful lecture
series is planned for
November and December.
Another SRO turnout is ex-
pected when details are
announced.
Underway, too, are plans
for a community-wide wine-
and-cheese party to emcom-
pass the 24 condominium
pssoeiations in Inverrary.
Also visualized is a special
breakfast to attract the
{rounger families in the new-
y developed Homes of In-
verrary area.
WITH RHYME
AND REASON
ON BEING
HUMBLE
Humility is heavenly,
A very special trait
To have and utilize while we
Are in the earthly state ..
When we cast down our spirits
and
Self-conceit deny,
It's like a ball thrown to the
ground
Rebounding toward the
sky. .
We find a way that's close to G-d
When we are not too proud,
And having learned humility,
With virtue we're
endowed.. .
By being low in our own eyes,
We take a track that's right
For deep inside our humble
hearts,
He will shed His light. .
All other ways lead us astray,
Ensnaring you and me.
One road alone leads us to G-d
And that's humility. .
Jack Gould
You've
Got What
It
T3K6S ^P.
(And You May Not Even Know It)
+ 1 +1 +
*

+1 +1 +
Help Those In Need...
And Help Yourself To A
Tax Deduction At The
Same Time.
The Douglas Gardens
Thrift Shops can use your
gifts of resaleable furniture,
appliances, and household
goods. Items YOU may no
longer need will buy life-
giving medicines and
medical supplies for the
indigent residents of the
Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged. For free
pick-up of your donations
simply call:
Dade: 751-3988
Broward: 981-8245
D
ouglas
Gardens
Thrift Shops
Two convenient locations:
5713 NW 27th Ave Miami
5829 Hallandale Beach Blvd.. Hallandale
A tftvistM ol the Miami Jowisa Homt and
Hospital tar Mm Aood at Douglas Gardans
You heard us right: Menorah wants you to shop and compare
pre-arrangement plans. Then come to Menorah last. With five
convenient locations, the finest options to custom-tailor your
plan, memorial gardens In Palm Beach and Broward. and
expert, counselors. Menorah is the plan more Jewish families
are choosing And our plans are available at the lowest prices
quoted by anyone. So go ahead shop "them" first. Then come
to Menorah where your last choice is your best choice.
Gardens and Funeral Chapels
North Miami Beach: 935-3939 Sunrise: 742-6000
Margate: 975-0011 Deerfield Beach: 427-4700
West Palm Beach: 627-2277
Omrtnlrs Kuiirr.il Chuprts Muusotrum Iff-Nrrd manning
>



Page 16 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, August 15,1986


'
ii



Full Text
Friday, August 15, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 5
In The Federation Spotlight...
TWENTY-THREE TAMARAC LEADERS
A distinguished group of men
and women from the communities
in Tamarac have been elected to
serve on the Jewish Federation
Board of Directors. The an-
nuoncement was made by Federa-
tion president Brian J. Sherr
following the recently held An-
nual Meeting at the Samuel and
Helene Soref Jewish Community
Center.
The members are:
Officers: Daniel Cantor, vice
president; Sidney Spewak,
treasurer; Gladys Daren, assis-
tant treasurer.
Board Members: Robert Adler,
Walter Bernstein, Abraham
David, Richard Entin, Jack
Farber, Morris Furman, David
Krantz, Leon Messing, Sigmund
Nathan, Harold Oshry, Sol
Schulman, Morris Small, David
Sommer, Marvin Stein and M.
Morris Wittenberg.
Life Members: Sen. Sam
Greenberg and Charles Locke.
Advisory Committee: Bernard
Libros.
Past Presidents: Leo Goodman
and Jean Shapiro.
Sherr indicated that these com-
munity members are the heart of
what makes the Federation work.
He said, "What has been done this
year and what remains to be ac-
complished could not be achieved
without the time and energies
they graciously give to our com-
munity. We at the Federation will
continue our creative efforts to in-
volve and encourage committed
Jewish leadership and look for-
ward to serve as a strong link in
the history of the North Broward
Jewish community."
Each of the board members
have totally committed
themselves to the work of the
Federation and Federa-
tion/United Jewish Appeal cam-
paign and have served in
chairmen, and prominent key divi-
sion leadership roles.
Latest on
Embassy
The State Department opposes
a provision of the Senate-passed
Embassy Security Act of 1986
which calls for construction of a
new American embassy in Israel
on a site within five miles of the
Knesset, excluding any location in
east Jerusalem. Robert Lamb,
director of State's Bureau of
Diplomatic Security, told
reporters last month "there is no
chance" the Reagan Administra-
tion will budget funds for a
Jerusalem embassy. Lamb said
that "we very much need a (new)
embassy in Tel Aviv. We're wor-
ried about the safety of the people
there."
