The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 3, no. 7 (Apr. 5, 1974)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 9, 1976 called v.4, no. 27 but constitutes v.5, no. 1; issue for July 7, 1989 called v.18, no. 11 but constitutes v.18, no. 13.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44570954
lccn - sn 00229545
ocm44570954
System ID:
AA00014312:00314

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Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward


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Full Text
tBS
jetish Florid ian o
OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE
Volume 15 Number 7
Fort Lauderdale, Florida Friday, February 14, 1986
OMM
Price 36 Cents
r
'J
Federation/UJA Special Gifts Cocktail Party Sets Pace ...
Woodmont Division '86 Dinner Event Feb. 23
Setting a fast pace for
the 1986 Jewish Federa-
tion/United Jewish/Appeal
campaign in the Woodmont
Division were key campaign
leaders who raised more
World New
than $45,000 at a January
Special Gifts Cocktail Party,
held in the home of Mr. and
Mrs. Harold Stein,
Tamarac.
The significant event, will
help to set the tone for the
Woodmont Division
Community-Wide Dinner,
Sunday evening, Feb. 23 at
6 p.m. at the Woodmont
Country Club, Tamarac. A
$500 minimum commitment
to the 1986 Federation/UJA
drive is required according
to co-chairmen Walter
Bernstein, Lou Colker, Moe
Wittenberg and honorary
chairman Daniel Cantor.
More than 300 residents
will hear a keynote address
by guest speaker Jerome
Gleekel, a businessman
whose association with
Zionist affairs and active
participation in the Jewish
settlement of Palestine
predates the formation of
the State of Israel.
A political scientist by
education, Mr. Gleekel is a
frequent traveler to Israel
and is known to leading
government officials and to
the leadership of the various
political parties. His interest
in international politics,
foreign affairs and middle
Continued on Page 3-
Provtding a "World of Jewish Need," through their heartfelt
generosity are these key campaigners from the Woodmont Divi-
sion at the Special Gifts Cocktail Party. From left, Victor
Blumenstyk, Sam Brenner, Nancy and Harold Stein and Adele
Blumenstyk.
BONN Elie Wiesel
returned to Germany last
month for the first time
since he was released from
the Buchenwald concentra-
tion camp almost 41 years
ago. Wiesel was in West
Berlin for a two-day
meeting of a West German-
American group established
to keep alive the memory of
the Nazi horror.
PARIS The Spanish
government by establishing
formal diplomatic ties with
Israel, took what it and ap-
parently most of the
Spanish people consider a
long overdue and honorable
step, at the risk of Arab
economic sanctions and
possible terrorist attacks
against Spanish installa-
tions and citizens abroad
and at home.
Plantation Annual '86
UJA Brunch April 13
Norman Ostrau, Chair-
man of the Plantation Divi-
sion of the 1986 Jewish
Federation/United Jewish
Appeal Campaign, announc-
ea that the Plantation Divi-
sion will hold its Annual
Brunch on Sunday, April 13,
11:30 a.m., at the Tower
Club in Fort Lauderdale.
The Plantation Brunch is
the main community event
on behalf of the campaign in
Plantation. Minimum con-
tribution to the 1986
Federation/United Jewish
Appeal Campaign is $250.
Ostrau stated that in
1986, there will be a
generous response of gifts
on behalf of the Jewish com-
munity's major philan-
thropy, and the men and
women on the brunch com-
mittee are diligently work-
ing toward a record-
breaking total for the
Federation/United Jewish
Appeal campaign.
Mark Your Calendar
President's Mission
The adventure of self-discovery; the 1987 Presi-
dent's Mission to Israel. This most exciting and
prestigious mission to our Homeland will take place in
mid-September of this year, prior to the Jewish High
Holidays, and now is the time to plan your Fall travel
plans, according to Barbara Wiener and Steve Lewin,
Federation/UJA Mission co-chairpersons.
"It will be a once-in-a-lifetime experience, the time
to walk the land and come to know the people, be
touched by the pride and the promise that bind all
Jews one to another," said the co-chairs. They con-
tinued, "participants will meet with national leaders
from all over the country as well as top government of-
ficials from the State of Israel."
"The itinerary for this mission will prove to be very
innovative, and will show the vital role you play as a
partner in one of history's greatest human
Continned on Pag* 2
TORONTO A book
that claims the Holocaust is
a hoax as well as controver-
sial publications will not be
banned from the library at
S^iSSS** Jewish Community Connection Showcase Feb 23
In the Community-Wide Spotlight
UNITED NATIONS
Egypt told the Security
Council that Israel "mustr'
withdraw from East
Jerusalem and that the
Palestinians in the West
Bank, including those living
in East Jerusalem, must
have their right to self-
determination.
BEIRUT A top
Moslem militia leader
angered by Christian rejec-
tion of a Syrian-mediated
peace accord announced
that his fighters had resum-
ed Lebanon's 10-year civil
war. Syria blamed Presi-
dent Amin Gemayel for the
breakdown of the pact:
Esther Wolfer
What is the Jewish
Community Connection?
As reported previously,
it happens Sunday, Feb.
23 between 1 and 3 p.m.
on the JCC campus. The
"Connection" is a day
planned for both
newcomers and
neighbors who are in-
vited to come to the JCC
and see just what the
Jewish community
hereabouts has to offer
area residents. Fort
Lauderdale's Jewish
Federation joins the
JCC to sponsor a
showcase of Jewish ac-
tivity. Come meet the
representatives from
neighborhood
synagogues and major
Jewish organizations!
Receive a welcome gift!
The Synagogues who
are sending their
representatives to
answer questions and
give out current
materials, are Beth Orr,
Bat Yam, Inverrary
Chabad, Kol-Ami, Con-
servative Synagogue of
Coconut Creek and
Tamarac Jewish Center
with many more to
come.
The organizations
"showing" to date in-
clude co-sponsor
Federation, BBYO,
Hebrew Day School,
Jewish National Fund,
Northwest Broward
Regional ORT, Parents
of North American
Israelis, and Volunteers
for Israeli. JCC Heads of
Departments will also be
present to tell all about
the Center programs
and to take visitors on a
tour of the campus.
Committee members
who will man the
membership and hostess
tables include Elaine
Cohn, Pat Friedman, Hy
Kaplan, Maddie Levitt,
Viola Melnick, Ava
Phillips, Pearl Reins-
tein, Sophie Safran, Ina
Sasster, Beverly Wolfer
and Len Wolfer. Co-
chairmen of the day are
Maria Frankel and Mar-
sha Levy. Esther
Wolfer, chairman of
Jewish Community Con-
nection Day, created the
Continued on Page 3-


N
I
Page.2 The Jewish Florkfcuvof Greater FortbauderdEteyPriday; February 14, 198T-
Rabbi Haskell Bernat to Speak at
Midrasha Lecture Feb. 24

Rabbi Haskell M. Bernat,
spiritual leader of Temple Israel
of Greater Miami, will speak for
the North Broward Midrasha of
the Central Agency for Jewish
Education of the Jewish Federa-
tion of Greater Fort Lauderdale
on Monday Feb. 24 at Ramat
Shalom in Plantation at 8 p.m.
Rabbi Bernat is involved in a
broad range of communal ac-
tivities including the Community
Relations Committee of the
Jewish Federation of Greater
Miami. Rabbi Bernat received his
B.S. from Columbia University, is
a graduate of the Hebrew Union
College Jewish Institute of
Religion in New York with honors
and was ordained Rabbi in 1961 at
HUC-JIR Cincinnati. He com-
pleted requirements for a PhD ex-
cept for a thesis at Brandeis
University advanced studies in
Jewish mysticism. Rabbi Bernat
has published many essays in-
cluding a study on damages for
theft in the Talmud, a future for
Reformed Jewish worship, and
the dynamics of Jewish worship.
Rabbi Bernat has appeared as a
frequent panelist on the inter-
faith TV series "Today's
Religion" in Los Angeles. He con-
tinues to appear from time to time
on radio and TV panels and talk
shows in the Greater Miami area.
The title for Rabbi Bernat's lec-
ture will be "Silent Crises The
Jew and Gentile Confront
American Democracy."
Rabbi Bernat's controversial
sermon on "The Chosen People"
was widely discussed in the South
Florida area. "It's the unique role
of the Jewish people to teach the
world that you don't have to be
Jewish for G-d to love you" said
the Rabbi. "All people have to do
is live according to G-d's laws to
be righteous." He further stated
that if the world gets the message
"there won't be any need for us
anymore. Simply stated, the task
of the Jewish people is to make
the existence of the Jewish people
unnecessary."
There will be a reception for
sponsors at 7 p.m. prior to the lec-
ture at Ramat Shalom. Individual
tickets will be on sale at the door
at $4 for members and $6 for non-
members of participating
institutions.
Paul Frieser is the Education
Chairman of the Jewish Federa-
tion of Greater Fort Lauderdale.
Dr. Abraham J. Gittelson is the
Director of Education and Helen
Weisberg is the Administrator of
the North Broward Midrasha.
