The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 3, no. 7 (Apr. 5, 1974)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 9, 1976 called v.4, no. 27 but constitutes v.5, no. 1; issue for July 7, 1989 called v.18, no. 11 but constitutes v.18, no. 13.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44570954
lccn - sn 00229545
ocm44570954
System ID:
AA00014312:00323

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Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward


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SewishFlor idian o
OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE
Volume IB Number 21
Fort Lauderdale, Florida Friday, June 20, 1986
n*
Price 35 Cents
Federation Bestows Honors And Achievements Awards ...
Annual Meeting Report To The Community
A standing room only group of distinguished leaders from North
Broward County were assembled at the Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale's '86 Annual Meeting and Installation, held May 29 in the
burgundy and grey bedecked motiff room at the Soref Hall on the campus
of the Jewish Community Center in Plantation. Annual meeting
cochairpersons were Alvera A. Gold and Steven Lewin.
Following the invocation by Rabbi Samuel April of Temple Sholom
in Pompano Beach, president, North Broward Board of Rabbis, and
the singing of the National Anthen and Hatikvah by the Hebrew Day
School students. Federation president Brian J. Sherr, conducted the
meeting which was of special significance to the entire Jewish
community.
Sherr, who was installed for the second term as president, opened the
proceedings by telling the community leaders that "1985-86 was a great
success. We continued to move toward the goals that we want. The
Federation/UJA campaign has gone over $6 million and hopefully will
achieve even greater heights." In referring to our brethren in Israel, he
said, "The commitment we feel for the State of Israel is shown by our
budget, which this year shows a record 52 percent of the funds raised go-
Continued on Page 12
At the helm of the 1986-87 Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale Board
are officers, from left, executive vice president, Sheldon Polish; vice presidents
Samuel K. Miller, Steven Lewin, Mark Levy, Alan Levy; president Brian J.
Sherr; vice president Daniel Cantor; secretary Irving Libowsky; assistant
secretary Milton Edelstein; treasurer Sidney Spewak and assistant treasurer
Gladys Daren.
Alvera Gold On UJA
Nat'l Women's Board
Western
Union
Mai lg ram
\ll S POM ,
World News
GENEVA The dean of
the California-based Simon
Wiesenthal Center reported
that the United States has
said it will actively oppose
the appointment of Her-
mann Klenner of East Ger-
many to a top UN post
because of allegations that
he was a member of the
Nazi Party.
LA PAZ The president
of Bolivia, who met recently
with B'nai B'rith Interna-
tional Vice President Elias
Zviklich of Argentina, hail-
ed the Jewish service
organization for its support
of Latin American
democracies.
NEW YORK Twenty
years after America first
realized the extent of its
drug problem, Israel is
fighting a similar war
against an escalating
number of drug abusers.
There are an estimated
15,000 drug addicts in Israel
today, an accumulation of
about 10 years of drug use
there.
NEW YORK A $1
million fund to alleviate the
shortage of trained cantors
and to combat Jewish il-
literacy in congregational
worship was proposed at the
Cantors Assembly held
recently in Lake Kiamesha,
N.Y.
Alvera A. Gold
For the first time in the
history of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale, a local com-
munity leader has been
elected to serve on the Na-
tional Women's Division J
Board for the United JewHfP
Appeal.
On May 19 in New York,
Alvera A. Gold became the
first Fort Lauderdale leader
to hold such an honor. Also
installed with Alvera were
14 other women from across
the United States. Installing
the new members was
Judith Levy, National
Women's Division
chairperson.
The National Women's
Division Board of United
Jewish Appeal consists of
102 women from around the
country who have been
carefully selected through
Continued on Page 22-
^Solidarity For Tourism
To: Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale
On May 20, officers of the UJA, heard reports about lack of
participation in Israel travel in general and UJA Missions in
particular, veteran guide Mike Traub reported that lack of
tourism is not only economic disaster but morale of Israeli
public very low as result of old friends and family staying
away because of fear.
Israel is probably the safest country in the world. El Al is
without Joubt the safest airline in the world and UJA Israel
' only missions use only nonstop El Al flights.
In unanimous support of solidarity, UJA officers committed
to personally go to Israel within next six months. Each en-
courage others to travel with them. Special emphasis is being
placed on UJA September Missions programs and opening
celebration. But each and any journey to the Jewish state has
full UJA support and encouragement.
Your UJA community consultant will soon be contacting you
to arrange visits for UJA National Leadership.
Only by standing together can we reverse the tide.
MARTIN F. STEIN
1987 UJA National Chairman

Spotlight On Jewish Community Center Dedication ...
Samuel and Helene Soref Ceremony June 22
A special event will take
place at the JCC Sunday,
June 22, when the Jewish
Community Center of
Greater Fort Lauderdale will
be named the Samuel and
Helene Soref Jewish Com-
munity Center, Perlman
Campus.
The ceremony will honor
the couple whose generosity
and devotion have been large-
ly responsible for the growth
and progress of the Center
encompassing both its
physical facilities and its pro-
gram of development.
The day was especially
selected to coincide with JCC
Summer Camp's Get-
Acquainted Day according to
Phil Cofman, the Center's ex-
ecutive director.
"In addition to the many
good friends of the Sorefs and
the considerable number of
area residents who will come
to congratulate them, we
have also invited close to 500
summer day campers and
their parents to be present,"
says Cofman. "Camp begins
the next day and this Sunday,
the day before, has been
traditionally set aside for
campers to come and meet
their counselors and learn
their way around the campus.
We'll also be serving
refreshments," he adds.
The Sorefs agree that the
presence of children during
the ceremonies is most ap-
propriate symbolizing con-
tinuation, and a lifeline to the
future of the Center.
exceptional.
Number 1!
In fact, as
"In
says
my opinion,
Soref," JCC is tops providing
programs for its youthful par-
ticipants. And United Way
agrees," he continues. "They
praise JCC Summer Camp
sessions as outstanding and
Sam Soref says, "Without
the Jewish Community
Center we have no Jewish
community. With 29 different
governmental units within
Fort Lauderdale and with
this area experiencing the
greatest influx of Jews in any
community in the country, we
could be divided, splintered
and in disarray."
He believes that JCC, with
its vast selection of activities
for children as young as one,
with programs listed for
every age thereafter, pro-
motes unity for Jews of every
affiliation and a place for an
ingathering of individuals and
groups who find their
Jewishness a common base
upon which to build toward
the future of Judaism.
"Every Jew in our area
ought to be supportive of the
Mr. and Mrs. Soref
JCC for the benefit of a
united Jewish community and
for the support of Israel
our most important priority,"
Continued on Page 17


Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort LauderdaJe/Friday, June 20, 1986
CAMPAIGN '86 Federation/United Jewish Appeal
How Your Federation/UJA Gift Helps ...
Supporting Humanitarian and Social Services Programs
Editor's Note: Major UJA Cam-
paign leaders were recently brief-
ed on how funds raised are used to
aid key beneficiaries and agencies.
The following is a result of the
briefing.
PROJECT RENEWAL
Looking at the overall picture,
Project Renewal has been
remarkably successful. But
because of local factors in the U.S.
and Israel, results have varied:
At one end of the spectrum of
56 neighborhoods are 15 that will
be independent of private
overseas Jewish philanthropy by
December, '86 .. including 12 by
this spring. They have a job train-
ing counseling and placement
. .. early childhood, remedial and
adult education health ser-
vices new buildings and sup-
plies .. and child care, paren-
ting, counseling, sports and
cultural programs.
In mid-spectrum are 23
neighborhoods in which some ma-
jor needs have not yet been met,
but sufficient progress is being
made.
At the far end of the spectrum
are 18 neighborhoods with
substantial gaps between aid and
need. In some, the fund-raising
challenge has been simply too
much. In others, help has come,
but problems have been unex-
pectedly difficult. In still others,
help has been limited because the
twinned U.S. community has had
difficulties awakening its consti-
tuents to the importance of
giving.
Progress in all neighborhoods
has been hampered by the Israeli
economic crisis and austerity
measures to rebuild the national
economy, which have hurt every
Renewal neighborhood family and
heightened the financial challenge
to American Jews.
This is why UJA is determined
to expand its commitment to Pro-
ject Renewal fund raising beyond
the twinning process and is deter-
mined to raise $65 million to com-
plete the historic $225 million
campaign. A capital campaign has
been launched; the Chairman is
Jane Sherman of Detroit.-
UJA voted to encourage ma-
jor donors to aid neighborhoods
beyond those to which their home
community is twinned.
UJA will encourage those who
have contributed to Renewal to
give again, and those in com-
munities not twinned to aid a
Renewal neighborhood.
Major donors are being of-
fered the chance to have their
name placed on a facility they help
finance.
UJA will also increase the
number of speakers and consulta-
tions and offer more materials to
aid solicitors.
RURAL SETTLEMENT
Major economic crisis exists
in rural settlement sector.
60 moshavim have gone
bankrupt and owe $80 million to a
variety of institutions: banks, etc.
Jewish agency owes these
moshavim about $50 million.
150 moshavim are still on the
agency's rehabilitation plan. If the
thousands of families in these set-
tlements primarily of North
African and Asian origin lose
their farms, they will join the
already high unemployment
statistics.
Jewish Agency projects hav-
ing to allocate 50 percent of its
next settlement budget to loans to
these settlements to prevent them
from going under.
Four new settlements are to
be established in the Galilee and in
the Arava region of the Negev.
YOUTH ALIYAH
There are more than 20,000
youngsters served by Youth
Aliyah programs, including 2,000
Ethiopians.
More money for Youth Aliyah
would mean that:
more young people who find
it hard to break out of the poverty
cycle could be enrolled;
the vocational education pro-
gram's training equipment, now
quickly becoming obsolete, could
be replaced by new computer,
electronic and engineering equip-
ment that would give the pupils
access to high-tech careers, ensur-
ing an economic future for them
and the nation.
Steven Lewin To Chair 1987
Oceanside Division Campaign
Steven Lewin, managing direc-
tor of Oppenheimer and Co. Inc.,
has been named chairman of the
1987 Jewish Federation/United
Jewish Appeal campaign for the
Oceanside Division, according to
1987 UJA general campaign
chairman Sheldon Polish. Lewin
also serves as a vice president of
the Jewish Federation.
"In the past year, Steve has
shown outstanding leadership
qualities and has exhibited the
ability that is necessary to head
the campaign for the Oceanside
'Division," Polish stated.
Lewin, an active member of the
Fort Lauderdale Jewish communi-
ty, has served on the Oceanside
I.
Mission Schedule Update
President's Mission Option I Sept.
15-28; Option II Sept. 21-26
Chazak Community Leadership Mission
Sept. 21-Oct. 1 (pre-mission to Amster-
dam Sept. 14-17)
Business and Professional Women's
Mission Sept. 14-26 (Poland and Israel)
National Women's Division, Lion of
Judah Ruby Mission Oct. 29-Nov. 7
(Paris and Israel)
Young Leadership Am-Echad Mission
March 25-April 5, 1987; March 25-29
choice of: Amsterdam, London, Milan,
Paris, Stockholm, Zurich; March 29-April
5, Israel.
Summer Family Mission July 1987
(start planning now for your Bar/Bat Mitz-
vah arrangements in Israel)

8
Steven Lewin
Division Campaign Cabinet,
chaired the Oceanside Division
dinner-dance for 1986, served as
chairman for the newly-formed
Business Executive Network, a
highly successful program which
attracts the top business leaders
from throughout the county; and
received Federation's 1986 Young
Leadership Award at the Federa-
tion's annual meeting.
Lewin was also very instrumen-
tal in establishing Temple Bat
Yam in east Fort Lauderdale, and
serves as Temple president.
Lewin projects that the 1987
Oceanside/UJA campaign will
reach the $1.5 million mark, ex-
ceeding the '86 total.
Helping bring the desert to flower. Sharing in the miracle, cam-
paign leaders plant saplings in the desert near Kibbutz Samar.
more than 30 percent of the JDC
budget.
AMERICAN JEWISH
JOINT DISTRIBUTION
COMMITTEE
JDC provides life-saving and
life-sustaining programs and ser-
vices for Jews and Jewish com-
munities worldwide.
JDC operates in more than 30
nations around the globe, in-
cluding Israel, which receives
JDC's budget for 1986 is ap-
proximately $50 million.
Well over 90 percent of JDC's
income is derived from
UJA/Federation community
campaigns.
1986
CAMPAIGN PLEDGES
TO DATE
as of June 9, 1986
? v



- i hi 4
$6,020,000
$5,000,000
$4,000,000
$2,000,000
Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale
United Jewish Appeal Campaign
John Strong
General Campaign Chairman


mm*
mm
Friday, June 20, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 3
Greetings By The President Of Israel, Mr. Chaim Herzog, To The
Jewish Communities Abroad, On Independence Day 1986 5746
Friends, far and wide:
Anniversaries by their very
nature turn our thoughts back on
the journey traversed up to the
date to celebration. This is
perhaps particularly true of the
Jewish people, exposed through
the long centuries to the shifts of
history and commanded to see
itself in every generation as heir
to those who left Egypt for the
Holy Land. So, too, on its In-
dependence Day the State of
Israel remembers each year a
history which, though short, is
crowded with change and rich in
development, a history at times
tragic, often triumphant, always
aspiring. It is the saga of the com-
ing into being of a vibrant and
creative state, a many-sided na-
tional unit established by a Jewish
population of 600,000 souls in
1948 and now home to over three
and a half million.
The very name of Israel, we
remember was born in Jacob's
struggle, when it was ordained
that his name be changed to
Israel.
The year just past has indeed
been marked by struggle, in Israel
and throughout the Jewish world.
Anti-Semitism has made itself felt
in many a country. The Jews of
the Soviet Union, of Syria and
Ethiopia, still find themselves
behind barred doors. Jews in the
free nations face the overwhelm-
ing threat of assimilation and
engage in a complex and ardent
effort to strengthen and expand
Jewish education.
Over Israel, as over the whole of
the civilized world hangs the
threat of terrorism. It is one of the
positive achievements of the year
that the international community
is beginning to think in terms of a
unified and unintimidated effort
to stem terrorism. In this Israel
has demonstrated leadership in
confronting the problem.
I call on the Jewish people to af-
firm their resolve to combat our
enemies by coming to Israel this
year in a demonstration of unity
ft Briefly
(JTA/WZN Newi Photo)
The Israel Festival gets underway in Jerusalem as Mayor Hy
Kollek cuts the ribbon in the midst of a carnival atmosphere at the
opening ceremony held in the plaza of the recently expanded
Jerusalem Theater. In the black top hat is Oded Kotler, the direc-
tor of this year's festival.
WORKING DAY AND
NIGHT to help bring in
outstanding pledges for the
Federation/UJA campaign, is
Sunrise resident, Mort Cherry.
The former Rochester, New
York paper salesman who
resides at The Pines of Spring
Tree with his wife, Beverly, is
one of the unsung heroes that
helps make Federation/UJA
the philanthropic structure
that helps support local agen-
cies and beneficiaries.
"The
Brickman
Hotel...
a Catsklll
resort
that lets you
stop eating
long enough
to have
some fun..."
$395-$415
Per week, per person (dbl. occ.)
Every room with Private Bath,
Air Conditioning and Color TV.
For reservations and
information phone
TOLLFREE
1800-431-3854
Hotel Brickman
South Fallsburg. NY. 12779
Master Card. Visa, Amex
Overlooking a great
18 hole golf course.
Bfic
When you escape the Florida heat this
Summer, escape to something more
than non-stop overeating.
Escape to the Brickman.
\bu go on vacation to do more than live
from one rneal to the next That's why we're
on the Modified American Plan, serving two
sumptuous meals daily. Breakfast (until 1130
am), and Dinner (from 6:30 to 8:30 pm).
Midday snacks? Magnificent Pbolside
CcfleeShop.
There wil be no announcement at 1 pm
calling you back to the Dining Room which
you >jst left, no need to rush off gof course
or tennis courts. Linger at the pool all day if
you choose. We have one outdoor and
indoor (containing health dub and jet
whirlpool spa). Play duplicate bridge, take
art classes, go folk dancing, jog, or work out
in our High Tech Fitness Center. In short,
enjoy a full day of outdoor activities and
sunshine, and all the other fabulous things
we have to offer, including entertainment
that's second to none.
So come to the Brickman. Where the
meals are fun...not something that gets
in the way of fun!
^n-t fit the mold.
Your host for three generations.
The Posner Family
and commitment.
In Israel we will rededicate
ourselves to the stuggle against
intolerance and for the
strengthening of our democracy.
Together with our Government's
successful efforts to rehabilitate
the country's economy and its
constant search for peace in the
region, we must rededicate
ouraelve to the principles of
equality and tolerance for all
faiths and peoples enunciated in
Israel's Declaration of
Independence.
Towards the end of the year a
happy note was struck by the
liberation of Anatoly Scharansky
from his long inhuman imprison-
ment. The hope that he may be
followed by many other prisoners
of Zion, together with the hope for
peace and harmony in Israel, for
fruitful Jewish education in the
world, for closer links between
Jews every where and Israel, and
aliya to it with these hopes and
with faith in the Rock of Israel, we
face the 39th year of the State of
Israel.
Oceanside Office Remains Open
The Federation's satellite of-
fice located at 335C NE 34 St.,
on the Gait Ocean Mile, will re-
main open throughout the sum-
mer months. Office hours will be
Monday through Friday, 9 a.m.
4 p.m. The telephone number
is 543-6202.
BROWN'S.
THE 9 STAR
HOTEL
SHIRLEY BASSEY
Sat. July 5
RITA MORENO
Sat, July 19
SHECKY GREENE
Sat, July 26

SAMMY DAVIS, JR.
Sat., Aug. 2
JERRY LEWIS
Sat., Aug. 9
NELL CARTER
Sat.. Aug. 16
TONY ORLANDO
Sat. Aug. 23
WAYNE NEWTON
Sun. Aug. 31
9 great oars keep Brown's reputation as "the snow
place" intact And tharsjusi the start of your very entertaining
vacation Because Brown's gets great reviews in everything
we do
In sports. Because free golf and free tennis always rate
high. And we collect stars when it comes to food with our 3
gourmet meals daily and cocktail parties, too.
And this summer, there's a first at Brown's that deserves a
star Now. you can enjoy buffet lunch at the pool in your
swimsuR and suntan lotion. There's nothing to interrupt yen:'
goodOmesI
Can Brown's today and we'll send you a free color bri>
chure wh aH the reasons that make our 9-star hotel a heavenly
place to vacation
SUMMER MIDWEEK JULY h WEEKENO
OmaniM'SwJa mum tomttnu^n
IW^IM M UM-MM
rv Am Cona ft Ughly '^m 'MM gm nw omM occiftnc.
I.N.V. btn ~~- ~"mn 111 1111
K xfMnms c*u tai >t 1-JM-3-M0WNS
''
|
i
J


Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, June 20, 1986
Viewpoint
IV views expressed by columnists, reprinted editorials, and copy do not neceisan
ly reflect the opinion of the Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale.
One People, One Destiny
As the 1986 Federation/United Jewish Appeal campaign
draws to a close, we are already thinking and planning ahead to
1987. With Middle East turmoil taking on new dimensions, with
an Israeli budget strained to its limits, and with local funding see-
ing the results of Gramm-Rudman, demands on our Jewish
Federation continue to increase. The demands are not just
monetary in nature, however. Our success is based on responsible
leadership, and our future success requires the proper balance of
seasoned experience and fresh enthusiasm dedicated to the ever
growing needs of our Jewish community.
Jewish Federations have become a major influence in Jewish
life, locally, nationally and internationally. To understand what
we are talking about, we must understand the total cost of ser-
vices provided. "The Total Gross National Jewish Product is over
2 billion Dollars."
There are 1,300 Social Agencies, over one million people con-
tribute, over 700,000 people serve as volunteers and over
1,600,000 people receive services.
There is no other institution like it, in or out of Jewish life. To
understand why it was established, we must remember the Values
taught us in the Talmud. Importance of ethical conduct sanctity
of life dignity of man importance of justice social justice
and community. What counts in Jewish life is why Jews have
always been activists in just causes. To aid one's fellow man is not
an individual act, but a group responsibility.
The Federation is the only Jewish organization that has been
able to develop a program of service to the entire Jewish com-
munity to include social educational cultural health and
welfare community relations aged welfare relationship
with government on matters of health and welfare immigration
and human rights.
The Federation and the programs they sponsor express our sense
of Jewish identity through a program of Jewish action. There is no
possibility that moral, ethical, or spiritual values can be made to
survive from one generation to the next if the only preservatives
are words, monuments, rituals, and sacred texts. It is necessary
for living men and women to recreate the values for their own time
by living the faith, by caring, by doing.
Let's continue to help all our brethren in need for we are all one
people, one destiny! MLV
Europe Is Safer Than A Bathtub
Above the din of anti-Europe hysteria that has caused millions
of Americans to cancel their summer vacations overseas for fear
of being a terrorist target comes some comforting news.
The chance of being killed in a terrorist attack abroad is two in
one million, according to an article in the May 19 edition of The
New Republic.
People who have decided that this is the year to forego that
European vacation (the number of people changing their plans
could reach 80 percent) and see the United States from their car
should be reminded that 43,500 Americans were killed in car ac-
cidents last year.
Of the 23 Americans killed in terrorist incidents worldwide last
year, only 10 were traveling in Europe. There were no deaths in
Israel.
No form of travel is perfectly safe: 15 Americans died last year
while riding elevators.
And New Republic tells us that more people drowned in their
own bathtubs in 1985 than died in terrorist attacks.
"Glamorous, publicized risks loom large in the public mind;
mundane, everyday risks are ignored," the article says.
South Florida tourist interests can be grateful that despite the
sometimes gruesome acts committed in this area, they are mun-
dane enough that South Florida is likely to benefit from the
glamorous risks perceived to exist in other parts of the world.
jewishFloridian o
______________________ OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDAtE
FREOKSMOCMET MARVIN LE VINE SUZANNE SMOCMET
Editor and PuoMahar Director ol Communieationa Ecutive Edilo-
Published Weekly Mid September through Mid May 81 Weekly Dalanca ol year
Second Class Pottage Paid at Haliandale. Fla USPS 899420
POSTMASTER: Sand address changes to The Jewish Floridian.
P.O. Box 012973, Miami, Fla. 33101
Fo1LauderdaleMolly*oodOttice 8358 A Oakland Park Blvd. Fort Laoderdale. FL 3332t
Phone '48 8400
Plant l20NthSI Miami. Fla 33132 Phone 1 373 605
Member JTA. Seven Arta, WNS NEA AJPA and FPA
Jewish Floridian Dees Not Oueranlee Kaehruth ol Merchandise Adverllsed
SUBSCRIPTION RATES 2 Year Minimum $7 50 (Local Area $3 95 Annoall or by membership
Jewish Federation ot Greater Fort Lauderdale
Jewish Federation ot Greater Fort Lauderdale Brian J Sherr, President; Kenneth B Blerman, Exec
utive Director Marvin Le Vine. Director ot Communications, Lori Ginsberg. Assistant Director, Ruth
Geller Coordinator 8358 W Oakland Park Blvd.. Fort Lauderdale. FL 33321 Phone (305| 748-8400 Mail
lo- the Federation and The Jewish Floridian ot Greater Fort Lauderdale should be addressed Jewish
Federation ot Greater Fort Lauderdale. P.0 Box 26810, Tamarac. FL 33320*810
Ff9C SnOCrl#i
Missing
Weapons
An Egyptian magazine
reported that approximately
20,000 weapons disappeared from
the camps used by police con-
scripts following the recent police
riots and "Islamic extremist
groups may have obtained some of
them" (Rose Al-YusufM&y 2). The
publication noted tht authorities
have arrested dozens of Islamic
extremists, "including Sheik
Omar Abdal Rahman, who is a
Jihad Movement ideologist. He
has already been acquitted twice
in connection with the assassina-
tion of... Anwar Sadat."
Rahman reportedly issued afatwa
(judgment) permitting the killing
of Sadat.
A Middle East News Agency
report noted that "the public pro-
secutor in Aswan has decided to
imprison 56 people belonging to
the extremist Islamic group which
had attempted to storm the Al-
Nasser Mosque" on April 29. A
commentary in a Cairo publication
took note of increasing violence by
Islamic militants on university
campuses and urged an open
political discussion to "lessen the
possibilities of confrontation and
violence" (Al-Musawwar, April
25).
Saudi
Bank
Saudi Arabia banned the impor-
tation of Al-Ahram, a leading
Egyptian newspaper (Middle East
News Agency, May 3). The Egyp-
tian wire service said that accor-
ding to Al-Ahram, "this step by
Saudi Arabia was the first of its
kind, with the exception of the
short period in which all Egyptian
papers were banned from certain
Arab states, including Saudi
Arabia following the signing of
the Egyptian-Israeli peace
treaty."
Those Moderates
There are several misconceptions floating around in the wake
of the Senate and House votes on the Saudi arms sale. The first,
which apepared most prominently in Meg Greenfield's Newsweek
column of May 19, is that anti-Arab racism has infected U.S.
policymaking. She sees a "flight back to the generalized, hostile
attitudes toward Arabs and/or Moslems as a collectivity that
prevailed both as government policy and as public prejudice for so
many years."
It's hard to know what Greenfield is talking about. The Saudi
arms vote was not motivated by anti-Arab animus. If she would
read the Congressional Record's report on the debate in both the
Senate and the House, Greenfield would discover a Congress that
is concerned about Saudi Arabia's support for the PLO and other
terrorists and its subversion of the Middle East peace process
Members of Congress do not want to reward the Saudis for
ostracizing Egypt or for putting obstacles in the way of King Hus-
sein's pursuit of peace. That is hardly anti-Arab. On the contrary,
that concern is "pro-peace," which is good for Arabs, Israelis and
Americans. In fact, supporters of the Saudi sale join its opponents
in wishing that Riyadh would end its stonewalling of the peace
process. The difference comes over timing. Do we provide the
Saudis with more arms to encourage them to hop aboard the
peace train or do we hold off until after the Saudis change
directions?
The other major misconception is that in opposing arms to
Saudi Arabia, Congress is abandoning Arab moderates. Once
again one must question what an Arab moderate is. In State
Department parlance, a moderate Arab government is one that
has closer ties to Washington than to Moscow. (Ideally, it will
have no ties to Moscow.) Under this definition, Saudi Arabia is
moderate while Syria most certainly is not.
This formulation is incomplete, however, because it ignores an
Arab state's view of the Arab-Israeli conflict. It suggests that at-
titudes toward Israel are irrelevant as compared to attitudes
toward the East-West conflict.
However, it is an Arab state's attitude toward Israel, and
toward terrorism, that are the central factors when considering
whether an Arab state should receive U.S. arms. Saudi Arabia
clearly prefers Washington to Moscow but it simply gives no
evidence that it believes Israel has the right to exist or that ter-
rorism against Israel is wrong. It has repeatedly worked to
sabotage the peace process through diplomatic means and
through its backing of terrorist organizations.
That is why the United States should begin rethinking its defini-
tion of moderate to include a nation's policy toward Israel. And
that is also why friends of Israel must be concerned about armas
sales to any Arab nation which refuses to accept Israel's right to
exist. Saudi Arabia may be "moderate." But that is the right
answer to the wrong question. Ambassador Chester Bowles, the
great statesman and internationalist who died recently, said that
the Arab-Israeli conflict will only end "when the Arab nations
begin to realize that whatever they think of Israel, it is there to
stay." The real question then is whether the Saudis have come
around to that realization. The answer still appears to be no.
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Friday, June 20,1986
Volume 15
13 SIVAN 5746
Number 21


Friday, June 20, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 5
The Reward Of A Personalized Philanthropic Fund
Deeply hidden in most people's
psyche there's a secret desire. It's
not something most people talk
about, nor is it a desire most of us
ever realize. But there's little
question that almost everyone
would like to leave their mark on
history to be remembered for
having improved our community
and our world.
Now, there's a great way for
many people to accomplish that
difficult goal. Through the Foun-
how it works:
The donor makes an irrevocable
lifetime gift to the Federation of
money or appreciated property.
There is no minimum gift.
The donor and/or his or her
Profiles in Generosity: Jacob Brodzki
FOUNDATION OF JEWISH PHIL\NTHROPIES
8158 W OAKIANU I'ABK BLVD. I! IAUOIRDAU. Fl \M1\ HOT) 748-840(1
For Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale Board
Member Jacob Brodzki, communi-
ty service is a lifelong commit-
ment. Despite the demands of his
business, he has found time to par-
ticipate in many worthwhile
causes which benefit the com-
munity. He currently serves as
chairman of the Foundation of
Jewish Philanthropies.
Brodzki sees the Foundation as
a logical extension of charitable
giving above and beyond the
Federation's annual United
Jewish Appeal campaign. In this
interview, be discusses his views
on the importance of the Founda-
tion and the building of the Jewish
Community Trust Fund.
Q: Let '$ start with a basic point.
What is the difference between
Federation's annual campaign
and giving opportunities with the
Foundation of Jewish
Philanthropies ?
A: The difference is that the an-
nual campaign seeks to meet the
current needs of the Jewish com-
munity through its local agencies
and programs as well as for the
people of Israel and Jews
throughout the world. At the end
of the year there are no funds left
in reserve because we have
allocated all the money raised in
the annual campaign. On the
other hand, the Foundation acts
as a community reserve, pro-
viding necessary funds for
emergencies at home and abroad.
It represents, in some ways, the
long term stability of the Greater
Fort Lauderdale Jewish communi-
ty. In essence, the campaign is the
basic life-blood, providing for the
current needs of our beneficiary
agencies. The Foundation is here
for the unforaeen and to make
change and creativity possible.
Q: As someone who has been ac-
tive in our community for many
years, can you tell me why you see
the need for the Foundation f
A: Well again, it builds stability,
it provides us with the flexibility
to meet the ever increasing needs
of our community. It creates a
comfort zone which allows the
community to handle unexpected
reverses or emergency situations.
The Foundation can also help to
meet the extraordinary needs for
capital which weren't provided for
in annual budgets. Funding is also
available to provide seed money
for projects and programs which
Bonn Charges Neo-Nazis
BONN (JTA) Seven neo-Nazis have been charged
in Stuttgart with spreading violence, displaying illegal Nazi
symbols, circulating anti-Semitic propaganda and other
political offenses. The Stuttgart Prosecution office said
that the seventh and last member of the group was ar-
rested recently while entering West Germany.
THE OFFICE statement said the others were arrested
previously when they returned to West Germany from
various European countries where they had been trying to
avoid prosecution. Most of the offenses charged against
members of the group were committed last year.
haven't been tried before, and
which we feel there is a need for in
the community. In short, the
Foundation's reserves are the
funds that are put aside in ad-
vance, in anticipation of future
needs. These reserves are terribly
important to us.
Q: Do you feel that giving to the
Foundation is limited to the
wealthy members of our
community?
A: Absolutely not. Everyone in
the community can contribute in
some manner to help us build and
strengthen the future of our peo-
ple. After all, it is not just wealthy
people who have chidren and
grandchildren who will be grow-
ing up in our community. All of us
have an obligation to make this a
better place for our children and
grandchildren to live. That's part
of Jewish life and always has
been.
Q: You're an astute
businessman- Tell us what you see
as some of the business and tax ad-
vantages of giving to the Founda-
tion of Jewish Philanthropies.
A: Let's assume that an in-
dividual has an asset which has ap-
preciated in value. This asset
might take the form of real estate
or common stock. Were this per-
son to sell this asset today, a
capital gains tax would have to be
paid on the profit above the initial
cost. If our contributor would con-
sider gifting this asset to the
Foundation, prior to sale, the tax
would be avoided. Under present
law, the Federal government
allows a contributor to take a full
income tax deduction in the year
the gift is made for the fair
market value of any asset that is
contributed to us. So several
things happen.
First, the contributor saves a
potential long term capital gains
tax that he or she would have had
to pay by selling the asset, and, se-
4 4 My great-
grandfather
invented
Gulden's* Mustard
Vegetable Fritters
Vi cup butter or margarine,
melted; or as needed
V< cup finely chopped zucchini
Vi cup finely chopped -
mushrooms
CHARLIE GULDEN
H cup shredded carrots
V< cup chopped onion
V< cup dairy sour cream
3 tablespoons Guldens Spicy
Brown Mustard
2 beaten eggs
3 tablespoons cornslarch
Saute vegetables in I tablespoon butter; remove from heal. Mix
sour cream, mustard and eggs. Gradually beat in cornslarch
Stir in vegetables. Melt I tablespoon butter in skillet. Spoon
2 tablespoons Intler batter in skillet Lightly brown on both
sides. Add butler to skillet as needed. Makes I 10 fritters
Note: Any combination of vegetables
can be substituted
It's his recipe
that makes
these recipes
so delicious!99
Spinach-Stuffed Mushrooms
I pound fresh spinach (or I package
III ots.| froien chapped spinach,
thawed, well drained)
I pound fresh mushrooms (about 16
edtaavsaed)
3 tablespoons butter, melted
I cup ricotta cheese
4 teaspoons Guldens Spicy Brown Mustard
Pinch crushed oregano
Vash. clean spinach; steam in covered
skillet five minutes. Remove, drain and
chop Remove mushroom stems and finely
chop. Saute steins and spinach in one
ConatM spinach
_ -dients
Spoon into caps. Place on cookie sheet;
brush with remaining butter Bake at 3St*F
IS minutes or until heated through Makes
about li.
dation of Jewish Philanthropies,
you can establish a personalized
Philanthropic Fund that will bear
your name and carry your good
works into the future.
Setting up a Philanthropic Fund
is easv and convenient. Here's
Jacob Brodzki
cond, the contributor receives the
full income tax deduction for the
value of the asset Third, the con-
tributor maintains the right to
make recommendations to the
Foundation Board as to distribu-
tions of income and principal of
the fund which further the con-
tributor's own philanthropic
desires. Finally, the asset which
has been given away is no longer a
part of the donor's estate, thereby
saving taxes which would have
been imposed by the government
at a future point. I think we are in-
deed fortunate to live in a country
where philanthropic giving is
rewarded. These advantages cer-
tainly cannot be found in other
countries!
For further information, call
Janice Salit, Foundation director
at 748-8400.
FOUNDATION
Or |fWISH fHltANTHtOPIfS
designee has the privilege of mak-
ing recommendations for the
distribution of principal and/or in-
come from the fund to organiza-
tions on the Foundation's ever-
expanding list.
If those recommendations are
approved by the Foundation
Board, the gift is sent either in the
name of the donor or anonymous-
ly, depending on the donor's
wishes.
The Foundation's professional
staff handles all the paperwork.
The donor is granted the max-
imum tax deduction for charitable
contributions. Capital gains taxes
are not realized on the transfer of
appreciated property.
Additions can be made to the
Fund with the same tax and
charitable benefits that were pro-
vided at its inception. All interest
accrues to the Fund.
All funds are strictly confiden-
tial. Overall Foundation opera-
tions are monitored by the Foun-
dation's Board of Trustees.
In short, a Personalized Philan-
thropic Fund offers an outstan-
ding way to make an enduring gift
and obtain a range of great tax
benefits while truly making an
important mark on history.
For further information, call
Janice Salit, Foundation director
at 748-8400.
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Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, June 20, 1986
l Martin Stein Of Milwaukee Named
UJA National Chairman
Rabbi Albert Schwartz
Addresses CJF Conference
NEW YORK, NY- Martin F.
Stein of Milwaukee was officially
named National chairman of the
United Jewish Appeal.
The announcement was made by
Robert E. Loup, Chairman of the
UJA Board of Trustees, at a
special dinner honoring outgoing
National chairman Alex Grass and
marking the closing of the 1985-86
UJA/Federation Campaign.
UJA, one of the most successful
voluntary fund-raising organiza-
tions in the nation, raised $733
million last year in partnership
with local Jewish federation
campaigns.
Stein has held leadership posi-
tions in a wide variety of
humanitarian organizations,
Jewish and nonsectarian, both na-
tionally and in Wisconsin. Among
his achievements as a UJA leader
has been the chairmanship of the
Special Task Force for Operation
Moses, an effort that mobilized a
campaign raising over $60 million
in less than four months for the
resettlement in Israel of Ethio-
pian Jews who were caught in the
grip of famine.
"Greeting Ethiopian refugees
arriving in Israel," Stein said,
"was one of the most exciting
moments of my life. Our tradition
teaches us that to save a life is to
save the world. How moving to be
part of saving over 10,000 lives!"
IDF Report Controversial
Israel's Chief of Staff, Gen.
Moshe Levy, has ordered a con-
troversial report on the Israel
Defense Forces to be included in
the army's new five-year plan,
which is to be published soon. The
report, originally commissioned
by the IDF, was done by Em-
manuel Wald, a reserve colonel
and former head of long-range
planning on the General Staffs
planning branch. It listed several
criticisms of the military, accor-
ding to Israeli press accounts.
Wald's report asserts that
Israel's military power has eroded
since 1967. It noted that the IDF
defeated more than three Arab ar-
mies on three fronts in six days
with only 6 percent of the gross
national product (GNP). In the
1973 Yom Kippur War "it barely
achieved a tie against two armies
on two fronts with twice as
much... GNP; in the (1982)
Peace for Galilee war it failed to
defeat less than a single army on a
single front under optimal cir-
cumstance and with an invest-
ment of 18 percent of GNP,"
Hadashot commented.
The head of IDF Ground
Forces, Maj. Gen. Amir Drori,
told Ha'aretz that there has been
a decline in ground forces since
1980. He said it is not yet drastic
but is continuing and noted that
the size of the standing forces has
decreased. Not only has the
number of reserve units decreased
but, because of budget cuts, in-
vestment in equipment has declin-
ed as well. Drori said the army can
deal with new threats but may
have to pay a higher price. "It will
be harder to carry out missions
that were once easy to
implement."
Defense Minister Yitzhak Rabin
told the Knesset Foreign Affairs
and Defense Committee that
With Rhyme
And Reason
Prayer For
Our Country
Oh G-d of all our ancestors,
From Your lofty throne,
Bestow Your fruitful blessings on
ThiB land we call our home.
Inspire our U.S. government
To consummate good deeds,
And influence our president
To ably serve our needs.
Instruct administrators that
One nation under You
Can achieve a happiness
That's forever true.
Unite our country with the world
In peace and brotherhood,
And let Your foresight help us be
An instrument for good.
Dear G-d, safeguard America,
And make our freedom thrive,
Protect us with Your Providence
So that we can survive.
-Jack Gould
publication of parts of the report
in the press presented an un-
justified, distorted picture of the
IDF's ability, development plans
and level of its commanders. He
said that perhaps the report
should have been discussed at IDF
headquarters, but added that at
least it was presented to those
who prepare the military's work-
ing plans.
Martin F. Stein
UJA National Chairman
Vitally concerned with the pro-
blems of alcohol and chemical
dependencies, the Council of
Jewish Federations and the
Federation of Jewish Philan-
thropies of New York, recently
sponsored the National Con-
ference on Addictions in the
Jewish community June 8-10 at
the Central Synagogue Communi-
ty House in New York City.
Conducting a special workshop
on, "Community Action," was
Rabbi Albert B. Schwartz, direc-
tor of the Federation's Chaplaincy
Commission and chairman, Task
Force on Jewish Alcoholism and
Substance Abuse.
Rabbi Schwartz stressed the im-
portance of recognizing
alcoholism and substance abuse in
the Jewish community. He dealt
primarily with the organization
and the activities of the local task
force which is a joint effort of the
five South Florida Federations
coordinated by the Jewish Federa-
tion of Greater Fort Lauderdale.
The addiction conference was
developed in cooperation with the
Association of Jewish Family and
Children's Agencies, Jewish
Alcoholics, Chemically Dependent
Persons and Significant Others
Foundation. Inc. (JACS), Jewish
Rabbi Albert Schwartz
Education Service of North
America, Inc.; National Associa-
tion of Jewish Vocational Ser-
vices; and the National Jewish
Welfare Board.
Cochairs of the Conference,
Peggy Tishman, Federation of
Jewish Philanthropies of New
York, and Beryl B. Weinstein,
Council of Jewish Federations,
stated that this important
meeting brought together con-
cerned organizations from
throughout the country to discuss
and formulate plans for these mat-
ters of vital concern to the Jewish
community. For further informa-
tion on the program contact the
Federation at 748-8400.
tVan1.Dietf|N*can't-
Mix can. Forfibout half
_ystal light has 10 natur,
Nui(asyveet*anp Qjjffi calories a gl
A lot of great taste fq/r u
tumtmmitiulim>maiifitat. ,,... ... ,


