The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale

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Title:
The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 3, no. 7 (Apr. 5, 1974)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 9, 1976 called v.4, no. 27 but constitutes v.5, no. 1; issue for July 7, 1989 called v.18, no. 11 but constitutes v.18, no. 13.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44570954
lccn - sn 00229545
ocm44570954
System ID:
AA00014312:00320

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Jewish Floridian of North Broward


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Full Text
j^khFlopidian o
OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE
Volume 15 Number 18
Fort Lauderdale, Florida Friday, May 9, 1986
T
CMINlM
Price 35 Cental
Celebrate Israel Independence Day At JCC Festival May 18...
'Israel '38' One People, One Destiny
Yom Ha'atzmaut. Israel Independence Day! No matter how it is said, the meaning is
the same. The world celebrates as One People With One Destiny, rejoicing in the fulfill-
ment of the dream of a Jewish Homeland.
Only 38 years of independence have passed, bat the Hatikvah, the hope of 5,000
years, keeps the reality of the dream always foremost in the minds of Jews
everywhere.
As the world celebrates Israel's 38th year of independence, Jewish men, women and
children in the Greater Fort Lauderdale community will join the festivities on Sunday,
May 18, in North Broward Counties Israel '38, at the Jewish Community Center all-day
Festival on the JCC campus, 6501 West Sunrise Blvd., Plantation.
The celebration, in co-operation with the Jewish Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale, Central Agency for Jewish Education together with local synagogues
and Jewish organizations, will feature a variety of events and activities.
According to the JCC organizers, "Israel '38, a day of festivities, has been planned
for the purpose of joining together with our fellow Jews in joyous reunion so that we may
continue to increase our understanding and knowledge of the State of Israel its
history, its art and its people and work towards its permanent establishment in a world
of peace." See Pages 2, 3.
Abba Eban Remembers
Day Of Independence
World

LONDON B'nai B'rith
International called on the
Polish government to honor
its commitment under a
1972 UNESCO convention
to retain the unique Jewish
identification with
Auschwitz by halting the
construction of a Catholic
Carmelite convent on the
site of the former Nazi con-
centration camp.
PARIS The Stockholm
City Council has decided to
re-name a square in
Stockholm in honor of Raoul
Wallenberg, the Swedish
diplomat who saved more
than 100,000 Hungarian
Jews from deportation to
Nazi death camps during
World War II.
The occasion of Israel
marking 38 years after its
birth, causes Abba Eban to
look back and remember
two days before that birth.
Eban, the Israeli
statesman and diplomat,
told of those days during
his recent address in South
Florida, which he called a
"revolutionary moment
that separated our past
from our future and mark-
ed our reentry into
history."
"The morning before the
day that we would announce
our independence, we were
an embattled community,
threatened by a ring of
hostility, facing the pro-
spect of physical destruction
and looking back at the
graves of millions of our
kinsmen engulfed in the
Holocaust. It was the lowest
point of weakness in the
history of our people.
Nothing: was certain. There
Oceanside '86 UJA
$1 Million Total Mark
Abba Eban
were four questions still to
be answered. Would the
British really leave? Would
the Arabs really invade?
Would we really declare?
Would anyone recognize our
action?
"For none of those ques-
tions was there a sure
answer," Eban said. But
Continued on Pag* 8
Lee Rauch, chairman of
the Oceanside Division of
the 1986 Jewish Federa-
tion/United Jewish Appeal
campaign, has announced
that for the second con-
secutive year, the Oceanside
Division has reached the $1
million mark.
"I am so pleased to be a
part of this record ac-
complishment," Rauch
stated. "Everyone
associated with the Ocean-
side Division is a pleasure
to work with therefore
making our jobs that much
easier."
According to Rauch, the
Oceanside still has some
$200,000 to raise to reach
its 1986 goal. "Our cam-
paign goal is still in sight.
With more hard work and
dedication, I'm sure we'll
reach it."
Highlighting the suc-
cessful 1986 Oceanside
Division campaign was the
Feb. 15 Oceanside dinner
dance honoring general
campaign chair John
Streng.
Rauch thanked the many
volunteers who worked so
hard throughout the year.
Special thanks went to
Oceanside Cabinet
members, Bonnie Barnett,
Larry Behar, Pola Brodzki,
Arthur Cohen, Herman
Cooper, Judah Ever, Evelyn
Gross, Dr. Philip Kanev,
Paul Lehrer, Esther
Lerner, Steven Levine,
Steven Lewin, Barry
Mandelkorn, Bren Simon,
John Streng and Bart
Weisman.
TORONTO "The
highest priority for Jews
must be to reach out to Jews
of different beliefs," Rabbi
Henry Sobel of Sao Paulo,
Brazil, told delegates at the
World Union for Pro-
gressive Judaism Interna-
tional Conference in Toron-
to. Calling for a dialogue
with the "moderate Or-
thodox," Sobel admitted
there are "non-negotiable"
differences. "But that
should not prevent us from
looking for areas of coopera-
tion and trust," he said.
"Support of Israel is one ex-
ample. The struggle for
Soviet Jewry is another."
A Message From The Prime Minister...
To Our Jewish Brethren In The Diaspora
From Jerusalem, our eternal and indivisible Capital, I
send my heartfelt greetings to the Jewish communities
throughout the Diaspora on the occasion of the Thirty-
Eighth Anniversary of Israel's Independence.
Yom Ha'atzmaut the Independence Day of the
Jewish State is unique in the annals of mankind
because it celebrates an unprecedented historical truth,
namely, the return and self liberation of an ancient exil-
ed, scattered, persecuted and ultimately almost
devastated people back to the land of its birth after close
to twenty centuries of homelessness, defenselessness
and Holocaust. This victory of life over death, justice
over might, right over wrong, the few over the many,
elevates Yom Ha'atzmaut into a universal Jewish
festival for all generations to come.
In the year of freedom, which his independence day
heralds, we will together pay homage to all those who, in
the blackness of the night, kindled the torch which il-
luminated our path to national liberty and who have defend-
ed that liberty ever since.
We recall the martyrs and the heroes, the partisans and
the soldiers, who raised the flag of Jewish revolt against the
Continued on Page 3
PRIME Minister Shimon Peres of Israel address-
ing the biennial convention of Pioneer
Wov; idNa'amat in Tel Aviv. Mr. Peres was the
keynote speaker at ceremonies installing Gloria
Fibling of Pittsburgh as national president of the
60-year-old organization, which changed its name
to Na'amat USA.



1

-*-:
I


Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, May 9, 1986
i
I
p
Thus saith the Lord: I will even
gather you from the people and
assemble you out of the countries
where ye have been scattered,
and I will give you the Land of
Israel. ezekielxi:17
Israel '87 featured Maccabiah games and festival rides.
Program 'Israel '38'
Sunday, May 18
ENTERTAIMENT SCHEDULE (Tentative)
Under the Show Tent
10:30 a.m. OPENING CEREMONIES Maccabiah Games
11:30 a.m. SENIOR OLYMPICS Award Presentations
NOON SONG SELECTIONS I.L. Peretz School Choir
Directed by Hollie Berger
12:15 p.m. SONG SELECTIONS JCC Elementary Chorus
Directed by Hollie Berger
12:30 p.m. SONG SELECTIONS Hollie Berger and Students
1:15 p.m. SONG SELECTIONS Cantor Bella Milim
3:15 p.m. MAJOR CONCERT SHAJAR. The Argentinian
Way with Israeli Music
INDOORS SOREF HALL
11:30 a.m. NAT AND IDA WOLFSON'S ISRAELI
DANCERS
NOON ISRAEL TRAVELOGUE. Film, Entertainment,
Discussion. Presented by David Levitan, Superior Tours
1:15 p.m. TEMPLE KOL AMI CHOIR
2 p.m. RABBI KURT STONE. Entertains with song and
commentary
SPEAKERS BUREAU
Developed in conjunction with the Central Agency for Jewish
Education
11:30 a.m. Ari Shacham, (cultural ambassador a shaliach)
J.N.F. "LAND AND SECURITY IN ISRAEL ON ITS 38TH
BIRTHDAY" Room B 101/102
1 p.m. Rabbi Arnold Lasker B101/102. "RELIGIOUS MAKE-
UP OF ISRAEL
1-2 p.m. ISRAEL KNOWLEDGE BOWL. Competition of local
Youth based on events in Israel. Room A 103/104
2 p.m. Rabbi Jeffrey Ballon, Temple Emanuel, Rabbi Elliot
Skiddell, Ramat Shalom. ISRAEL AND THE AMERICAN
JEWISH COMMUNITY. Room A 103/104
2:30-3:30 p.m. Uri Cohen (shaliach) Israel Program Office,
Miami Federation. "THE STAGES OF ISRAEL BEFORE AND
AFTER INDEPENDENCE" Room B 101/102
FILM CENTER BUILDING "C"
NOON-3 p.m. PROGRAMS DEVELOPED WITH C.A.J.E.
Central Agency for Jewish Education A continuous showing of
a variety of films depicting life in Israel, Israel's political scene
and the history of the Jewish State.
CHILDREN'S M ACT ASIAN GAMES FIELDS
10:30 a.m. OPENING CEREMONIES. Fre Tee Shirts to all
children grades K-6, 1st and 2nd place award ribbons
PHOTO CONTEST AND EXHIBIT
10:30 a.m.-5 p.m. All entries to be submitted to the JCC by
Wednesday, May 14. Photos taken in Israel. Three photos per en-
try. Additional photos beyond three will be accepted for display
only
10:30 a.m.-5 p.m. SHUK (ISRAELI MARKET PLACE OUT-
DOORS) JUDAICA, HANDMADES, GENERAL ITEMS
CARNIVAL ATTRACTIONS OUTDOORS
10:30 a.m.-5 p.m. BALL CRAWL, WHIP, FERRIS WHEEL,
MOONWALK, ROLLER COASTER, ELEPHANT (REAL!!)
RIDES. Advance Sale Carnival Attractions. Buy $7 worth of
Ride Coupons for $5 at the JCC
SNACKS AND FOOD AND BEVERAGES
10:30 a.m.-5 p.m. FALAFEL, HOT DOGS, FRUIT SALAD,
BAKERY GOODS, SODA, JUICE, SNO-CONES, POLAR CUP,
COFFEE
Education Program At Israel Independence Day
The Israel Independence Day
celebration on May 18, at the
Jewish Community Center in
Sunrise will include the following
cultural programs:
From 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Ari
Shacham, Jewish National Fund
Shliach will speak on Land and
Security Israel on its' 38th Bir-
thday. Shacham is a Colonel in the
Israel Defense Forces and was
Deputy Chief of the Artillery
Corp. 1-2 p.m. Rabbi Arnold
Lasker will speak on the religious
make-up of Israel. Rabbi Laster
has published many articles in
conjunction with his son Dr.
Daniel Lasker who is a senior lec-
turer on Jewish Thought at Ben-
Gurian University, Israel. He now
serves as the Chaplain at Aviva
Manor, the only kosher nursing
home in Broward County. From
2:30-3:30 p.m. Uri Cohen,
Shliach of the Israel Programs Of-
fice, Miami Federation, will speak
on The Stages of Israel before and
after Independence. This program
will be held in rooms B101-102.
From 12-3:00 p.m. in Building C
there will be a showing of films of
Israel. This program has been ar-
IsrKK'l
ISRAEL 38
^jjP?T One People, One Destiny
Featuring Contemporary
Israeli Music
Carnival Rides Game
Booths Petting Zoo
ranged through the Central Agen-
cy for Jewish Education of the
Jewish Federation
Fort Lauderdale.
of Greater
Israel '38' Underwriters and Sponsors
The State of Israel shall be open
to Jewish immigration and the in-
gathering of the exiles.
UNDERWRITERS -
$1,000
Balloons, Balloons, Balloons
Communications by Cell
Communications Matt
Cokee
Florida Medical Center
Hebrew National
International Medical
Centers Gold Plus Plan
Tara and Joshua Mirmelli
Family Practice Centers
SPONSORS $250
Arcade Gaming, Inc.
Jules Ross
The Cohen Family Sandy,
Ron, Michelle, and Michael
Commonwealth Savings and
Loan
Dr. Bruce Conan
Doctor's General Hospital
Dr. Ivar Fandel
Steven Feller, P.E., Inc.
Freckles Clothing Store
Levine Family
Ferrero, Middlebrooks,
Strickland and Fischer
P.A.
Humana
Bennett
E. F. Hutton Richard
Sommers
Kopelowitz, Atlas,
Pearlman and Trop, P.A.
Massachusetts Mutual
David Schulman
Paine Webber Bob Tokar
Plantation General Hospital
Peter D. Sarbone, M.D.,
P.A. Dermatology
United Growers The Tatz
Family
University Community
Hospital
ISRAEL DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE
May 14,1948
Hospital
'y.
CHILDREN'S OLYMPICS!
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ADE BROWARD
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ommentary
Friday^ May 9, 1986/The Jewish Floridiao of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 3
THE JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE
6501 W. Sunrise Blvd.
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33313 792-6700
By Muriel Haskell, Director of Public Relations
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION AND FEES CONCERN-
ING THE EVENTS OR PROGRAMS LISTED PLEASE CALL
THE CENTER.
A GIANT FESTIVAL
Over 5000 people are expected
to attend JCC's Israel In-
dependence Day Sunday May 18
and among them at display
tables representatives of
Broward County's synagogues
and Jewish organizations who'll
be there to give out the latest in-
formation about their temple or
group.
A MEMORABLE YOM
HA'ATZMAUT
According to David Surowitz,
JCC Assistant Executive Direc-
tor, "Israel '38 on the Center's 16
acre campus will present
residents of Broward County with
a memorable and joyous day of
celebration.
"This year our festival happens
just four days away from the ac-
tual Yom Ha'atzmaut," he says.
"The fifth day of Iyar this year
corresponds to May 14th and
we've planned a day full of music,
dancing, discussion, workshops,
movies, games, food and where
shopping will be a pleasure."
Surowitz refers to shopping at
the "Shuk" the Israeli
marketplace where unusual pieces
of jewelry, art and giftwares may
be found.
JCC SENIORS START
THE MUSIC
Appropriately, the sounds of
music lead up to the big day with
two concerts by JCC's 60 member
Jewish Festival Chorale, led by
Hollie Berger, on Tuesday, May
13 at 7:30 p.m. and Thursday,
May 15 at 1:30 in the afternoon.
Both concerts feature the
"History of Israel Through
Music" with song and narration
retelling the story of Eretz
Yisrael. Tickets, nominally priced,
are available at the Center.
SOMETHING FOR YOU ...
AND EVERYONE
Israel '38 features an attraction
for every single member of the
family.
BEGINNING WITH THE
YOUNG
A fascinating collection of
Yom Ha'atzmaut
Israel's Independence DayJ
Thirty-eight years ago the Jewish homeland in Eretz Yisrael
became officially an independent state recognized by the nations
of the world. On the 14th of May, 1948, Israel regained its in-
dependence after two thousand years.
But gaining independence was not as easy as it sounds. It took
more than just two thousand years.
It took a vision that many people never believed would become a
reality.
It took a lot of people with faith who worked and gave their
lives to make this dream come true.
It took hundreds of years of pogroms against the Jews and the
years in which six million Jews were burned to ashes.
It took years of fighting against the British and the Arabs, both
in Israel and outside of Israel.
And most importantly, there are numerous stories of people
who sacrificed their lives on the altar of the Jewish state. Their
death was not in vain. And when they died, they gave us life.
The things I have mentioned above are a few of the reasons why
Independence Day is one, if not, the most important day in the
Israeli calendar.
One of the pieces that best describes the feeling of the 14th of
May, 1948, and what it took to bring us to this day is a poem writ-
ten by one of Israel's most famous poets, Natan Alterman. It is
called "The Silver Platter."
The earth grows still. The lurid sky
slowly pales over smoking borders.
Heartsick, but still living a people stand by
To greet the uniqueness of the miracle.
Readied, they wait beneath the moon.
Wrapped in awesome joy, before the light.
Then soon.
A girl and boy step forward
And slowly walk before the waiting nation.
In work garb and heavy-shod they climb in stillness
Wearing yet the dress of battle, the grim of aching day and fire-
filled night.
Unwashed, weary unto death, not knowing rest.
But wearing youth like dew drops in their hair.
Silently the two approach and stand.
Are they of the quick or of the dead?
Through wondering tears, the people stare.
"Who are you? The silent two?"
And they reply
"We are the silver platter upon which
the Jewish state was served to you."
And speaking, fall in shadow at the nation's feet.
Let the rest in Israel's chronicles be told.
Thirty years have passed since that day, but the state of Israel is
still fighting for its existence; and as we pray every time on the
day of independence, "May the next year be a year of peace.'