Participating institutions are
Temple Beth Am, Temple Beth
Israel, Temple Beth Torah, Tem-
ple Beth Orr, Temple Emanu-el,
Temple Sholom, Ramat Shalom,
Omega Condominium, Temple
Beth Israel of Deerfield Beach,
Temple Sha'aray Tzedek, Hebrew
Congregation of Lauderhill,
Liberal Jewish Temple of Coconut
Creek, Southeastern Region of
Steve Lewin
Barbara Wiener
President's Mission
Continued from Page 1
endeavors," said Wiener and Lewin.
Watch the coming issues of the FLORIDIAN for
more details of this "not to be missed mission." For
further information concerning this mission and other
mission programs, contact Sandy Jackowitz, Mission
coordinator at 748-8400.
AVAILABLE
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Rabbi Haskell M. Bernat
United Synagogue of America,
Jewish Community Center. For
further information call Helen
Weisberg at Federation at
748-8400.
RABBI MICHAEL COOK left, speaking at the Contemporary
Issues of Jewish Life lecture series sponsored by the North
Broward Midrasha of the Central Agency for Jewish Education
of the Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale said there
has been positive and negative developments on the subject,
Judaism in a Christain World. His remarks were regarding the
Radical Right Christian Movement and the Vatican Council II.
Pictured with Cook is Rabbi Jerrold Levy, Spiritual leader of
Temple Beth Orr, the host synagogue.

THE SHOW THAT SOLO OUT IN NEW YORK
Myra learned that funeral service
between Florida and New York was
less expensive than she thought.
Thanks toThe GUARDIAN PLAN program.
Myra believed in being prepared.
That's why she looked into buying cemetery property in Florida
where she had retired. Her two sisters, her children and her grandchildren
still lived in the Mew York area. And if the truth be known, Myra would have
preferred to have funeral services held in Mew York. But she thought that
would cost too much.
Luckily Myra learned about The QUARDIAM PLAMthe insurance
funded, prearranged funeral program. She liked what she heard, so she
decided to talk to The QUARDIAM PLAM counselor. He told her about
RIVERSIDE and the other members of the guardian family of Jewish
funeral directors-BOULEVARD-PARR WEST, SCHWARTZ BROTHERS
and JEPFER who honor The QUARDIAM PLAM program in Florida and Mew
York. Myra decided that The QUARDIAM PLAM program would make things
a lot easier on her family up north.
So Myra settled all the details in advance with the help of her
counselor. Everything was arranged as she wished. And at a cost she felt
was right for her.
She feels better because now she has more time to concentrate
on living.
Learn more. There's no obligation. Call toll free
Write to Quardian Plans Inc., P.O. Box 459, 1-800-432 -0853
Maitland, Pla. 32751 or call toll free.
Riverside sponsors xm^m/
The GUARDIAN PLAN.SiKJk
insurance funded prearranged program
One of the most respected names in funeral preplanning.
An INSURANCE rUNDCD prearranged funeral service provided by Quardian Plans. Inc. (riorlda)
In conjunction with Tamlly Service Life Insurance Company (Forms Nos. 060184-A/060I84-S/
0l02O3-A/010203<:/OI02O3 B 2/ IOI203 0-3/183456-1 /183436-2) and participating funeral firms
across the United States and Canada. In the State of riorlda the initial face amount of the benefit
payable under such a life Insurance or annuity contract shall not exceed $5,000.00 and all prearranged
funerals in excess of $3,000.00 shall be funded through a trust established in accordance with
Chapter 639 ria. Stats.


Friday, February 14, 1986/The Jewish Ftoridimn of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 3
A Jewish Heroine For All Mankind...
Judith Resnik A Space Pioneer
"There was always a smile on
her face, this lovely young lady,
who had a dream ... a dream to
be a space pioneer." The words
that described Judith Resnik, one
of the seven who perished in the
25th shuttle launch great tragedy
last month.
According to her father, Mar-
vin, of Akron, Ohio, he had nur-
tured his daughter to reach her
greater expectations, giving her
the best start an American kid
could have for Judy was not only
one of the first women in the
space program, but was also the
first and only Jew to achieve that
distinguished honor.
She was a unique person, known
in school as "The Brain," her hob-
by playing classical music on the
piano.
She graduated from Pitt-
sburgh's Carnegie-Mellon Univer-
sity in 1970 with a degree in elec-
trical engineering, and she receiv-
ed a doctorate in the same field
from Maryland in 1977. While
working for Zerox in California,
she happened to spot a NASA
recruitment poster and this was
the beginning of her career in the
space profrram. Entering in 1978.
CAMPAIGN '86
)
Setting the pace for the upcoming Woodmont
Division FederationJUJA Dinner, Feb. 23,
are these key campaign couples, from left,
Woodmont
Continued from Page 1
eastern activities have
brought him before more
than 100 audiences in the
United States. His close
association with the Israeli
issues and political
developments enables him
to convey the views of the
Israeli government to his
various audiences.
According to the Division
chairmen, "We are grateful
to campaign and dinner
committee leader Abraham
David, who helped achieve
the record gifts at the
cocktail party by setting an
example and calling for in-
creases of 25 percent or
more to aid the Jewish com-
munity's major
philanthropy."
Funds raised by the
Federation/UJA campaign
are used to help tens of
thousands of Jewish men,
women and children in need,
in Greater Fort Lauderdale,
in Israel and around the
world.
Feb. 23
Continued from Pag* 1
concept and headed the
arrangements.
WECARE volunteers
who were members of
the phone campaign are
Sylvia Boltax, Sunny
Freedman, Sylvia Golds-
tein, Ruth Horowitz,
Faye Jackler, Yetta
Lewis, Allan Marcus,
Shirley Marcus, Ann
Messing, Edythe
Morgano, Bertha
Strauber and Allyn
Kanowsky, WECARE
director.
Shirley and Harold Skolnik, Dorothy and
Sidney Nadel and Mr. and Mrs. Henry
Hilsenroth.
Woodmont Division leaders for FederationJUJA at Special Gifts
Cocktail Party, from left, Abe David, Nancy Stein, and Ann and
Charles Ross.

Passover
at the Concord
Wed. April 23-Thurs. Moy 1
The observance of tra-
dition, the magnificence
of the Sedorim, the beoufy
of the Services, the bril-
liance of the Holiday Pro-
gramming.
Cantor Herman
Malomood. assisted by
the Concord 45-voice
Symphoic Chorale, di-
rected by Mothew Lazar
and Don Vogel, to officiate
at the Services ond
Sedarim.
Outstanding leaders
from Government, Press,
the Arts ond Literature.
Great films. Music doy ond
night on weekdays.
Special programs for tots,
tweeners ond teens.
Rabbi Simon Cohen
ond resident Rabbi Eli
Mozur oversee constant
Koshruth supervision ond
Dietary Law observance.
lit
in
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she was a member of the
Discovery Flight in August, 1984.
According to her father, "My
daughter was the first Jew in
space, and in Israel, her exploits
were followed with great
interest."
Noted author James A.
Michener in talking about Judith
put. it best when he said, "The
mind of man is restless. No matter
how great the challenge, gallant
men and women will step forward
to tackle it. Judith Resnik could
serve as the symbol of why men
and women dare great things."
JUDITH A. RESNIK
.. her religion was space
Newswire/U.SA
SAN FRANCISCO Mt. Zion, the only hospital here under
Jewish auspices, opened an "infectious diseases and immunity
clinic" Jan. 16 to diagnose and refer, among others, patients suf-
fering from AIDS. It is believed to be the first such outpatient
clinic in the country at a Jewish hospital.
NEW YORK Anti-Semitic incidents against Jews and
Jewish property in the United States decreased significantly last
year, according to the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith.
SAVANNAH Pupils in grade one through four of the Savan-
nah Jewish Academy were praised by the American Jewish Joint
Distribution Committee for their contribution to Mexican earth-
quake victims relief. The JDC's executive vice president Saul
Cohen wrote the children that "it is wonderful that you realize
and understand that there are people in the world who need
help..."
MIFFLINTOWN, PA. Nearly 1,000 workers, some of them
rabbis, were out of work after a fire destroyed most of the Empire
Kosher Poultry Inc. plant, said to be the largest of its kind in the
world.
NEW YROK In a major breakthrough in the use of Jewish
video, the Jewish Media Service is now offering for purchase 29
videocassettes of Jewish educational interest to Jewish com-
munities in the U.S. and Canada.
NEW YORK Dr. Gerson D. Cohen, Chancellor of The Jewish
Theological Seminary of America, has appointed Dr. Fritz A.
Rothschild as the Joseph J. and Dora Abbell Associate Professor
of Jewish Philosophy.
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Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Priday, February 14, 1986
Viewpoint
The views expressed by columnist*, reprinted editorials. nd copy do not n
ly reflect the opinion of the Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdaie
To assure the Jewish Future
By LEON DULZIN
The great task of Zionism today is to assure the continuity of
the Jewish people, and the surest way to achieve this goal is to
establish and strengthen vital links between Israel and the
diaspora. This means that "declarative Zionists" those who an-
nounce themselves to be Zionists must assume a certain
specific set of responsibilities that will make them "committed
Zionists."