4-IA.1 Illlrl < iil i | i


m ,0i .nub . Friday, June 20, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 7
Young Business And Professional Division
Tarty In The Park' Sunday, June 29
Greater Fort Lauderdale com-
munity young leaders will take
part in the Jewish Federation
Young Business and Professional
Division's "Party In The Park,"
Sunday, June 29, beginning at
noon at Topeekeegee Yugnee
Park (T.Y. Park), on Sheridan
Street and North Park Road in
Hollywood. The party to be held at
Pavillion No. 7 will give the 'guys
and gals' the opportunity to un-
wind and have ran. Included on
the day's agenda will be
volleyball, baseball, potato sack
races all embellished by a barbe-
que and beer. The barbeque
begins at 4 p.m. There is a $10 ad-
vance admission or $12 can be
paid at the Park.
According to Nancy Rosenfeld,
Division Steering Committee
chairperson, "The Young
Business and Professional Divi-
sion was created to bring Jewish
business and professional people
together through high calibre and
stimulating programs. This group
plays an important role in further-
ing the work accomplished by the
Federation and helps to support
the Federation beneficiaries and
agencies through the Federa-
tion/UJA campaign."
Members of the committee in-
clude: Sue Amron, Larry
Apotheker, Diann Asher, Joy
Bedick, Monique Benghiat, Nor-
man Blinder, Lori Bergman,
Claire Bertman, Douglas Cooper,
Lia Ane Davis, Linda Druckman,
Leslie Gerber, Sharon Gintz,
Carey Goodman, Terri Levin, An-
drea Linn, Ellen Magnuson, Alan
Phillips, Harvey Rackmil, David
Richstone, Shana Safer, Todd
Saunders, Mindy Stein, Risa
Waldman, and Steve Wasserman.
For information on the event or
the Division contact Anne Cher-
nin, Human Resource Develop-
ment director at 748-8400.
Newswire/lsrael
Israeli Reaction To Waldheim Election
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
President Chaim Herzog said Sun-
day that Israel should react with
caution, not anger, that Kurt
Waldheim has been elected Presi-
dent of Austria. But Deputy
Foreign Minister Ronni Milo, a
Likud MK, saw the election
results affecting Israeli-Austrian
relations and said he considers the
election of Waldheim, alleged to
have a Nazi past, a "nightmare for
every Jew and every Israeli."
HERZOG, on a tour of Galilee,
said the government should
decide the matter on the basis of
what is "good for the people of
Israel and the government of
Israel." He referred to the in-
terests of Soviet Jews im-
migrating to Israel whose first
stop after leaving the USSR is
Vienna.
He said he believed in the max-
im of Israel's first Premier, David
Ben-Gurion, that while the past
must never be forgotten, it must
never be allowed to influence the
future.
Milo, a member of Likud's
Herat wing, said he considered
the election of Waldheim foremost
a problem of the Jewish people
which suffered the most from the
Nazis. "The State of Israel, as the
Jewish State, is concerned more
than any other state in the world,
and is therefore obliged to react
more than other countries."
HE ADDED, "Waldheim's elec-
tion is like a nightmare for every
Jew and every Israeli because in
1986, 42 or 43 years after the
Holocaust, to see the majority of
voters in Austria supporting a
man with a Nazi background like
Kurt Waldheim, is for us an issue
that we should react to as a
Jewish State."
Milo urged other countries to
reach similarly to Israel to that
"tragic election." He maintained
that Waldheim victory
demonstrates a "total lack of sen-
sitivity on the part of Europeans
toward the Holocaust.
Labor MK Shevah Weiss said
regardless of the outcome of the
elections, Israel should continue
the investigation of Waldheim.
There were demonstrations
against Waldheim outside the
Austrian Embassy in Tel Aviv
Sunday.
Increase In Incidence Of
Smuggling Causes Concern
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Israel
Defense Force and police officials
have expressed concern at the in-
crease in the incidence of smuggl-
ing, especially of drags, from
Lebanon into Israel since the IDF
withdrawal from its northern
neighbor a year ago.
Since then, three major smuggl-
ing attempts have been foiled and
over 8,000 doses of heroin and
more than 60 kilograms of hashish
have been seized at the border.
Large quantities of smuggled pro-
perty, including video recorders
and other electronic equipment,
have been found in searches of
cars being driven through the
border gate near Metullah by
Israeli civilians employed in
southern Lebanon.
Brigadier General Danny
Rothschild, commanding officer of
the IDF's liaison unit with the
South Lebanon Army, told Arab
affairs reporters Sunday that
there had been a considerable in-
crease during the past three mon-
ths of the Shiite Moslems joining
the SLA.
He also noted better coopera-
tion between the Shiite villagers
and SLA and Israeli officers
responsible for security in the
security rone.
For Enjoyable Vacations In The Catskills
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GIBBER
JERUSALEM The Health Ministry announced that the
government has given permission to the Hadassah Medical
Center to perform heart transplant surgery. According to unof-
ficial sources, permission will also be given to the Rambam
Hospital in Haifa which considers itself fully equipped to perform
the operation.
JERUSALEM Trees growing out of thin air instead of the
ground enable botanists at the newly opened Sarah Racine
Laboratory in Tel Aviv University's Botanical Garden to observe
the structure and development of roots.
ISRAEL In a land rich in treasures of the past, a recent
discovery in Israel has stirred both theologians and ar-
chaeologists. On the shore of the Sea of Galilee, a 2,000 year old
boat has been found embedded in the soil. Archaeologists dated
the vessel to the first century A.D., a period that witnessed
events which convulsed the country, the Roman Empire and
world history.
JERUSALEM One of the most monumental gates of
Jerusalem from the period of the First Temple, the only one of its
type that has thus far been found, has been revealed in excava-
tions of the Ophel area being conducted by the Hebrew University
of Jerusalem Institute of Archaeology.
HAIFA Former U.S. Secretary of State, Cyrus Vance, was
one of five distinguished recipients of honorary doctorates from
the University of Haifa. Others who received degrees are George
A. Cohon, Prof. Nathan Rotenstreich, Prof. Elie Wiesel, and Dr.
George S. Wise. The ceremony was held on June 4, the first day of
the University's 14th annual Board of Governors meeting.
Instead of serving the same old thing this Shabbos, why not try Ronzonir' pasta? Your
family will be delighted as they spin their forks and soak up their sauce with any one of
our 70 shapes and varieties. All made to our exacting standards with 100% durum wheat
semolina for unsurpassed taste and texture.
Ronzoni is not only good for Shabbos, it's good for you. Made of completely natural
ingredients, our pasta has no cholesterol and no added salt whatsoever. And, of course,
its absolutely Kosher and Parve.
So start a new tradition this Shabbos with Ronzoni No pasta shapes up better.
PASTA WITH FRESH TOMATOES
1 package (16 oz.)
RONZONI* Rotelle,
Elbow Twists, Elbows or
Medium Shells, cooked
and drained
Vi cup small whole or
slivered pitted ripe olives
1 Vfe pounds fresh ripe
tomatoes, at room
temperature
1 teaspoon finely minced
garlic
V* teaspoon salt
V* teaspoon crushed red pepper
V teaspoon black pepper
'/} cup olive oil
3 tablespoons torn fresh
basil leaves
3 tablespoons torn Italian
parsley
Cut tomatoes into wedges. (There should be about 1 quart.) Add olives, garlic, salt, red and black
pepper. Pour olive oil over mixture. Toss gently. Let stand at room temperature for at least 30 minutes.
Just before serving, add basil and parsley. Spoon over hot or cold pasta. Serve immediately with
additional fresh ground black pepper, if desired. Makes 8 servings.
Roazoai Sobo Baoni.
1986 Ganwn Food* Corporation


Varra fi Tk I~wioK FWwtian nf Clrtmtaf Port I iiiHorHala/Fri'tqv -Tlinp 20. 198fi
I
Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, June 20, 1986
Jews With Disabilities To Be A Focus of
Council Of Jewish Federations
NEW YORK, N.Y. The
Council of Jewish Federations
Task Force on Jewish Individuals
with Disabilities has released a
Mission Statement reaffirming
CJF's commitment to ensure the
maximum quality of life for
Jewish people who are disabled.
The Task Force, which was
created in 1985 in response to a
growing community con-
sciousness of the need for services
for the disabled especially for
services under Jewish auspices
is composed of individuals with
disabilities, parents/relatives, pro-
fessionals and lay leaders.
In the Mission Statement, the
Task Force spelled out its goals
which include:
1. To sensitize and educate the
community about the special
needs, rights and concerns of in-
dividuals with disabilities and
their families.
2. To stimulate Jewish com-
munities to increase services for
the disabled under Jewish
auspices.
3. To serve as a central clear-
inghouse providing local Federa-
tion planning committees with in-
formation from all relevant
sources.
4. To recommend methods for
maximizing integration of in-
dividuals with disabilities into the
life of the Jewish community.
5. To advocate for appropriate
services for Jewish individuals
with disabilities and for adequate
government, private and Federa-
tion funding.
6. To place the rights and the
needs of the disabled on the North
American Jewish community rela-
tions and advocacy agendas.
7. To develop coalitions with
other organizations and national
bodies tht advocate for the needs
of individuals with disabilities,
particularly Jewish individuals.
iNewswire/U.SA
NEW YORK Twenty-two Jewish cadets three women
among them graduated from three U.S. service academies and
were commissioned as officers, Rabbi Barry Hewitt Greene, of
Short Hills, N.J., chairman, JWB Commission on Jewish
Chaplaincy, reported.
NEW YORK The Jewish Theological Seminary of America,
currently celebrating its centennial, recently renamed its
Seminary College of Jewish Studies at its 3080 Broadway Cam-
pus. The new name of the undergraduate school will be the Albert
A. List College of Jewish Studies, which offers a complete pro-
gram in Jewish Studies leading to a Bachelor of Arts degree.
Most of the students in List College also receive a B.A. either
from Columbia University or from Barnard College.
WASHINGTON Sen. Howard Metzenbaum (D-Ohio) recent-
ly called on B'nai B'rith International and other Jewish organiza-
tions to become publicly involved in issues other than Israel. Ad-
dressing the spring meeting of the Jewish service organization's
Board of Governors, Metzenbaum urged B'nai B'rith "to go into
every nook and crany in America" to make its status known on
issues such as religion in public schools, attempts to transform the
United States into a Christian nation, and relating religion with
politics.
SKOKIE, HI. "The fourth of July weekend affords an ideal
opportunity of combining vacation pleasure with Torah study in
the company of leading scholars at The Hebrew Theological Col-
lege," proclaimed retreat co-chairmen, Dr. Irving Skolnick and
Lawrence Yellin. Beginning Friday, July 4 and running through
Sunday, July 6, the Yeahiva will be sponsoring a community-wide
Torah Retreat on its Skokie campus with housing provided by the
adjacent Holiday Inn. For information contact Rabbi Jerold
Isenberg, (312) 267-9800.
NEW YORK Walter H. Annenberg, publisher, philan-
thropist and former ambassador to Great Britain, will be honored
by B'nai B'rith International June 24 at a gala dinner-dance in
New York's Waldorf Astoria Hotel.
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8. To encourage Jewish agen-
cies and organizations to see that
facilities and events are accessible
to individuals with disabilities.
At its meeting during the CJF
Spring Quarterly in April, the
Task Force discussed implementa-
tion of these goals. Plans include
the establishment of a subcommit-
tee to survey the needs of Jewish
communities and to develop a
resource handbook; encourage-
ment of dialogue with national
Jewish agencies; production of a
handbook on how to develop a
local Task Force on the Disabled,
and, possibly, the initiation of
regional conferences on this im-
portant subject.
Mpwswire Florida
M AJORIE OLSTER began a summer internship at JTA's New
York bureau this week. Olster, 23, is completing a Masters in
Journalism at the University of Florida in Gamsville.
LAURENCE E. BOYDEN, the Senior Vice President of the
Chase Manhattan Trust Company of Florida, N.A. will apeak on
behalf of the American Friends of Tel Aviv University, at a lunch
meeting Friday June 27, at the Sheraton Hotel in Boca Raton.
Boyden's topic will be "Planned Giving as an Integral Part of an
Estate Plan."
DR. BARBARA WEINSTEIN has been promoted to the posi-
tion of Executive Director of the Early Childhood Development
Association. Weinstein is marrid to State Senator Peter Weins-
tein and they have two teenaged boys.
ALEXANDER BRUMMER, nephew of Cantor and Mrs. Hillel
Brummer of the Tamarac Jewish Center-Temple Beth Torah,
recently travelled with President and Mrs. Reagan on Air Force
One, to the economic summit meeting held in the Orient.
Israeli Scientist In Moscow To
Aid Victims Of Nuclear Disaster
By KEVIN FREEMAN
NEW YORK (JTA) An
Israeli-born Weizmann Institute
of Science specialist in bone mar-
row transplants left recently for
Moscow to aid patients suffering
marrow damage from radiation
poisoning as a result of the Soviet
nuclear plant accident at
Chernobyl.
The Israeli expert is Dr. Yair
Reisner, affiliated with the Weiz-
mann Institute in Rehovot since
1981, and currently working at
New York's Memorial Sloan-
Kettering Cancer Center. Two
other bone marrow experts Drs.
Paul Terasaki and Richard Gale
also left New York for Moscow
with Reisner to aid the patients.
Reisner's revolutionary method
of bone marrow purification
developed while at Sloan-
Kettering, has been used in more
that in 160 marrow transplants.
The success rate has been 70 per-
cent in children with genetic
defects that deprive them of im-
mune defenses.
While Terasaki specializes in
getting the closest possible match
between the patient's body and
the transplanted marrow,
Reisner's method cleanses
donated marrow of cells that
cause the rejection, according to a
spokesperson for the American
Committee for the Weizmann
Institute.
Description of Reisner's
Technique
Diseased marrow cells are first
destroyed by a massive dose of
radiation. Reisner's technique
then calls for about a quart of
marrow to be extracted from the
donor's hip bone, after which that
marrow is exposed to lectin, a
chemical extracted from peanuts,
to- remove the T-cells that cause
rejection.
Purified marrow cells are in-
i'ected into the recipient's
loodstream. They find their way
to the bones, establish themselves
and begin to reproduce.
Reisner and his colleagues at
Sioan-Kettering and the Weiz-
mann Institute develope the
medical breakthrough to perform
transplants, on "incompatible,"
genetically unrelated individuals.
Bone marrow transplants, as in
many other types of skin and
organ transplants can result in the
grafted organ being rejected by
the host.
In order to prevent rejection by
the host, Reisner and his col-
leagues worked to develop the cell
separation technique. It was an
outgrowth of 20 years of research
by Dr. Nathan Sharon, head of the
Weizmann Institute Biophysics
Department and Reisner's
mentor.
In 1978, Sharon's findings,
published in a science journal,
drew the attention of Dr. Robert
Good, then at Sloan-Kettering and
a leading innovator in cancer
research. Good invited Reisner -
then a doctoral student at the In-
stitute in Rehovot who had been
working closely with Sharon on
the soybean lectin bone marrow
connection to be a research
associate at Sloan-Kettering.
Over the next few years,
Reisner worked with members of
the Sloan-Kettering staff to ad-
vance and refine the cell separa-
tion technique. Starting in
December, 1980, physicians at
Sloan-Kettering used the techni-
que to perform the first of a series
of successful bone marrow
transplants. Reisner holds the Dr.
Phil Gold Career Development
Chair in cancer research at the
Weizmann Institute.
Synagogue
Is Repaired
PARIS (JTA) East
Berlin's 100-year-old New
Synagogue is being repaired and
will be reopened for the 50th an-
niversary of Kristallnacht in
1988, according to the East Ger-
man news agency monitored here
. The New Synagogue, which was
spared during the Kristalinacht
pogrom when the Nazis destroyed
281 synagogues throughout the
country, was ruined during an
Allied air raid in 1943. The
building and its decorations will
be reconstructed as they were
originally.
SOME PEOPLE LIVE THEIR
ENTIRE LIVES WITHOUT
TASTING WATER.
Some people have never tasted water that's fresh
and pure as a spring. Water without sodium,
pollutants, or carbonation Water with nothing added,
nothing taken away Some people have never tasted
clean, dear Mountain valley Water from a natural
spring in Hot Springs, Arkansas.
It you re ooeol those people, try Mountain valley
Water. You'll be tasting water for the very first time.
HOUHTJUN VAUIY WATER
SPWNG WATER FROM HOT SPRINGS. ARK.
DADE
696-1333
Purely for drinking.
BROWARD
563-6114
Say "Cheese"
and Put a Smile on
Your Kids' Faces
Watch your kids' faces light up
when you serve Smurt Pasta in
Spaghetti Sauce with Cheese
Flavor. You'll smile, too, knowing
it's got all the goodness and ta'am
of Chef Boyardee*


SMORF IMC 1986 Peyo I icensed by Wallace
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^^^t**n-
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t>>^ iKiMmi
w*iiytu in
Friday, June 20, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 9