He added that State is discuss-
ing the Israeli embassy provision
of the legislation with members of
Congress. The section, originally
sponsored by Sens. Jesse Helms
(R-N.C), Rudy Boschwitz (R-
Minn.), Paula Hawkins (R-Fla),
and Chic Hecht (R-Nev.), prohibits
the spending of any funds on con-
struction of a new embassy not in
west Jerusalem within the truce
lines as they existed before June,
1967. It does not require new con-
struction "if the Secretary of
State determines and reports to
the Congress that the physical
security of personnel to be
employed at that facility cannot
be adequately guaranteed."
State considers the present em-
bassy, located along the Tel Aviv
beachfront, close to other
buildings and among narrow, busy
streets, to be vulnerable to attack.
Lamb asserted that a new em-
bassy in Tel Aviv was necessary
for security reasons.
The Israeli embassy provision
adopted by the Senate is not part
of the House version of the em-
bassy security legislation.
liorrii Funnan
David KranU
LaonMeaaing
Sifmuod Nmtfau Harold Othry
Sol Schulman
Morria Small
David Sommer
Marvin Stain
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.'


Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, August 15, 1986
We Must Never Forget The Bravery of Our Fellow Jews ...'
Forty Years Later: Into The Kingdom Of Night
By HERBERT SAFRAN
Editor'8 Note: Herbert Safran
is a retired high school English
department chairman and is the
former editor of The Humanities
Journal. He resides with his wife,
Lillian, in Alexandria, Virginia.
I am not certain when I sensed
the urgency to travel to Germany
to see the infamous Dachau. Yet,
at some point in my life, both as a
Jew and as a human being, I need-
ed to tread on that hallowed
ground where so many of our
Family were put to death during
that horrible night of the
Holocaust. I had to see the bar-
racks, the roll call area, the elec-
trified fence. Inexplicably, I felt
the need to walk inside a death
chamber. I even knew I had to
hold in my hands the earth atop
the mass graves. But, first, I had
to transport my body, as well as
my mind, to that time 40 years
ago and 4,000 miles from
Washington, D.C., my present
home. Could I do this? I had to ask
myself this question before I could
accept the possibility of being
psychologically capable of travel-
ing to Germany, to the source of
the bureaucratic, systematic,
near-annihilation of our people.
Should I go? Why? What good
would it do to go there? Why must
I experience the trauma involved?
Neither reason nor cautious ad-
vice from some family and friends
would prevail. I was drawn inex-
orably to Dachau. And so, I travel-
ed into the past, into the
kingdom of night.
I flew to Munich the day after
Yom Kippur, curiously enough.
And on that day of arrival, ex-
hausted, as any traveler knows,
by the flight and jet lag, I took the
train and bus to Dachau to begin
my odyssey. I found that it isn't
necessary to think much, if one
doesn't care to, when visiting this
place only to feel. But, I came
to do both and found it necessary
to put my impressions into words.
It is sterile, this KZ Dachau. To-
day, in 1985. But, from March,
1933, when it was the very first
camp set up, it was on the grounds
of a former ammunition factory.
Jews, political opponents, clergy,
and other "undesirable elements"
were to be isolated here as
enemies of the Nazi regime.
Enlarged in 1938 from a planned
5,000 persons, it expanded to hold
over 200,000 registered prisoners
from 1933-45. This does not in-
clude the many sent there "tem-
porarily" who were not registered
and who were not heard from
again.
As I enter the only gate to the
camp, I envision the slogan,
Arbeit macht frei (work makes
one free) painted on its portal and
in all camps, but it is no longer evi-
dent here. Following the pathway
first to the left, then right, I
notice hundreds of yards of open
space ahead. According to the
diagram given me, this is the roll
call area. One sees an administra-
tion building on one side and a
barracks on the other. I don't
understand why, but I first want
to see the barracks on the far side.
It takes some minutes to get there
over the hard-packed earth and
stones. My shoes become dusty
while crossing the open expanse.
The day is cool, but I begin to
sweat just a little. I stop in front
of an open door to the barracks,
and hesitate before entering. Do I
dare enter? That's what I came
for, isn't it? To see this and
everything else around here, I re-
mind myself. What do I expect to
see? Others stand and wait behind
me. I didn't think there would be
so many people. Where was the in-
terest 40 years ago? Why, they
aren't even Jewish; in fact, most
are foreigners. What am I think-
ing? I'm a foreigner, too. Idiot. It
is only the tens of thousands of
dead who are indigenous. I enter
the barracks.