Because we are a voluntary movement, this must be a moral
commitment, but the result must be assumption of certain com-
pulsory tasks that each Zionist can carry out in his or her own
family. It means learning to speak Hebrew. It means giving our
children a solid Jewish and Zionist education so they too can
speak Hebrew.
It means sending them to Israel on summer camp programs...
It means sending our college youth to study at least one year at an
Israeli university. And finally, it means making sure that at least
one family member goes on aliya to Israel...
Only in this way will we be able to forge the ties between Israel
and the diaspora that will guarantee Jewish survival. Aliya is im-
perative to Israel. It is even more vital for the Jewish world out-
side Israel if we are ever to say with confidence that our grand-
children and our great grandchildren will remain Jewish.
These are excerpts from remarks by Leon Dulzin, chairman of
the World Zionist Organization and the Jewish Agency, to the Pan
American Convention of the World Union of General Zionists
meeting in Hollywood, Fla.
Newswire/Washington
NINE SOVIET Jewry activists, including a Soviet Jewish
emigre who became a naturalized U.S. citizen last fall, were found
guilty of conducting an illegal demonstration in front of the
Soviet Embassy here.
A SENIOR member of an Israeli Knesset committee urged that
Congress not cut back on proposed foreign assistance programs
to Israel.
A STUDY of discrimination and gender bias in the Philadelphia
legal community is being planned to verify the problem, according
to a report in B'nai B'rith Women, the organization's official
publication.
IN AN effort to pre-empt a Reagan Administration plan to sell
more than $1 billion in sophisticated arms to Saudi Arabia, Con-
gressman Larry Smith (D-HoUywood), along with 11 of his col-
leagues sent a letter to the President urging him to cancel the
potential sale. In addition to Smith, the signers include Con-
gressman Mel Levine (D-Calif.), Christopher Smith (R-N.Y.), Vin
Weber (R-Minn.), Peter Kostmayer (D-Pa.), F. James Sensen-
brenner, Jr. (R-Wisc.), Harry Reid (D-Nev.), Mark Siljander (R-
Mich.), Bill Green (R-N.Y.), Ted Weiss (D-N.Y.), Gary Ackerman
(D-N.Y.), and Ed Feighan (D-Ohio).
A Museum of Influence
^mmimUT)
By GREER FAY CASHMAN
RAIN, though a boon for crops
is hardly conducive to tourism.
But even a steady winter
downpour can't damper the spirits
of the hundreds of daily visitors to
Tel Aviv's Beth Hatefutsoth, the
Museum of the Jewish Diaspora.
Buses arriving at Tel Aviv
University, where the museum is
located, unload soldiers, students
and tourists all of whom are
eager to trace the history and
heritage of the Jewish people.
Among its many distinctions,
Beth Hatefutsoth is the first non-
profit institution to be awarded
the title of "Tourism Institute of
the Year." The citation recognizes
the museum's outstanding
achievements in presenting
Diaspora Jewish life and its con-
tribution to strengthening the
links between the Diaspora and
Israel.
When Beth Hatefutsoth opened
in May 1978, its classification as a
museum was still a matter of
dispute because the museum does
not contain any original
manuscripts or artefacts.
Everything on display is a replica.
The dispute, however, was settl-
ed in 1979 when the European
Council of Museums (Ecom)
selected Beth Hatefutsoth as the
European Museum of the Year.
This was a major breakthrough in
the concept of what defines a
museum. Credit for this change
must be given to the eminent
British museum expert, Kenneth
Hudson, who advocated a broader
classification of what may be con-
sidered a museum.
In a letter to Beth Hatefutsoth
director Aharon Doron, Hudson
reiterated his great admiration
for Beth Hatefutsoth and advised
that it be included in his book,
Museums of Influence, to be
published next year. The book
identifies 37 museums that Hud-
son believes have influenced the
development of museums.
Among its many awards, Beth
Hatefutsoth received in February
the $20,000 Speaker of the
Knesset prize for its documenta-
tion of the culture and heritage of
Ethiopian Jewry.
Nearly three years before the
mass aliya of Ethiopian Jews
Operation Moses Beth Hatefut-
soth photographer Doron Bacher
was sent to Ethiopia to record life
in Jewish communities there. He
also documented their prepara-
tions for aliya and has since been
following every stage of their ab-
sorption process.
Beth Hatefutsoth has also train-
ed three Ethiopian immigrants to
guide members of their communi-
ty through Diaspora Jewish
history.
Wherever possible, Beth
Hatefutsoth has photographers
working in disappearing Jewish
communities. One of the moat uni-
que exhibits in this category
"The Jews of Kaifeng" was
displayed in April 1984 and is cur-
rently being shown through the
U.S. It tells the story of a com-
munity that dates back to the 11th
century, when Jewish merchants
travelled the Silk Route stret-
ching from the Mediterranean to
Kaifeng and Peking. Intermar-
riage and assimilation made the
Jews indistinguishable in ap-
pearance from mainstream
Chinese society.
This Jewish community, living
on the banks of the Yellow River,
had by the end of the last century
all but disappeared. However,
even today there are some 200
descendants of the Jewish com-
munity of Kaifeng still residing in
the city. Some still identify
themselves as Jews.
Not all the exhibits deal with a
specific community, nor do they
necessarily cover a set period of
time. Some, such as "Jews in the
Wo I'.ort, '.' and
''Synagogues fri Western
Egyptian students visiting the
Galicia," are theme oriented.
Some of the exhibits are also
geared to an outstanding Jewish
personality, such as Moses
Mendelssohn and Franz Kafka.
Beth Hatefutsoth not only
reflect? the past but also points to
the future. Among its regular ac-
tivities are seminars mainly for
youth on Jewish identity. ITiere
is no uniformity in Jewish iden-
tification. For some people iden-
tification is expressed through
religious observance, and for
others it is through the preserva-
tion of cultural values.
The exhibits at Beth Hatefut-
soth are a link in the chain of
Jewish continuity and Jewish
viewers cannot help but recognize
themselves as links.
Although 90 percent of the
visitors to Beth Hatefutsoth are
Jewish, there are many non-Jews
who visit the museum. When rela-
tions with Egypt were less strain-
ed, Egyptian school children were
brought to learn something not
only of Israeli life, but also of
Jewish life.
Moreover, for the past three
years two groups of Israeli Arab
youngsters have toured the
museum weekly to glean
something of the background of
their Jewish neighbors.
Among other non-Jewish
groups who regularly visit the
museum are a group of African
priests who study Judaism, and a
delegation sent by the Anglican
museum.
Church to view Beth Hatefutsoth
to use as a basis for a church
museum in England. The Interna-
tional Women's Club, which in-
cludes the wives of foreign
diplomats, participates in a course
on Jewish life and ritual.
However, group tours by Chris-
tian pilgrims are infrequent.
Doron attributes this to the fact
that Tel Aviv is seldom on the
itinerary of Christian tour groups.
But for Jews, whether secular or
religious, Beth Hatefutsoth is a
must. Bearded, black-garbed men
can almost always be seen in the
building, especially during
Pessah, Succot and Hanukah,
when they come in droves with
their families.
The museum is neutral territory
for Jews of all persuasions, and
because displays are often added
to or changed, visitors often
return.
With the exception of the
holocaust, Beth Hatefutsoth has
not yet engaged in in-depth
studies of contemporary Jewish
history. For this purpose, it is
building an annex.
Beth Hatefutsoth tries to in-
volve the whole of the Jewish
world in its projects both as
subjects and participants.
Worldwide amateur photo com-
petitions are conducted to en-
courage Jews to look with keener
eyes at the communities from
which they have sprung.
Help is Needed at Home
North American Jewry has been hailed as the most powerful,
the most affluent, the most successful Diaspora community in
Jewish history.
But for many Jews today, this great dream has become a cruel
illusion. Economic hard times have ripped through the tapestry of
North American Jewry, leaving gashes of desperation and
despair. Today more Jews are hungry, jobless, homeless and
hopeless than at any time since the Great Depression.
True, Jews in need are still a minority. But because we are
Jews, we cannot tolerate suffering in even the smallest fraction of
our community. Because we are Jews, we cannot turn away from
the unaffiliated and uninvolved the hungry of spirit any more
than we can turn our backs on the homeless and/or the
unemployed. Fort Lauderdale's Jewish Federation is ready to
help all of our brethren in need here at home through the Federa-
tion/UJA annual campaign. Now is the time to help your fellow
Jew. Make 1986 your year of total commitment. Get involved by
contacting the Federation or your area chairperson. You can
make the difference.
jewishFloridian o
Of QREATCT TOUT LAUOHWALE
SUZANNE SMOCMET
Executive Edilo-
FRED K SMOCMET MARVIN LE VINE
Editor and Puoheher Director el Communlcat iona
Published Weekly Mid September throuoh Mid-May tVWMklybalanceof yaar
(com)Class Poetage Paid n Heliandale Fla. USPS MS420
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Jewish Rortdian,
P.O. Box 012973, Miami, Fla. SS101
Fort Leuderdale-Mollywood Ollice: 8368 W Oakland Par* Blvd. Fort Lauderdale, Ft 33321
Ptiona 74S4400
Plane 120NE Bth SI Mianv. Fla 33132 Ptiona 1 373-4605
Mtmotr JTA. Sevan Aria. WNS. NEA. AJPA. and FPA
Josneh FluJeVw Pees No) Oaoraates KaaHnUti a> MaroHaaaHa Advertised.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES 2 Year Minimum $7 SO (Local Area S3.M Annual) or By memoerehip
Jewish Federelion ol Greater Fort Lauderdale
Jewien Federation ol Greater Fort Lauderdale Brlen J Snerr. President; Joel M. Telles, Executive
Director. Marvin Le Vine. Director ol Communications; Lon Ginsberg. Assislsnt Director ol Commu
nications: 8358 W Oakland Park Blvd.. Fort Lauderdale. FL 33321 Phone (306) 748-8*00 Mall or in
Federetion and The Jewish Fiondlan ol Greater Fort Lauderdale should be addreeeed Jewisn
Federetlon ol Greeter Fort Lauderdeie. P.O Box 26810. Temerac, FL 33320*810 fnt s/iocfl*'
Friday. February 14.1986
Volume 15
5 1 ADAR5746
Number 7



Friday, February 14, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 5
Volunteers for Israel
Student Spring Break Program
Volunteers for Israel announces
a special program for
matriculated students from ages
17 to 26, stated Ben Dinkes,
Regional Coordinator.