Page 10 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, June 20, 1986
ommentary
THE JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE
6501 W. Sunrise Blvd.
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33313 792-6700
By Muriel Haskell, Director of Public Relations
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION AND FEES CONCERN-
ING THE EVENTS OR PROGRAMS LISTED PLEASE CALL
THE CENTER.
HIGHLIGHT '86
INSTALLATION
JCC members, friends and
relatives experienced a "high" in
the Tower Club atop the new
C and S Bank Building Sunday,
the first day of June. Witnessing
the installation and con-
gratulating the incoming slate
provided an evening of elegant
dining and dancing according to
over 100 guests attending who
viewed the sparkling nighttime
panorama of the city from the
28th floor. It was all compliments
for the English antique ambiance
created by the highly polished
Tudor furniture, Queen Anne
Chairs, the appointments, the
superb menu, the soft lights and
sweet music.
FROM THE PODIUM
An eloquent hamotze by Sam
Soref began the program followed
by an impressive message and
report by Al Capp, outgoing presi-
dent. And the address by newly
installed president David
Schulman, recently returned from
his first trip to Israel with Car-
rie reflected his enthusiasm and
promise for the JCC to continue
its course of commitment to
Judaism and the Holy Land.
Other pulpit participants includ-
ed Jacob Brodzki, past president,
Alan and Marsha Levy, JCC
Secretary; Lydia Golden JCC Vice
President and Norman Ostrau of
Federation; who gave the con-
cluding toast all ably, warmly
and effectively led by Federa-
tion's Sheldon Polish who acted as
installing officer and MC.
THE HELENE AND SAMUEL
M. SOREF COMMUNITY
SERVICE AWARD
Presenters: Marsha and Alan
Levy. Al Capp was honored with
this prestigious annual award
which this year took the form of a
handsome sculpture of Moses.
Serving as president during the
past two years he has earned a
record of innovation and dedica-
tion in his service to the city and
to the Center.
An original founder of JCC
along with his family, his leader-
ship qualities have helped the
Center achieve its purposes and
goals during his tenure as presi-
dent. Other notable affiliations:
Ameican Jewish Council, AIPAC,
B'nai B'ritk Menbership and
President of Temple Emanu-El in
1976.
Capp is a native Floridian, a
graduate of George Washington
University and has his own law
practice: Alvin Capp, P.A. Planta-
tion residents, the family consists
of his wife Gail, daughter Barbara
and son Edward all of whom join
him in responding to the needs of
the Jewish and the general
communities.
ANITA AND LOUIS L.
PERLMAN VOLUNTEER
OF THE YEAR AWARD
Presentor: Jacob Brodzki. New
member of the board Stuart Tatz
was the recipient of the annual
award in recognition of his many
hours of service to JCC. Always
responding affirmatively to calls
for volunteer help, he does what is
needed and after all is said and
done, he asks for more!
AMONG HIS
ACCOMPLISHMENTS
As Chairman of Las Vegas
Night, he trained volunteers to
operate games, he solicited prizes,
sold tickets and even prepared the
food! For Israel Independence
Day celebrations he has cooked
the corn and grilled the ham-
burgers. And for Summer Camp
'86 he'll be organizing a fund-
raising program.
A CENTER COUPLE
Stuart and his wife Fran, who is
assistant to Early Childhood
The Israeli Boy and Girl Scout Friendship Caravan, a 10
member English speaking troupe of boys and girls 16 and 17 years
old, come to the JCC Monday, June SO at 8:45 p.m. Carefully
auditioned and trained, they have been chosen for their ability to
act as cultural ambassadors as well as for their theatrical talents.
The group'8 hour-long performance includes contemporary
Israeli song selections accompanied by dance routines, dialogue
and their own elaborate electric musical equipment. The Friend- Jure of protein and fat, resulting
WHERE ARE
CALORIES?
Where are the calories in a food,
and where in the food would most
of them be? It depends what the
food is in terms of calorie
nutrients, says Dorothy Y. Gif-
ford, Broward County
Cooperative Extension Agent.
Most foods are mixtures of water
protein, carbohydrate, and/or fat!
The number of calories in a food
depends on how much each of
these are present in the food mix-
ture. Water contains no calories.
However, alcohol does have
calories, about 7 calories per
gram. Proteins and carbohydrates
have 4 calories per gram, while
fats have about 9 calories per
gram. In easier terms Vi cup or 4
ounces of cooked macaroni has
about 65 calories. A 4 ounce patty
of lean ground beef has over 300
calories. Macaroni is mostly a mix-
ture of carbohydrate and protein
whereas the beef is mostly a mix-
ship Caravan travels to camps, synagogues and Jewish com-
munities during the summer. Their appearance at the JCC has
been underwritten by the Four W's Service Inc., Air Condition-
ing Electrical and Radio Specialist, 755-1458, Moty's Car Care,
972-3855 and People's Towing, 753-0490. For ticket information
please call the Center, 792-6700. Pictured: Israeli Friendship
Caravan, 1984-
in more calories.
We need protein, car-
bohydrates, fat, and water as
essential nutrients in a varied
diet. Knowing that many extra
calories are found in fats it makes
good nutritional sense to be aware
of our intake of them.
Director Judy Kissel, head the
JCC Couples Bowling League.
Their children Michelle, seven,
and Robert, four-and-a-half, go to
Hebrew Day School. Tatz was
born in the Bronx and raised in
Little Neck, L.I. He is a plant
broker and owns Atlantic
Growers, Inc.
ESTABLISHMENT
OF RUTH HOROWITZ
WECARE MEMORIAL FUND
Announced by Lydia Golden.
Among the guests were Aaron
Horowitz and his sisters, Ruth
Hertzberg and Eleanor Gaston,
who were proud to hear that the
memory of Ruth Horowitz will be
perpetuated through the
establishment of the WECARE
Memorial Fund in her name. Ruth
Horowitz, who was a dedicated
Board Member and chairperson of
the Center's WECARE program,
inspired many other volunteers to
join her in service to those in need
in Broward County.
JCC, with her family, mourns
her untimely loss.
The JCC is a major beneficiary
agency of the Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale, receiv-
ing funds from the annual United
Jewish Appeal campaign.
FOR FORT LAUDERDALE
Among his accomplishments in
the Fort Lauderdale and Planta-
tion communities: Prosecutor for
the City of Plantation, member of
the Broward Community Rela-
tions Committee, activity with
redevelopment plans for the
downtown area; member, Board
of Directors, Fort Lauderdale
Film Festival contributing his
services as counsel; involvement
with the Fort Lauderdale
Museum of Art and with the Pro-
menade and Las Olas Art Festival
fund-raisers.
IN THE JEWISH
COMMUNITY
One of the original Board
Members of Jewish Federation,
he was an active participant in its
organization and helped initiate
the Federations Plantation cam-
paign. In 1972 he was the reci-
pient of Federation's Young
Leadership Award. LJ
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By DEBORAH FULLER
HAHN
Publicity Chair
"VOICES
FROM KFAR SABA"
The best stories always begin
with "Once upon a time ." this
story, told in the voices of the par-
ticipants, is one of those.
Once upon a time a beautiful
American tourist visited the (not
very) far away land of Israel.
There she met a little girl named
"Revital." Revital asked the
beautiful American woman if they
could become pen-pals, and so
they did. The tourist is our own
Selma Streng, who has greed to
share with us her wonderful cor-
respondence with two young
Israeli girls from our Project
Renewal neighborhood of the city
of Kfar Saba. We shall excerpt
some of the letters but the gram-
mar and spelling is original, they
were written for Revital by her
older sister, Niza.
Selma Streng
11/83
Hello Dear Selma!
Do you remembre me Tarn Revital from KFar-Saba (ISRAEL) How are you? How
was your visit in Israel did you like it? please write me about it.
Your little friend
Revital Tevil
I expect you letter soon (my sister helps me with my English)
12/83
Dear Selma
You wanted to know about my family, well we are eight kids in the family, we have a
big house with a big yard. My father is a butcher, my mother is a housewife. My biggest
brother is in the army he is 20 years old and the little one is 3 years old (My sister Niz she
is in high school helps me with the English) I study at the elementary school. I still prac-
tise the fleut, I read books. I study at the third grade.
Your little friend from Israel,
Revital Tevil
2/84
Dear Selma Hello!
It was very nice to get your letter (although your handwriting wasn't clear).
Selma can you tell me more about the place, I mean I know you live in the U.S.A. but I
want to know more about the country you live in. In your last letter you wanted to know
where my parents come from, well my parents come from Yaman. By the way, in Israel
we try not to put a stress to the exit country our parents came from, 'cause in Israeli's
society we're all Jews from different places from all over the world. If you want to know
anything more about Israel or me write to me.
Your friend from Israel
Revital Tevil
9/84
Dear Selma,
It was nice to have a picture of you and you daughter. It is the end of our summer
vacation now and Revital goes back to the 4th grade. She continues to play the fleut and
she is rolling with a roller skate. Revital asked me to tell you that she likes pop music and
her favorite singer is Michael Jackson.
hope to hear from you soon
your little friend from Israel.
Revital (Nixa)
10/84
Dear Selma,
Hello! It's been a long time since we've written you a letter, and the reason could be
our studies. Revital is very busy with her homework and her fleut practise laUy they had
many performances in our community center, they performed in front of many tourists
groups, from the U.S.A.
hope to hear from you soon
Year. Revital (Nixa)
Friday, June 20, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 11
Last month my father became a grandfather and Revital is an aunt now. My sister
Rina gave a birth she has a daughter, her name is Angel. We are having "Purim" it's the
happiest Holyday, we all wear costumes and we have great celebrations at home, at
school, on the street. By the way Revital is celebrating her birthday on the 4th in March,
she'll be 10 years old.
Revital your little friend from Israel
and Niza
10/85
Dear Selma,
We want to wish you and your family Happy New Year, all the best to you.
Two weeks before Rosh-Hashana I was in the Negev for pre-military basic training.
Now I have two months till my drafting day. Meanwhile I take driving lessons and it costs
me a lot. So I am trying to find me a fine job. I change my job almost every two weeks. I
worked as a waitress in a home to old people in Kfar Saba, I sold cookies in a bakery I did a
cleaning job, I taught English and some French to little kids and I am fed up with all
these.
Revital and her little sister Orit had a lot of fun on these holydays, tomorrow they are
going back to school at last.
We hope to hear from you soon
Bye,
Revital and Niza
12/85
Dear Selma,
The serigraph on the- back of your last greeting card is lovely. It interested my big
brother Shlomo he likes art, he himself draws, but now he is very busy he's studying elec-
tronic engineering which is hard, but he'll handle it except English lessons, well I'm try-
ing very hard to help him, in fact I'm doing everybody's homework in English at home.
I postponed my drafting date to the 24th so I can have a driving test on the 23. We are
having a hard time at home now my father isn't doing well in the shop. My married sister
Rina with her husband and their little child Angel live with us and it's hard on my mother,
everybody busy even my little sister, and there's a lot of work in the house, soon I'll be go-
ing too. In my next letter I'll write more about the army.
Hope to hear from you soon
Niza
1/86
Dear Selma,
You wanted me to keep you informed about the army, well I am now on the basic
training. I have one week to finish it.
In the basic training we learn many new things about weapon, first aid, self defence.
We also have many lectures about being a soldier. I sleep with 15 girls in a room. We wake
up at 4:30 a.m. we go to sleep at 10 p.m.
I didn't know any roommates of mine before. We are all from different areas in Israel
but I like them all, now we are good friends. We do everything together. We all having a
hard time, we have a long day with all kinds of activities, with no breaks. We also have to
guard at night, to work in the kitchen, to clean the showers. Three times a day sometimes
more we have to clean our room, to shine our weapon and shoes, everything must shine
and tidy our beds, uniforms and all the other equipment. I know it's sound very hard
especially when we all miss our family, friends, home but after two weeks I can say that I
get used to it and we are even having fun there.
After the basic training I'll know exactly what I am gonna do and where I am gonna
serve the two years.
Hope to hear from you
Fondly
12/84
Dear Selma,
Thank you for the Hannuka presents it was a nice surprise. Revital wants to know
how you celebrate Hannuka in Florida?
You wanted to know more about me, well my name is Niza and I am seventeen years
old. I study in high school in Kfar Saba actually it's my last year in school, next year I'll be
in the army. In school I mostly study French and Geography. I also study English,
Mathematics, I am in the 12th grade.
Next time I'll write to you about what I want to do during my military service if I
make up my mind.
Happy Hannuka to you all
Revital (Niza)
2/85
Dear Selma,
You wrote me about your grandsons and you said that its out of their minds going to
the army, they rather go to college.
In Israel if you want to go to a university you must have had a military service, of
course there are exceptions, but they do a national service for one year only. There is a
priority in most of Israel's academies. My big brother was released from the army last
month he is 21 now, he wants to study a profession I think he wants to be an electrician,
he plans to work in the evening andL to. study in.the morning.
Niza
3/86
Dear Selma,
You probably want to know about what I'm doing in the army now, well all I can say,
I'm in the Air Force in a large base in the south of Israel, doing some secaritarial job. The
base is far from Kfar Saba so I live there. I come home once in two weeks for a weekend. I
was depressed at the begining when I was told to be in the air force although it gives you
some kind of honour to be wearing the grey uniform of the air force, I wanted to guide on
tanks or something like that, not sitting in an office.
I must say we're having good conditions in this base like good food, accomodatdons, all
kind of activities in the evenings like library, disco, shows and movies. About studing in
college like your grandsons, we can register in an open university, all the studing will be in
our free time in the base, only a few are doing so 'cause most of us don't have much free
time to study. I hope I'll manage to keep studying somehow, so I wont be wasting these
two years.
I'm quiet new in this base and in the army, there's a lot of things I don't know about
my opportunities as a soldier.
Selma, I hope to write some more next time.
Fondly,
Niza
3/86
Dear Selma,
How are you. I miss you so much. My teacher gave me an English book to read: the
name is BABAR famli loses his crown and iy read the book, in Sunday we are going to
celebrate Pourim I am going to be a flowr gril
I want to hear from you again soon
fraa:RavitalTavil
5786
Dear Selma,
I know it's been so many time since the last time I wrote to you. I guess because of me
being a lot in the army. Passah I had to stay in the base. For the first time in my life I
wasn't at home in this holyday. But it was nice being there on this holyday. On the 13th in
May we had our independence day, even on this day I couldn't go home. I was very angry
about that so my commander gave me a week off. I and a good friend of mine packed some
clothes, uniforms and money and went to Tibirias (She's a soldier too). The buses are free
for female soldiers in uniform, we bought some food, we slept for a little fee in a 'soldier
house' which is a little hotel for soldiers only.
We met a lot of soldiers like us, we had a lot of fun in Tibirias, we went to all the
beaches of the Kineret. What was funny is that although you're on vacation with no
uniforms on there's a military discipline in the "soldiers house" like, boys are not allowed
in girl's room, we had to keep it tidy, at midnight they close the front door.
The days we spent on the beaches, the nights we and friends from the "soldier house"
spent in the city. We had to go with boys 'cause its dangerous to go back at night so we
went as a group, everyone spoke about his job in the army. We all laughed at our com-
manders, we walked barefoot we even sang on the streets. I enjoyed every minute, after 4
months of dicipline this week off was a wonderful thing.
But now back to the boring routine.
At home is very crowded. I wrote you about my married sister Rina, she's having two
babies Angel, Korin. She and her husband and the two girls lives in our place. My big
Coatinaed on Page 14-


I mil*
Page 12 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Landerdale/Friday, June 20,1986 i ,i
Establishing Achievements Of The Past Year As A Stet
The Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Laud
1
mw
Esther Lerner tells of the
Women's Division's ac-
complishments for 1986.
Specially designed artifact award goes to 1986 general
campaign chairman John Streng, right, from Federa-
tion president Brian J. Sherr.
Continued from Page 1
ing to the Jewish State."
Sherr continued with the funds distribution naming the local agen-
cies and beneficiaries and their recent allocations. These included
B'nai B'rith Youth Organization, Central Agency for Jewish Educa-
tion, Chaplaincy Commission, Committee on Elderly, Community
Relations Committee, Coral Springs Coalition, Foundation of Jewish
Philanthropies, Hebrew Day School, High School in Israel, Hillel
Foundation of Florida, Jewish Community Center, Jewish Family Ser-
vice, Jewish Floridian, Jewish High School of South Florida, Judaica
High School, Kosher Nutrition Program, North Midrasha, Volunteers
for Israel, and Young Leadership and Development Program.
Among the prominent speakers and keynote address reports were
Esther Lerner, Women's Division president who announced that the Divi-
sion had reached a record-breaking $1.1 million plus campaign, better
than 18 percent of the total regular figures. She stated that Alvera A.
Gold has been named campaign chairperson for the coming year.
Reporting on Project Renewal, the Federation twinning program with
the Israel comunity of Kfar Saba, chairperson Alvera A. Gold told of the
1979 commitment of $1.3 million to help rehabilitate and renovate the
slum area, explaining that to date 20 people have helped to provide the
life-giving service with dedicated buildings and rooms, and that the drive
is still short approximately $150,000 of the overall goal.
General campaign chairman John Streng, the recipient of the highest
honor award for his outstanding role as the campaign top officer, told the
gathered throng that as of this date, the campaign had raised $6,013,000
compared with 1985's $5,732,000 and extended his profound appreciation
for the tireless effort and heartfelt generosity of the men and women of
the community.
Other reports were on the Foundation of Jewish Philanthropies, which
included Ludwik Brodzki, chairman of the Finance Committee, who spoke
in lieu of his brother, Jacob, Foundation chairman, who was out of town.
He stated that the Foundation goal was to double the present $2.5 milliop
in gifts. This included currently more than $850,000 in bank funds,
$909,000 in holding, and some $700,000 in charitable trusts.
In a special presentation, Abraham Gittelson, CAJE director of
Education, and Sharon Horowitz, administrator, Judaica High School, in-
troduced student Howard Goldner who gave Federation/UJA a check on
behalf of the student body.
Among the key awards presented at the meeting the recipients were:
Outgoing Board Members Milton Edelstein, Irving R.
Friedman.
Outgoing Service Myron (Mike) Ackerman, Larry Behar,
Walter Bernstein, Max Buck, Marty Cain, Bernard Canarick, Murray
Chermak, Louis Colker, Judah Ever, Richard Finkelstein, Bruce
Goldman, Jim Goldstein, Harold Kaufman, Daniel Klein, Joseph
Kranberg, Alex Kutz, Paul Lehrer, Maury Levine, Mark Levy, Steven
Lewin, Irving Libowsky, Barry Mandelkorn, Selig Marko, Harold Oshry,
Norman Ostrau, Lee Rauch, Sy Roberts, Harry Sacks, Toots and Phil
Sacks, Mark Schorr, Sol Schulman, Morris Small, Sam Stone, Jeffrey
Streitfeld, Maxine and Daniel Tishberg, Milton Trupin, Andrew
Waldman, David Weinberq, and M. Morris Wittenberg.
Special campaign cochairman Daniel Cantor, Alvera A. Gold,
Alan Levy, Mark Levy, Irving Libowsky, Samuel K. Miller, Sheldon
Polish, Sidney Spewak.
Foundation Libo Fineberg, Joel Reinstein, Carl Schuster.
Young Leadership Steven Lewin.
Special campaign chairman John Streng
Special president's Leo Goodman
Following the discharge of outgoing officers, the election and installa-
tion of officers and board members for the 1986-87 year, the Federation's
new executive director Kenneth B. Bierman, told the membership that the
Federation had come a long way. Having served as the campaign director
previously from 1979-83, Bierman stated, "When I came to the Federa-
tion, the Jewish Community Center had just purchased the Florida Air
Academy, and tonight we stand on this very site in Soref Hall. I remember
the presidencies of Jacob Brodzki and Leo Goodman and how the Federa-
tion became a maior force in the community."
He continued, "Many people are responsible for the success of the
Federation, but we must not stand on our accomplishments and
achievements. We must not let the light go out. We have a vision of mak-
ing a $10 million campaign in the Greater Fort Lauderdale area. We must
all work to achieve this goal, and I ask you to join me in making the
1986-87 Federation/UJA campaign the turning point."
Following the business meeting and the benediction by Rabbi Aron
Liberman of Inverrary Chabad, the group was treated to a specially
prepared array of refreshments, donated by Alden Merrell Cheese cake in ll a?? -K 7 8tudents P ** meeting with the singing ofHatikvah and
Tamarac and served by the Hebrew Day School Students. Alden Merrell "* NattoruU Anthem.
now provides a line of kosher food in order to accommodate the local com-
munity organizations and functions.
Special campaign cochairman awards, from left, Sheldon Polish, Daniel Cantor,
Sidney Spewak, Samuel K. Miller, Alvera A. Gold and Mark Levy.
H
mi
Rabbi Sat
Shohnw
vide*d*