JSKOttL
FOOD-WONDERFUL
FOOD! .
Of all kinds will be presented at
various booths around the cam-
pus, both Israeli and American
style. Like Felafel Hot Dogs,
Bakery Goods, Fruit Salad, Ices,
Sodas-Coffee-Tea.
COME ONE-COME ALL
YOU'LL ENJOY "ISRAEL 38"
by the JCC!
The JCC is a major beneficiary
agency of the Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale, receiv-
ing funds from the annual United
Jewish Appeal campaign.
carnival-kind of attractions for
pre-school on their own turf!
There'll be the Tiberius Fishing
Game, The Felafel Toss, Pin the
Tail on Judah Macabbee, to name
a few. They'll also be inspired to
join in arts and crafts projects
such as making Israeli Flags and
special Kava caps. All in the newly
renovated gym! Yes, its now air-
conditioned!
IT'S ELEMENTARY
For "middle school age"
children they'll have a. Ball.. .
Crawl, a Whip, Ferris Wheel,
Roller Coaster and Rides on a Real
Elephant! There's also Maccabeah
Games starting earlier, for all
children, in athletics, game com-
petitions, races, relays and swim
events. Prizes and free shirts, too!
THE TEENS SCENE
Teens in the area celebrate
Israel Independence Day the
night before with a Dance com-
plete with D.J., refreshments and
entertainment and a big salute to
Israel. All the teens who danced
the night away will still get up
"early" to help staff a number of
carnival kind of game booths.
Teenagers also look forward to
that ultimate of quiz games which
has been part of the Israel In-
FOR ADULTS
Entertainment Outdoors under
a tent, and indoors in air-
conditioned facilities. Israeli films
will be run on a continuing basis in
Building "C."
FREE CONCERT
Shajar Argentina's "gift" to
the world of music will perform
again outdoors. This five member
combo has become a favorite
among young and older people
who appreciate the harmony, beat
and melodious sound effects pro-
duced by the singers and musi-
cians. If you didn't hear them
before-now'8 your opportunity.
They specialize in Israeli numbers
in die contemporary mode and
their appeal is irristible!
INDOORS SOREF HALL
In the morning, Nat and Ida
Wolfson present their group of
lively well-trained Israeli dancers
followed by David Levitan's
superb travelogue of Israel, with
film, entertainment and discus-
sion. The Temple Kol Ami Choir is
scheduled to follow, with Rabbi
Kurt Stone, of Tamarac Jewish
Center concluding the Soref Hall
presentations with his entertain-
ing song and commentary.
SPEAKER'S BUREAU
In conjunction with the Central
Agency for Jewish Education,
JCC hosts a program of renowned
speakers and statesmen who will
give up to the minute information
about Israel.
Ari Shacham, Shaliach (a
cultural ambassador) of the
Jewish National Fund, will speak
on "Land and Security," Rabbi
Arnold Lasker on "Religious
Make Up" and Uri Cohen,
(Shaliach, Israel Program Office)
Miami Federation, on the Country
- "Before and After
Independence."
Rabbi Jeffrey Ballon, from Tem-
ple Emanuel, and Rabbi Elliot
Skiddell from Ramat Shalom, will
speak and lead a discussion on
"Israel and the American Jewish
Community."
ANOTHER NEW FEATURE
A Photo Contest! Do you have
some super shots of your trip to
Israel? Do you know someone who
has?
Entries (limited to three per
person) may be brought to the
Center by Wednesday, May 14.
There'll be prizes and publicity
If you have more than three, bring
thejn alone-for display!
Prime Ministers Message
Continued from Page 1
Nazi ex-
terminators, fighting them, often
hopelessly, inside the death camps
and the ghettos. We com-
memorate this year the forty-
third anniversary of the Warsaw
Ghetto Uprising.
We shall remember the fighters
for the liberation of our land from
foreign rule, the members of
Haganah, Irgun and Lehi. We
shall pay tribute to all our sons
and daughters who continued the
heroic fight to sustain our in-
dependence against aggression.
And we shall salute die Israel
Defence Forces, the army of the
people of Israel, devoted and
brave, dedicated to but one single
purpose the protection of our
country and people and the ad-
vancement of peace with security.
Israel has remained faithful to
its declaration of independence.
We have built np the land and
made it green. We have gained
national vigor with each passing
year. We have renewed out
heritage in oar ancient
homeland. And we have brought
home millions of our scattered
sisters and brothers.
This above all, the great in-
gathering, the Aliyah, remains the
ultimate mission of our genera-
tion. Let all those in the free
world who perceive the greatness
of this challenge come and join us
in the further upbuilding of our
beautiful country and of our free
and democratic society.
There are still vast numbers of
our brethren who wish to join us,
Continued on Page 4
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DELIGHTFUL FUGHT
Bright, pleasantry appointed Super 80s. one of the most
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DELIGHTFUL DESTINATIONS
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Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, May 9, 1986
Viewpoint
The views expressed by columnists, reprinted editorials, and copy do not necessari-
ly reflect the opinion of the Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale.
Strategic Oil Reserve Reviewed
The Reagan Administration is reevaluating its decision to halt
filling the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). According to
Department of Energy officials, the Administration is taking "a
new look" at filling the reserve "as a national security matter and
for economic reasons."
The SPR was authorized by Congress is 1975 in an effort to
reduce America's vulnerability to foreign oil supply disruptions.
The reserve, which is slated to hold 750 million barrels upon com-
pletion, currently stores close to 498 million barrels.
Twice in the past two years the Administration has decided to
defer funding for SPR fill-up. Officials claimed that this was due
to budgetary considerations. Last year, however, Congress pass-
ed a measure to override the President's deferral. This year the
measure is pending in the Senate after having gained approval in
the House.
Energy Department sources told NER that Energy Secretary
John Herrington ordered a study of the Administration's posi-
tion. The study, which is reportedly nearing completion, will look
at the rate of nil, purchasing expenses, and maintenance and con-
struction costs. While officials were quick to point out that merely
undertaking the study does not "signal a new change" in policy,
they said that "the falling price of oil is one of the major factors in
that drive."
Department of Energy officials expressed concern about the
long-term impact on the U.S. economy of the collapse of the world
oil market. In the last three months, the price of oil has plum-
meted from $27 a barrel to less than $12, and reports indicate the
price may go as low as $8 a barrel.
Cheap foreign oil threatens domestic oil exploration and in-
creases American dependence on imported petroleum poten-
tially leading to the reemergence of OPEC and a replay of the
energy crisis of the 1970's. Oil industry experts blame Saudi
Arabia, the world's largest oil exporter, and other Persian Gulf
states for triggering the oil-price war as they sought to undercut
non-OPEC oil producers. From last July and to this February, the
Saudis increased production from their fields more than 100
percent.
Stephen Silberfarb.
Silberfarb is the American Israel Public Affairs Committee's
senior legislative assistant.
Rabbis Among Young Warriors I\
v
WIU-THE CHEMISTRy WORK?
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jewishFloridian o
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rnso aaocnet
Friday, May 9, 1986
Volume 15
30 NISAN 5746
Number 18
By ALBERT W. BLOOM
(Fourth in a Four-Part
Special Series for JTA)
"The well-being of the soul can be
obtained only after that of the body
has been secured."
Maimonides,
"Guide for the Perplexed"
AURORA, COLO. (JTA) Fitz-
simons Army Medical Center, one
of the world's largest military
facilities, has served American
soldiers and their dependents for
more than half a century, many of
them Jewish servicemen and
women, Chaplain (Col.) Arthur L.
Fine, 53, said proudly.
Chaplain Fine, rabbi of Con-
gregation Zera Israel in nearby
Denver, is Jewish Staff Chaplain
of a proud chaplaincy service at
Fitzsimons Hospital. Fine is one
of America's Rabbis Among
Young Warriors.
"We deal with military service
patients at their most vulnerable
times of life," explains Chaplain
Fine. "They are often far from
home and far from their extended
families.
"This requires special insight
and compassion from any
chaplain, especially those of us
who are Jewish, since our faith
group is a small minority, stress-
ing quality rather than quantity."
In fact, Fitzsimons can "expand
overnight almost" from its normal
461 beds to almost 1,000 beds and,
in an emergency, to 4,000 beds,"
according to Captain Charles Fer-
ris, 38, our special briefing officer,
a research physiologist and
clinical investigator.
Fitzsimons conducts joint
research projects with the civilian
National Jewish Hospital at
Denver, where kosher food is
available. Beth Israel Hospital is
kosher and Rose Medical Center
has TV-kosher dinners available.
Chaplain Fine, an Orthodox rab-
bi, notes that all Jewish chaplains
must find ways to conduct their
diverse congregations in
"military-type Jewish services,"
making allowances for varied
religious backgrounds. "We are
here to attract all of our Jewish
servicemen and women, we do not
ever want to lose any."
Sgt. Gerry Schlesinger, 30, of
Harrisburg, whose main duty is
student training advisor at Fitz-
simons, doubles as the volunteer
"hazzan" at Chaplain Fine's
religious services.
"My observant background
helps me to find ways to make the
service meaningful as well as
musical to all other backgrounds.
Someday, I hope to be a hazzan in
civilian life," Schlesinger, an 11
and-a-half year Army veteran,
remarks.
Under a new program, Chaplain
Fine is an IMA (Individual
Mobilization Assignee), so that in
event of military emergency he
would assume full-time, uniform-
ed chaplaincy duties on the spot at
Fitzsimons Army Medical Center.
Normally he is on inactive duty,
but spends one day weekly on du-
ty and is always "on call."
Lt. Col. Peter Blue, 43, of Col-
umbus, Ohio, chief of nuclear
medicine at Fitzsimons, is the
JWB Commission on Jewish
Chaplaincy-certified Jewish Lay
Leader at Fitzsimons. Both
Chaplain Fine and Colonel Blue
include nearby Lowry Air Force
Base as part of their official
religious assignment.
Lay leaders are all volunteers
under the JWB-CJC lay leader
program. Since full-time chaplains
are scarce, especially for far-flung
and small Jewish military com-
munities, the JWB-CJC develop-
ment of the Lay Leader concept
and program enables Jewish ser-
vicemen and women to be covered
anywhere in the world where U.S.
forces are on duty.
Recently honored by JWB-CJC,
Colonel Blue said, "Honors are
nice but Jewish duty is nicer."
Chaplain Fine is "on the alert at
any time of day or night" in the
event Jewish personnel are in
need of a chaplain.
"Often, our military retirees
surface with a family problem dif-
ficult of solution." Chaplain Fine
says. "Sometimes there is a mixed
marriage, the surviving spouse is
not Jewish and is bewildered as to
what to do. There is no synagogue
affiliation oftentimes.
"Nearby Fort Logan, called the
'Arlington (National Cemetery) of
the West,' may not be sought as a
last resting place by the family
that feels a loved one should rest
in a Jewish cemetery. Further,
the family may be beset by finan-
cial straits.
"In such cases, the rabbis,
civilian and military, have worked
out a special agreement with a
Denver mortician who will handle
all arrangements, accepting the
standard minimum government-
specified fee for service-connected
burials." This is a little discussed
private, human assistance pro-
gram to avoid any family embar-
rassment, Chaplain Fine explains.
But it is a heart-rending
chaplain's duty that the civilian
society rarely hears, or knows,
about.
Today Fitzsimons is a major
asset among Denver's great
modern medical centers, strategic
to the vast Rocky Mountain West.
The demands of a hospital
chaplain's ministry and a troop
chaplain's ministry are among the
most intensive and draining
assignments one can have.
Something new and different is
always confronting you," the
chaplain says.
We had just rounded a corner in
one of the hospital corridors and
came upon Private Isadora Slav-
sky of New York, who had retired
in November, 1984. He was quite
ill now, but brightened up when he
found he had the Jewish chaplain
visiting with a mixed faith-group
team as a roving editor represen-
ting JWB-CJC.
"I'm not feeling well these days,
but I am prepared, and I ap-
preciate this," he said with a
smile. The chaplain put a brother-
ly arm around Slavsky, and the
rest of us retreated a discreet
distance to let them talk privately.
Compassionate medical care is a
hallmark of Fitzsimons. Fitz-
simons has treated a wide variety
of patients: gas-attack victims of
World War I; tuberculosis pa-
tients; Pearl Harbor victims;
enemy Prisoners of War; Viet-
namese orphans rescued by the
Americans in "Operation
Babylift" in early 1975; and the
mass release of POW's from Viet-
nam in ''Operation
Homecoming."
Today, Fitzsimons is a hospital
of enormous proportions with 288
buildings and a whole spectrum of
responsibilities. In addition, there
is a whole array of research in-
cluding a dual laser, fluorescent-
activated cell sorter and
ophthalmology's Argon ion laser
to treat the eye in retinal disease.
A well-trained, large surgical staff
can perform a full spectrum of
surgical procedures, with the ex-
ception of organ transplants.
Chaplain Fine says, "So vast is
this hospital and its support
facilities for patient care, train-
ing, and education that I con-
tinually learn new things about
what is going on as I seek out
Jewish patients and staff person-
nel to keep Jewish contact alive
and well." Services, especially on
the Jewish holidays, draw
anywhere from 25 to 100. A sweet
table and special Jewish foods
afterwards will often bring a
whole spectrum of faith-groups
and friends.
When I dined alone with
Chaplain Fine in the Fitzsimons
officer's club, the chef arranged
for us a full kosher table with new
plastic table settings and kosher
TV dinners, kept on hand for such
occasions, at the request of the
Staff Chaplains, whose courtesies
consideration, and thoughtfulness
know no bounds. That makes pa-
tient care all the more special at
Fitzsimons. Chaplain (Lt. Col.)
Fletcher D. Wideman is the Fitz-
simons Hospital Chaplain.
"Our job as chaplains is to say in
some way to each patient, 'I care
about you as a person," he says.
"We try to help patients so that
they do not become prisoners of
their disease, their sick bed, or to
their other relationships. Our job
is to give hope to enable them in
some way to cope with their
ailment."
In terminal cases, the ability
and strength to face death is
necessary. "In America, too
often, we run away, avoid the
thought or idea of death," noted
Colonel Wideman.
The chaplain observed how ap-
propriate is the Jewish custom of
"tearing Kriah," ripping a piece
of one's clothing, or cutting a
black ribbon, worn by the
mourners to show sad loss but
then going on to work through the
grief process of "Shiva" for seven
days, and slowly adjust and begin
anew while holding memories
dear.
Chaplain (Col.) Norman G.
Walker, Jr., Chief of the Depart-
ment of Pastoral Care of Fitz-
simons, was recently honored by
JWB-CJC for his special efforts in
interfaith integration among
chaplains, making their very dif-
ficult jobs less stressful.
"We all offer pastoral care to
our patients, their families, and to
the hospital staff. We have to
minister to the whole person, not
only to his body, but to him or her,
first, as a human being," he says.
Chaplain Fine nodded vigorously.
Maimonides, the great 12th-
century rabbi, savant, and physi-
cian, would heartily approve of
that sentiment, too.
Prime Ministers
Message
Continued from Page 3
but are barred from doing so
because of the hostile policies of
their regimes, notably Syria,
Ethiopia, Iran and the Soviet
Union. There, in the Soviet Union
is the largest of all the Jewish
communities which lives in a state
of distress. After some years of
emigration the doors of the USSR
have again been slammed shut, as
elsewhere, with unbelievable
courage, the prisoners of Zion, the
Refuseniks and the activists for
Aliyah keep alive this heroic
Jewish movement to return to the
historic homeland, Eretz Israel.
Their voice is heard and the
response of the free world was
given dramatic and loud expres-
sion at the Jerusalem World Con-
ference on Soviet Jewry. That
conference declared "Let My Peo-
ple Go." We, Israel, the whole
Jewish people and men and
women of good will everywhere,
rededicate ourselves to the holy
endeavor to bring home all of our
fellow Jews who so wish for the
Soviet Union and from every
country where the torment per-
sists. We shall succeed.
Israel, stable, strong and
faithful ally of the free and
democratic world, enters its thirty
eighth year of freedom with the
unflinching resolve remaining
ever vigilant in protecting its na-
tional rights and its vital security
in Eretz Israel. By standing
together in the performance of
the momentous tasks of our
generations, the justice of our
cause shall surely win the day.
Shimon Peres
Prime Minister of Israel