Students may go to Israel dur-
ing their spring break for a two or
three week period to perform
maintenance work in the Israel
Defense Forces.
The student will eat and sleep
(at no expense) with the Israeli
soldiers. He will learn the trials
and tribulations of life in Israel
from conversations with his new
Israeli working friends and people
Ci Briefly
in the streets of Israel.
The volunteers short stay will
be an indoctrination that he will
carry home to tell his friends. He
will learn that the time spent ac-
tually helped the economy and
bolstered the confidence of the
Israeli; that his brethern in the
"Galut" want Israel to survive.
Cost to the student is $399 for
two weeks and $430 for three
weeks round trip (via Tower Air
from JFK) plus a $30 registration
fee. Departure dates will be
March 2, 16, 30.
Men and women up to the age of
65 may apply. They can fly from
JFK either on Tower Air during
the same departure dates at a cost
of $480 on El Al March 10, 25
(cost $599) students $525.
Call the volunteers at
305-792-6700 Monday, Tuesday,
Thursday, and Friday between
the hours of 1 and 4 p.m. The of-
fice is located at 6501 W. Sunrise
Blvd., Fort Lauderdale, FL
33313.
Volunteers for Israel is a
beneficiary of the Jewish Federa-
tion, funded by the Federa-
tion/UJA campaign.
\mrM
THE FINANCE DIVISION of the 1986
Jewish Federation/United Jewish Appeal
campaign met recently for an educational
seminar conducted by Richard Brodsky, an
attorney with the Miami law firm of Paul,
Landy, Beiley and Harper, P.A. Pictured at
the event, which was held at Marina Bay, are,
from left. Division co-chairmen Judah Ever
and Steven Lewin, guest Richard Brodsky,
Richard Drath and Leonard Kinker. The
Finance Division is comprised of accountants,
mortgage brokers, bankers, stock brokers, etc.
For further information about the Division,
contact Janice Salit at the Jewish Federation,
7*8-8+00.
Hillel Retreat Feb. 14-16
Hillel has organized a retreat
Feb. 14-16 to better understand
the nature of student programm-
ing. A special program entitled,
"We Are the World: Politics and
Social Action in the Jewish Tradi-
tion," will be held at 8:15 p.m.
Feb. 15 at Camp Owaissa Bauer in
Homestead.
The theme of the retreat is
Judaism and commitment to social
change. In workshops, discussion
groups and keynote talks,
students will encounter ways to
improve their community, focus-
ing on issues which range from
global politics to helping a friend
in need.
The program will include a
briefing by Jonathan Kessler, na-
tional staff member of the
0ROWARD
IJAPER *
QACKAGING
American Israel Public Affairs
Committee (AIPAC), on the cur-
rent state of relations between
Israel and the United States.
Students will be met during their
evening program and at a bonfire
afterward.
Interested parties should call
661-8549.
THE BONAVENTURE DIVISION recently held a planning
meeting to finalize arrangements for their upcoming cocktail buf-
fet on behalf of the 1986 Jewish Federation/United Jewish Appeal
campaign. The supper will be held on Sunday March 9 at the
Bonaventure Spa Hotel. Pictured hard at work, from left, Phil
Sacks, Bonaventure Division/UJA chairman; Sylvia Blumenthal
and Murray Chermak, co mation contact Janice Salit at the Federation, 7U8-8U00.
Newswire Florida
GRAPHIC ARTIST Chuck Ax's licence plate design will not
grace the new Florida tags after all. Instead, the current tags will
be used with a reversal of colors, it was decided by Gov. Bob
Graham and the Cabinet. "I was so disappointed," the 60-year-old
Ax said.
WITH 17.6 percent of its total population in the age 65 and
older bracket, Florida is far and away the leading location for
senior citizens according to the Census Bureau. Arkansas is in se-
cond place followed by Rhode Island, Iowa, and Pennsylvania.
Arizona ranks 20th on the list.
PREPARATIONS ARE underway for the 8th Annual Margate
Senior Olympics co-sponsored by the Northwest Focal Point
Senior Center and the city of Margate Parks and Recreation
Department to be held during the week of March 17-21.
FLORIDA DRIVERS may soon be asked to pay for road im-
provements out of their own pockets nickels, dimes and
quarters at a time because of what state and federal officials
say is a growing need to place toll booths on highways and bridges
now traveled for free.
THE NUMBER of anti-Semitic incidents last year decreased
eight percent in Florida and dropped 11 percent nationwide, ac-
cording to a report issued by B'nai B'rith's Anti-Defamation
League. The worst incident in Florida happened March 24 when
vandals blew in the front windows of the Jewish Federation of
South Broward.
fat & e****
FT LAUD 776-6272
LJROWARD
IJAPER a
PACKAGING
WHAT DO YOU GET FOR $109,900 IN BOCA DEL MAR?
EVERYTHING!
A select community of just 56
Fee simple villas and townhomes
adjoining Boca Pointe
Community Features: heated
pool, recreation building, sauna,
tennis courts.
Homes Feature: 1,913-3,144 sq.ft.
total living space Garage
Extravagant array of luxury
extras all included in one low price
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DIRECTIONS: Canary Palm Drive runs
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Models open 10-5.
FINAL PHASE. ACT NOW! 5=5*
Canary Palm Club, 6676 Canary Palm Circle, BocaRaton, Florida33433 305/368-5133.


.
Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, February 14, 1986
Mayor Bradley
regains
Jewish support
WASHINGTON Los Angeles
Mayor Tom Bradley, widely
criticized for his delay in criticiz-
ing Nation of Islam leader Louis
Farrakhan for his anti-Semitism,
has regained the support of promi-
nent Jewish activists for his cam-
paign as Democratic candidate for
governor against Republican
George Deukmejian's bid for re-
election.
Edward Sanders, the noted Los
Angeles lawyer who resigned as
president of the American-Israel
Public Affairs Committee in 1980
to help President Carter's re-
election effort, was co-chairman
of a major fund-raising dinner for
Bradley. The head of the organiz-
ing committee for the affair was
Victor Carter, a long-time leader
in Los Angeles Jewish circles.
The Los Angeles Times reported
Sanders saying the presence of
himself and Carter is an effort to
defuse remaining hard feelings in
the Jewish community, tradi-
tionally a source of strong support
for Bradley, over the mayor's
delay in criticizing Farrakhan
earlier this year.
"It's not an accident that I am
co-chair," Sanders was quoted.
"It is a conscious decision on my
part. While I felt the Farrakhan
situation was not handled in a
positive way.
Noting that Bradley has admit-
ted he could have spoken out
sooner to criticize Farrakhan,
Carter said, "My feeling is that if
you have a friend for many years,
you don't drop that friend because
he made a mistake he apologized
for."
Dr.BeUa Brodxki, professor at Sarah Lawrence College, is shown
with Dr. Abraham J. Gittelson, CAJE Director of Education
left and her father, Ludwi# Brodzki and uncle, Jacob Brodzki
right, prominent community leaders, at the time of her lecture
A Comparison of Agnon and Kafka' at the Jewish Federation.
CAJE Features
College Professor
Dr. Bella Brodzki, professor of
English literature at Sarah
Lawrence recently addressed an
enthusiastic audience at the
Jewish Federation on "The
Parable: A Comparison of the
Writings of Franz Kafka and
Shmuel Yosef Agnon."
Dr. Brodzki, daughter and niece
of prominent community leaden,
Ludwig and Jacob Brodzki,
analyzed how each writer
employed parables in their stories,
to both reveal and conceal the
realities of life. She noted that
each one, acclaimed among the
greatest writers of the 20th cen-
tury, was a master of the parable,
stimulating the reader to discover
the various layers of meanings in-
herent in their writings.
The lecture was part of the
ongoing programming of the
North Broward Midrasha Adult
Education programming under
the direction of Helen Weisberg.
We Must Win the Battle Against Terrorists...