Friday, June 20, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 13
pping Stone For Even Greater Achievements In 1987
derdale '86 Annual Meeting And Installation
1"!
Jewish Federation Foundation
report speaker was Ludwik
Brodzki, who spoke for brother,
Jacob, chairman, who was out
of town.
Recipient of the Federation's annual Young Leader-
ship Award was Steven Lewin, right, with Brian
Sherr.
Annual meeting cochairperson
Steven Lewin gives report of
nominating committee.
In a special installation, Federation president Brian
J. Sherr watches as his daughter, Alexa, reads a poig-
nant message to her father as mother, Janet, looks on.
Former Federation president and chairman of the
Development Committee for the Foundation, Victor
Gruman, left, presents Foundation award to im-
mediate past president Joel Reinstein.
Samuel April of Temple
m in Pompano Beach pro-
ths Invocation.
Judaica High School student Howard Goldner
presents the school's check for Federa-
tion/UJA to Brian Sherr.
Outgoing board member, Irving R. Friedman,
right, accepts his award for six years of
dedicated service from president Sherr.
Meeting cochair Albera A.
Gold presents report on Project
Renewl.
;h
riDN
Federation executive director
Kenneth B. Bierman presents
his report to the community.
Rabbi Aron Lieberman of {n-
verrary Chabad and the
Benediction


Page 14 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, June 20, 1986
Kol Ishah
Vioces From
Kfar Saba
Continued from Page 11
The Children of Kfar Saba
brother Shlomo keeps studing electronics he has one and a half year to finish. He's
studing very hard, I know its hard now for him with all the noise at home so he study
mostly at nights.
I hope my sister will move soon to their apartement 'cause its hard on everyone.
I took some pictures on the vacation but I don't have them now, as soon as I have
them I'll send.
I hope to get a letter from you soon.
Fondly,
Mm
The New York Times Sunday Magazine section of May 25 in it's cover story on Israel,
had this to say about Project Renewal.
"... One finds in Israel a sincere admiration for American Jews, both for what they
have accomplished in America and what they have contributed to Israel. Project Renewal,
for example, a program in which individual American Jewish communities sponsor urban
renewal and education projects in "sister cities," has had a real impact in improving the
quality of life in towns all across Israel."
The flute (fleut) that Revital is now playing in the students' orchestra was one of
many instruments donated to Kfar Saba by our community. The Women's Division is cur-
rently building a much needed Home Environment Center where a young man such as
Shlomo, who needs a place for quiet study, may concentrate, and where both Rina and her
mother can learn how to better care for their children. All of the money that we raise for
Project Renewal goes directly to our "sister city" in Yoseftal and Kaplan, called our 'Kfar
Saba' Project Renewal neighborhoods, because they are located just outside of the old,
but affluent, city of Kfar Saba.
Bruce Yudewitz Named Director
N ews wi re/Washi ngton
HALF OF America's Jews a silent half agree with Israel's
Labor Party views on granting territorial concessions to Arabs as
a key to obtaining peace in the Middle East, a member of the
Israeli Knesset declared.
CONGRESSMAN LARRY Smith (D-Hollywood) announced
that Gretchen Biesecker of Cooper City, Florida, has been named
a winner in the 1986 Congress-Bundestag Youth Exchange Pro-
gram. As one of 260 American high school students chosen from
3,000 nominees, Biesecker will receive a full scholarship to spend
one year in Germany as a member of a German family while atten-
ding high school.
MR. AND MRS. Average American will send $6,867 of their
earnings to the federal government this year, and $965 of it will
go to pay interest on the public debt, a private study says.
GOVERNMENT SAFETY and clean-air standards may add as
much as $1,500 to the price of a new car and another $700 to its
upkeep, a study by four leading economists said.
DURING CONGRESS first attempt in 18 years to rewrite the
nation's gun control laws, Congressman Larry Smith (D-Florida)
successfully offered an amendment to ban machineguns
throughout the United States.
tions and the full range of the
Federation's programs.
"I am looking forward to the
challenge ahead. There is a great
potential in the North Shore and I
am delighted to be able to serve in
this important and growing com-
munity," Yudewitz said. "I am
proud that I was able to help Fort
Lauderdale grow during these
past two years which have been an
important period of transition for
the community."
Bruce, his wife Sharon and their
four children will be moving to
Marblehead in the summer.
SiiBi mm1 *<*** ******
?o StrtetlvW^L-**,
OCEAMfMHT
tut, art Con Av.
MIWYWEHHI $84
4MyS/3fiHTS
perperso"
dbto-occ.
INCLUDES:
Bruce J. Yudewitz, campaign
director for the Jewish Federation
of Greater Fort Lauderdale has
been appointed executive director
of the Jewish Federation of the
. North Shore in Marblehead, Mass.
Howard Rich, president of the
Federation made the
announcement
Yudewitz has been the cam-
paign director of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale for the past two
years. During that time the UJA
Campaign has grown from just
over five million to the over six
million dollars. Over a half million
dollar* in new pledges for Project
Renewal and over one quarter of a
million dollars was raised for
Operation Moses, the special ef-
fort for the rescue of Ethiopian
Jews.
He was instrumental in getting
the community involved in UJA"s
Community Leadership Consulta-
tion Program to bring to Fort
Lauderdale top professional and
volunteer leadership to help plan
for the future growth of the cam-
paign and the Federation.
The Jewish Federation of the
North Shore serves 22 com-
munities just north of Boston.
Centered in Marblehead
Massachusetts, the Federation
raises over $2.6 million dollars
from the approximately 22,000
Jews there.
Yudewitz will serve as the ex-
ecutive director, and will be
responsible for the operations of
the Federation, overseeing the
Campaign, planning and alloca-
At Brown's we do things one way.
triA
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Everything we do, we do
with you in mind. We know
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right at the pool. And we
make sure every sport you
play is here for you, too.
? **
SHIRLEY BASSEY
Sat.Julys
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Sal. July 12
RITA MORENO
Sal July 19
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Sat, July 26
SAMMY DAVIS, JR.
Sat .Aug. 2
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Sat, Aug. 9
NELL CARTER
Sat, Aug. 16
TONY ORLANDO
Sat.. Aug. 23
WAYNE NEWTON
Sun.. Aug. 31
And while you're having fun, the kids will too, in
our supervised day camp.
So you have your whole day, your way!
And in the evening, you have choices, too. There's
entertainment, parties and socializing in our cocktail
lounges.
Call Brown's today and we'll send you a free color
brochure with all the reasons that make our 9-star hotel
a heavenly place to vacation.
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*~> -a s.-1
.
Friday, June 20, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 15
P.M. Network Highlights
Black/Jewish Relations
WOMEN'S DIVISION
P.M. Network is an evening
discussion group sponsored by the
Women's Division of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale in cooperation with
the Central Agency for Jewish
Education.
On Monday May 19, members of
P.M. Network participated in one
of the year's most provocative
programs, a dialogue on
Black/Jewish relations.
Scholar-in-residence, Dr.
Abraham J. Gittelson, served as
the program's facilitator. Joining
him in a panel presentation were
Alice Solomon, executive director
of the National Conference of
Christians and Jews, and two pro-
minent members of the local Black
community, John Ruffin, presi-
dent of the Broward County Ur-
ban League, and Daisy Taylor,
formerly on the staff of Con-
gressman E. Clay Shaw.
The speakers focused on the
traditional partnership between
Jews and Blacks, a coalition which
was at its strongest during the
Civil Rights movement of the 60's.
The consensus seemed to be that
while the partnership has been
weakened in recent years, and
while the two communities do
have different priorities, the fun-
damental beliefs of the two com-
munities and their commitment to
social and economic justice is still
strong.
Both Ruffin and Taylor believe
that the traditional Black/Jewish
coalition can and should be re-
established and that participating
in this type of dialogue is the first
step in building the necessary
relationships.
Those who attended the pro-
gram agreed, and long after the
formal program concluded, par-
ticipants remained to continue the
dialogue informally, in small
groups.
The year's final P.M. Network
meeting took place on June 16,
with chairperson Selma Telles and
scholar-in-residence Dr. Abe Git-
telson, facilitating a general
discussion summing up the year's
activities.
P.M. Network will resume
meeting in September. For fur-
ther information contact the
Women's Division of the Jewish
Federation, 748-8400.
Pwtured at the final meeting of the Women's Division's P.M. Net-
work are program participants, from left, Alice Solomon, ex-
ecutive director of the National Conference of Christians and
Jews; John Ruffin, president of the Broward County Urban
league; and Daisy Tayhr, formerly on the staff of Congressman
E. Clay Shaw.
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"**'*
.^HJff
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Chaplains Get-Together June 24
.fid) ?,' o#.
Members of the volunteer
Chaplaincy Corps of the Chaplain-
cy Commission of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale, and-their wives, have
been invited by Chaplaincy chair-
man Alfred Golden, and director
Rabbi Albert Schwartz, for a get-
together, Tuesday, June 24.
In a special ceremony, Rabbis
Arnold Lasker, chaplain, Aviva
Manor, and Mordecai Brill,
chaplain, Doctors Hospital, will be
honored for 50 years of rabbinical
ordination. The two North
Broward County members of the
Chaplaincy Commission were
classmates together and ordained
on June 7.
The dinner will be held at 6 p.m.
at the Embassy North, 1025 E.
Hallandale Blvd., Hallandale.
A special presentation will be
made by Dr. Stuart R. Grant of
North Miami Beach. His topic will
be "One Need Not Smile New
Dimension Pastoral Counselling."
Dr. Grant is the Assistant Prin-
cipal and Emotional Guidance
Counselor for the Jewish High
School of South Florida and has a
private practice in Pastoral
Counseling. He has served as a
pulpit rabbi for seven years. He
holds an MS degree in Jewish
Education from Ferkaut
Graduate School. Yeshiva Univer-
sity; an MS degree in Jewish
History from Bernard Revel
Graduate School, Yeshiva Univer-
sity, and a PhD in Psychology and
Pastoral Counseling from Boston
University. He received certifica-
tion in Hospital Chaplaincy at
Mercy Hospital, Springfield,
Mass. He has done extensive lec-
turing and counseling in loss and
grief therapy.
Special commendations will be
tendered on behalf of the Commis-
sion by Alfred Golden, Chairman
to:
Rabbi Mordecai Brill, Doctors
General Hospith_i4ev. Harold
Cowen, Florida'Medical Center;
Rabbi Simon Eckstein, Manor
Health Care; Rabbi Abraham J.
Al Golden
Ezring, Sunrise Health Center;
Rabbi David Gordon, North Ridge
General Hospital, North Beach
Community Hospital, Prison
(Broward), St. John's Nursing and
Rabbi Mordecai Brill
Rehab.; Rabbi Joseph Langner,
Humana Cypress Community
Hospital; Rabbi Arnold Lasker,
Aviva; Rabbi David Matzner, Holy
Cross Hospital; Rabbi Elliot Skid-
Dr. Stuart Grant
dell, Plantation General Hospital;
and Rabbi Kurt F. Stone, Humana
Hospital Bennett.
Also invited to attend this an-
nual event are members of the
Rabbi Arnold Lasker
Federation's Board of Directors
and community leaders.
For further information contact
the Federation at 748-8400, ext.
53.
Your Federation/UJA Dollars Help Support Jewish Education .
Through Hebrew Day School Classes
PICTURED WITH a pre-kindergarten class of the Hebrew Day
School of Fort Lauderdale, are left, Carol Rosenbloom, teacher,
and Lent Glassman, teacher's assistant.
T
ALL SMILES are the students ofMaxine Ross's kindergarten
class of the Hebrew Day School. The Day School is a major
beneficiary agency of the Jewish Federation receiving funds from
the annual United Jewish Appeal campaign.
.?'
SaUtes THE ISRAEL PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA
Thursday, September 4th at 8:15 P.M.
THE jgjgffi*:
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cwv T.inP 90 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 19
Spotlight On Dedication June 22
Friday, June 20,1986/The Jewish Floridian of, Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 17
Continued from Page 1
says Soref. "With proper sup-
port and funding our JCC can
become one of the outstan-
ding Jewish Centers in the
nation to bring us all con-
siderable pride and
satisfaction.
THE SOREF STORY
We can look back "with
pride and satisfaction" and
stand in awe of the Soref
record of accomplishment. A
man of many talents, in-
terests and inclinations, Sam
Soref, a former attorney,
could also have been called
outstanding as teacher,
athlete, public servant,
legislator, orator, in-
dustrialist, philanthropist and
a life-long supporter of Israeli
and Jewish causes.
Born in Milwaukee, Soref
grew up in the same Jewish
neighborhood as Golda Meir.
Acquiring his love of Judaism
from his father, who was one
of the founders of Wiscon-
sin's first Zionist group, he
has faithfully followed the
path of service to the Jewish
community here and in Israel
ever since.
While earning his doctorate
in Jurisprudence and
Philosophy at the University
of Wisconsin his favorite
extra-curricular activities
were to help found the Zionist
group's "Palestine Builders"
and additional groups which
became the first Hillel-related
clubs. He also entered and
won a B'nai B'rith national
essay contest. Taking time
out from his scholarly pur-
suits to excel as a semi-pro
baseball player, he was also
considered championship
material in the sports of
basketball, football, handball
and boxing!
In 1928, with his reputation
growing as a brilliant young
lawyer and with his strong
sense of civic responsibility
noted, he ran for the
Milwaukee Council, won, and
served 12 years. His leader-
ship in civic improvement,
especially in the city's
Lakefront Filtration Plant
and city housing projects
earned him plaudits and
gratitude.
One achievement which
gives Sam Soref satisfaction
is his work in curbing the
widespread and in-
discriminate use of fireworks.
Much of the anti-fireworks
legislation now on the statute
books throughout the states
is modeled after his programs
of prevention and supervised
exhibition.
Another accomplishment
during his term of office in ci-
ty government was to invoke
the city's police and licensing
powers against the German-
American (Nazi-oriented)
Bund for their defacement of
synagogue and Jewish owned
establishments in addition to
other offenses.
In 1940 Sam Soref turned
his talents to private industry
when he became associated
with the world's largest lock
manufacturer, called the
Master Lock Company, as
Vice President Among his
responsibilities was his direc-
torship and successful opera-
tion of the company's labor
relations resulting in
favorable relationships with
the UAW-CIO.
During World War II, Sam
Soref was appointed by Presi-
dent Roosevelt to serve on
tie War Commission for the
Conservation of Strategic
Materials, earning commen-
dations from the group.
In 1964 Soref became
Master Lock's Chairman of
tiie Board and in 1970 he
retired.
Among Soref s involve-
ment in Milwaukee civic life
was activity "with the
Milwaukee Airport Commit-
tee and its Library Board. In
Jewish life, an honoree of
NCCJ, he was a founder of
the city's Federation and
Jewish Community Center
besides being on the founding
committee of three children's
Jewish camps in*Wisconsin.
On the boards of numerous
Jewish organizations, he also
has a forest in Israel named
after him through the
gratitude of JNF..
IN FORT LAUDERDALE
The Sorefs have not paused
while following the path of
service to the Jewish and
general communities. Their
involvement and good works
have earned them many more
citations. In 1976, Sam Soref
was named by Jewish Federa-
tion as the "Man of the
Year," the first person to be
so honored. Technion, too
paid tribute to the Sorefs as
lifetime supporters of their
university. As for the JCC,
their affiliation and history of
devotion since its establish-
ment is recognized and well-
documented.
HELENE SOREF
Considered a figurehead in
her own right, Helene Soref
has also made her mark in
Jewish communal life. An ar-
dent supporter of Sam's
ideas, ideals and in-
volvements, she has been the
perfect helpmate at his side.
In Fort Lauderdale she is
well-known in Federation's
Woman's Division for becom-
ing its first Life Member and
for her activity in a variety of
committees. She founded the
Lion's Division, the "Pride"
of the Women's Division and
was also honored by JNF.
For the JCC Helene Soref
helped the Center start on its
way by sitting on the first
committees when its program
was developing and serving
wherever she was needed.
Mrs. Soref has logged
countless hours of volunteer-
ing, many of them guiding the
operations of the Center's Le
Browse Thrift Shop. She has
been cited as a JCC Volunteer
of the Year.
THE JCC COMMITTEE
Board member Maxine
Adler, of The Adler Network,
Inc. is chairing the committee
in charge of the day's ar-
rangements. Other members
are her husband Owen; Mar-
tin Dishowitz, Plantation City
Councilman; and Dorothy
Rubin, publisher of the
Jewish Journal.
Now Welcoming Dot First Residents For
Exciting Rental Retirement Living
The Horizon Club at Meadow Lakes is now open, and retirement
living has never looked this good. Imagine a community with
a cascading waterfall, winding streams filled with ornamental
fish, sunken grottoes for quiet conversation, and a sun-splashed
pool deck on the lake-front. Picture a community that offers you:
Delicious Meals
Efficient.Housekeeping
Emergency Nursing
Convenient Chauffeured Transportation
24 Hour Electronic
and Manned Security
Live Entertainment & Parties
Adult Education
Spacious Apartments With Pull Kitchens
And Much More!
AH with No Endowment or Entry Fee!!
You've imagined the Horizon Club. Now you can lease
at the Horizon Club for immediate occupancy.
Open daily 10 am to 5 pm. Sundays noon until five.
We're located on Military Trail between Sample Road and
Hillsboro Blvd. in Deerfield Beach.
cc
Call mat (305) 4812111
A RadkeCare (ommtmity
SEND THIS COUPON FOR TOUR FREE COLOR BROCHURE
HF Hopeon CLW
Club Style Retirement Living
At Meadow Lakes
1220 S.MinUry Trail
DeriMdBck.,FLSS442
(MS) 481-2111
NAME.
PHONE
ADDRESS.
cnr.
.STATE
/;..'


i;

rase lb I Hf .inwich Klnnman f>rnrfcltw l< nrr I .aluiwHWPjr rwlftv. .lime zii MiHwva',^.i
Page 18 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Laudeniale/Friday, June 20,1986
FederationIUJA Beneficiaries In Action ...
Kosher Nutrition Programs
Provide That Special Feeling
kosher
Nutritioti
Briefly-
r
i
The Jewish Federation's Kosher Nutrition Program, housed at
the Jewish Community Center is fortunate to have intergenera-
tvmal visits. Shown is a preschool class from the Hebrew Day
School singing songs and showing off their ever enlarging Hebrew
vocabulary. There is a wonderful comraderie between the
children and the elderly.
Jews in Paris Protest Award
Of PhD to Thesis on Holocaust
Andrew Frank (center), of South Plantation High School and a
member of Tempi* Kol Ami, is pictured with two participants at
the NCCJ Youth Workshop.
National Conference Of Christians
And Jews Holds Youth
Relations Workshop
PARIS (JTA) Several hun-
dred Jews and non-Jews
demonstrated recently at the
Memorial to the Unknown Jewish
Martyr here to protest the award
of an academic degree by Nantes
University to the author of a
thesis claiming that the Holocaust
was "a figment of Jewish
imagination."
In Nantes, in eastern France,
the city council suspended a
regular session to publicly con-
demn the university's acceptance
of the doctoral thesis.
The matter was raised in the
National Assembly where
Georges Fontes, the minister in
charge of war veterans affairs, de-
nounced the "vice of denying con-
temporary history." Minister of
Education Rene Maunoury pro-
mised a full-scale investigation.
The thesis, claiming that the
deadly gas found at Nazi death
camps when they were liberated
was for "sanitary purposes" was
written by Henri Roques, 65, a
retired agricultural engineer and
amateur historian. It received the
highest grades from the accep-
tance committee.
The Jewish Federation's
Kosher Nutrition Programs
are entertained by many com-
munity volunteers, including
Eunice Levitt, who is seen
smooching with ninety-six year
old Irwin Kern in a vaudeville
skit. Irwin beamed that it is
wonderful to still have a little
spice in life.
Eighty students from 21 public
and private high schools in
Broward County recently attend-
ed the Fourth Human Relations
Workshop sponsored by the
Broward National Conference of
Christians and Jews. The
workshop, held at the Plantation
Holiday Inn, brought together
high school students of different
racial, religious and ethnic
backgrounds.
The first part of the workshop
entitled, "Traditions of Life
Cycles," was led by members of
the clergy. and educators, in-
cluding Mary Lou Balog, St.
Thomas Aquinas High School;
Rabbi Rachel Hertzman and
Elaine Litvak, Temple Kol Ami,
Plantation/ and Michael McKen-
zie, Second Presbyterian Church,
Fort Lauderdale, and many
others.
The second half of the program,
led by Mrs. Balog, Boyd Ivey of
Nova Middle School and Selma
Telles, Human Relations
specialist; was devoted to
workshops on developing com-
munication skills and better per-
sonal relationships among people
of differing backgrounds.
For information about the
NCCJ, contact 749-4454.
Not since the birth of Israel has
something so tiny made it so big.
It's Tettey's tiny little tea leaves. They've been making it big in
Jewish homes tor years. Tetley knows that |ust as tiny lamb
chops and tiny peas are the most flavorful, the same thing is
true for tea leaves. So tor rich, refreshing flavor, take time out
tor Tetley tea. Because tiny is tastier!
l
md*<
K Certified Kosher
"Tiny Is la.llrr"
For daiidou ly x>l wmmw-
timo rofrodMnont, pour on ft*
Sartp* Brand Docoffoinolod
How ono roundod tea-
spoon Srtp Inttontor
Frwzc-Drwd Dotaffainotod
CsNm>in o toil daw. Stir in one cup coid wotor. Add
k* and mtv with craam and >ugar, if you want. Or
ptk for Hot your fovoritrMtouraflt. Wtl hovo a d-
Hgfctfui ummm cootor. Rid* roof coffao that'i 97%
eaffcrn-froo. And Koshor, too. $orip
ortwMnwbHM*am*aio~riwra*t
of your tvmmor thooW onfy bo to
rafmhingl
KOrtiKWKo**
f
NMUt Q0M
iWOwrfMiCmnto