Friday, May 9, 1986/The Jewish Floridjan of Greater Fort LauderdaJe Page 5
Spend Your Summer In Israel On The 1986 Singles Mission
MISSION IN ACTION Robert Jackowitz, second from right,
1985 Singles Mission with newly arrived Ethiopian Immigrants.
Imagine spending your summer
in Israel, retracing the steps of
your forefathers as you make new
paths for the next generation.
Now is your chance to become a
part of history. The Jewish
Federation is offering two Sum-
mer Singles Missions to Israel this
summer.
The first offers an optional pre-
Mission to Warsaw, Poland, July
9-14. In Poland you will visit
Kracow, meet with Jewish com-
munity leaders and attend the
Yiddish Theater. On July 14, you
will depart for Israel and spend
nine fun-filled nights with singles
your own age, who will be there
from all over the U.S.
If July is a bad month for you to
get away, another Singles Mission
is being offered in August.
This one features a pre-Mission
to Prague, Czechoslovakia, Aug.
13-18. In Czechoslovakia, you will
visit Theresienstadt, Jewish
museums and synagogues and
meet with Jewish leaders. On
Aug. 18, you will depart for Tel
Aviv, Israel and will tour Israel
through Aug. 27.
Both Summer Missions include
nine nights in Israel, bed and
breakfast, seven lunches and
seven dinners. The Summer single
missions will fly via El Al Israel's
airline nonstop from the United
States to Ben Gurion Airport with
no stops or layovers in Europe.
Its a chance of a lifetime. Don't
miss out. For reservations contact
Sandy Jackowitz, Mission coor-
dinator, at 748-8400.
They were there Jvly 1985
Singles Mission participants
arriving in Israel on El Al
jumbo jet.
The Coral Springs Connection A Contemporary Jewish Series
Reagan's televised address, the group spent a fascinating evening
On April 14 the Coral Springs Connection met at the home of
Judy and David Henry to discuss a previously scheduled topic,
"Being Jewish in a Non-Jewish World." The two dozen par-
ticipants quickly discovered that the program does indeed con-
front contemporary Jewish issues, when at the last minute, the
topic was changed to a timely discussion of terrorism and the
situation in the Middle East.
As many will recall, on April 14, the United States attacked
bases in Libya in response to recent acts of terrorism. As the
members of the Coral Springs Connection arrived for the even-
ing's program all agreed that the current events required the
group's attention. Breaking at one point to watch President
Central Agency
for
Jewish Education
confronting their reactions to the U.S. attack.
Though unanticipated, the program was an outstanding suc-
cess. Rabbi Norman Lipson, Director of the Institute for Jewish
Studies for the Central Agency for Jewish Education in Miami,
impressed the group with his ability to set aside his prepared pro-
gram and help them to explore the situation in the Middle East.
The next session of the Coral Springs Connection is scheduled
for Tuesday, May 20, at the home of Ronnie and Joy Kertes. The
Coral Springs Connection is sponsored by the Jewish Federation
of Greater Fort Lauderdale. For further information contact
Debra Roshfeld at the Federation, 748-8400.
For 'Roof
Seekers

The Healthiest Traditions
Start With
Fleischmann's Margarine and Egg Beaters:

Newsletters which may prove
helpful to searchers of their roots
are:
AVOTAYNU
The International Review of
Jewish Genealogy
P.O. Box 1134
Teaneck, NJ 07666
SEARCH
International Quarterly for
Researchers of Jewish Genealogy
P.O. Box 481022
Niles, IL 60648
DOROT
The Journal of the Jewish
Genealogical Society
P.O. Box 6398
New York, NY 10128
MISHPACHA
A Publication of the Jewish
Genealogical Society of
Washington, D.C.
P.O. Box 412
Vienna, VA 22180
Did You
Know. .
North American Jewry has
been hailed as the most powerful,
the most affluent, the most suc-
cessful Diaspora community in
Jewish history.
But for many Jews today, this
great dream has become a cruel il-
lusion. Economic hard times have
ripped through the tapestry of
North American Jewry, leaving
gashes of desperation and despair.
Today more Jews are hungry,
jobless, homeless and hopeless
than at any time since the Great
Depression.
True, Jews in need are still a
minority. But because we are
Jews, we cannot tolerate suffer-
ing in even the smallest fraction of
our community. Because we are
Jews, we cannot turn away from
the unaffiliated and uninvolved
the hungry of spirit any more
than we can turn our backs on the
homeless.and/or the unemployed.
M**"*!