Let's Show Our
Solidarity to Israel ^^
Editor's Note: The following letter to our com-
munity is from Israel Resnikoff, a member of the
Jewish Federation board of directors and cam-
in Margate.
It has come to my attention that many prospective travelers to the State of Israel have become
somewhat skeptical, hesitant and questioning. My dear friends allow me to assure you about elaborate
safety measures taken by our little beloved State of Israel. We know Air-lines are subjected to hijack-
ing and other incidents, but not one embarrassing moment has affected the El-Al Israel's own Air-
Line. El-Al enjoys this superior record because of the measures which have been taken to make sure
that you and I arrive safely, unmolested and have a beautiful trip at all times. The food and service
cannot be excelled and are tailored to our pleasure.
You and I cannot and must not allow the few Arab incidents to stop us from visiting Israel. To do so
is the exact strategy of the entire Arab world and nothing will please them more.
Remember that the State of Israel needs our purchase of Israel Bonds, it needs our direct dollar
help through United Jewish Appeal, but above all it needs Tourism. Tourism is still the number one in-
dustry because it creates jobs of every description therefore affecting the entire economy; it is the
lifeline for our beloved Israel whose very existence is largely dependent on one word "Tourism."
So my dear friends, give this your utmost attention and intelligent approach. Shall we allow the
fanatics to guide our destiny or shall we all say "no, a thousand times no" to their plans and strategy?
Let us counteract their well laid plans, be more determined than ever and make plans to visit Israel, to
spend time there and show them once again our solidarity and sincerity.
Failure to do so definitely helps the Arabs, the terrorists, to win the battle against Israel's very ex-
istence. So once again I ask you to give this your complete consideration.
A true friend of Israel,
ISRAEL RESNIKOFF
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Action Resolutions...
Services to Jews
With Disabilities
Editor's note: The following was adopted by the 5ith General
Assembly of the Council of Jewish Federations, November, 1985,
Washington, D.C., and expresses the views of the delegates of the
member Federations.
The recent appointment of the CJF Task Force on the Jewish
Disabled represents a unique opportunity for the Council, its
member agencies and national Jewish organizations to respond to
Jews with disabilities and their families, to expand and develop
high quality services for the disabled under Jewish auspices, and
to be informed on and address inquiries about government fun-
ding policies and community planning in this area. The formation
of the Task Force implemented a recommendation from delegates
at a special session on services to Jewish with disabilities at the
1934 General Assembly in Toronto. The session highlighted the
need to provide a wide range of high quality services including
housing, social and recreational programs, vocational services,
educational programs, and counseling and supportive services;
the session also clarified the importance of providing many of
these services under Jewish auspices.
In addition to increased attention within the Jewish community,
the development of adequate services for the disabled will also re-
quire increased advocacy on the part of the Jewish community
and its community relations agencies to secure the civil rights of
the disabled and to encourage adequate levels of government fun-
ding for needed services.
The CJF Task Force on the Disabled was therefore formed to
sensitize Jewish communities to the needs and concerns of the
disabled; to educate communities about the Jewish responsibility
for providing adequate services to the disabled; to advocate for
adequate government, private and Federation funding; and to
share information about community programs and issues.
Recognizing the critical nature of representing those who are
least able to represent themselves we urge the following:
1. The Council should move expeditiously in its study of services
under Jewish auspices and allocate appropriate resources to ad-
dress the issues mentioned above.
2. The Council should work closely with other continental
organizations, especially those involved in community relations
and advocacy, to address critical national and local civil rights,
social policy, and funding issues that affect Jews with disabilities.
3. CJF member Federations should explore the need for special
services to Jews with disabilities in their communities and pro-
grams should then be developed where appropriate to address the
needs.
4. CJF and member Federations should seek to maximize ac-
cessibility of their own meetings to Jews with disabilities.
DELUXE KOSHER
PASSOVERTOURS
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Friday, February 14, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 7
They Wear the Prestigious Lion of Judah Pin...
Dedicated Leaders at the $5,000 Luncheon for UJA '86
Seen enjoying the $5,000 Lion of Judah lun-
cheon are, from left, Florence K. Straus, Bar-
bara Goldstein and Gladys Daren.
Marcia Steinfeld, Jo Ann Levy, Jo Ann M. Levy.
WOMEN'S DIVISION
From Uift, Lee Dreiling, $5,000 Division chairperson; Jo Ann
Levy and Jo Ann M. Levy, co-chairpersons of the event; Esther
Lerner, Women's Division president; and Barbara Wiener,
Women's Division campaign chairperson.
Committed to helping a "World of Jewish Need" were
the North Broward community leaders that attended the
Women's Division Lion of Judah event, open to those
women who made a minimum commitment of $5,000 to the
1986 Women's Division campaign of the Jewish Federa-
tion/United Jewish Appeal.
According to chairpersons Jo Ann M. Levy and Jo Ann
Levy, "A great time was had by all, and our special thanks
to those women for their heartfelt generosity to the Jewish
community's major philanthropy. The event, held Jan. 13,
included a special viewing of the Picasso Exhibit on display
in Miami followed by a luncheon at the Pavilion Hotel.
Myra Brumberger Pictured, from left, Dottie Sherman. Aqnes
Feme, and Bea Fligelman.
Seated, from left, Jean Steirdierg, Deborah Aa-enne Barowsky and Evelyn
Hahn and Claire Oshry. Standing, from Kalmowitz
left, Roz Dorfman, and Fran Levey.
Ethel Waldman
Charlotte Padek.
(seated), and Alvera A. Gold with Marine Tishberg.
UJA Contributors Help Solve Israel's
Foreign Currency Reserves Problem
By GERALD S. NAGEL
UJA Watch Desk Editor
JERUSALEM When
American Jews contribute to
Federation UJA campaigns, they
directly meet humanitarian needs
in Israel but also indirectly help all
the people of Israel as well.
One example of this is in helping
Israel build its foreign currency
reserves, a critical basis of the
country's economic survival, but
often glossed over by Americans
more familiar with other economic
concents such as inflation,
unemployment and balance of
trade. American Jews help Israel
solve its reserve problem simply
by paying their pledges.
These reserves are moneys from
overseas, especially dollars, that
Israel needs to purchase raw
materials and crude oil from
abroad, which comprise 92.5 per-
cent of Israel's overseas buying.
These imports make industrial
and agricultural production and
therefore exports possible,
helping Israel improve its balance
of trade position. While campaign
dollars are converted and spent as
shekels by the Jewish Agency and
FLORIDA REGIONAL MISSION
SOUTH AMERICA
March 16-27, 1986
YOUNG LEADERSHIP
MADRID/ISRAEL
(26-46 Years)
May 8-20, 1986
FAMILY MISSION-ISRAEL
July 6-16, 1986
SINGLES ISRAEL
(22-40)
July 13-23, 1986
August 17-27, 1986
For further information, contact Sandy Jackowitz at the Federa-
tion office, 748-8400.
Joint Distribution committee, the
actual U.S. currency remains for a
time in the Israeli economy.
Uri Oren, an Israeli consul who
became an assistant to the Deputy
Prime Minister recently, said the
presence of these dollars has
helped stem a dangerous decline
in reserve levels. Last spring,
reserves dropped to barely $2
billion, long considered the
minimum to keep the economy
sound. Two years ago, reserves
were $3.5 billion. However an in-
flux of dollars has helped register
the first increase in reserve levels
in years, $3 million reported for
last month.
"UJA dollars are part of this
flow on an ongoing basis," Oren
said. "The actual dollars of the
$250 million or so received from
you are used to purchase raw
materials and crude, making it
possible to produce for export."
"I am highly encouraged the
Israeli economy will continue to
improve," Oren said. He at-
tributes this to Israel's actions, in-
cluding "disconnecting" the
linkage between price rises and
salary increases; and to help from
Americans, through U.S. aid,
trade, tourism and campaign
" T?-? ';vv'.V. V. ./.,
Welcoming 1986
By ELIE WIESEL
Watchman, what of the night? Years come and go. Prayers are
offered and forgotten, resolutions made and repudiated. Will
there now be an end to violence? Will fear be vanquished and hate
disarmed? Will death yield to humanity and hope?
Watchman, what of the night? Another year has receded; 1986
has emerged young and fragile. May it bring on its wings consola-
tion rather than threats, promise instead of bloodshed.
Will 1986 enable and force us to learn from what we endured in
1985? We have learned that other peoples' suffering is our
business. When free men and women are imprisoned, we side
with the jailers, unless we raise our voice in protest, when
children die of starvation, we are responsible for their parents'
agony.
We have learned that terrorism is evil. It must be outlawed by
all civilised nations not explained or rationalized, but fought
and eradicated. Nothing can, nothing will, justify the murder of
innocent people and helpless children neither the murder ol
Leon Klinghoffer nor the murder of Natasha Simpson. Terrorists,
today, are murderers, not idealists. To denounce them, to oppose
them, is to affirm what is noble in human beings.
Watchman, what of the night? So many victims in so many
places need help. We need, above all, to be shaken out of our indif-
ference the greatest source of danger in the world.