Friday, June 20, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page ^9
Island Bay.
The Most Affordable
Continuing Care
Community
in Florida.
+m
'u-~ :- ;:;> -:::' '^.-m >
Island Bay-a first class, residential resort community-
not only gives you lifelong housing but lifelong health care.
And more amenities than any continuing care community
in Florida. Look what you get for our low entrance fees
starting at $38,375.
A modern Health Care Center available whenever you
need it.
A beautiful apartment home with free weekly housekeeping.
Your own Clubhouse with arts and crafts workshops.. game
rooms and exercise/aerobic rooms...a theatre auditorium...
and religious services on premises Friday nights and holidays.
A host of outdoor activities-swimming, jogging, biking...
everything to help you lead a vital, active life.
An inviting dining room serving three tempting meals a
day-your choice of one meal daily included in your monthly
maintenance fee.
An ideal location. Twenty-five lushly landscaped acres in
Florida's sunny Deerfield Beach.
All this for a surprisingly low, one-time entrance fee.
Make your over-60 years the time to have the time of your
life. Write for our brochure. Or call for an appointment to see
what we believe is one of the finest and most affordable resort
retirement communities in the country.
Contact
Fran Phillips
at Island Bay (305) 426-3222.
Or send for our brochure.
N
Maad&y O.
{ofonnafMACeMtr
Century PtauiS
-
cot
MU90>euiO
ISLAND
BAY
Please send me your Island Bay brochure.
Name__________________________
Address.
City____
Phone 1_
State
Zip
)
Mail to: Fran Philips
Island Bay Information
Century Plaza III
1856-H West Hillsboro Blvd.
Deerfield Beach, FL 33442
TJF
A non-profit continuing care community owned and
operated by Continuing Lite Care of North Broward. Int


Page 20 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, June 20, 1986


JEWISH FAMILY SERVICE OF BROWARD COUNTY
4517 Hollywood Boulevard, Hollywood. Florida 33021 (305) 9660956
Sherwin H. Rosenstein, ACSW, LCSW, Executive Director
THOSE SUMMER BLUES
Another summer is on the way.
We, in South Florida, become
aware of the approach of summer
as the days become more rainy
and humid. At the beginning,
many of us greet the hot weather
as a pleasant alternative to the
"cold" winter days that we have
previously experienced. As the
days pass, however, many of us
yearn once again for cooler
weather. Thus, the flight of the
snowbirds becomes telltale of our
changing seasons.
There is an exodus from South
Florida and many of us find that
friends and relatives have left
their homes, condominiums or
apartments for the summer
season. For many South Flori-
dians the moon over Miami in the
summer is less than romantic.
Summer, for many people,
becomes symbolic of loss, isolation
and depression. The feeling of be-
ing left behind because of an in-
ability to travel due to inadequate
finances or no one to visit is in-
deed a depressing theme. We can
become even more depressed if we
allow ourselves to think that all
those people who left South
Florida are having a ball while we
are holding the fort in the swamp.
If you think that the snowbirds
are singing up north while you are
screeching for worms down here,
then the rest of this article is
meant for you. If you, on the other
hand, enjoy South Florida's
change of seasons and find
stimulation and beauty in our en-
vironment, then stop reading.
The old adage that "the grass is
greener" certainly cannot be ap-
plied to South Florida because
everyone knows that our grass is
a deep green all year. For those
readers who experience the sum-
mer blues of isolation and depres-
sion, it is time to fieht back.
The artillery and ammunition to
combat isolation and depression is
planning and action reaching
out. There are acquaintances and
neighbors who you could approach
or even members of your family
you haven't spoken to since last
summer. There are free local
events and activities which you
could partake in a low costing
movies that you see. The JCCs,
community centers, libraries,
parks and beaches, volunteer pro-
grams all await you. Too hot you
hjROWARD
IJAPER a
Qackaging
say! Then go out in the morning
before noon or plan a walk after
supper on the beach boardwalk or
where you live. Just do and get
out! If you don't use it you lose it!
For those of you who still are
unable to make a move or believe
that the situation is too distressful
and have lost hope, please call
Jewish Family Service of
Broward County so that we can
help you see just how green your
grass is. Please call at the
Hollywood office, 966-0956; Fort
Lauderdale office, 749-1506; or
Deerfield Beach office, 427-8508.
Jewish Family Service of
Broward County is affiliated with
the Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale, Jewish Federa-
tion of South Broward, and the
United Way.
AT A RECENT dinner at Temple Emanu-El,
the teachers of the Religious School were
honored. Seated, from left, Cantor Rita Shore,
Rabbi Jeffrey L. Ballon, Marine Ross. Stan-
ding, from left, Sylvia Levitzky, Helen
Winoker, Lee Corburn, Karen Koller,
Leonard Kaufman, Educational Director,
Nikki Cowan, Anne Krone, Chairman of the
School Committee, Leona Mills, Jeannette
Fishman and Shirley Miller.
Cardinal Lustiger Addresses
American Jewish Leaders
NEW YORK Jean-Marie Cardinal Lustiger,
the Roman Catholic Archbishop of Paris, told a
group of American Jewish leaders here that he.
hopes the Vatican will establish full diplomatic
relations with Israel.
"I hope it will come," the church official, a con-
vert from Judaism, remarked when asked about
Vatican recognition of the Jewish State. This is..
believed to be the first time a Roman Catholic car-
dinal has expressed such a view publicly, although
many members of the Church nave voiced it. in.'
private.
The prelate, in the United States on a brief visit, '"
spoke to some 30 leaders of American Jewish
organizations at a meeting arranged by the
American Jewish Congress Institute for Jewish/.
Christian Relations. Henry Siegman, executive
director of AJCongress, served as chairman. The
meeting took place at AJCongress headquarters in
Manhattan.
While declining to discuss the theological im-
plications of his identity as a Roman Catholic who
also considers himself a Jew, Cardinal Lustiger,
whose mother died in a Nazi concentration camp,
said that "if I tried to tell myself I am not a Jew, I
simply would not be honest with myself."
At one point he noted that he was "troubled by
how to say I am still a Jew without offending other
Jews." He also observed wryly that "some
Rightist newspapers in France call me 'the Jew,'
and that's fine."
&u4 & &**%*}
FT LAUD 776 6272
0ROWARD
[JAPER &
Packaging
Dial Station (11) charges apply These charges do not apply to person-to-person, com. hotel guest, calling card collect calls, calls charged to another number. o to time and
rharge calls Rates sub|ct to change Daytime rates are higher Rates do pf '"fleet applicable federal, state and local taxes Applies to mtra-LATA long distance calls only.
T


Friday, June 20, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 21
Community Calendar
Organizations
Compiled by Lori Ginsberg,
Federation 748-8400.
SATURDAY JUNE 21
Temple Beth Torah-Men's Club:
8:30 p.m. Show, "The
Shenanigans." Donation $5, $4.
At Temple, 9101 NW 57 St.,
Tamarac. 721-7660.
Omega Playhouse: 8:30 p.m.
Show featuring Cantor Rita and
Ira Shore and Lee Stanley. Dona-
tion $4. Playhouse, 7200 NW 17
St., Plantation. 792-0237 or
791-4268.
MONDAY JUNE 23
B'nai B'rith Women-Deerfield
Chapter: 12:30 p.m Special Pro-
gram: Dolls for Democracy. Tem-
ple Beth Israel. D.B.
Hadassah-Ilana Hawaiian
Gardens Chapter: Noon. Alice
Halperin Memorial luncheon and
card party. Mr. Ray's Cafeteria,
Lakes Mall. 485-3699.
WLI-Tamarac Chapter: Lun-
cheon and card party. Donation
A Diversified Jewish Quiz
By RABBI
DAVID W. GORDON
1-What does the expression,
"Sagi Nehor" mean and to whom
is it addressed?
2- What is the primary function
of the Synagogue?
3- What is the Hebrew word
"Ben" connote?
4- What is implied by the ex-
pression, "From Dan to
Beersheba"?
5- What was the Damascus
Affair?
6- Name a sport that was prac-
ticed in ancient Israel?
7-What did G.K. Chesterton,
noted English writer, imply when
he said that "G-d is not the Chief
character in the Bible?
8- Name the first Ashkenazic
Congregation established in
Manhattan (N.Y.C.)?
9- Does the "Shemoneh Esray"
(Eighteen Benedictions) still con-
tain that number?
10- With what weapon did
young David kill the giant
Goliath?
Answers
1- "Men of much light" and as a
contrary euphemism is directed to
the blind.
2- To inspire the soul and to in-
struct the mind.
3- TSon or son of.
4- The length and breadth of the
then Palestine, since these cities
were its boundaries.
5- In 1840 a group of prominent
Jews were imprisoned, tortured
and threatened with execution on
a false ritual murder charge (blood
libel) which unleashed world-wide
condemnation that fortunately
brought about their release.
In The
Beginning .
Fort Lauderdale recently lost
one of the founding members of
the first synagogue to be built in
the Fort Lauderdale area.
A co-founder of Temple Emanu-
El in Lauderdale Lakes, Sadye
Katz came to Fort Lauderdale in
1924 and along with her husband,
Mack, opened the city's first
women's clothing store, Mack's
Lady's shop on Brickell Avenue
and later on Andrews Avenue.
The Katzs attempted to establish
a place of worship for the then
seven Jewish families in town,
however, the structure was
smashed by the 1926 hurricane.
In 1936 with the aid of the
founders of the Lerner Stores,
money was raised and long-range
funding arranged to build Temple
Emanu-El, a Reform synagogue.
The Temple was completed in
September, 1937, in time for the
High Holy Days housing a con-
gregation of residents from
Hollywood, Fort Lauderdale,
Pompano and Boca Raton.
7-That G-d is the only
character.
8- B'nai Jeshurun (Shearith
Israel-Spanish-Portuguese
Synagogue) the Sephardic Con-
gregation was the first.
9- No, a 19th Benediction has
been added following the destruc-
tion of the Second Temple,
"Velamalshinim" a prayer
directed against slanderers, in-
formers and traitors.
10- A slingshot.
$3.50. Italian-American Club,
6535 W. Commercial Blvd.
722-7039.
TUESDAY JUNE 24
Na'amat USA-Debra Gab: 12:30
p.m. Meeting. Laud. Lakes City
Hall. 485-3699.
WEDNESDAY JUNE 25
Na'amat USA-Gilah Chapter:
Noon. Closing luncheon. Temple
Beth Israel, D.B.
American Red Crou-Broward
County Chapters: Noon. Annual
luncheon and meeting. Speaker:
Khambrel Marshall of Channel 10
Sports. Pier 66 Panorama Room.
581-4221.
Jewish War Veterans-Ladies
Auxiliary No. 730: Noon. Card
party. Broward Federal, 3000 N.
University Dr. 971-4986.
THURSDAY JUNE 26
Coral Springs Area Coalition of
Jewish Organizations: 7:30 p.m.
Meeting. West Wing Room, Coral
Springs City Hall. 753-3653.
SATURDAY JUNE 28
Lauderdale Oaks: 8:30 p.m.
Show featuring Bobby Sherman
and the Opus Three. Clubhouse.
733-9338 or 731-7874.
AMERICAN
JEWISH CONGRESS
The Southeast Region of
American Jewish Congress will
present its first Community
Achievement Award to Miami im-
presaria Ruth Greenfield at a
noon luncheon, June 22 at the Om-
ni International Hotel. Greenfield
is best known as the Miami-Dade
Community College professor of
humanities and music who found-
ed the Lunchtime Lively Arts
Series.
BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY
NWC
The Fort Lauderdale/Pompano
Chapter of Brandeis University
National Women's Committee is
collecting books for its annual Us-
ed Book Sale. Paperbacks, tex-
tbooks, records, etc., would be
gladly accepted. For pick-up infor-
mation contact 974-8553 or
974-2044.
CORAL SPRINGS
COALITION
Stan Kane, president of the
Coral Springs Area Coalition of
Jewish Organizations, announced
that there will be a meeting of the
coalition at 7:30 p.m. Thursday
June 26 in the West Wing Room
of Coral Springs City Hall. Items
to be discussed include; new slate
of officers, the 1986 Chanukah
Festival, an interfaith council, and
creating a cultural heritage com-
mittee. For information call Stan
at 753-3653.
AMIT WOMEN
The Florida Council of Amit
Women held a very successful
donor luncheon recently at the
Konover Hotel, Miami Beach.
Guest speaker was Commissioner
Barry Schreiber. Serving as lun-
cheon chairman was Saundra
Rothenberg, president of the
Florida Council.
CENTRAL CONFERENCE
OF AMERICAN RABBIS
Over 500 Reform rabbis and
their families will gather at
Snowmass Convention Center,
Colorado, from June 25-30 to
discuss the controversy surroun-
ding relations with their Conser-
vative and Orthodox counter-
parts. The theme of this year's
97th Central Conference in,
"Reform Integrity Within Kelal
Yisra-Eil."

where shopping is a pleasure 7days a week
Publix
DANISH
BAKERY
Publix Bakeries open at 8:00 A.M.
Available at PubHx Stores with
Freeh Danish Bakeries Only,
Delicious, Large
Sugar
Cookies
*
!
dozen
Wedding Cake Ornament
(Valued up to $15.00)
FREE!
with the purchase of a 3-ber
or larger wedding cake during
the months of
June, Jury and August
Available at Publix Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only
Raisin
Pumpernickel
Bread
!
Available at ail PubHx Stores
and Danish Bakeries, Tender
danish filled with a
rich cherry filling
Danish
Cherry Strip
$*89
each
Available at all Publix Stores
and Danish Bakeries
%^t*4^; Ri9hUR...rv.d. ^^g>^
M
o Prices Effective
/^-------^ Thursday, June 19 thru.
/;^^~^J Wednesday, June 25, 1986.
" rw