'%&*



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c.epeon*lpWl *#*!
iMrtMWlpghrSSi0M!B5 e,m*o-
sides,0
mm M .^,n SQUaiW on ^onamon GUM
Fleischmann's A
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'com
o
r9arin
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j
S Mot* Soui ^ ,j,r, Wno ft
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It s nid lime lo
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Fleischmann s Margar irnm 111) corn oil and Eqg
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vm a ft vtr. In MiupM kMhnM
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Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, May 9, 1986
Federation Host A Joyous Pesach For Community ...
TAe Gathering kosher
GPlace Nutrition
An Adult Day Care Center
The Jewish Federation recently hosted a Seder for the par-
ticipants of all three of their elderly programs; the Gathering
Place, an adult day care program; the Jewish Community Center
Nutrition Program; and the Lauderhill Mall Nutrition Program.
The Seder was conducted by Rabbi David Gordon, assisted by
Cantor Philip Erstling, valued friends of the Elderly Programs,
and second graders of the Hebrew Day School, led by Arlene
Solomon, music director, entertained with Passover songs.
Focus
Rabbi David Gordon, left, and Irving Libowsky, Federation
secretary are shown giving greetings before the Hebrew Day
School second graders presented their Passover melodies to the
delight of the audience.
Shown from left are Sandra Friedland, director of Elderly Ser-
vices and Irving Libowsky, Federation secretary and chairman
of the Kosher Nutrition Program, giving Passover greetings to
those in attendance.
A SPECIAL LECTURE was recently held for the sponsors of the
North Broward Midrashas', "Contemporary Issues of Jewish
Life,' Lecture Series. Dr. Reuben Luckens, guest speaker,
discussed, "Jewish Mysticism and Kabbalah," to a filled Temple
Beth Am auditorium. Pictured at the special lecture, from left,
Berte Resnikoff, Adult Eduction chair of Temple Beth Am; Rabbi
Rueben Luckens; Dr. Abraham J. Gittelson, Federation director
of education; and Helen Weisberg, administratior of the North
Broward Midrasha.
Pakistan's
Call
Pakistani President Zia al-
Haq called on the PLO to
recognize Israel (The Jerusalem
Post, Mar. 16.) In Israel the
Foreign Ministry downplayed the
statement, noting that Zia "had
not urged Jordan or even Syria to
open talks with and recognize
Israel" and that Jerusalem's
policy remains not to negotiate
with the PLO.
In Washington an Israeli source
called Zia's statement "unusual"
and said that it might have been
meant to support an ally, Jordan's
King Hussein. Zia, as the leader of
a large Moslem state, might have
been trying to help Hussein end
his isolation.
Briefly-
Rabbi
Schwartz
Elected
As always...
Half the calories
of butler
& twice as good
Most people are surprised to find out that
Philadelphia Brand cream cheese has always
had half the calories of butter or margarine. But
fortunately they've always known That Philly
cream cheese tastes twice as good.
The good news is. now that they know Philly
cream cheese-either soft or regular-has half
the calories of butter, they can enjoy twice as
much Philadelphia Brand cream cheese-or
twice as often.
Whether you use our super-spreadable soft
package, or the regular Philly cream cheese,
your whole family will enjoy a terrific spread.
What a mechayeh for your bagel, matzoh, bially
or toast!
So, pick up a package of Philly cream cheese,
because naif the calories means a great deal.
Rabbi Albert Schwartz
Rabbi Albert Schwartz, director
of the Chaplaincy Commission of
the Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale, was elected
president of the South Florida
Chaplains Association.
Elected vice president was the
Rev. Ron Mensinger, State Prison
Chaplain. Rev. Donald F. Bautz,
consultant of the Specialized Ur-
ban Ministry, was elected
secretary/treasurer. Rev. Bautz
also serves as chairman of the
Federation's Inter faith
Caregivers Coalition.. .....
^1984 Kraft


Friday, May 9, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 7
Strengthening The Jewish Education Of Our Young
And Heightening Their Pride In Judaism
The Hebrew Day School
of Fort Lauderdale
6501 W. Sunrise Blvd. Plantation, Florida 33313 (305) 5836100
CHERYLL BEST, kindergarten teacher at the Hebrew Day
School, proudly displays her class of 1986. The Hebrew Day
School is a major beneficiary agency of the Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale, funded in part by the FederationlUJA
campaign.
Every Year In Jerusalem
Yom Yerushalayim, celebrating
19 years of the reunification of
Jerusalem will be held at a com-
munity observance on June 5, at
Temple Beth Torah, 9101 N.W. 57
St., Tamarac. The event will
highlight "Every Year In
Jerusalem" through a display of
information on tours and travel to
Israel in a "Tourism Shuk."
Registration will begin at 9:30
a.m. The program will start pro-
mptly at 10 a.m. and conclude at 3
{).m. The fee for registration and
unch is $ per person. Reserva-
tions must be made by May 26 and
space is limited.
Other highlights of the program
will be Proclamations of Yom
Yerushalayim from the city of
Tamarac and the city of
Jerusalem, highlights of tours to
Israel by Rabbis Skiddell, Ballon
and Plotkin, displays and books of
Jerusalem, an original play by
Rabbi Kurt Stone "If These
Stones Could Speak," "Jerusalem
Is Never Trivial" a Jerusalem
quiz, By Popular Demand
Simultaneous Workshops. The
workshops will include: A Walk-
ing Tour of Jerusalem with Gil
Elan, Director of Travel,
American Jewish Congress;
Legends of the Western Wall
Dr. Abraham J. Gittelson, Direc-
tor of Education, Jewish Federa-
tion of Greater Fort Lauderdale;
The Gates and Walls of Jerusalem
- Dov Goldflam, Shliach Torah
Dept. World Zionist Congress;
Life in Meah Shearim (in Yiddish)
- Max Rolnick, Veteran Jewish
Educator; Going Up: Jerusalem
and Aliyah Uri Cohen, Shliach
for Aliyah; Arab', Christian and
Jewish Holy Places in Jerusalem
- (in Hebrew) Effrat Afek,
Representative Dept. of Educa-
tion and Culture World Zionist
Organization; Jerusalem Coins
Reveal History Morris Bram
American Israel Numismatic
Assn; Jerusalem: Problems and
Prospects David Cohen, Consul
of Israel. These will be
simultaneous workshops,
therefore only one workshop can
be attended by each person.
This Fourth Annual Yom
Yerushalayim community obser-
vance is presented by the North
Broward Midrasha and its par-
ticipating institutions: Temples
Beth Am, Beth Israel, Beth Israel
of Deerfield Beach, Beth Orr,
Beth Torah, Emanu-El, Sha'aray
Tzedek, Sholom, Ramat Shalom,
Hebrew Congregation of
Lauderhill, Liberal Jewish Temple
of Coconut Creek, Kol Ami,
Southeastern Region of United
Synagogue of America, Jewish
Community Center, Omega Con-
dominium. It is coordinated by the
Central Agency for Jewish Educa-
tion of the Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale in
cooperation with and supported
by the Department of Education
and Culture of the World Zionist
Organization, American section.
Brochures are available at par-
ticipating institutions. For further
information call 748-8400 Educa-
tion Department.

THE THREE-YEAR-OLD CLASS of the
Hebrew Day School of Fort Lauderdale is all
smiles as they pose for their class picture with
teacher assistant Mrs. Goldie Rothstein. left,
and teacher Diane Goodman.
IF YOU'RE EATING A
HIGH FIBER BRAN FLAKE,
THATSG
in
IF IT'S HIGHEST IN FIBER
ANDBESTTAST1NG.
THATSPOSt
You've got the right idea. You're eating a high fiber cereal because
you know how beneficial a high fiber diet can be.
But do you know there's a bran flake that's highest in fiber, best
tasting and absolutely Kosher?
Its Post* Natural Bran Flakes.
Post* has more fiber than the other leading bran flake. And Post*
is oven toasted. So every flake is crispy, golden and delicious
Now that you've decided to have a high fiber bran flake, make sure
its Post'Natural Bran Rakes. The best tasting, highest fiber bran
flake
C19a6Gwwal Foods Cotporakon
Where keeping Kosher is a ddkious tradition.
i


^^ 8 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, May 9, 1986
Project Renewal Serves As Model For International Conference
The successful results of
Israel's Project Renewal Program
served as a model for delegates to
the International Conference on
Urban Revitalization held recent-
ly in Jerusalem under the auspices
of the Jerusalem Center for Public
Affairs. This was announced by
Jane Sherman, National Chair-
man of Project Renewal for both
United Israel Appeal (UIA) and
United Jewish Appeal (UJA), who
pledged that U.S. Jewish Federa-
tions would continue to support
Project Renewal, reaffirming the
commitment to their partnership
with distressed Israeli
neighborhoods.
Mrs. Sherman said that some
400 participants from 28 coun-
tries, including a number of third
world nations, attended the con-
ference. The Israeli delegation
itself numbered over 100
delegates and the majority of con-
ference speakers were Israeli ur-
ban specialists who drew on
creative Project Renewal
achievements in areas such as
physical rehabilitation, health
education, neighborhood plann-
ing, social program, educational
enhancement, twinning, group
programs, development of in-
digenous leadership and economic
factors. Other internationally
recognized experts presenting
papers came from the United
States, Canada, Holland, Den-
mark, the Phillipines, Norway,
England, Italy, and Australia.
Mrs. Sherman said that the con-
ference was addressed by Israel's
Prime Minister, Shimon Peres,
who promised not only to continue
government support of Project
Renewal, but to expand it in new
directions. Mr. Peres told the
delegates that stress would be
placed on creating high-
technology enterprises in develop-
ment towns and distressed areas,
as well as in the provision of the
vocational skills required for area
residents to work in these
On Urban Revitalization In Jerusalem
enterprises.
Israel's Minister of Construc-
tion and Housing, David Levy,
said Mrs. Sherman, announced
that more neighborhoods would
be added to the Project Renewal
roster.
Mrs. Sherman said that in a
memorandum to the conference,
Jerusalem's Mayor, Teddy Kollek,
cited the firm partnership bet-
ween Jewish communities
throughout the world and disad-
vantaged Israeli neighborhoods as
one of the major achievements of
Project Renewal. Other Project
Renewal results listed by Mr.
Kollek included the improvement
of living conditions and raising of
the level of community services;
the creation of opportunities for
greater education and employ-
ment achievements, the involve-
ment of neighborhood residents in
controlling their own affairs,
which increases a sense of belong-
ing, and the encouragement of
greater political involvement for
neighborhood residents.
Mrs. Sherman observed that
some conference delegates ex-
pressed serious concerns about
the premature termination of
Jewish community support of
twinned neighborhoods. In the
light of Israel's grave economic
situation, it was agreed that phas-
ing out must be done in a more
orderly fashion and must provide
for continued support wherever
and whenever necessary.
Mrs. Sherman stated that, ac-
cording to latest reports, Project
Renewal neighborhoods number
82 and are populated by approx-
imately 570,000 Israelis, or about
15 percent of the national
population.
Mrs. Sherman stated that the
conference included more than 30
workshops. Marilyn Wechsler,
Project Renewal Coordinator for
UIA, chaired one of the
workshops. The President of The
Jerusalem Center for Public Af-
fairs, Professor Daniel J. Elazar,
said that, "The conference ...
was an extraordinary opportunity
to demonstrate Israel's success in
the renewal of its neighborhoods
to the world."
Commenting on the conference,
Maariv, one of Israel's leading
dailies, stated: ". Today, we
(Israel) can serve as a 'light unto
the nations' with regard to involv-
ing residents in the revitalization
of their own neighborhoods; and
with regard to social and
economic advancement not
through huge budgets but rather
through gradual improvement of
housing quality and level of
education. ."
United Israel Appeal receives
funds from National UJA Cam-
paigns, as well as U.S. State
Department grants, and ad-
ministers and allocates these
funds in Israel through its sole
operating agent there, the Jewish
Agency.
The Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lavderdale's Project
Renewal city is Kfar Saba, Israel.
Through the efforts of our Project
Renewal chairperson, Alvera A.
Gold, and a host of dedicated in-
dividuals, Kfar Saba has grown
from a struggling ghetto to a thriv-
ing neighborhood. Still, much
more needs to be done and the
Federation needs to raise more
monies to reach their committed
totals.
For further information about
Project Renewal and how you can
help, contact the Jewish Federa-
tion at 7U8-8U00.
Joel Reinstein, right, enjoying home hospitality in Kfar Saba on
the October 1984 Community Mission.
Capacity Crowd Attend
UJA Pharmacists Event
An overflow crowd filled the
home of Phyllis and Arnold Mann
in Plantatin on Sunday evening,
May 5, as pharmacists from
Greater Fort Lauderdale
gathered on behalf of the Jewish
Federation/1986 United Jewish
Appeal campaign.
Chairman David Weinberg, vice
president of Key Phar-
maceuticals, Inc., of Miami,
welcomed the audience as he in-
troduced noted guest speaker
Gene Greenzweig, Southeast U.S.
executive director of the Central
Agency for Jewish Education.
Greenzweig eloquently presented
the case for the current campaign
to those present.
This event was the first ever for
area pharmacists and marked the
inauguration of their profession as
a Division of the campaign. Co-
chairman of the Division is Bruce
Goldman, president of Tamarac
Pharmacy.
Other committee members in-
clude Howard and Lew Becks, Ar-
thur Behm, Steven Goldstein,
Alan Katz, Martin Leach, Larry
Mann, Angela Mann, Lou Truchil,
Mel Levine, Jerry Guttman and
Sam Swartx.
lj Briefly
Woodlands Mini-Mission Highlights
Woodlands residents Sol
Schulman, Morris Small, Harold
Oshry, Sidney Spewak, Larry
Domenitz, Manny Zisser, Al
Sharenow and Harry Wainer
recently had the opportunity of
participating in a mini-mission to
the Jewish Community Center
campus to see Federation/United
Jewish Appeal dollars at work.
Accompanying the group was
Dr. Abraham J. Gittelson, Federa-
tion director of education.
The first stop was the Hebrew
Day School, housed on the JCC
Federation Agencies
Campus. Fran Merenstein, HDS
director, let the mission par-
ticipants sit in on a seventh grade
class as they learned math in
English and Hebrew.
Also featured was a visit to
Federation's Kosher Nutrition
program where participants
shared a Seder lunch with the
elderly of the program. The seder
was conducted by volunteer Rabbi
David Gordon, under the leader-
ship of Sandy Friedland, Elderly
Services director.
Phil Cofman, executive director
of the JCC, explained to the par-
ticipants about the Jewish agen-
cies funded by Federation/UJA
and gave a tour of the JCC's
facilities.
All who participated agreed
that the mission was a worthwhile
experience and an excellent way
to show people how Federa-
tion/UJA dollars are spent locally.
Abba Eban Remembers Independence Day
Continued from Page 1
he said, "in that
weakness, the Jews were
never stronger, never more
helpful." And that hope
was justified, for with in-
dependence "all was
transformed, we were no
longer an anonymous com-
munity, but a sovereign
state, our flag flew with
all others in the family of
nations. We had recap-
tured our sense of
identity."
And he went on from
there. "Then we were
650,000 people, now we are
nearly four million. We have
grown fivehold in one
generation, including doubl-
ing our population in the
last years by taking in a
group of battered im-
migrants and our starving
Ethiopian brethren in a
miraculous act of human
rehabilitation.
We were then weak in
arms with a few bombs, a
few aircraft, and a few
weapons, all that stood
between the Jews and the
extinction of our greatest
vision. Today we are not
weak, our valor and
resourcefulness having
proved themselves in the
protection of our lives.
Our economy had $48
million in exports then. To-
day we have more than $8
billion, from a total labor
force of more than two
million manning the most
sophisticated scientific bas-
ed industry in the world.
We have seen the
resurgence of mankind's
oldest culture, the revival of
our ancient language, the
constant development of a
mature democracy."
Looking at all that has
been done and looking
back at how it all began,
Eban says, "It is clear that
the day 38 years ago when
Israel declared its in-
dependence was a moment
of truth that moved all of
Israel and that set history
on a new course."
Eban told the South
Florida audience, "If
anyone had asked any
Israeli on either side of the
political barrier, wouldn't it
be a good idea to have a
peace with Egypt and give
up airfields, the naval bases,
the oil fields, the set-
tlements, everybody would
have said you must be crazy.
But when peace is a real
possibility, we made conces-
sions we never would have
dreamed possible.
CONGREGATION BETH HILLEL OF MARGATE recently
held its annual breakfast on behalf of the 1986 Jewish Federa-
tion/United Jewish Appeal campaign. Pictured at the breakfast,
from left, honorees Ida and Abe Dinowitz and Florence Goldfarb,
chairman and plaque presenter.
7^hA^f,faU8 UmU!r ** Greater Mar9ate AreaJUnited
irJTr^^A "a^Pa^n-:^Uly held a UJA Victory Party at
%%ZAAl ^T- TheFfA *"* of Oakland Hills
SSt1' mU ""****& pign. to date. Chairing the
uakland HtUs campaign was Seymour Folk.