For, remember. The opposite of love is not hate but indif-
ference; the opposite of faith is not arrogance but indifference;
the opposite of culture is not ignorance but indifference; the op-
posite of art is not ugliness but indifference. And the opposite of
peace is indifference to both peace and war indifference to
hunger and persecution, to imprisonment and humiliation, indif-
ference to torture and persecution.
Thus, let us invite the new year, as one invites a friend, to bring
joy and meaning to our lives, and to make us more sensitive to one
anothers' fears and promises.
Watchman, what of the night? Humankind needs peace more
than ever, for it has, more than ever, been saturated with violence
and war. Now the entire planet is in danger. But peace is not
God's gift to his creatures. It is our gift to each other.
M


Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, February 14, 1986
$500 Plus Special Gifts
Luncheon Attracts 95
Over 95 people representing
many of the North Broward con-
dominiums turned out to show
their support for Israel and make
their commitment to the 1986
Jewish Federation/United Jewish
Appeal campaign at the first-ever
$500 Plus Club Special Gifts lun-
cheon, held at Inverrary Country
Club.
"It was such a treat to see
residents of Margate sitting with
residents of Tamarac," stated
Samuel K. Miller, chairman of the
event. "People forgot where they
lived and just mingled like they
were one big, happy family."
A minimum commitment of
$500 was required for attendance
to the luncheon, which was
keynoted by the Rev. John
Stanley Grauel, a Christian who
was a key force in the establish-
ment of Israel.
"For a first time event, the ex-
citement and participation was
truly wonderful," stated co-
chairman William Katzberg. "I'm
sure next year we will double the
attendance and double the com-
mitments to UJA which support
needs locally, in Israel, and
worldwide," added David Krantz,
co-chairman.
Operation Moses:
One Year Later
By Wendy Elliman
UJA PressService
The difficult and dangerous
march through the desert...
disease and death in the refugee
camps... the tense clandestine
airlift and the dramatic homecom-
ing they are all a year ago now.
Fifteen thousand Ethiopian Jews
have reached Israel; thousands of
others remain in Ethiopia.
One year later, how are Israel's
Ethiopian Jews faring? The first
year has been a success, according
to both the Absorption Ministry
and the Jewish Agency. The
Agency receives most of its funds
from the United Jewish Ap-
peal/Federation Campaigns in-
cluding Operation Moses. It
received $60 million from
American Jews to aid in Ethiopian
Jewry's initial absorption through
Operation Moses funds put to
good use.
"These 12 months were design-
ed to equip Ethiopian Jews for fife
in Israel," says a representative
of the Jewish Agency. "The ma-
jority of Ethiopian Jews are now
comfortable in Hebrew, the
children are in school, and the
adults working or retraining. And
the community is learning to use
communal, commercial and
municipal services."
As the initial year ends,
however, the real absorption of
Ethiopia's Jews begins. "Until
now, they've been sheltered in the
absorption center," says a Jewish
Agency field worker. "Gas, water,
electricity, food and even pocket
money have been regularly pro-
vided. Advice and support have
been on hand. Now, they're going
to be on their own."
Some 750 families (3,000 peo-
ple) have already left the absorp-
tion centers and have been
allocated permanent housing in
towns throughout Israel. The
housing plan places groups of 20
families in 40 to 50
neighborhoods. Availability of
housing, however, is inevitably
the determining factor.
A major concern, as Ethiopian
Jews move out of the absorption
centers, is to ensure that they
enter into the mainstream of local
life. Israel's 160 community
centers, developed largely by the
Joint Distribution Committee
(funded by U J A/Federation Cam-
paigns), are to be the main
vehicles. Veteran Israeli and
newcomer Ethiopian families are
being paired.
"This pairing is to bring Ethio-
pian Jews into the neighborhood
social framework, and to help
them use local facilities. We want
to prevent a build-up of frustra-
tion within the Ethiopian com-
munity, or tension between Ethio-
pians and others in the
neighborhood," says a community
Pictured at the first $500 Plus Club Special
Gifts luncheon for the condominiums were,
from left, co-chairmen David Krantz and
William Katzberg; ouest speaker, the Rev.
John Stanley Grauel; and chairman Samuel
K. Miller.
center worker.
Over half of the Ethiopian
Jewish commujity in Israel (54
percent) is younger than 18, and
the adjustment is relatively fast.
Nearly 3,000 are in Youth Aliyah
frameworks, funded through
U J A/Federation Campaigns, with
the remaining 5,000 children in
day schools. The plan for this year
is to close separate classes and ful-
ly integrate Ethiopian youngsters
into tne schools. Another 129
Ethiopian Jewish students are
enrolled at Israeli universities and
technical colleges.
For the community's working-
age adults, on-the-job training
programs have been in operation
since February. Factories, hotels
and chain stores throughout the
country are employing hundreds
of Ethiopian Jews for a shortened
working day, and allowing them
time for study after work. Within
two years, 1,580 Ethiopian Jews
or half the working-age com-
munity will have passed
through the program.
"It's important for the Ethio-
pian immigrants to get jobs as
soon as possible," says a Jewish
Agency official. "It's
psychologically healthier and
unemployment in Israel will get
worse before it gets better. So it's
vital that Ethiopian Jews have
employment before the crisis
more fully hits."
The problems of employment,
housing and integration into the
community are all ultimately
solvable, especially with sufficient
funding. What a Jewish Agency
social worker describes as "the
worst problem," however, is less
easily addressed.
In over a third of all Ethiopian
Jewish families in Israel, one
parent it is usually the father
is absent. Often he is dead, or
trapped in Ethiopia; sometimes
the couple was divorced.
Economically and psychologically,
this puts the family under
pressure.
"The situation in Ethiopia is
very bad," says the social worker.
"But when you look back from the
freedom of the Jewish state and a
three-room apartment with a
refrigerator and running water,
to the life you knew in an Ethio-
pian village, it looks even worse."
If Israel's Ethiopian Jews have
traveled far beyond the life they
left a year ago, there is still a long
road ahead. Israel estimates that
toe full absorption of the com-
munity will take several years and
ultimately cost $800 million, in-
cluding the $126 million budgeted
for the first phase of absorption.
Half of the $126 million was raised
from American Jews through
Operation Moees, but more funds
are needed to make this dramatic
aliyah successful.
Daniel Cantor was chairman of
the Federation/UJA Operation
Moses.
Prime Minister Peres: UJA-Israel Relationship
is the Most Unique Expression of Brotherhood
Alex Grass, UJA National
Chairman, and Stanley B.
Horowitz, President, recently
conducted an interview session
with Prime Minister Shimon
Peres at the Prime Minister's Of-
fice in Jerusalem. The interview
session was recorded on video and
is currently being distributed to
Jewish communities across the
United States.
Responding to a question
presented by iff. Grass, the
Prime Minister said that the UJA
has become "the moat important"
channel for the expression of
solidarity and kinship between
Israel and the American Jewish
community.
"The relationship is of great and
deep importance for the existence
of our people," Prime Minister
Peres said.
The Prime Minister noted the
achievements made by Project
Renewal and praised the increas-
ed personal contact between
Israelis and American Jews.
"Project Renewal should been
enlarged in.two ways," Mr. Peres
said. "Fir%^ there are still many
Israeli communities who are
waiting for a Project Renewal
partner from the U.S. Second, in
addition to all the communal work
being done, Project Renewal
should build business enterprises
for the local communities. Pro-
viding the residents with jobs
would be a very great
contribution."
Commenting on Operation
Moses, the Prime Minister told
Messrs. Grass and Horowitz that
Israel has a responsibility to pro-
vide jobs, build homes, and offer
the new Ethiopian Jewish im-
migrants the best education
possible.
"Together, we did a marvelous
job," Mr. Peres said, "and I would
like to thank the UJA for its
participation."
CONDOMINIUM
The Difference Between
a People. And a Person
Ambassador
SandL
For Oakbrook
Oakbrook VUlage Federa-
tion/United Jewish Appeal wishes
to express their thanks and
gratitude to Ambassador Savings
and Loan Association for sponsor-
ing their 1986 United Jewish Ap-
peal Campaign Coffee at
Oakbrook Village on Sunday, Feb.
28 at 7 p.m. in the Clubhouse.
Everyone is welcome to attend.
Standing at the Western Wall
in Jerusalem, one is constantly
reminded of the passage of time
the treasure of collective ex-
perience that has combined to
form the context of modern
Jewish life.
You are not alone, nor are you
of one time. Instead, you are a link
in the continuity of the Jewish
people, its past and the hope of the
Jewish future.
Decades of effort created Israel,
a focus for our peoplehood. Now
we must work to ensure her sur-
vival. She gives you unity you
give her life.
You.
You are the difference.
Give to the 1986 Jewish Federa
tion/UTA campaign.
WHAT'S HAPPENING
FEBRUARY
Feb. 15 Oceanside Dinner-Dance. 7
p.m. Pier 66. Honoree: John Streng.
Feb. 16 Oriole Gardens I. 10 a.m.
Breakfast. Clubhouse.
Feb. 16 Lime Bay. 10 a.m.
Breakfast. Clubhouse.
Feb. 16 Paradise Gardens IV. 10
a.m. Breakfast Cong. Beth Hillel of
Margate.
Feb. 17 Palm-Aire Golf and Dinner.