Visions of haunting eyes sunk
into skulls leap into my mind from
pictures I have seen. I blink a few
times as I enter. Nothing. Just
bunks. Bunks for hundreds of vic-
tims, upwards of 1,600 prisoners
to a single barracks built to hold
200, according to my printed
guide. How many were there to a
bunk? The pictures conjure up so
many. I hurry outside. Where
now? I look at the diagram in my
sweating hand. It shows the
Jewish memorial a quarter-mile
distant.
To get there, I have to pass
more open ground. But I feel so
closed in. How is that possible?
Once I entered the gate to this
place, I think I lost a bit of my
sanity. I begin to sweat even more
now. Wait. This isn't just open
ground on either side of a road-
way. There are rectangular, con-
crete foundations filled with
gravel.
And each foundation has a
number; yes, it must be a barracks
number. So many barracks, 30 or
more, it seems. So many victims
filled each one. So many tortured
souls. Each a story. Each a life.
Now dead. And forgotten by so
many. Died again.
Horrible visions of the ex-
perimental station in Block 5
come to mind stimulated by the
description in my printed guide.
This is where bio-chemical and ex-
posure experiments were practic-
ed on the defenseless inmates.
Nearby, the morgue was per-
manently crammed with corpses.
I hurry on to the Jewish memorial,
some 100 yards away.
At the iron gate of the
memorial, I mumble the Kaddish.
As I touch the Star of David, I
ask, why? Out loud, I do this. I
shake my head slowly side to side
and again ask the gate, why?
Since when can one expect an
answer from a gate? I cannot
believe my emotional state. I tell
you, I think this place has upset
me more than I thought possible.
I have become irrational in this
aseptic hellhole because of what I
have seen.
Significantly, silence answers
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Friday, August 15,1986 10 AB 5746
Volume 15 Number 25
my question just as it engulfed
everything 40 years ago. An indif-
ferent quietness now, like an indif-
ferent world them. It was a silent
world that watched, shrugged,
and hardened itself by not accep-
ting the tragic facts, not wanting
to realize what was, indeed, hap-
pening. My mind, seemingly func-
tioning without direction,
wanders to a scene at my uncle's
home sometime in 1942 ...
I recalled his telling me that the
correspondence between him and
our relatives in Berlin and Vienna
had suddenly ended. "No more
letters from them," he repeated,
every time I asked if he had heard
anything. Being young and naive,
I didn't think too much about it. It
didn't grasp the importance of
what was taking place then. In
fact, I am not certain I can com-
prehend fully the enormity of that
Nazi crime even now, 40 years
later. But I do recall my parents
and relatives saying again and
again: "Nothing like that could
happen not now in the 20th cen-
tury. It must be more of that
British propaganda like the
Belgian baby atrocity stories of
the First War. No, nothing like
the wholesale slaughter of Jewish
people could be taking place,
especially in such places as Vien-
na; it's the center of opera and
drama. Not in Germany, with its
philosophers and culture. After
all, the Jews had contributed so
much to these countries and to
their well being. Not even in
Poland; yes, there were pogroms
there, as in Russia, but with it be-
ing the center of Jewish culture
and three and half million of our
people, so many murders could
not be possible. After all, Jews are
integral members of society a
society which needs them, doesn't
it?" they asked plaintively. And
they used to look to one another
for support of their statements.
Each one in turn nodded agree-
ment. Each one believed this tale.
For who in his wildest nightmares
could have thought otherwise?
The victims knew. And some
like my uncle knew, but who
would listen? And those
Americans who did hear the cries,
how did they respond? Yes, the
Madison Square Garden rallies
were well-attended in 1943. But
who heard those voices? There
was a war to be fought and won.
Who heard the victims cry? They
were certain that if the free world
heard, the murders would stop.
Well, the world heard, and it re-
mained silent. But, then, the
reader knows this all too well. To-
day. Forty years later. Forty
years too late.
If being silent to the cries of the
victims in the camps were not
shameful enough, what did we do
to warn the still, untouched in-
nocents in Romania and Hungary?
This silence was the greatest com-
panion of the butchers. Even in
late 1943, when told of the
atrocities occurring at that
railroad siding in southwest
Poland, the Romanian Jews ex-
claimed naively: "The people here
need us. Besides, business is so
good, and we have-placed so many
orders for inventory and new fur-
niture. Why would anyone,
especially our neighbors and
business associates, want to harm
us? We can hear the Russian ar-
tillery getting closer. For us, the
war is practically over." How
prophetic.