Friday, May 9, 1986/The Jewish Floridimn of Greater Fort LauderdaJe Page 9
CAMPAIGN '86 Federation/United Jewish Appeal
Women's P.M. Network Set May 19
WOMEN'S DIVISION

The Women's Division's
popular monthly program, P.M.
Network, has embarked on an in-
novative presentation which will
bring Black and Jewish leaders
together to share views and ideas.
This new program was announced
by Selma Telles, chair of P.M.
Network. The meeting will take
place at 7:30 p.m. Monday May 19
in the Federation building, 8358
W. Oakland Park Blvd.
P.M. Network meets on the
third Monday of each month and
invites interested women of the
community to partake. "P.M. Net-
work (rives the working woman as
well as the mother a chance to
meet with her contemporaries in a
Judaic atmosphere," Telles
stated.
Discussions range from Bible
studies to contemporary issues of
Jewish life. As the scholar-in-
residence, Dr. Abraham J. Git-
telson, Federation director of
education, has led lively discus-
sions about many different topics.
Recently he held an informative
session on Passover.
If you wish to participate in
P.M. Network, please contact the
Women's Division at 748-8400.
\
Federation/UJA Gift Provides Hope ...
JDC Day Care For Elderly
By CHRIS LEPPEK
Intrrmountain Jewish News
(Denver)
JAFFA, Israel Near the
center of the old Israeli city of Jaf-
fa, under the cooling shade of the
tall trees that tower above it,
stands a rather ordinary set of
buildings with a rather important
role.
Once a military hospital, then a
maternity hospital, this complex
known as Zahalon came under the
direction of new masters a few
years ago. Under a program co-
sponsored by the Israeli Ministry
of Health and local agencies, the
Joint Distribution Committee is
helping utilize Zahalon as a pro-
totype in a fledgling effort to vast-
ly upgrade Israel's system of car-
ing for its elderly citizens.
On a recent morning, a small
delegation from the United
Jewish Appeal/Leadership Con-
ference visited this facility. They
were greeted in the pleasant cour-
tyard with the strains of "Shalom
Aleichem" sung by a chorus of
Jaffa residents who spend their
days within Zahalon's day center
for the elderly. Inside, in a clean
and well-furnished dining room,
the delegates were treated to
more music (including, in a fine
touch of symbolism, "We Shall
Overcome") before quickly tour-
ing the rest of the facility.
Although the buildings
themselves are decades old, they
are in solid shape and well-
furnished. The main structure
contains the facility's main func-
tion which is to provide a comfor-
table and accessible environment
for those residents of the Jaffa-
Tel Aviv area awho are mobile and
essentially self-sufficient. There
are crafts and exercise classes,
noontime meals, extra activities
such as the chorus, and plenty of
opportunities to avoid solitude.
Several yards away stands a
building used for the handicapped
elderly who are driven to the
center daily and returned home
after spending several hours in a
.-/
JDC IN ACTION The Joint Distribution Committee, a major
beneficiary agency of the United Jewish Appeal/Community
Campaign, helps meet the needs of elderly Jews and makes it
easier for elderly Jews, and others, to enjoy their lives. -UJA
Press Service Photo by Richard Lobel.
place which provides essentially
the same services as the day
center, but tailors to the needs of
the physically handicapped.
Upstairs is a spacious facility in
which medical, psychological and
social workers provide care for
those elderly who have a range of
handicaps. This day care facility
provides comfort, attention and,
most importantly, a safe environ-
ment for its charges.
These dimensions of Zahalon's
services represent efforts by JDC,
with ESHEL, the Association for
Care and Services for the Aged, to
care for Israel's elderly on a day-
time basis, allowing them to
return to their homes in the even-
ing and thereby preventing, in as
many esses as possible, a family
decision to choose a full-time nurs-
ing home. Such a program's
economic benefits are matched,
JDC contends, by its therapeutic
and social benefits.
Currently, Zahalon is ap-
proaching capacity in some of its
facilities and the staff is eagerly
awaiting the completion of a new
building on the campus, a nursing
center for the psychologically han-
dicapped elderly. This new facility
will provide Zahalon with an addi-
tional 30 short-term beds for such
patients, as well as 70 full-time
beds, greatly increasing the
center's ability to serve its com-
munity's needs.
The Israeli medical establish-
ment is closely watching the pro-
gress and effectiveness of such
early day care facilities as
Zahalon, says Chaim Burger, a
Ministry of Health psychiatric
social worker. Nevertheless,
needs still greatly outnumber ex-
isting services and Israel's
escalating inflation rate will sure-
ly force government cutbacks in
such human services as these. The
support from UJA Federation/
which provides nearly all of JDC's
$46.5 million budget for overseas
Jewish needs and from other
non-governmental sources.
Burger indicates, is becoming
steadily more crucial.
Burger is pointed in describing
most existing nursing homes in
Israel as "a nightmare." "In
Israel, if you have money, the nur-
sing homes are pretty good," he
says. "But if you re poor and sick,
and in need of help, things aren't
so good. The Zahalon project is an
example of what Israel can be do-
ing for its elderly, but at this point
t's very far from adequate."
WHAT'S HAPPENING
MAY
May 6 Community-wide Yom Hashoa Pro-
gram. 5:30 p.m. Temple Beth Am, Margate.
May 8 Business Executive Network. 5:30-7:30
p.m. Marina Bay.
May 29 Federation Annual Meeting and In-
stallation. 7 p.m. JCC.
INFORMATION
For information please contact the Jewish
Federation at 748-8400.
2 Jews Elected Mayors
In South Africa
JOHANNESBURG (JTA) -
Two leading Jewish political
figures have been elected mayors
of Johannesburg and Sandton.
Prof. Harold Rudolph, 38, serv-
ed for 14 years on the Johan-
nesburg City Council before being
inducted as the city's mayor last
month. Rudolph, who is associate
professor at the Wits University
School of Law, is an active
Rotarian past chairperson of the
Emmarentia Hebrew Congrega-
tion, and vice chairperson ot the
Transvaal Council of the Jewish
Board of Deputies.
Hazel Edges-Shochet, 52, has
been a Sandton town councillor
for almost nine years before tak-
ing on the duties of mayor. She
was the town's Mayoress as the
wife of the late Morris Edges,
Sandton's mayor in 1973. She was
also the first woman to be elected
to the town's management
committee.
-