Feb. 22 Oakland Hills Dinner-Dance.
7:30 p.m. Tamarac Jewish Center.
Feb. 23 Aragon. 11:30 a.m.
Clubhouse.
Feb. 23 -. Palm Lakes. 10 a.m.
Breakfast. Clubhouse.
Feb. 23 Paradise Gardens III
Cocktail Party. 3 p.m. Home of Mr. and
Mrs. Engelmeyer.
Feb. 23 Oakbrook Village. 7 p.m.
Clubhouse.
Feb. 23 Castle Gardens. 10 a.m.
Breakfast. Clubhouse.
Feb. 23 Woodmont Dinner-Dance. 6
p.m. Woodmont Country Club.
Feb. 24 Women's Division Palm-Aire
Golf and Luncheon.
Feb. 25 Coral Gate Cocktails. 8 p.m.
Model and Sales Office.


Friday, February 14, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 9
CAMPAIGN '86 Federation/United Jewish Appeal
CENTURY VILLAGE IN DEERFIELD
Beach recently held an Israel Update where
1,200 people gathered to hear Gideon Peleg
discuss the growing needs of Israel as well as
the needs of the local community. This event
kicked off six weeks of door-to-door solicitation
in Century Village on behalf of the 1986 Jewish
Federation/United Jewish Appeal campaign.
Pictured, from left, Sybil Hecker, chairman of
the day; Ruth Scherz, Bennie Kemmelman,
and Irene Diamond, entertainers; and Evelyn
Denner, Century Village general UJA
chairman.
CONDOMINIUM UPDATE
WESTWOOD 17 one of the many con-
dominiums that fall under the umbrella of the
Tamarac Division of the Jewish Federa-
tion/United Jewish Appeal campaign, has
once again, exceeded the total of dollars raised
for UJA, from last year. Accordina to Sam
Federman, Tamarac Division chairman,
there are 108 Jewish families residing in
Westwood 17. So far, 78 pledges have been
received which is 7t percent of the Jewish
families. Pictured are the hardworking
Westwood 17 Committee members. Seated,
from left, Albert Arnold, Martin Krebs, Rose
Klein and Alice Arnold. Standing, from left,
Harry Korn, Eugene Klein, Mildred EUowitz,
Edward Cohen, and Dr. Paul Ellin,
chairman.
PALM SPRINGS II honored Daniel and
Grace Kramer at their annual breakfast on
behalf of Federation/United Jewish Appeal on
Jan. 26. Pictured at the Junction, from left,
Hannah Unger, chairman; Daniel and Irace
Kramer, honorees; Sam Krupnick, award
presentor; and Morris Edelman, co-
chairman.
WATER BRIDGE, under the chairmanship
tfESLZ Spector.and c^ir^nD^d
Moger, recently held its *^,^7$g
where awards were presented to those Water
Bridge residents far their deduxUton and
aevotUm to Jewish causes J^w%*
were Lillian Goldstein, ^Q..?^'
Edna Ifshiu, Sylvux and *fJj**5
Charlotte and David Mogerand M***
Leonard Rosenblatt. Special guest speaker
was Federation vice president Daniel Cantor.
Pictured, from left, Lou Colker, a former res%r
dent of Water Bridge who is currently UJA co-
chairman in Woodmont and an honored guest;
Daniel Cantor, guest speaker; chairman Irv-
ing Spector, and co-chavrman David Moger. A
special thank you was extended to Rose
Goldberg who baked goodies for the entire
breakfast
PARADISE GARDENS SECTION 3 will hold its annual event
on behalf of the 1986 Jewish Federation/United Jewish Appeal
campaign, in the form of a cocktail party at 8 p.m. Sunday Feb.
28 at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Engelmeyer. Serving as chairman
is Irving Tannenbaum. Tannenbaum announced that Leonard
Weisinger will be the guest speaker. Being honored are Paradise
Gardens 8 UJA Committee members. Seated, from left, Irving
Tannenbaum, chairman; Janet Plotkin, Ruth Schwartz, and
Israel Resnikoff. Standing, from left, Sid Koeppel, Reuben
Smelensky, Louis Auerbach and Louis Goldberg.
CASTLE GARDENS recently held a $100 minimum wine and
cheese party on behalf of the 1986 Jewish Feieration/United
Jewish Appeal campaign. The event was highlighted by a moving
speech by guest speaker Daniel Cantor, a Federation vice presi-
dent. Violinist George Shwiller entertained. Pictured at the func-
tion, from left, Max Kronish, Castle GardensfUJA chairman;
Mildred Kronish, and Sunny Friedman, Castle Gardens Special
Gifts chairman.
Reserve the Date:
Bonaventure UJA
Supper March 9
On Sunday, March 9, the
Bonaventure Division, on behalf
of the 1986 Jewish Federa-
tion/United Jewish Appeal, will
hold a supper at the Bonaventure
Hotel. Chairman Phil and Toots
Sacks, and their Bonaventure
UJA Committee are asking that
all Bonaventure residents reserve
the date and stand up and be
counted.
"The need to raise money to
help Jews all over the world is
growing," stated Phil Sacks,
"Israel needs our backing more
than ever."
A minimum commitment of
$300 per family to the '86 Federa-
tion/U J A campaign is required to
attend the supper.
Serving on the Bonaventure
UJA Committee are: Sam and
liirrel Agid, Sylvia Blumenthal,
Murray and Victoria Chais, Mur-
ray and Gloria Chermak, Maury
and Marilyn Citron, Bebe Epstein,
Milton Field, Beulah Fine, Ber-
nard Goldberg, Harry and
Charlotte Goldstein, Harold Kauf-
man, Sheldon and Annette Kay,
Lester Kolb, Jules Krakower,
Norman Levine, Dorothy
Mellman, Saul and Charlotte
Padek, William Scheinberg, Adele
Server, Ann Shear, Milton and
Ruth Sperber, William Traubman,
Harold and Ruth Warshaw, and
David and Marion Weinberg.
For information or reserva-
tions, contact Jan Salit at the
Federation, 7*8-8400.
Pine bland Ridge
Pine Island Ridge will hold a
breakfast on behalf of the 1986
Jewish Federation/United Jewish
Appeal campaign at 10 am. Sun-
day March 2 in the Social Room of
the Clubhouse. Chairing Pine
Island Ridge' UJA Committee are
Max Bernstein, Oscar Davis, Ar-
thur Galonsky and Bernard
Greenspan. Special honoree will
be Dr. B. Greenspan. Guest
speaker will be Dr. Phillip Kanev.


Page 10 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, February 14, 1986


Project Renewal Meets Key Needs in Many
Israeli Towns Thanks to Help From U.S. Jews
By GERALD S. NAGEL
UJA Watch Desk Editor
BET SHEAN, Israel Most
visitors to this town of 14,000, 50
miles north of Jerusalem, come to
see ruins of a Roman am-
phitheater. They learn how
Philistines locally displayed the
desecrated body of the slain King
Saul. And they hear from guides
how PLO fighters used to shell
Bet Shean from Jordan, seven
miles to the east. But the Los
Angeles Jewish Community
knows that today the real story,
and main enemy, in Bet Shean is
unemployment. And, through the
United Jewish Appeal/Federa-
tion's Project Renewal campaign,
they are doing something about it.
Even when unemployment was
low nationally, just four percent
two years ago, it was high here
and in all Renewal neighborhoods.
Now that Israeli unemployment
has doubled, and will likely in-
crease, it is 16.6 percent in Bet
Shean. That means 753 workers
here have no jobs.
Los Angeles Jews could have
rested on their laurels, but didn't.
Since 1979, when Renewal began,
they met a separate $3.5 million
goal for Musrara near Jerusalem.
But they also raised $2.8 million
for Bet Shean constructing and
staffing a child development
center, providing programs for all
segments of the local population,
and beginning to build a communi-
ty center. This year they are con-
tributing $400,000, a sum in effect
matched by the Israeli govern-
ment. And they are stepping up
$5.5
their drive to reach their
million goal for Bet Shean.
Here are additional programs
they are funding to help curtail
local unemployment:
Vocational education, to
retrain workers and to convince
employers to remain in the town
Business skills, to help mom-
and-pop stores survive adverse ef-
fects of national austerity
Counseling aid, to assist
youngsters about to enter the
work force.
Additionally, L.A. businessmen
visit here often and provide ideas.
Bet Shean's population had
been declining since the late
1970*8 when the spinning mill and
other key local factories began to
close, but it has stabilized now, in-
CJF Spring Meeting April 16-20
Council of Jewish Federations
meetings will take place Thursday
through Sunday, April 16-20, at
the JW Marriott
Washington, D.C.
Hotel in
CJF Plans National Conference on
Addiction in the Jewish Community
The first National Conference
on Addiction in the Jewish Com-
munity will be held June 8-10, in
New York. Co-sponsored by CJF
and the Commission on
Synagogue Relations, Federation
of Jewish Philanthropies of New
York, it will address the problems
of alcoholism, drug addiction and
gambling from medical,
psychological and sociological
perspectives.
A recent survey conducted by
the CJF Community Planning
Deparment indicated that addic-
tion problems are present in
Jewish communities of all sizes
and in all parts of the country.