Indeed, as late as the spring of
1944, the Hungarian Jews, as
well, had no inkling of Auschwitz
before they, themselves, were
herded onto cattle cars. Still, no
one was telling the victims. But
why were Jews victims then? Why
are we victims of terrorism even
today? (The murders of the
yachtsmen in Cyprus; the killing
on the Achille Lauro, etc.) Simply
because we are Jews. No more.
No Less. Ever the scapegoat for
anything and everything that goes
wrong in a society. This has been
the attitude for centuries. The
reader knows this. The reader
knows we are the Chosen people.
The Crusades. The pogroms.
Kristallnacht. The fateful con-
ference at Wannsee in January,
1942, where the "Jewish ques-
tion" was to be resolved once and
for all time by the building pro-
jects at Treblinka, Chelmno,
Ravensbruck, and hundreds of
other sites devoted solely to our
destruction. Yes, that is known.
That's our history. World History
101. But, is that reason enough to
despair? Here, dear reader, it is
reason to despair. The older
among us who scanned the New
York Times in 1943-44 saw the
details about the elimination of
the ghettos, the wholesale
transfer of Jews from their
homes. Where to? Only silence
was reflected in our silent in-
quiries once they were moved.
And what did we do even after
reading? Indeed, what? Yes, an in-
different and silent world then. If
the reader doubts these accounts,
he has only to look at the
microfilm in his local library and
read the accounts for himself.
I am shaken from my thoughts
about the past by a young man
who wishes to take a picture of the
memorial. I am blocking the Star
of David. Would I please move? I
apologize and shuffle away, look-
ing at the brochure in my hand,
and puzzling as to what it is. Ah,
yes, now I remember. This shows
my state of mind. I look at the
diagram again. It indicates that
the location of the gas chamber is
to the left of the memorial. I am
pulled there by the fascination of
seeing what I have read about for
40 years. Could it still be that hor-
rible so many years later?
It is easy to find. So many are
walking slowly toward it. The poe-
ple are of different nationalities,
mostly young, and probably have
a multiplicity of reasons for being
here. They are remarkably quiet
as they enter. A few whisper as
they point both to the ceiling and
the walls. I notice the odor, no, the
stench, which seems to pervade
my senses. All are silent now,
staring, not knowing what to say,
to do. They shrug, shake their
heads, and move along. Seems to
be a microcosm of the world 40
years ago, doesn't it? But, I am
different. I see things differently.
Now, I feel the urge to scream,
yell, curse, pull my hair, rip my
clothes. I feel like punching, scrat-
ching the walls, anything.
Anything, just to rebel against the
peaceful, quiet, almost serene at-
mosphere there. But, I, too, re-
main silent. Staring. I, too, am
impotent.
I don't know what it is I smell,
but it's disgusting. Is it real, or am
I imagining it? It can't be the
Syklon B gas in the air after so
long a time. Besides, I sigh, there
on the wall is a plaque which in-
dicates this gas chamber was
never used. Maybe I am wrong.
Ha! Maybe there is no odor. No
crematorium. No barracks. No
roll call area. No museum. No
electrified fence. No Dachau. And
yet, I hear the screams, the silent
screams in my head.
Maybe the Holocaust never did
happen, as some try to get us to
believe today. Let these naysayers
come to Dachau. To Terezin. To
Mauthausen. And let them speak
to our martyrs, to the ashes of our
sue million who burned in the
flames of that horrible night. Let
these revisionists tell the rem-
nants of our vanished Family and
our near-extinct Yiddish culture.
And then let them burn in hell for
their blasphemy.
It does stink in here.
Outside. At last I struggle to
get outside. Looking around to
get my bearings, I notice a path
along which no one seems to be
walking. I step slowly onto it and
proceed along its quiet tree-
shaded avenue. What is this? It's a
different world. I must be
hallucinating, for I see manicured
lawns and beautiful flowers set
atop what does that sign say?
Oye! It. It's a mass grave. The
sign in German and English (why
English?) indicates such a gory
tale, and it states plainly: "A ditch
of running blood." It elaborates
for the observer that this is the
spot where people were executed
by pistol shots to the back of the
head. Horror of horrors. It is, in
fact, an open chamber of horrors,
but I must look upon it. I see, I see
a cement wall which seems to be
replastered (why? from shots gone
astray or worse, or the passage of
time?). Could the murderers have
missed at such close range? It is
possible, but it makes no dif-
ference. Once taken to this spot,
the victims, the innocent, were
slaughtered. Thousands of them.
Here. And Bergen-Belsen. Lodz.
Riga. Babi Yar. In Greece and
Austria. Murdered by butchers.
All over civilized Europe. And
Continued on Page 13
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