Page 10 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, May 9, 1986
Newswire/U.S.A.
PHILADELPHIA A Tax Court judge has ruled that a Rabbi
cannot deduct the costs of his son's Bar Mitzvah reception as a
business expense even though the entire congregation is invited.
The Judge ruled that Rabbi Arnold Feldman's $4,0% in reception
costs were not deductible because the Bar Mitzvah was a personal
celebration unrelated to the conduct of his profession.
NEW YORK An official of West Germany's opposition Social
Democratic Party (SPD) likened the current wave of terrorism
emanating from the Middle East to the "same nationalistic seed
that saw anti-Semitism kindle the flames of the Holocaust."
NEW YORK The leaders of the Soviet Union now recognize
that there can be no rapprochement with the United States unless
they restore the process of emigration for Jews seeking to join
their families in Israel. This assessment was made at a news con-
ference by Eliahu Essas, one of the most prominent Jewish ac-
tivists in Moscow until he was permitted to emigrate to Israel in
January.
NEW YORK Israel's two Chief Rabbis Ashkenazic Chief
Rabbi Avraham Shapira and Sephardic Chief Rabbi Mordechai
Eliyahu said that the Reform and Conservative movements in
America "are creating a new Torah that can divide the Jewish
people. They must not change halacha (Jewish religious law) and
must stop converting to Judaism according to their new laws,"
the two rabbis said.
tCmSktucon' mm
ocuumoHT
gOAfW/ALK HOTEL
-tomlB.ch.n-33t0
FuHfUr Condition*
SocfiPnar*r*'Q*
nabbMclSupanMon
MMOMALDAY $84
MAY 23-26 __ prpto"
4 DAYS/3 MIGHTS *-<
MfllV/ INCLUDES
11jffisaar.,ss
t
Adult Care
Speaker May 26
MURRAY DANINHIRSCH.
Licensed Clinical Social Worker, a
member of the Interfaith
Caregivers Coalition of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale, will present a paper
on "Adult Day Care For The Frail
Elderly" at the Conference On
Jewish Communal Service on May
26, in Cleveland, Ohio.
Mr. Daninhirsch is the
Secretary of the Broward Unit,
National Association of Social
Workers and serves on the
Florida Chapter Committee On
Aging of NASW. He is a member
of the Aging Network Coalition,
Broward County Area Agency On
Aging. He is affiliated with the
National Association of Jewish
Family, Children's and Health
Professionals and with the World
Conference of Jewish Communal
Service.
Mr. Daninhirsch served, part-
time, as a social worker at the
Federation's "Gathering Place,"
from June 1982 to Dec. 1984 and
he has functioned, in the same
capacity, at the St. Elizabeth
Senior Day Care Center from
June 1982 until the present. He
has provided counseling to the
frail elderly and their families at
both of the above settings.
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JEWISH FAMILY SERVICE OF BROWARD COUNTY
4517 Hollywood Boulevard, Hollywood. Florida 33021 (305) 966 0956
Shcrwin H. Rosenstein, ACSW, LCSW, Executive Director
DIVORCE:
"BREAKING UP
IS HARD TO DO"
By SUSAN N. KOSSAK,
MSW, Family Life
Education Coordinator
Divorce under the best of cir-
cumstances (and rarely is that the
case) is difficult to say the least.
Usually it is not a situation that
touches only two lives. Children,
parents, relatives, and friends
have a stake in the process.
Histories, feelings, finances, and
careers are affected by the break-
ing of the marriage vows.
Does that mean a person must
stay in a relationship that is
detrimental to their health and
well-being? No, not necessarily.
However, even if divorce is the
best solution under the cir-
cumstances, it is not without
great pain.
Change, even positive change, is
unsettling. Divorce is made up of
a multitude of changes. There are
emotional issues such as love,
hate, guilt, anger, resentment,
etc., to deal with. There are prac-
tical issues such as money,
residence, career, custody, and
visitation. There are social issues,
namely, friends, parties, and
group involvement. And, of
course, there are the results of all
these changes, of ten at a time
when they are going through
physical and emotional upheavals
not even related to the divorce. In
addition, each situation and cou-
ple have unique issues to resolve.
Ultimately, it may be the best
possible arrangement. Living
through the process may very well
be taking its toll on your coping
mechanisms. Added problems
often are unintentionally created
by our inability to see the process
objectively, to see options, and to
deal with grief and loss.
Is there a light at the end of the
tunnel? Yes. With time and pro-
fessional guidance, the pain can be
lessened and the process while not
pleasant, can be a learning and
growth experience for everyone
involved. Then people can move
on to a new phase in their lives.
Jewish Family Service has pro-
fessionally trained counselors to
help you deal with the painful pro-
cess of divorce. Call us at
749-1505 in Fort Lauderdale or
966-0956 in Hollywood if we can
be of service. Our fees are on a
sliding scale.
Jewish Family Service is af-
filiated with The Jewish Federa-
tion of South Broward, The Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale, and The United Way
of Broward County.
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Friday, May 9, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 11
Gifts Of Income: The Charitable Lead Trust
FOUNDATION OF JEWISH PHILANTHROPIES
B158 W OAKIANIJ PARK BLVD.. FT. LAUDtRDAU.
11 HMI IVM) 74JI-H4CHI
FOUNDATION
Of IIWISH PMIlANIHtOfllS
Editors Note: Another in a
series of articles from the Founda-
tion of Jewish Philanthropies,
Jewish Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale, Jacob Brodzki,
Chairman.
One of the more valuable
strategies available for a wealthy
person who wishes to give to
charity while increasing the level
of affluence of family members is
the charitable income trust. This
trust, often called a charitable
lead trust, is designed to provide a
charity, such as the Endowment
Fund, with a determinable
amount of income for a deter-
minable period of time. At the end
of that period, individual
beneficiaries would receive a re-
mainder trust, where individuals
start out as the income
beneficiaries and the Endowment
Fund would hold a remainder in-
terest. It is important to note that
the distinction is not always clear-
cut.
It is possible for the lead trust to
take the form of a living trust or a
testamentary trust. It is the living
trust which is most valuable and
used more often in charitable giv-
ing. It is most appropriate in a
situation where the potential
donor and his family have no im-
mediate need for more income
than they now enjoy and are able
and willing to defer current in-
come for the prospect of long-
term capital appreciation. In such
a situation, the charitable lead
trust may:
1) Enable the philanthropic
donor to give funds over a period
of years to charity, rather than
paying them out in taxes.
UJA Project For Solicitors
NEW YORK, N.Y. The
United Jewish Appeal has
established a new training project
for major gifts solicitors under the
leadership of National Vice Chair-
man Sandra Weiner.
"The purpose of the program is
to train major gifts solicitors and
help them attain greater expertise
in the solicitation process," Mrs.
Weiner said. "The ultimate goal is
to create a new generation of well-
trained campaign solicitors who
will achieve higher levels of
contributions."
This unique program in its
16-hour learning framework con-
centrates on the development of
practical skills in face-to-face en-
counters. Emphasis is also placed
2) Enable the donor to pass pro-
perty with strong appreciation
potential to his beneficiary
without gift tax cost on the
appreciation.
3) Enable the donor to exclude
the appreciation and gift taxes
paid from his gross estate. This
may in fact reduce the need for
estate liquidity and permit the re-
taining of an otherwise illiquid
asset with high yield and/or
growth potential to the ultimate
benefit of the individual
beneficiaries.
4) Enable the donor to keep con-
trol of the trust's assets in the
family. A commonly used asset to
fund the trust is the interest in a
closely held business where the
control of the business by the
family is of crucial importance.
Since other investment property
may also be used to fund the trust,
control by the family will allow
changes in investment strategy
that will serve the family interest.
This article cannot provide all
the answers about charitable lead
trusts but merely creates an
awareness of the value such trusts
may have in overall estate plann-
ing. Yes, it is possible to benefit
your family, reduce taxes and at
the same time make a lasting con-
tribution to the Endowment Fund.
To find out how, call the Founda-
tion director, Janice Salit at
7*8-8400.
on different strategies of
negotiating, the art of closing a
solicitation, and the improvement
of communications skills.
Videotaped role playing and
group discussions enhance the
practical focus of the program.
A two-day pilot project was
recently tested in Westchester
County, N.Y. with community
campaign leadership. The par-
ticipants rated the program as
"stimulating," "challenging,"
"thought-provoking" and
"fascinating." Alice Kulick,
chairperson of the Real Estate
Division of Westchester County,
wrote: "A tremendous learning
experience. The presentations are
unique and unforgettable."
44 My great-
grandfather
invented
Gulden's'Mustard
Vegetable Fritters
Vi cup butter or margarine,
melted, or as needed
Vi cup finely chopped tucchmi
Vi cup finely chopped
mushrooms
CHARLIE GULDEN
H cup shredded carrots
M cup chopped onion
H cup dairy sour cream
3 tablespoons Guldens Spicy
Brown Mustard
2 beaten eggs
3 tablespoons cornstarch
Saute vegetables in I tablespoon butler; remow Irom heat. Mi*
sour cream, mustard and eggs Gradually beat In cornstarch
Stir in vegetables. Melt I tablespoon butter in skillet Spoon
2 tablespoons fritter batter in skillet Lightly brown on both
sides. Add butter to skillet as needed. Makes 8-10 fritters
Note: Any combination of vegetables
can be substituted
It's his recipe
that makes
these recipes
so delicious!99
Spinach-Stuffed Mushrooms
I pound Iresh spinach (or 1 package
110 ots I frozen chopped spinach,
thawed, well drained)
I pound fresh mushrooms (about 16
medium sized)
3 tablespoons butter, melted
I cup ricotta cheese
4 teaspoons Guldens Spicy Brown Mustard
Pinch crushed oregano
Vvksh clean spinach, steam in covered
skillet fr* minutes. Remove, drain and
chop. Remove mushroom stems and finely
chop. Saute stems and spinach in one
tablespoon butter. Combine spinach
mixture with remaining ingredients.
Spoon into caps. Place on cookie sheet;
brush with remaining butter Bake at 350*F
IS minutes or until heated through. Makes
about 16
Master of Arts
in Jewish Studies
"Fix A Time For The Study Of Torah"
Shammai (Ethics Of The Fathers 1:15)
The Jewish Studies Program at Barry University announces the following summer schedule:
Summer Session I: May 13-June 20
Hebrew Literature (RJS 613) An analysis of selected
portions of Hebrew literature in the original. Prerequisite:
one year of college Hebrew or the equivalent. The class
will meet Tuesday and Thursday evenings from 6:00-9:30
p.m. Instructor: Dr. Rachel Abramowitz. Room Andreas 104.
Talmudic Literature (RJS 642) Studies in selected por-
tions of the Talmud and Midrash. The class will meet
Monday and Wednesday evenings from 6:00-9:30 p.m. in
Andreas 103. Instructor: Dr. Yehuda Shamir.
Summer Session II: June 23-August 1
Modern Jewish History (RJS 611) Studies in Jewish
history from the Enlightenment. The class will meet on
Monday and Wednesday mornings from 9:00-12:30 in
Andreas 109. Instructor: Dr. Yehuda Shamir.
Jewish Mysticism (RJS 632) Studies in the development
and concerns of Jewish mysticism, with emphasis on
such texts as the Zohar. The class will meet on Tuesday
and Thursday evenings from 6:00-9:30 p.m. in Andreas 108.
The instructor: Dr. Yehuda Shamir.
GENEROUS SCHOLARSHIP AID IS AVAIULABLE
FOR QUALIFIED STUDENTS. AUDITORS WILL BE
GRANTED A 50% DISCOUNT.
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT
THE JEWISH STUDIES PROGRAM AT 758-3392, Ext. 524.
OR SEND IN THE ATTACHED COUPON.
" Mail Coupon Today'
JPS/X
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Addreaa.
City _
State
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Phone____________________________________________________________________
Jewish Studies. Barry University, 11300 N.E. 2nd Avenue, Miami Shores. FL 33161
' BARRYTJJN1V KRSITY H300 Northeast Second Avenue Miami Shores, Florida 33161
* -


Page 12 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, May 9, 1986
I -, m
The Joy Of Passover A Shared Experience
Chaplaincy Commission \
Provides Area Services I
THE RESIDENTS OF BEVERLY MANOR
in Margate were treated to a Passover Seder
by the volunteers of the Chaplaincy Commis-
sion of the Jewish Federation. Among those
participating were Mr. and Mrs. Hy Berlin,
Mr. and Mrs. Israel Resnikoff, Mr. and Mrs.
Robert SUverstein, and Mr. Teddy Straus.
Newswire/lsrael
JERUSALEM Most tourists see Israel only through their
own eyes. They never consider the in-depth understanding possi-
ble with a third lens. That close-up view of Israeli society is
available to college students in the summer program, Jerusalem
Film Workshop, which uses a videocamera and film screenings to
offer a different perspective of the Jewish State. The program is
sponsored by the American Zionist Youth Foundation and the
Youth and Hechalutz Department of the World Zionist
Organization.
JERUSALEM Israel is prepared to assist South African
Jews who decide to immigrate because of the mounting unrest in
South Africa, Absorption Minister Yaacov Tsur told reporters.
He predicted that some 600 South African olim would settle in
Israel this year.
JERUSALEM Daylight savings time, a commonplace in vir-
tually all Western countries has become a fiercely controversial
issue in Israel pitting ultra-Orthodox Jews who oppose it
against what appears to be the great majority of their
compatriots.
JERUSALEM The Cabinet agreed to a $315 million bail-out
of Sole! Boneh and Kupat Holim, the two largest Histadrut-owned
enterprises which are tottering on the brink of financial collapse.
7 ThcPines "*
has everything!
Even the nearness of
your family.
RESIDENTS OF MANOR OAKS in Fort
Lauderdale were recently treated to a
Passover Seder by volunteers of the Chaplain-
cy Commission of the Jewish Federation. Pic-
tured conducting the Seder, from left, Adolph
Novak, Max Kronish and Lou Gold. The Com-
mission provides this special service from
funds raised by the Federation/UJA
campaign.
RABBI ABRAHAM J. EZRING, left, is pic-
tured conducting a Seder at BARC, Lauren
Sanfeliz in Davie, while Craig Ezring, top,
entertains. Both are volunteers for the
Chaplaincy Commission of the Jewish Federa-
tion. The Chaplaincy Commission sends
volunteers and Rabbis to local retirement
homes to bring the Passover holiday to shut-
ins.
Spring Break
Our Price includes
port charges, three generous meals,
and roundtrip motorcoach from selected locations
in Broward, Dade and Palm Beach Counties.
The regular Seniors fare, 55 years and older
is $83.00. BUT FOR THE MONTHS OF
APRIL. MAY AND JUNE. WERE GIVING
SENIOR CITIZENS A SPRING BREAK BY
REDUCING THIS PRICETO A LOW$63.00.
Every departure, seven days a week, subject
to space availability.
Depart Miami at 8:30 a.m.. spend the
afternoon in Freeport/Lucaya and return to
Miami at 11:00 p.m. All the magic of a
longer cruise in just one day. Dine and
Dance. Relax by the pool. Play bingo.
Take in the SeaEscape Revue. Big Band
every Monday. \bu can do as much or as little
as you like.
And when your club or homeowners
association books a group of 40 or more,
well take $4.00 more off each fere and
provide a special motorcoach to/from any
point of your choice in Broward. Dade or
Palm Beach Counties.
So don't miss our special Senior Citizens
Spring Break. See your travel agent today
or call SeaEscape at 1 -800-432-0900 or in
Dade County. 379-0000. Proof of age may
be requested. Cabins optional.
South Florida's only One Day Cruises to the Bahamas
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Ships Registry: Bahamas
_