.^wSSSPs^
v


in '*
-
V
Page_22 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, June 20, 1986
Bar/Bat Mitzvahs
Lazarus
Bortx
TEMPLE KOL AMI
The B'not Mitzvah of Stephanie
Leigh Laxanu, daughter of Ran-
dy and Peter Lazarus, and
Stephanie Borte, daughter of
Sharon and Norman Bortz, was
celebrated at the Saturday morn-
ing June 14 service at Temple Kol
Ami, Plantation.
The Bar Mitzvah of Todd
Heimowitz, son of Paula and
Heimowitz
Gary Heimowitz, will be
celebrated at the Friday night
June 20 service at Kol Ami.
Debbie Droga, daughter of
Susan and Irwin Droga, and
Allison Joy Stecker, daughter of
Diane and Bill Stecker, will
celebrate their B'not Mitzvah at
the Saturday morning June 21
service at Kol Ami.
AT A RECENT gala dinner, Temple Emanu-El of Fort Lauder-
daU celebrated the burning of the Temple's mortgage. Pictured,
from left, Carey Fisher, incoming Temple president; Rabbi Jef-
frey L. Ballon, spiritual leader of Emanu-El; and Richard J.
Levy, outgoing president.
Alvera Gold Named To
UJA Nat'l Women's Board
Continued from Page 1
an extensive screening
process.
These leaders should be
involved in their own local
community as well as being
active nationally. Board
members will have
demonstrated outstanding
talents in speaking, train-
ing, and solicitation and are
qualified to serve as
representatives to other
Women's Divisions.
Alvera has been at the
forefront of the Women's
Division campaign of the
Jewish Federation of
Greater Ft. Lauderdale for
many years.
Most recently she has
served as 1986 Women's
Division campaign
cochairperson and has
assumed the position of
Women's Division executive
vice president of campaign
for the 1987 campaign year.
She has also served as
Federation's Project
Renewal chair and Project
Renewal chair for the
Florida region, in addition
to serving on the Federa-
tion's Board of Directors.
Guest speaker at the May
19 installation was Stanley
Horowitz, UJA president.
WE ARE P1EASED TO ANNOUNCE
NEW LOCATIONS FOR OUR MEDICAL PRACTICE
ORTHOPAEDIC ASSOCIATES OF BROWARD
Harold S. Reitrnan, M.D.
Richard S. Kleiman, M.D. Bruce M. Berkowitz, M.D.
SPECIALIZING IN:
Orthopaedic Surgery Hand Surgery Joint Replacement
Arthroscopic Surgery Sports Medicine
PLANTATION OFFICE
Orthopaedic Associates
Plaza
7390 N.W. 5th Street
Plantation, Florida 33317
7*1-3171 ________
LAUDERDALE LAKES OFFICE
Florida Medical Center East
Suite 100
3001 N.W. 49th Avenue
lauderdale Lakes, FL 33313
735-61M
Stecker
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
Barry Rothberg, son of Susan
and Alan Rothberg, was called to
the Torah in honor of his Bar Mitz-
vah on Saturday morning June 14
at Temple Emanu-El, Ft.
Lauderdale.
TEMPLE BETH TORAH
The Bar Mitzvah of Michael
Walker, son of Arline and Ray-
mond Walker, will be celebrated
at the Saturday June 21 service at
Temple Beth Torah, Tamarac.
Lisa Sage, daughter of Elaine
and Bruce Sage, will become a Bat
Mitzvah celebrant at the Friday
night June 27 service at Beth
Torah.
The B'nai Mitzvah of Jayson
Zion, son of Sharon and Steve
Zion, Charles Codeil, son of
Helene and George Codeil, and
Milo Fox, son of Louise Fox, will
all celebrated at the Saturday
morning June 28 service at Beth
Torah.
TEMPLE BETH AM
Sean Greenberg, son of Carol
and Farrel Greenberg, and
Suzanne Dobkin, daughter of
Ellen and Martin Dobkin, will
celebrate their B'nai Mitzvah at
the Saturday June 28 service at
Temple Beth Am, Margate.
TEMPLE BETH ORR
On Saturday June 21, the B'nai
Mitzvah of Leonard Bomwell,
Jr., son of Leonard and Margaret
Bomwell, and Michael Goodman,
son of Susan and Jonathan Good-
man, will be celebrated at Temple
Beth Orr, Coral Springs.
RAMAT SHALOM
The Bat Mitzvah of Jennifer
Harris was celebrated at the
Saturday morning June 14 service
at Ramat Shalom, Plantation.
The B'not Mitzvah of Shanon
Gnntora and Johanna Liroff will
be celebrated at the Saturday
morning June 21 service at Ramat
Shalom.
Temple Beth Israel To
Install New Rabbi June 22
An installation ceremony for
Temple Beth Israel's newly-
arrived rabbi, Dr. Howard A. Ad-
dison, will be Sunday, June 22, at
7 p.m., at the temple in Sunrise,
7100 W. Oakland Park Blvd.
The former spiritual leader of
Temple Shaare Tikvah in Chicago
arrived in Florida recently and
began conducting services June 6.
Installing officer and keynote
speaker at the ceremony will be
Rabbi Benjamin Z. Kreitman, ex-
ecutive vice-president ot unueu
Synagogue of America. Speakers
will include Temple Beth Israel's
president Dr. Clark D. Galin, and
Harold Wishna, executive direc-
tor of the Southeast Region of
United Synagogue of America.
Rabbi Theodore Feldman of
Boca Raton, will also participate
in the event.
"We invite the temple family
and the area's Jewish community
to help welcome Rabbi Addison to
West Broward," said Dr. Galin.
Publication of Atlas Suspended
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Deputy Premier David Levy
suspended publication and
distribution of the Israel Atlas.
Monday on grounds that a
paragraph on Jewish settlements
in the administered territories
violated the policies and decisions
of the unity government.
Levy, who is also Minister of
Housing and a leader of the Herat
wing of Likud, took exception to a
section written by Hebrew
University David Amiran which
stated that most of the set*
tlements were established in
Arab-populated area* in nifter in
preclude any future territorial
concessions. Amiran wrote fur-
ther that this policy would lead in-
evitably to a bi-national state, con-
trary to the traditional goal of
Zionism which is a Jewish State
with a Jewish population entirely
Jewish in character.
Candlelighting Times
June 20 7:57 p.m.
June 27 7:58 p.m.
July 4 7:58 p.m.
July 11 7:57 p.m.
Benediction upon Kindling the
Sabbath Lights
BORUCH ATTO ALM>NAI ELO-
HEINU MELECH HO-OLOM
ASHER KID-SHONU BEMITZ-
VOSOV VETZI-VONU LE-HAD-
LIK NEYR SHEL SHABOS.
Blessed art Thou, 0 Lord our G-d,
King of the universe, who hast
sanctified us by Thy command-
ments and commanded us to kin-
dle the Sabbath light.
CONSERVATIVE
CONSERVATIVE SYNAGOGUE OF COCONUT CREEK, meets Broward
Federal Savings, Lyons Road and Coconut Creek Parkway, Coconut Creek.
Services: Friday at 8 p.m. and Saturday at 9 a.m. Rabbi Josish Derby. Cantor
Sydaey Golesabe.
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER (721-7660), 9101 NW 57th St.. Tamarac, 38321.
Services: Sunday through Friday 8:30 a.m., 6 p.m. Late Friday service 8 p.m.
Saturday 8:46 a.m. Rabbi Kart F. Stone. Cantor P. Hillel Bnuuaer.
TEMPLE BETH AHM (431-5100), 9730 Stirling Road. Hollywood, 33024.
Services daily 8 a.m.; Sabbath 8 p.m.. Sabbath morning 8:45 a.m. Rabbi Avraham t
Kapnek. Cantor Stuart Kanae.
TEMPLE BETH AM (974-8650), 7205 Royal Palm Blvd.. Margate. 33063.
Services: Monday through Friday 8:30 a.m., 5 p.m. Friday late service 8 p.m.;
Saturday 9 a.m., 5 p.m.; Sunday 8 a.m.. 5 p.m. Rabbi Pan! Ptotkia. Rabbi
Emeritus. Dr. Soloaioa Geld. Cantor Irving Grossman.
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL (742-4040). 7100 W. Oakland Park Blvd., Sunrise.
33313. Services: Sunday through Thursday 8 a.m., 5:30 p.m.; Friday 8 a_m., 5
p.m., 8 p.m.; Saturday 8:45 a.m 7:45 p.m. Rabbi Howard A. Addisea, Cantor
Maurice A. Nee.
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL OF DEERFIELD BEACH (421-7060), 200 S. Century
Blvd., Deerfield Beach, 33441. Services: Sunday through Friday 8:30 a.m., 5 p.m.
Friday late service 8 p.m.; Saturday 8:45 a_m.. and at candleHghting time. Rabbi
Joseph Laagaer, Cantor Saabtal Aekerman.
TEMPLE B'NAI MOSHE (942-5880), 1434 SE 3rd St., Pompano Beach. 33060.
Services: Friday 8 p.m. Canter Jebadaa Heilbraaa.
TEMPLE SHA'ASAY TZEDEK 741-0296), 4099 Pine Island Rd., Sunrise.
33321. Services: Sunday through Friday 8 a.m., 6 p.m.; Late Friday service 8
p.m.; Saturday 8:46 a.m., 6 p.m. Canter Jack Merchant.
TEMPLE SHOLOM (942-6410), 132 SE 11 Ave., Pompano Beach, 38060.
Services: Monday through Friday 8:46 a.m., evenings: Monday through Thursday
at 5 p.m., Friday evening at 8. Saturday and Sunday 9*a.m. Rabbi Saanei April.
Cantor Ranald Graaer.
CONGREGATION BETH HILLEL OF MARGATE- (974-3090), 7640 Margate
Blvd., Margate, 33063. Services: Sunday through Friday 8:15 a.m., 6:30 p.m.
Late Friday service 8 p.m. Saturday 8:46 am, 5:30 p.m. Rabbi Nathan
Zolcadch. Cantor Joel Cobra.
HEBREW CONGREGATION OF LAUDERHILL (733-9660), 2048 NW 49th
Ave., Lauderhill, 33313. Services: Sunday through Friday 8:30 a.m., 5:30 p.m.;
Saturday 8:46 a.m. Rabbi Israel Helpers.
NORTH LAUDERDALE HEBREW CONGREGATION (722-7607 or 722-2722).
Servieee: at Banyon Lakes Condo Clubhouse, 6060 Bailey Rd, Tamarac, Friday
at 6 p.m., Saturday 8:45 a.m. Caarlee B. Frier. President.
ORTHODOX
TEMPLE OHEL B'NAI RAPHAEL (733-7684), 4861 W. Oakland Park Blvd..
Lauderdale Lakes, 38313. Services: Sunday through Thursday 8 a.m., 6 p.m.,
Friday 8 a.m., 6 p.m.. Saturday 8:46 a.m., 6 p.m. Castor Paal 04salt.
SYNAGOGUE OF INVERRARY CHABAD (748-1777), 4661 N. University Dr.,
Lauderhill. Bervtoasu Sunday through Friday 6:46 a-m, 8 a.m.. 6:16 p.m.,
Saturday 9 a-m., 5:30 p.m. Btady grif si M. Saaasys saBswIi services;
Waeses. Taeedars 8 am. Rabbi Are*
YOUNG ISRAEL OP DEERFIELD BEACH (421-1867), 1880 W. Hillaboro
Blvd., Deerfield Beach, 3S441. Servieee: Sunday through Friday 8 am. and
sundown. Saturday 8:46 a-m. and sundown.
YOUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD-PORT LAUDERDALE (966-7877), 3291
Stirling Rd., Fort Lauderdale. 38312. Servieee: Monday through Friday 7:30 a.m.,
and sundown; Saturday, 9 a.m., sundown; Sunday 8 a.m., sundown. Rabbi
Edward Darts.
CONGREGATION MIDGAL DAVID 726-3683), 8675 W. McNab Rd., Tamarac,
33321. Sank. Daily 8 a.m.; mincha 5 p.m.; Saturday 8:46 a.m. and 6:16 p.m.
Rabbi Chain Schaetder. "
REC0N8TRUCTI0NI8T
RAMAT SHALOM (472-3600), 11801 W. Broward Blvd., Plantation, 8SS26.
Servieee: Friday, 8:16 p.m.; Saturday. 10 a.m. Rabbi Elliot SkiddeU. Caster
BeUa Begart.
REFORM
TEMPLE BETH ORR (763-3232), 2151 Riverside Dr., Coral Springs, 33066.
Services: Friday 8 p.m.; Saturday 10 a.m. Rabbi Jerreld M. Levy. Caster Nancy
TEMPLE B'NAI SHALOM OF DEERFIELD BEACH (426-2532). Servieee at
Menorah Chapels, 2306 W. Hillsboro Blvd., Deerfield Beach, 38441, Friday 8 p.m.
Rabbi Nathan H. Fish. Caster Merris Liviaasa.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL (781-2810), 3246 W. Oakland Park Blvd., Lauderdale
Lakes, 33811. Services: Friday 8:15 p.m.; Saturday, only on holidays or
celebration of Bar-Bat MHsvah. Rabbi Jeffrey Ballon. Cantor Rite Saere.
TEMPLE KOL AMI (472-1988), 8200 Peters Rd.. Plantation, 33324. Services:
Friday 8:16 p.m., Saturday 10:30 a.m. Rabbi Sheldon J. Hair. Canter Geae
Canaan.
LIBERAL JEWISH TEMPLE OF COCONUT CREEK (973-7494).
Friday night services twice monthly st Calvary Presbyterian Church, 3960
Coconut Creek Parkway. Rabbi Brace 8. Warsbal. Canter Barbara Roberts.
TEMPLE BAT YAM (661-6308), McGaw Hall, 1400 N. Federal Hwy. (adjacent to
Second Presbyterian Church), Ft. Lauderdale, 33304. Service: Weekly on Friday
evenings at 8 p.m. Canter Richard Brows.


New Rabbi To Start At
Temple Beth Israel
Friday, June 20, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 23
.remple Beth Israel, 7100 West
Ikland Park Blvd., first conser-
|tive synagogue in Broward, is
loud to introduce Rabbi Howard
[Addison to the community.
.. graduate of the University of
nois, the Rabbi was ordained by
le Jewish Theological Seminary
INew York City. He received his
Ictorate from The Chicago
leological Seminary at The
diversity of Chicago.
Jor the past eight years, Rabbi
Edison has served as spiritual
kder in Chicago at Temple
laare Tikvah.
abbi Addison is affiliated with
|iny Jewish and communal
janizations such as B'nai B'rith,
vish Federation, Labor Zionist
Diance, Council of Urban Af-
fairs, North River Commission
Civic Association, and the
Chicago Conference on Religion
and Race. He also takes an active
role in the Rabbinical Assembly
and serves as a member of the
Board of Rabbis in Chicago.
He has written several articles
that were published in The
Chicago Sentinel, Jewish Fron-
tier, Conservative Judaism, Jour-
nal of Reform Judaism, and
Pioneer Women, and is currently
writing the weekly "Sedra" col-
umn for the Chicago Sentinel.
Rabbi and Mrs. Addison will be
settling in their new home at the
beginning of June, 1986. His wife
Adena, is the granddaughter of
Rabbi Gutstein, Rabbi Emeritus
of Chicago's Temple Shaare
Tikvah.
Temple News
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
Temple Emanu-El has announc-
I that there are still some vacan-
\es in the Religious School for
des K through 3 and the Aleph
tebrew Class, for the upcoming
phool year. Temple Emanu-El,
he oldest congregation in
[reward County, boasts a fine
afessional faculty as well as an
xciting and challenging program
fading to Bar/Bat Mitzvah and
onfirmation.
JFor information contact the
femple at 731-2810.
TAMARAC
JEWISH CENTER-
TEMPLE BETH TORAH
I On Monday, May 26, a special
[reakfast was given in honor of
ol Schulman's 75th birthday. The
elebration was given by
chulman's fellow minyanaires.
Ir. Schulman is well-deserved of
his tribute for all his efforts in
bstering and organizing the Tem-
le Hebrew School, Nursery
chool, and for raising funds for
he new Temple Youth Lounge.
I Sol Schulman is a member of the
federation's Board of Directors.
TEMPLE BETH ORR
I Temple Beth Orr recently held a
fervice of Confirmation for the
pllowing confirmants, Robin
evenston, David Levy, Laura
lorris, Daniel Reimer, Cynthia
|ands and Shira Schwartz.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
I On Friday evening June 27 at
fcmple Emanu-El, Fort Lauder-
Me. Cantor Rita Shore will pre-
|nt a sermon in song entitled,
lewish Music Alive through
H Ages." The sermon will con-
ft of a discussion of Jewish
^sic and the part it plays in our
leryday lives. For information
|ntact the Temple at 731-2310.
TEMPLE KOL AMI
lAs part of Temple Kol Ami's
avuot service on Thursday June
It 33 students were confirmed
pm the Religious School. Confir-
Ption certificates were
Nented by Rabbi Sheldon Harr,
fns Ezry, Religious School
ctor and Susan Tabin, educa-
|n vice president.
[o Change Seen
TEL AVIV (JTA) There
been no change in the military
Payment of Jordan and Syria,
fording to the head of the Israel
prise Force's northern com-
a. Maj. Gen. Ori Orr. He said
P recent talks between the
Kins and Jordanian leaders had
led to or resulted in any
Age in the military deployment
weir armies.
Those being confirmed were:
Stacy Ardman, Tami Augen,
Pamela Boreth, Lisa Bussell.
Kimberly Charin, Daniel DeRosa,
Andrew Frank, Laura Feiss,
Suzanne Friedman, Debra
Gorsen, Stephanie Gross, Daniel
Horwitz, Elizabeth Hurwitz, Holly
Iglehart, Jenifer Levy-Jacobs,
Kimberly Jason, Jason Laing,
Seth Levine, Stephen Lindie, Car-
rie Morris, Julie Pelton, Lanelle
Polen, Rachel Rubin, Stacey
Sachs, Kimberly Sanders, Carri
Slade, Andrew Stein, Staci Sum-
mers, Daniel Thaler, David Vaz-
quez, Tracy Waxman, Daniel We-
inger, Jonas Werner.
RAMAT SHALOM
A confirmation ceremony was
held recently for students who
graduated from Judaica High
School. They included Marc Fried-
man, Erin Goldman, Lawrence
Jackowitz, Craig Lazarus, Neil
Pollack, Francine Silverstein,
Randi Streisand and Chandra
Wood.
HAPPY BIRTHDAY SOL Sol Shulman,
left, active member of the Jewish community
and a member of the Federation's Board of
Directors, recently celebrated bis 75th birth-
day with the members of the Minyanaires of
Tamarac Jewish Center-Temple Beth Torah.
Wishing Sol best wishes and a happy birthday
were, from left, his wife Lenore, BUI Katzberg,
Temple Board member; Rabbi Kurt F. Stone,
and David Krantz.
Statue Of Liberty Centennial To Be
Enhanced By Jewish Media Service
NEW YORK, N.Y. The
celebration of the centennial of
the Statue of Liberty by the
American Jewish community will
be enhanced by the use of films
and videocassettes listed and
reviewed in the current issue of
Medium, just published by the
Jewish Media Service.
Theme of the issue is "Promises
and Reality: The Jewish Immigra-
tion Experience in America."
"The films and videocassettes
listed and reviewed in the current
issue of Medium can be shown in a
variety of settings to spark discus-
sions of the immigrant ex-
perience," Harriet L. Rosenthal,
of South Orange, N.J., vice-
president of JWB and chairperson
of the Jewish Media Service, says.
A complete boxed set of back
issues of Medium can be purchas-
ed for $30 prepaid from Jewish
Media Service, 15 East 26th St.,
New York, N.Y. 10010.
JWB is the association of 275
JCCs/YM-YWHAs and camps in
the U.S. and Canada with a consti-
tuency of more than one million
Jews, a major source of Jewish
educational and cultural program-
ming for North American Jewry,
and the U.S.-accredited agency
for serving American Jewish
military families.
It is supported by Jewish
Federations, the UJA-Federation
of Greater New York, Jewish
Community Centers and YM-
YWHAs, and JWB Associates.
Wilton Manors Ft. Lauderdale
By owner -1 sell one-bedroom, one-bath, fully
furnished condo with all the kitchen appli-
ances, dishwasher, two-space parking, swim-
ming pool, lake view, freshly blue paint, new
ceiling fan, new vertical blinds, nearby shop-
ping and transportation, low tax and mainte-
nance. For information call:
564-3312
Qualified BAL-SCHARCHRIT needed for
TEMPLE SHOLOM, High Holy Days Satellite
Services in Pompano Beach.
Inquire V.P. religion, J. Sharlet 974-3160 or
Temple Office, 132 S.E. 11th Ave., Pompano
Beach, 942-6410.
0
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiwiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiU'iiiniinnn'i'inifc
anniiimn
Why be bored while you're still productive.
Qet back into the action!
Renew old 7th Avenue Garment District
Friendships. Enjoy earning additional income.
No travail Wo furnish the customers,
you furnish your Q-d given "Expertise!"
Full/Part-time. Interested? Call Jake:
735-2241
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J
mzjr.* rw
You heard us right: Menorah wants you to shop and compare
pre-arrangement plans. Then come to Menorah last. With five
convenient locations, the finest options to custom-tailor your
plan, memorial gardens in I'aim Beach and Broward. and
expert, counselors. Menorah is the plan more Jewish families
are choosing. And our plans are available at the lowest prices
quoted by anyone. So go ahead shop "them" first. Then come
to Menorah where your last choice is your best choice.
Gardens and Funeral Chapels
North Miami Beach: 935-3939 Sunrise: 742-6000
Margate: 975-0011 Deerfield Beach: 427-4700
West Palm Beach: 627 2277
Omrtrrtn KUnrrol Chaprls Muusoirum l*rr-Nwd I tanning