^^
Friday, May 9, Ipg6/The Jewish Floridian of Greater FortLauderdale Page 18
1
Community Calendar
Compiled By Lori Ginsberg,
Federation 748-8400.
SATURDAY MAY 10
Sunrise Lakes Condo Assoc. I:
7:30 p.m. Show. Donation $4.
Playhouse, 8100 Sunrise Lakes
Dr. N. 742-5150.
Temple Beth Ant-Sisterhood:
Semi-formal dinner dance for
Mother's Day. At Temple.
974-8650.
SUNDAY MAY 11
Temple Beth Israel,
D.B.-Sisterhood: 6 p.m. Mother's
Day dinner dance. Sammy Fields
to entertain. At Temple.
421-7060.
Men of Hope: 9:30 a.m. Breakfast
meeting. Nob Hill Center, 10000
Sunset Strip. 741-2032.
MONDAY MAY 12
B'nai B'rith Women-Cypress
Chase Chapter: 11 a.m. Meeting.
Laud. Lakes City Hall.
B'nai B'rith-Pompano Lodge: 3
p.m. Board of directors meeting.
Pompano Beach City Hall, Com-
mission Chamber.
TUESDAY MAY 13
Jewish Community Center: 8
p.m. Jewish Festival Chorale Con-
cert. Admission $1. At JCC, 6501
W. Sunrise Blvd., Plantation.
792-6700.
Na'amat USA-Debra Club: 11:30
a.m. Luncheon and card party.
Mr. Ray's Cafeteria. 485-3699.
Na'amat USA-Tamara Chapter:
Noon. Meeting. Water Bridge
Rec. Center, 1050 Del Lago Cir.
Deborah-Sunrise Chapter: 11
a.m. Meeting and mini-lunch.
Fashion show by Marie's.
Playhouse, 8100 Sunrise Lakes
Dr. N.
WEDNESDAY MAY 14
Temple Emanu-El: 6:30 p.m.
Gala dinner in celebration of burn-
ing the Temple mortgage. Inver-
rary Country Club. 731-2310.
Na'amat USA-Negev Chapter:
12:30 p.m. "We've Come a Long
Way Baby," a pictorial of the pro-
gress of Na'amat. Temple Beth
Israel.
B'nai B'rith Women-Ocean
Chapter: Noon. Meeting. Connie
Ganci will entertain. Ocean Manor
Hotel, 4040 Gait Ocean Dr.
942-6009.
B'nai B'rith Women-Lakes
Chapter: Noon. Meeting. Laud.
Lakes Public Safety Bldg., 4300
NW 36 St.
Century Village: 9:30 a.m. An-
niversary celebration of the State
of Israel. Century Village
Clubhouse.
NCJW-N. Broward Section:
Donor luncheon. Gibby's Rest.
Temple Emanu-El Men's Club
and Sisterhood: Installation
dinner.
JCC: 1:30 p.m. Jewish Festival
Chorale Concert. At JCC, 6501
W. Sunrise Blvd.
Independent Order of Odd
Fellows-Hatchee Lodge: 8 p.m.
Meeting. Odd Fellow Temple,
1451 N. Dixie Hwy. 974-5946.
City of Hope-Plantation
Chapter: 11:45 a.m. Meeting.
Deicke Aud., 5701 Cypress Rd.
792-8009.
City of Hope-Lakes Chapter:
12:30 p.m. Meeting. Laud. Lakes
City Hall.
JWV-Century Village Poat: 7:30
p.m. Meeting. Dr. Elliot Cohen
will speak. Temple Beth Israel,
D.B.
FRIDAY MAY 1C
Hadassah-Plantation Yachad
Chapter: Noon. Meeting and in-
stallation. Deicke Aud., 5701
Cypress Rd. 581-6981.
Temple Emanu-El: 6:15 p.m.
Educator's Shabbat Service. At
Temple.
Lauderdale Oaks: 8:30 p.m.
Variety show featuring Valerie
Gilbert, Kay Lederle and the Di
John Skaters. Clubhouse, 3060
NW 47 Terr. 733-9338.
SUNDAY MAY 18
NCJW-Plantation Section: An-
nual Woman and Power luncheon.
JCC: Israel Independence Day
celebration. JCC, 6501 W. Sunrise
Blvd.
AMIT Women-Florida Council:
Donor luncheon. Noon. Konover
Hotel.
Odd Fellows and Rebekahs
Social Club: 1 p.m. Meeting. Odd
Fellow Temple, 1451 N. Dixie
Hwy.
Hadassah-Florida Mid-Coast
Region: Regional Conference.
Women's Division: May 18-20.
Regional Conference.
Bnai Z ion -Southeast Region:
Noon. Israel's 38th birthday
celebration. Deauville Hotel.
MONDAY MAY 19
American Cancer Society: Gold
Classic. Inverrary Country Club.
486-9676 or 742-2201.
TUESDAY MAY 20
Jewish Family Service: Annual
Meeting. JCC.
THURSDAY MAY 22
Hadasaah-Ilana Chapter: 12:30
p.m. Meeting. Laud. Lakes City
Hall.
B'nai B'rith-Pompano Lodge: 8
p.m. Meeting. Palm-Aire Country
Club, 551 S. Pompano Pkwy.
Temple Emanu-El: 7:45 p.m.
Board of directors meets. At
Temple.
B'nai B'rith Women-Tamarac
Chapter: Board of directors
meeting. Italian-American Club,
6535 W. Commercial Blvd.
Mandela's
Release
WASHINGTON (JTA) B'nai
B'rith International has called on
South Africa's President to free
that nation's Black leader, Nelson
Mandela, from prison. In a cable
to president P.W. Botha, Gerald
Kraft, B'nai B'rith president,
praised the lifting of the state of
emergency and easing police con-
trol. He added that "the release of
Mandela would be an even more
dramatic signal" of the South
African government's intention
"to heal the national wounds" and
bring all of the nation's political
groups together "to negotiate a
better future."
h r i
I m
n mi
^ n
? 1 if
[ I u
in,rii im
M V
May commemorates the Annual National Days of Remem-
brance of the Victims of the Holocaust. It is a time when com-
munities throughout the Nation honor the millions who perished
during the Nazi persecution in World War II.
In observation of the days of Remembrance, WPBT Channel 2,
is presenting the following programs:
We Were German Jews
Sunday, May 11, 3 p.m. (R)
This is the story of Herbert and Lotte Strauss, German Jews
who made the courageous decision in 1943 to escape from Ger-
many and almost certain extermination in a Nazi concentration
camp. The documentary is a personal account of their dramatic
escape, the building of a new life in the United States, and their
coming to terms with the Holocaust.
The Precious Legacy
Sunday, May 25, 3:30 p.m.
This award-winning film documents one of the strangest foot-
notes to the history of World War II. As the Nazis were
methodically exterminating thousands of Czech and Slovak Jews,
they were just as systematically confiscating their material
possessions. The collection of these artifacts, paintings, sacred
objects, and manuscripts were to be exhibited in what the Nazis
called "A Museum of an Extinct Race" in the city of Prague.
Ironically, the Nazis put together one of the world's greatest
collections of Judaica that toured major museums in the United
States, including the Miami Beach Bass Museum.
where shopping is o pleasure 7 days a week
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- Page 14 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, May 9, 1986
Bar/Bat Mitzvahs
TEMPLE
SHA'ARAY TZEDEK
Brian Adam Kohn, son of Jac-
queline and Lawrence Kohn, was
called to the Torah in honor of his
Bar Mitzvah on Saturday May 3 at
Temple Sha'aray Tzedek, Sunrise.
TEMPLE KOI. AMI
Heather Beth Feinman,
daughter of Eileen and Michael
Feinman, celebrated her Bar
Mitzvah on Saturday May 3 at
Temple Kol Ami, Plantation.
TEMPLE BETH ORR
The Bar Mitzvah of Robert
Karol, son of Rona Karol, and the
Bat Mitzvah of Rachel Glickson,
daughter of Audrey and Samuel
Glickson, were celebrated on
Saturday May 3 at Temple Beth
Orr, Coral Springs.
With Rhyme
and Reason
CHUTZPAH OF
THE COLOSSAL
KIND
On a Sixty Minutes TV show
We heard a Nazi tongue
Spew from the television screen
Some barbs that deeply stung:
"The Holocaust did not take
place,"
"Six million did not die,"
"Treblinka was a fairy tale,"
"It's all a hoax, a lie!"
We listened, stared, and sat ag-
grieved,
What was this we heard??
No Jews were ever burned or
gassed??
No trials at Nurenberg??
No gates of hell in Maidanek??
No Auschwitz?? And No Buna??
What gall! What guile! What
base design!
This was more than Chutzpah!
Hypocrisy was at its worst
With each perverted claim
For camp survivors do exist
For shame for shame for
shame!
Jack Gould
Feinman
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
Evyan Streitfeld, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Jeffrey Streitfeld,
will be called to the Torah on the
occasion of her Bat Mitzvah on
Saturday morning May 10 at Tem-
ple Emanu-El, Ft. Lauderdale.
TEMPLE BETH AM
The B'nai Mitzvah of Craig
Schneider, son of Faye and Mar-
tin Schneider, and Jennifer
Tresser, daughter of Suzanne and
A Diversified Jewish Quiz
HATS OFF TO LEO
GOLDSCHLAGER: Leo
Gold8chlager, past president
and treasurer of the Oakland
Estates No. S125 Lodge of
B'nai B'rith, for the fifth year
in a row, has secured a pledge
of $1,000 from the lodge on
behalf of the 1986 Jewish
Federation/United Jewish Ap-
peal campaign, in addition to
his own personal commitment
to Federation/UJA Serving as
president of the lodge is Victor
Peter Freund.
HOLLYWOOD
Retirement Home
Great Food
Laundry Reasonable
Call Gloria
922-6924
,
Advertising Sales
Miami based publishing company has
opening for Fort Lauderdale
publication advertising sales person
with proven track record of success.
Send letter and resume to Jewish
Floridian P.O. Box 012973 Miami, Fla.
33101.
Jaffe
Pinkert
Ronald Tresser, was celebrated on
Saturday May 3 at Temple Beth
Am, Margate.
Robert Wiener, son of Joan and
Mort Wiener, and Marci Diem,
daughter of Harriett and Rael
Diem, will celebrate their B'nai
Mitzvah on May 10 at Beth Am.
The following week on May 17,
Andrew Odze, son of Joan and
Dr. Melvin Odze and Jennifer
Greenstein, daughter of Linda
and Robert Greenstein, will
celebrate their B'nai Mitzvah.
TEMPLE BETH TORAH
On May 3, the Bar Mitzvah of
Evan Mandell, son of Barbara
and Robert Mandell was
celebrated at Temple Beth Torah,
Tamarac.
At the Friday night May 9 ser-
vice Bonnie Fischer, daughter of
Rita and Richard Fischer, will
become a Bat Mitzvah celebrant.
The Bar Mitzvah of Evan Pear-
son, son of Roni and Elliot Pear-
son, will be celebrated at the
Saturday May 10 service.
The Bat Mitzvah of Lisa Driks,
daughter of Judith and James
Driks, will be celebrated on Fri-
day May 16.
Raymond Strouse, son of
Judith and Stephen Strouse, will
become a Bar Mitzvah celebrant
on Saturday May 17.
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL
The Bar Mitzvah of Scott Jaffe,
son of Rona and Dr. Alan Jafee,
was celebrated on May 3 at Tem-
ple Beth Israel, Sunrise.
Melanie Pinkert, daughter of
Shirley and Robert Pinkert, will
become a Bat Mitzvah on Friday
May 16 at Beth Israel.
Candlelighting Times
May 9 7:38 p.m.
May 16 7:42 p.m.
May 23 7:45 p.m.
May 30 7:49 p.m.
Benediction upon Kindling the
Sabbath Lights
BORUCH ATTO AD-ONAI ELO-
HEINU MELECH HO-OLOM
ASHER KID-SHONU BEMITZ-
VOSOV VETZI-VONU LE-HAD-
LIK NEYR SHEL SHABOS.
Blessed art Thou, O Lord our G-d,
King of the universe, who hast
sanctified us by Thy command-
ments and commanded us to kin-
dle the Sabbath light.
By RABBI
DAVID W. GORDON
1- In a husband and wife rela-
tionship, there is one goal the
Sages highlighted?
2- Why was the Torah given on
the lowest mountain (Mt. Sinai)?
3- Is killing a human being ever
justified?
4- Name the Talmudic Sage who
best epitomizes the adage, "It's
never too late to learn."
6- In what novel way do the
Sages stress the importance of
truth (Emet)?
6- Would sports as Boxing and
Wrestling be acceptable to
Judaism?
7- Who was the first presumed
to translate and publish the
Talmud in English?
8- How do the Thirteen Prin-
ciples of Jewish Faith compiled by
Maimonides begin?
9- Why are Synagogues re-
quired to be fitted with windows?
10- Is vegetarianism an ideal
way of Jewish life?
Answers
1- "Shalom Bayit" Peace in the
household.
2- To emphasize that a student
of the Torah should be humble.
3- Only in self-defense, since our
tradition has always revered and
sanctified human life.
4- Rabbi Akiba who began his
initial studies at the age of 40.
5-G-d's seal they say is
"Truth." Where truth abides,
G-d's presence is to be perceived.
6-Violence that is inflicted
knowingly upon an individual
would not be in keeping with the
spirit of Jewish law.
7- Michael Rodkinson.
8- "Ani Maamim" I believe.
9- In order to let in light, air and
the delights of G-d's world.
10- No, the consuming of meat
serves as a means for rejoicing,
though the pain inflicted on
animals should be reduced by
Shechitah (Ritual slaughtering).
CONSERVATIVE
CONSERVATIVE SYNAGOGUE OF COCONUT CREEK, meets Broward
Federal Savings, Lyons Road and Coconut Creek Parkway, Coconut Creek. Ser-
vices: Friday at 8 p.m. and Saturday at 9 a.m. Rabbi Josiah Derby. Castor Sydney
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER (721-7660), 9101 NW 57th St.. Tamarac, 33321.
Services: Sunday through Friday 8:30 a.m., 5 p.m. Late Friday service 8 p.m. Satur-
day 8:45 a.m. Rabbi Kart F. Stoae. Castor P. Hillel BnuuBMT.
TEMPLE BETH AHM (431-5100). 9730 Stirling Road. Hollywood, 33024. Services
daily 8 .m.; Sabbath 8 p.m.. Sabbath morning 8:45 a.m. Rabbi Avraham Kapnek.
Cantor Stuart Kanas.
TEMPLE BETH AM (974-8660), 7206 Royal Palm Blvd., Margate, 33063. Services:
Monday through Friday 8:30 a.m.. 5 p.m. Friday late service 8 p.m.; Saturday 9 a.m.,
6 p.m.; Sunday 8 a.m.. 5 p.m. Rabbi Paal PUtkia. Rabbi Emeritus. Dr. Solomon
GW. Caator Irriag Groesaua.
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL (742-4040), 7100 W. Oakland Park Blvd., Sunrise, 38313.
Services: Monday through Thursday 8 a.m., 5:30 p.m.; Friday 8 a.m., 5 p.m., 8 p.m.;
Saturday 6:30 p.m.; Sunday 9 a.m.. 6:30 p.m. Rabbi Albert N. Troy. Castor
Maurice Nes.
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL OP DEERFIELD BEACH (421-7060), 200 S. Century
Blvd., Deerfieid Beach, 33441. Services: Sunday through Friday 8:30 a.m., 6 p.m.
Friday late service 8 p.m.; Saturday 8:46 a.m., and at candlelighting time. Rabbi
, Coatee Saabtal Ackerauui.
TEMPLE B'NAI M08HE (942-6380). 1434 SE 3rd St., Pompano Beach. 33060.
asrrk: Friday 8 p.m. Castor Jehndah Heilbraaa.
TEMPLE SHA'ARAY TZEDEK 741-0296), 4099 Pine Island Rd., Sunrise, 33321.
Bank: Sunday through Friday 8 a.m., 6 p.m.; Late Friday service 8 p.m.; Satur-
day 8:46 a.m 6 p.m. Cantor Jack Marrbaart
TEMPLE 8HOLOM (9424410), 132 SE 11 Ave., Pompano Beach, 33060. Services:
Monday through Friday 8:46 a.m., evenings: Monday through Thursday at 6 p.m.,
Friday evening at 8. Saturday and Sunday 9 a.m Rabbi 8assail April. Canter
CONGREGATION BETH HILLEL OF MARGATE (974 3090). 7640 Margate
Blvd., Margate, 33063. flsrifaes. Sunday through Friday 8:16 a.m., 6:30 p.m. Late
Friday service 8 p.m. Saturday 8:46 a-m., 6:30 p.m. Rabbi Nathan Zilsalik. Caa-
HEBREW CONGREGATION OF LAUDERHILL (733-9660), 2048 NW 49th Ave.,
Lauderhill, SSS18. Services: Sunday through Friday 8:30 a.m., 6:30 p.m.; Saturday
8:46 a.m. Rabbi Israel Hainan.
NORTH LAUDERDALE HEBREW CONGREGATION (722-7607 or 722-2722).
Services: at Banyon Lakes Condo Clubhouse, 6060 Bailey Rd.. Tamarac, Friday at 6
p.m., Saturday 8:46 a.m. Carles B. Fyiar, Pfiaiaent.
ORTHODOX
TEMPLE OHEL B'NAI RAPHAEL (733-7684), 4361 W. Oakland Park Blvd.,
Lauderdale Lakes, 83313. Services: Sunday through Thursday 8 a.m., 6 p.m., Friday
8 a.m., 6 p.m., Saturday 8:46 a-m., 6 p.m. Cantor Paal Stoats.
SYNAGOGUE OF INVERRARY CHABAD (748-1777), 4661 N. University Dr.,
Lauderhill. garvfcee. Sunday through Friday 6:46 a.m, 8 a.m., 6:16 p.m., Saturday 9
a-m., 6:30 p.m. Stony greens: Man, Sanders following services; Weesea.
Tuesdays g ,.m. Rabbi Area Ueberassa.
YOUNG ISRAEL OF DEERFIELD BEACH (421-1367), 1880 W. Hillsooro Blvd.,
Deerfieid Beach. 83441. Sarikaa. Sunday through Friday 8 a-m. and sundown
Saturday 8:46 a.m. and sundown.
YOUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD-FORT LAUDERDALE (966-7877), 3291
Stirling Rd., Fort Lauderdale, 33312. Services: Monday through Friday 7:30 a.m.,
and sundown; Saturday, 9 a-m., sundown; Sunday 8 a-m., sundown. Rabbi Edward
Davta.
CONGREGATION MIDGAL DAVID 726-3683), 8676 W. McNab Rd., Tamarac.
33321. Services: Daily 8a.m.; miner* 6 p.m.; Saturday 8:46 a.m. and 6:16p.m. Rab-
bi Caaiai Schneider. Congregation president: Hstsm
RECONSTRUCnONIST
RAMAT SHALOM (472-3600), 11301 W. Broward Blvd., Plantation, 33826. Ser-
vkee: Friday, 8:16 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. Rabbi Elliot Skidoell. Cantor Bells
Begart
REFORM
TEMPLE BETH ORR (763-3232), 2161 Riverside Dr., Coral Springs, 33066. Ser-
vices: Friday 8 p.m.; Saturday 10 a.m. Rabbi Jerrold M. Levy. Cantor Nancy
TEMPLE B'NAI SHALOM OF DEERFIELD BEACH (426-2682). Services at
Menorah Chapels, 2306 W. HUlsboro Blvd., Deerfieid Beach, 33441, Friday 8 p.m.
Rabbi Nstnaa H. Fish. Caster Morris Leviaeoa.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL (781-2810), 3246 W. Oakland Park Blvd.. Lauderdale Lakes,
33311. Services: Friday 8:16 p.m.; Saturday, only on holidays or celebration of Bar-
Bat Mitsvah. Rabbi Jeffrey Ballon. Canter Rita Snore.
TEMPLE KOL AMI (472-1988), 8200 Peters Rd., Plantation, 38324. Services: Fri-
day 8:16 p.m., Saturday 10:30 a.m. Rabbi Sheldon J. Barr. Canter Gone Corbara.
LIBERAL JEWISH TEMPLE OF COCONUT CREEK (973-7494). Services: Fri
day night services twice monthly at Calvary Presbyterian Church, 3950 Coconut
Croak Parkway. Rabbi Brace S. War.sal Castor Barbara Roberta.
TEMPLE BAT YAM (661-6808), McGaw Hall, 1400 N. Federal Hwy. (adjacent to
Second Prosbytenan Church), Ft. Lauderdale. 33304. Service: Weekly on Friday
evenings st 8 p.m. Cantor Richard Brown.




Friday, May 9,1986/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 15
Soviet Jewry
Local Activist Works To Free Soviet Refusenik
By LLOYD RESNICK
When Sandra Goldberg was
called to the Torah for her bat
mitzvah in November, 1985,
she was celebrating her 50th
birthday. Having been raised
in an Orthodox household,
Sandra did not have the oppor-
tunity of commemorating that
important religious rite of
passage when she was 13.
' Yet there was something
else very special about this
ceremony.
"I had decided that the bat
mitzvah would be more mean-
ingful if I did it on behalf of a
Soviet refusenik, preferably
twinning with a woman my
age," recalled Mrs. Goldberg,
who said a special prayer for
Cherna Goldort of Novosibirsk
and had a special twinning cer-
tificate prepared for the
former Soviet physicist-
engineer, who first applied to
emigrate to Israel in 1975.
"I presented the certificate
to Cherna's daughter Galina,
who lives in Jerusalem, when I
visited Israel with my husband
after the bat mitzvah," said
Mrs. Goldberg. "Her daughter
will give it to Cherna when she
is allowed to leave and join her
family in Israel."
Since that time Sandra
Goldberg has embarked on a
persistent campaign to have
her Soviet "sister" released.
As the former chairman of the
North Shore (Mass.) Soviet
Jewry Committee, and a
member of the Soviet Jewry
Task Force of the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County, Goldberg is familiar
with the plan of action in these
cases.
She has written eloquent let-
ters to Senators Edward Ken-
nedy and Paula Hawkins, to
President Reagan and to
Soviet Ambassador Anatoly
Dobrynin enlisting their sup-
port for the 53-year-old
refusenik who, for various in-
supportable reasons, has been
repeatedly refused permission
to emigrate.
"The first time Cherna ap-
plied, she was refused because
of 'regime considerations,' "
Mrs. Goldberg said. According
to a report on Goldort from the
Israel Public Council for Soviet
Jewry, Cherna did in fact have
a second degree security
clearance when she worked as
a clerk at a research plant in
Bisk, but so did everyone at
the plant, including the clean-
ing staff.
In 1971 Cherna moved to
Novosibirsk with her family
and worked in a factory involv-
ing no secret Work. She was
dismissed from her job in 1980
due to ill health and spent a
large part of the next year con-
Ined to bed.
Meanwhile, Cherna's hus-
>and had died and her
laughters Galina and Irina had
)th been granted exit visas
id were living in Israel.
When Cherna applied for an
exit visa again in 1980, she was
told that she had to wait until
11990, despite Soviet claims of
|concern for "family reunifica-
tion." In 1982, after being told
3y her former boss in Bisk that
far as he was concerned her
Jriod of "secrecy" had ended,
Cherna applied again and was
told that she may have to wait
lifetime.
"Why are the Soviets keep-
ing a 50-year-old, depressed,
sick woman who is not work-
ing and whose entire family is
in Israel, including three
grandchildren she's never
seen?" Sandra Goldberg ask-
ed, emphasizing the inhumani-
ty and lack of reason in this
case.
"Her daughters want to take
care of her," Goldberg con-
tinued. "The Soviet
authorities have fabricated ar-
bitrary reasons for refusing
her applications."
Nevertheless, Sandra
Goldberg remains optimistic
about Cherna's situation.
"There is activity on behalf
of Cherna," Goldberg said.
"People in Canada, England
and Miami write to her, as do
I, but I'm not sure my letters
get to her. I have a gut feeling
about this, though. I think she
will get out. The question is
when."
Displaying press clippings
from a Canadian newspaper
which reported that Cherna
had contacted Canadian jour-
nalists during a visit by a
Canadian commission led by
Joe Clark, External Affairs
Minister, Mrs. Goldberg said,
"The journalists who spoke to
Cherna became more in-
terested in her plight than in
the official goings-on. The
KGB threatened to take
passports away from anyone
who tried to communicate with
her."
Goldberg's activities on
behalf of Soviet Jewry took
shape in 1969 when she visited
the Soviet Union with her hus-
band as part of a medical
delegation.
Despite warnings she receiv-
ed from her rabbi and others
not to visit or abet any
refuseniks, she brought yar-
mulkes, tallit and prayerbooks
into the country and delivered
the gifts to a Moscow
synagogue.
"The next day three KGB
agents joined our group and
hung around for a few days,"
Mrs. Goldberg recalled. "But I
just had to do it."
Mrs. Goldberg also sym-
pathizes with the torment ex-
perienced daily by Cherna's
two daughters in Israel, who in
1985 petitioned Ronald and
Nancy Reagan for help. "My
mother's struggle to emigrate
has destroyed ner, weakened
her health, left her without
hope," Galina and Irina wrote
to the President and First
Lady.
When Sandra Goldberg met
Galina in Israel they rendez-
voused at the Hecht
Synagogue on Mt. Scopus to
pray. "I hope to meet Cherna
in the same place, some day,"
said Mrs. Goldberg. "Many
people are working so that she
can spend next year in
Jerusalem. Only constant and
consistent public pressure will
force the Soviet Union to
change its treatment of Soviet
Jews."
Hoping to see Cherna's
status raised among the more
than 400,000 Soviet Jews wan-
ting to emigrate, Mrs.
Goldberg added that "time is
of the essence. A concerted
statement of Jewish solidarity
needs to be made now, before
President Reagan and Mikhail
Gorbachev meet again."
Mrs. Goldberg suggested
Cherna Goldort in 1979 (left) and in June of
1985. Six years of despair and loneliness
have obviously taken their toll.
that letters be written to Con-
gressmen, Senators (especially
Sen. Edward Kennedy, who
has personally intervened on
behalf of Soviet Jews with
some positive results), Presi-
dent and Mrs. Reagan and
Anatoly Dobrynin at the
Soviet Embassy, 1 Andrei
Sakharov Plaza, N.W.,
Washington, DC 20036.
She also said that letters of
support may be written to
Cherna's daughters Galina
Nabati and Irina Tzeitin (c/o
Irina Tzeitin, Minz Street
28/17, Beer Sheva, Israel) and,
of course, to Cherna herself
(Ulitza Votutina 33, Apart-
ment 32, Novosibirsk 64,
USSR).
Noting that the Passover
holiday reminds Jews
everywhere of the despair of
bondage and the joys of
freedom, Sandra Goldberg
said, "We set a place for Cher-
na at our Seder table. We can-
not be complacent about our
freedom while refuseniks like
Cherna languish in the Soviet
Union."
Editor's Note This article
reprinted from Jewish Flori-
dian of Palm Beach County.
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___
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Page 16 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, May 9, 1986
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