"
*^
Page 24 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, June 20, 1986
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Full Text
"
Wf
Pagej2 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday. June 20, 1986
Bar/Bat Mitzvahs
Lazarus
Borta
TEMPLE KOL AMI
The B'not Mitzvah of Stephanie
Leigh Lazarua, daughter of Ran-
dy and Peter Lazarua, and
Stephanie Borta, daughter of
Sharon and Norman Bortz, was
celebrated at the Saturday morn-
ing June 14 service at Temple Kol
Ami, Plantation.
The Bar Mitzvah of Todd
Heimowitz, son of Paula and
\ \v
Heimowitz Droga
Gary Heimowitz, will be
celebrated at the Friday night
June 20 service at Kol Ami
Debbie Droga, daughter of
Susan and Irwin Droga, and
Allison Joy Stecker, daughter of
Diane and Bill Stecker, will
celebrate their B'not Mitzvah at
the Saturday morning June 21
service at Kol Ami.
AT A RECENT gala dinner, Temple Emanu-El of Fort Lander-
dale celebrated the burning of the Temple's mortgage. Pictured,
from left, Carey Fisher, incoming Temple president; Rabbi Jef-
frey L. BaUxm, spiritual leader of Emanu-El; and Richard J.
Levy, outgoing president.
Alvera Gold Named To
UJA Nat'l Women's Board
Continued from Page 1
an extensive screening
process.
These leaders should be
involved in their own local
community as well as being
active nationally. Board
members will have
demonstrated outstanding
talents in speaking, train-
ing, and solicitation and are
qualified to serve as
representatives to other
Women's Divisions.
Alvera has been at the
forefront of the Women's
Division campaign of the
Jewish Federation of
Greater Ft. Lauderdale for
many years.
Most recently she has
served as 1986 Women's
Division campaign
cochairperson and has
assumed the position of
Women's Division executive
vice president of campaign
for the 1987 campaign year.
She has also served as
Federation's Project
Renewal chair and Project
Renewal chair for the
Florida region, in addition
to serving on the Federa-
tion's Board of Directors.
Guest speaker at the May
19 installation was Stanley
Horowitz, UJA president.
WE ARE PHASED TO ANNOUNCE
NEW LOCATIONS FOR OUR MEDICAL PRACTICE
ORTHOPAEDIC ASSOCIATES OF BROWARD
Harold S. Rertman, M.D.
Richard S. Kleiman, M.D. Bruce M. Berkowitz, M.D.
SPECIALIZING IN:
Orthopaedic Surgery Hand Surgery Joint Replacement
Arthroscopic Surgery Sports Medicine
PLANTATION OFFICE
Orthopaedic Associates
Plaza
7390 N.W. 5th Street
Plantation, Florida 33317
791-3171 ________
LAUDERDALE LAKES OFFICE
Florida Medical Center East
Suite 100
3001 N.W. 49th Avenue
Lauderdale Lakes, FL 33313
735-6160
Stecker
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
Barry Rothberg, son of Susan
and Alan Rothberg, was called to
the To rah in honor of his Bar Mitz-
vah on Saturday morning June 14
at Temple Emanu-El, Ft.
Lauderdale.
TEMPLE BETH TORAH
The Bar Mitzvah of Michael
Walker, son of Arline and Ray-
mond Walker, will be celebrated
at the Saturday June 21 service at
Temple Beth Torah, Tamarac.
Lisa Sage, daughter of Elaine
and Bruce Sage, will become a Bat
Mitzvah celebrant at the Friday
night June 27 service at Beth
Torah.
The B'nai Mitzvah of Jay son
Zion, son of Sharon and Steve
Zion, Charles Codell, son of
Helene and George Codell, and
Milo Fox, son of Louise Fox, will
all celebrated at the Saturday
morning June 28 service at Beth
Torah.
TEMPLE BETH AM
Sean Greenberg, son of Carol
and Farrel Greenberg, and
Suzanne Dobkin, daughter of
Ellen and Martin Dobkin, will
celebrate their B'nai Mitzvah at
the Saturday June 28 service at
Temple Beth Am, Margate.
TEMPLE BETH ORR
On Saturday June 21, the B'nai
Mitzvah of Leonard Bomwell,
Jr., son of Leonard and Margaret
Bomwell, and Michael Goodman,
son of Susan and Jonathan Good-
man, will be celebrated at Temple
Beth Orr, Coral Springs.
RAMAT SHALOM
The Bat Mitzvah of Jennifer
Harris was celebrated at the
Saturday morning June 14 service
at Ramat Shalom, Plantation.
The B'not Mitzvah of Shanon
Gnmora and Johanna Liroff will
be celebrated at the Saturday
morning June 21 service at Ramat
Shalom.
Temple Beth Israel To
Install New Rabbi June 22
An installation ceremony for
Temple Beth Israel's newly-
arrived rabbi, Dr. Howard A. Ad-
dison, will be Sunday, June 22, at
7 p.m., at the temple in Sunrise,
7100 W. Oakland Park Blvd.
The former spiritual leader of
Temple Shaare Tikvah in Chicago
arrived in Florida recently and
began conducting services June 6.
Installing officer and keynote
speaker at the ceremony will be
Rabbi Benjamin Z. Kreitman, ex-
ecutive vice-president ol unueu
Synagogue of America. Speakers
will include Temple Beth Israel's
president Dr. Clark D. Galin, and
Harold Wishna, executive direc-
tor of the Southeast Region of
United Synagogue of America.
Rabbi Theodore Feldman of
Boca Raton, will also participate
in the event.
"We invite the temple family
and the area's Jewish community
to help welcome Rabbi Addison to
West Broward," said Dr. Galin.
Publication of Atlas Suspended
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Deputy Premier David Levy
suspended publication and
distribution of the Israel Atlas.
Monday on grounds that a
paragraph on Jewish settlements
in the administered territories
violated the policies and decisions
of the unity government.
Levy, who is also Minister of
Housing and a leader of the Herut
wing of Likud, took exception to a
section written by Hebrew
University David Amiran which
stated that most of the set-
tlements were established in
Arab-populated area* in nrrlor tn
preclude any future territorial
concessions. Amiran wrote fur-
ther that this policy would lead in-
evitably to a bi-national state, con-
trary to the traditional goal of
Zionism which is a Jewish State
with a Jewish population entirely
Jewish in character.
Candlelighting Times
June 20 7:57 p.m.
June 27 7:58 p.m.
July 4 7:58 p.m.
July 11 7:57 p.m.
Benediction upon Kindling the
Sabbath Lights
BORUCH ATTO AD-ONAI ELO-
HEINU MELECH HO-OLOM
ASHER KID-SHONU BEMITZ-
VOSOV VETZI-VONU LE-HAD-
LIK NEYR SHEL SHABOS.
Blessed art Thou, 0 Lord our G-d,
King of the universe, who hast
sanctified us by Thy command-
ments and commanded us to kin-
dle the Sabbath light.
CONSERVATIVE
CONSERVATIVE SYNAGOGUE OF COCONUT CREEK, meets Broward
Federal Savings, Lyons Road and Coconut Creek Parkway, Coconut Creek.
Services: Friday at 8 p.m. and Saturday at 9 a.m. Rabbi Joeiah Derby. Cantor
Sydaey Golembe.
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER (721-7660), 9101 NW 57th St., Tamarac, 33321.
Services: Sunday through Friday 8:30 am., 6 p.m. Late Friday service 8 p.m.
Saturday 8:45 a.m. Rabbi Kart F. Stone. Cantor P. HUM Brummer.
TEMPLE BETH ARM (431-5100), 9730 Stirling Road. Hollywood, 33024.
Services daily 8 am.; Sabbath 8 p.m., Sabbath morning 8:45 am. Rabbi Avraham I
Kapnek. Cantor Stuart Kanas.
TEMPLE BETH AM (974-8660), 7205 Royal Palm Blvd.. Margate, 33063.
Services: Monday through Friday 8:30 am., 5 p.m. Friday late service 8 p.m.;
Saturday 9 a.m., 5 p.m.; Sunday 8 am., 5 p.m. Rabbi Paul Plotkia. Rabbi
Emeritus. Dr. Solomon Geld. Cantor Irving Groasaun.
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL (742-4040). 7100 W. Oakland Park Blvd., Sunrise,
33313. Services: Sunday through Thursday 8 a.m., 5:30 p.m.; Friday 8 am., 6
p.m., 8 p.m.; Saturday 8:46 am., 7:46 p.m. Rabbi Howard A. Addison, Cantor
Maurice A. Neu.
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL OF DEERFIELD BEACH (421-7060), 200 S. Century
Blvd., Deerfield Beach, 33441. Services: Sunday through Friday 8:30 am., 5 p.m.
Friday late service 8 p.m.; Saturday 8:46 a.m., and at candlelighting time. Rabbi
Joseph Langner, Cantor Saabtal Ackerman.
TEMPLE B'NAI M08HE (942-6880), 1434 SE 3rd St.. Pompano Beach, 33060.
Services: Friday 8 p.m. Cantor Jehadah Hailbraan.
TEMPLE SHA'ARAY TZEDEK 741-0296), 4099 Pine Island Rd., Sunrise,
33321. Services: Sunday through Friday 8 am., 6 p.m.; Late Friday service 8
p.m.; Saturday 8:46 am., 5 p.m. Cantor Jack Marekant.
TEMPLE SHOLOM (942-6410), 132 SE 11 Ave.. Pompano Beach, 38060.
Services: Monday through Friday 8:46 am., evenings: Monday through Thursday
at 5 p.m., Friday evening at 8. Saturday and Sunday 9~a.m. Rabbi Samuel April.
Cantor Ronald Gmaer.
CONGREGATION BETH HILLEL OF MARGATE-(974-3090). 7640 Margate
Blvd., Margate, 33063. Services: Sunday through Friday 8:15 am., 6:30 p.m.
Late Friday service 8 p.m. Saturday 8:46 am., 5:30 p.m. Rabbi Nathan
Zoloadek. Cantor Joel Cohen.
HEBREW CONGREGATION OF LAUDERHILL (733-9660), 2048 NW 49th
Ave., Lauderhill, 33313. Services: Sunday through Friday 8:30 am., 5:30 p.m.;
Saturday 8:46 am. Rabbi Israel Hainan.
NORTH LAUDERDALE HEBREW CONGREGATION (722-7607 or 722-2722).
SnultOJ. at Banyon Lakes Condo Clubhouse, 6060 Bailey Rd, Tamarac, Friday
at 5 p.m., Saturday 8:46 am. Charles B. Frier, President.
ORTHODOX
TEMPLE OHEL B'NAI RAPHAEL (733-7684), 4861 W. Oakland Park Blvd.,
Lauderdale Lakes. 38313. Services: Sunday through Thursday 8 am., 6 p.m.,
Friday 8 am., 6 p.m., Saturday 8:46 am., 6 p.m. Cantor Pan! Stuart.
SYNAGOGUE OF INVERRARY CHABAD (748-1777), 4681 N. University Dr.,
Lauderhill. 8ervicas: Sunday through Friday 6:46 am. 8 am.. 6:16 p.m.,
Saturday 9 am., 5:30 p.m. Study groans: Men, Snadnys following service.;
Wesson. Tuesdays 8 p.sa Rabbi Area Lioberman.
YOUNG ISRAEL OF DEERFIELD BEACH (421-1367),' 1880 W. HOIaboro
Blvd., Deerfield Beach, 38441. Services: Sunday through Friday 8 am. and
sundown. Saturday 8:46 am. and sundown.
YOUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD-FORT LAUDERDALE (968-7877), 3291
Stirling Rd., Fort Lauderdale, 38312. Services: Monday through Friday 7:80 am.,
and sundown; Saturday, 9 am., sundown; Sunday 8 am., sundown. Rabbi
Edward Darka
CONGREGATION MIDGAL DAVID 7288683), 8675 W. McNab Rd, Tamarac,
38821. Oilman. Daily 8 am.; mincha 5 p.m.; Saturday 8:46 am. and 5:16 p.m.
Rabbi Ckaim Scl
RECONSTRUCTIONS
RAMAT SHALOM (472-3600), 11801 W. Broward Blvd., Plantation, 38326.
Services: Friday. 8:15 p.m.; Saturday, 10 am. Rabbi Elliot SkideWI. Cantor
Bella Begart.
REFORM
TEMPLE BETH ORR (763-3282), 2161 Riverside Dr., Coral Springs, 38066.
Services: Friday 8 p.m.; Saturday 10 am. Rabbi Jerrold M. Levy. Cantor Nancy
TEMPLE B'NAI SHALOM OF DEERFIELD BEACH (4282632). Service* at
Menorah Chapels, 2306 W. HUlsboro Blvd.. Deerfield Beach, 38441, Friday 8 p.m.
Rabbi Nathan H. Fish. Cantor Morris LeftSB,
TEMPLE EMANU-EL (781-2810), 3246 W. Oakland Park Blvd., Lauderdale
Lakes, 38811. Services: Friday 8:16 p.m.; Saturday, only on holidays or
celebration of Bar Bat Mitevah. Rabbi Jeffrey Ballon. Cantor Rita Snore.
TEMPLE KOL AMI (472-1988), 8200 Peters Rd., Plantation, 33324. Services:
Friday 8:16 p.m., Saturday 10:30 am. Rabbi Sheldon J. Harr. Cantor Gene
Corbarn.
LIBERAL JEWISH TEMPLE OF COCONUT CREEK (9787494). Servicee:
Friday night services twice monthly at Calvary Presbyterian Church, 8960
Coconut Creek Parkway. Rabbi Brae* S. Wnrabal. Cantor Barbara Roberts.
TEMPLE BAT YAM (561-6308), McGaw Hall, 1400 N. Federal Hwy. (adjacent to
Second Presbyterian Church), Ft. Lauderdale, 38304. Service: Weekly on Friday
evenings at 8 p.m. Cantor Richard Brown.
I


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FILES


New Rabbi To Start At
Temple Beth Israel
Friday, June 20, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 23
Temple Beth Israel, 7100 West
ikland Park Blvd., first conser-
Itive synagogue in Broward, is
oud to introduce Rabbi Howard
Addison to the community.
graduate of the University of
bnois, the Rabbi was ordained by
le Jewish Theological Seminary
|New York City. He received his
Lctorate from The Chicago
geological Seminary at The
diversity of Chicago.
For the past eight years, Rabbi
fldison has served as spiritual
ider in Chicago at Temple
fcare Tikvah.
..abbi Addison is affiliated with
my Jewish and communal
jranizations such as B'nai B'rith,
Iwish Federation, Labor Zionist
lliance, Council of Urban Af-
fairs, North River Commission
Civic Association, and the
Chicago Conference on Religion
and Race. He also takes an active
role in the Rabbinical Assembly
and serves as a member of the
Board of Rabbis in Chicago.
He has written several articles
that were published in The
Chicago Sentinel, Jewish Fron-
tier, Conservative Judaism, Jour-
nal of Reform Judaism, and
Pioneer Women, and is currently
writing the weekly "Sedra" col-
umn for the Chicago Sentinel.
Rabbi and Mrs. Addison will be
settling in their new home at the
beginning of June, 1986. His wife
Adena, is the granddaughter of
Rabbi Gutstein, Rabbi Emeritus
of Chicago's Temple Shaare
Tikvah.
Temple News
t -
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
Temple Emanu-El has announe-
! that there are still some vacan-
>s in the Religious School for
Jes K through 3 and the Aleph
lebrew Class, for the upcoming
thool year. Temple Emanu-El,
le oldest congregation in
|roward County, boasts a fine
ofessional faculty as well as an
xciting and challenging program
ling to Bar/Bat Mitzvah and
jnfirmation.
J For information contact the
[emple at 731-2310.
TAMARAC
JEWISH CENTER-
TEMPLE BETH TORAH
On Monday, May 26, a special
fast was given in honor of
d1 Schulman's 75th birthday. The
ilebration was given by
chulman's fellow minyanaires.
"r. Schulman is well-deserved of
tribute for all his efforts in
Btering and organizing the Tern-
Hebrew School, Nursery
tool, and for raising funds for
he new Temple Youth Lounge.
I Sol Schulman is a member of the
federation's Board of Directors.
TEMPLE BETH ORR
I Temple Beth Orr recently held a
prvice of Confirmation for the
pllowing confirmants, Robin
evenston, David Levy, Laura
lorris, Daniel Reimer, Cynthia
|ands and Shira Schwartz.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
[On Friday evening June 27 at
pmple Emanu-El, Fort Lauder-
frle, Cantor Rita Shore will pre-
|nt a sermon in song entitled,
fewish Music Alive through
le Ages." The sermon will con-
Pt of a discussion of Jewish
pic and the part it plays in our
feryday lives. For information
Intact the Temple at 731-2310.
TEMPLE KOL AMI
fc part of Temple Ko! Ami's
avuot service on Thursday June
i 33 students were confirmed
pm the Religious School. Confir-
ftion certificates were
rented by Rabbi Sheldon Harr,
r"s Ezry, Religious School
jector and Susan Tabin, educa-
|n vice president.
[o Change Seen
^ AVIV (JTA) There
'been no change in the military
P'oyment of Jordan and Syria,
rding to the head of the Israel
[tense Force's northern com-
M. Maj. Gen. Ori Orr. He said
ft recent talks between the
an/* ad Jordanian leaden had
led to or resulted in any
>ge in the military deployment
I ^eir armies.
Those being confirmed were:
Stacy Ardman, Tami Augen,
Pamela Boreth, Lisa Bussell,
Kimberly Charin, Daniel DeRosa,
Andrew Frank, Laura Feiss,
Suzanne Friedman, Debra
Goreen, Stephanie Gross, Daniel
Horwitz, Elizabeth Hurwitz, Holly
Iglehart, Jenifer Levy-Jacobs,
Kimberly Jason, Jason Laing,
Seth Levine, Stephen Lindie, Car-
rie Morris, Julie Pelton, Lanelle
Polen, Rachel Rubin, Stacey
Sachs, Kimberly Sanders, Carri
Slade, Andrew Stein, Staci Sum-
mere, Daniel Thaler, David Vaz-
quez, Tracy Waxman, Daniel We-
inger, Jonas Werner.
RAMAT SHALOM
A confirmation ceremony was
held recently for students who
graduated from Judaica High
School. They included Marc Fried-
man, Erin Goldman, Lawrence
Jackowitz, Craig Lazarus, Neil
Pollack, Francine Silveretein,
Randi Streisand and Chandra
Wood.
HAPPY BIRTHDAY SOL Sol Shulman,
left, active member of the Jewish community
and a member of the Federation's Board of
Directors, recently celebrated his 75th birth-
day with the members of the Minyanaires of
Tamarac Jewish Center-Temple Beth Torah.
Wishing Sol best wishes and a happy birthday
were, from left, his wife Lenore, BUI Katzberg,
Temple Board member; Rabbi Kurt F. Stone,
and David Krantz.
Statue Of Liberty Centennial To Be
Enhanced By Jewish Media Service
NEW YORK, N.Y. The
celebration of the centennial of
the Statue of Liberty by the
American Jewish community will
be enhanced by the use of films
and videocassettes listed and
reviewed in the current issue of
Medium, just published by the
Jewish Media Service.
Theme of the issue is "Promises
and Reality: The Jewish Immigra-
tion Experience in America."
"The films and videocassettes
listed and reviewed in the current
issue of Medium can be shown in a
variety of settings to spark discus-
sions of the immigrant ex-
perience," Harriet L. Rosen thai,
of South Orange, N.J., vice-
president of JWB and chairperson
of the Jewish Media Service, says.
A complete boxed set of back
issues of Medium can be purchas-
ed for $30 prepaid from Jewish
Media Service, 15 East 26th St.,
New York, N.Y. 10010.
JWB is the association of 275
JCCs/YM-YWHAb and camps in
the U.S. and Canada with a consti-
tuency of more than one million
Jews, a major source of Jewish
educational and cultural program-
ming for North American Jewry,
and the U.S.-accredited agency
for serving American Jewish
military families.
It is supported by Jewish
Federations, the UJA-Federation
of Greater New York, Jewish
Community Centers and YM-
YWHAs, and JWB Associates.
+i
Wilton Manors Ft. Lauderdale
By owner -1 sell one-bedroom, one-bath, fully
furnished condo with all the kitchen appli-
ances, dishwasher, two-space parking, swim-
ming pool, lake view, freshly blue paint, new
ceiling fan, new vertical blinds, nearby shop-
ping and transportation, low tax and mainte-
nance. For information call:
564-3312
?
"Wtenjqpi
Qualified BAL-SCHARCHRIT needed for
TEMPLE SHOLOM, High Holy Days Satellite
Services In Pompano Beach.
Inquire V.P. religion, J. Sharlet 974-3160 or
Temple Office, 132 S.E. 11th Ave., Pompano
Beach, 942-6410.
*
ill|l|l|||l|||llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllHIHIIIIIHIillllH'IHIIl'llH|'l,ll,IM,|
3
Why be bored while you're still productive.
Qet back into the action!
Renew old 7th Avenue Garment District
Friendships. Enjoy earning additional income.
No travel! We furnish the customers,
you furnish your Q-d given "Expertise!"
Full/Part-time. Interested? Call Jake:
735-2241
NIMH
K./V?
You heard us right: Menorah wants you to shop and compare
pre-arrangement plans. Then come to Menorah last. With five
convenient locations, the finest options to custom-tailor your
plan, memorial gardens in Palm Beach and Broward. and
expert, counselors. Menorah Is the plan more Jewish families
are choosing. And our plans are available at the lowest prices
quoted by anyone. So go ahead shop "them" first. Then come
to Menorah where your last choice Is your best choice.
Gardens and Funeral Chapels
North Miami Beach: 935-3939 Sunrise: 742-6000
Margate: 975 0011 Deerfield Beach: 427-4700
West Palm Beach: 627-2277
Cemrtertrs Funeral Chapels Mausoleum I're-Need I tanning