Several Federations have organiz-
ed special committees to develop
programs and services for addicts
and their families. Participants in
the Conference will represent
local Federations, Jewish Family
and Children's Agencies, Jewish
Community Centers, Jewish
Vocational Service Agencies and
Central Agencies for Jewish
Education, as well as self-help
groups and synagogues.
CJF Holds National Consultation
on Cults and Missionaries
"* N Co-sponsored by CJF, NJCRAC
and the JCRC of New York, the
first National Consultation on
Cults and Missionary Activities in
the Jewish Community was held
Dec. 15-16, 1985, in the CJF of-
fices in New York City. The Con-
sultation was initiated by CJF as a
result of a CJF survey, conducted
in September 1984, which in-
dicated that numerous Jewish
communities were aware of in-
creasing problems in these areas
and expressed a need for
assistance and resources.
Julius Bet-man, Chairman of the
Task Force on Missionaries and
Cults, JCRC, New York, served as
Chairman of the Consultation. He
offered introductory remarks, as
did Dr. Conrad L. Giles of Detroit,
Chairman of the CJF Community
Planning Committee, and Michael
Pelavin, Chairman of the
NJCRAC Task Force on Domestic
Concerns. Rabbi A. James Rudin.
Director of Interreligious Affairs,
American Jewish Committee, was
the keynote speaker. Lester
Levin, Director of the CJF Com-
munity Planning Department, and
Lvnn Markowitz, Planning Con-
FE WIST OLIM IN 1985
Only 11,298 immigrants came
to Israel in 1985, the lowest-ever
annual figure, including 2,035 im-
migrants from Ethiopia. The
previous all-time low was 1953,
when 11,826 immigrants arrived
in Israel. The 1985 figure
reflected a drop in immigration
from Rumania from 1,950 in
1984 to 1,330 last year. Western
European immigration was down,
too from 2,958 to 2,343.
siiltant, provided staff services.
The Consultation program in-
cluded a national overview,
"state-of-the-art" strategies for
prevention and counseling and
community relations and network-
ing opportunities.
A rich and full agenda is in the
making.
A number of relevant United
States national issues are likely to
be at a critical point. We will
benefit from updating discussion
and presentations. These include:
Tax revision and the
budgetary effects of Gramm Rud-
man on our agencies.
An opportunity to review our
role regarding Soviet Jewry in
light of the upcoming visit of
Secretary Gorbachev to the
United States.
A progress report on Liabili-
ty insurance, a major concern of
Federations and their agencies,
and what is being done.
Women's Division
workshops.
An exciting open forum to
discuss the recommendations
coming from the CJF Committee
on the Jewish Agency to the CJF
Board of Directors.
A meeting to discuss plann-
ing for the 1987 campaign.
Numerous other CJF Com-
mittee meetings our commit-
tees will be meeting on a broad
range of matters.
NEW JERSEY YMHA-YWHA CAMPS
> ?**
ill
AT MILFORD, PA
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stilling hope. No longer do
youngsters automatically leave to
compete for jobs in Tel Aviv, 75
miles southeast of here, as soon as
they are able to do so. Yet, pro-
blems remain.
"I am tempted to see the entire
budget spent in the jobs area,"
Ami Shmuel, Bet Shean's on-site
Renewal manager told UJA
Watch Desk. "But the elderly,
small children and others need our
help too. In the long term, we
need a competent work force and
profitable industry and services to
finance our programs. In the short
term, we need local economic
development and provision for
current social needs."
David Gill, the L.A. Federa-
tion's project Renewal Chairman,
said, "We've helped a lot, but
we're not finished yet."
Bet Shean is just one Renewal
success story in progress. Neve
Israel and Shaviv, Herzylia, are
others. Jews have provided $5.2
million toward an $8 million goal,
through the Combined Jewish
Philanthropies of Greater Boston.
Facilities and services have im-
proved and the neighborhoods'
population flow to Tel Aviv has
ended.
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And in Gil Amal and Giora, in-
land from Herzylia, the talk of the
town is education mainly im-
provements fostered by the part-
nership with Palm Beach County
and South Broward, Florida
Federations. "The rate of student
retention in high schools has in-
creased dramatically," said H. Ir-
win Levy, Renewal Chairman for
Palm Beach County. In addition,
he said:
"In 1979, 30 percent of
elementary school pupils read at
grade level; today 54 percent do.
"In 1979, 23 percent of first
graders did well in a psychomotor,
test, of motor action directly pro-
ceeding from mental activity; to-
day 60 percent do.
"Then, ten high school
graduates a year enrolled in a
university; now, 60 a year do.
"and we are determined to do
even better," Mr. Levy said.
"Such successes have encourag-
ed National UJA to increase its
help to Federation Renewal Cam-
paigns," said Sherman of Detroit,
UJA National Chairman for Pro-
ject Renewal. "But the Renewal
Campaign is not finished. We
must fulfill our promise to rebuild
the 56 neighborhoods currently
twinned to U.S. communities and
others yet to be twinned.
The Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale 's Project
Renewal city is Kfar Saba. Alvera
A. Gold serves as both chairperson
for Federation's Project Renewal
and the Florida Regional UJA.
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Friday, February 14, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 11
i a^^ 5*
^^ eflhT
Members of the Great Jewish Books Discus-
sion Group organized by the JCC and CAJE
are shown at their monthly session, with co-
leaders, Dr. Abe Gittelson, CAJE Director of
Education, left, standing, and Laura
Hochman, JCC Adult Programming Director,
right. Next to Gittelson is Helen Weisberg,
North Broward Midrasha Adult Education
administrator.
Jewish Books Reveal Jewish History
Understanding the saga of
modem Jewish history through
novels and short stories is the
theme of the Great Jewish Books
Discussion Group that meets mon-
thly under the aegis of the Jewish
Community Center and the Cen-
tral Agency for Jewish Education.
Led by Laura Hochman, JCC
Adult Programming Director, and
Dr. Abraham J. Gittelson, Federa-
tion Director of Education, the
group of 20 participants analyze
major Jewish writings that reflect
the turbulent period of the last
two hundred years of Jewish
history.
First book to be discussed was
"The Slave," by Nobel laureate
Isaac Bashevis Singer. The set-
ting of the book is 17th century
Poland where the Jews sought to
preserve their heritage in a world
of paganism, superstition and
virulent hatred.
The short stories of Shalom
Aleichem, Isaac Leib Peretz and
Shalom Asch, giants of Yiddish
literature, were chosen as
representing the transition period
in Eastern Europe when Judaism
encountered the values and mores
of Western culture.
The immigrant experience in
America, with all its struggles,
was represented by "Call It
Sleep," by Henry Roth, con-
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^ffl | find cool surroundings and warm receptions everywhere
ft you turn.
wl And it you plan to make your summer rcscrva
i\ lions now. yixi can plan to take advantage of our special
J I Extended Stay Rates At that rate, you'll en| Fallsview activities even more.
There's indoor and outdoor tennis and swimming, a Robert Trent
Jones golf course, racquetball, boating and so much more There's even
a two meals a day plan to let vou pack in more excitement than ever
So this summer, come to where the atmosphere is as inviting as the
weather. The Fallsview.
sidered to be one of the finest ex-
pressions of Jewish American life
in the early 20th Century.
The torment and anguish of the
Holocaust and its effect not only
on those who survived but their
children as well the themes of
"The Fifth Son," by the eminent
author, Elie Wiesel.
The forthcoming session on
March 6 will concentrate on the
book, "My Name is Asher Lev,"
by Chaim Potek, who highlights
the conflict between the values of
traditional Jewish life and the at-
traction of the world of art for a
gifted young artist.
The final two books will be "Ex-
odus," by Leon Uris, relating the
miracle of the establishment of
the state of Israel, and "Orphan in
History," by Paul Cowan, describ-
ing the spiritual oddysey of an
assimilated Jew who returns to a
traditional form of Jewish life.
The group is modeled after the
Great Books Discussion groups, in
that each member is required to
read the book prior to each ses-
sion, and be ready to analyze it
from literary, psychological and
cultural viewpoints. Each book is
seen in its historical setting with
special focus as to how the story
reflects the great movements and
ideas of Jewish life in the past two
centuries. In each session the
discussion is animated and con-
troversial, as each member brings
to the group not only the message
of the book, but his/her own life
experiences as well.
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Page 12 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, February 14, 1986
Community Calendar
Compiled by Lori Ginsberg,
Federation 748-8400.
FRIDAY FEB. 14
ORT-Lauderdale West Chapter:
Noon. Round robin card party and
luncheon. Cost $3. Plantation
Community Center, 5555 Palm
Tree Rd. 473-6338.
Temple Beth Orr-Sisterhood: 8
p.m. Sisterhood Sabbath. At
Temple.
ORT-Northwest Broward
Chapter 11:30 a.m. Mother-to-
Another luncheon. Stuart and
Sebastian will entertain. Holiday
Inn, 1950 Glades Rd., Boca Raton.
Temple Emanu-EI: 8:15 UAHC
speaker. At Temple.
SATURDAY FEB. 15
Bnai Zion-Harry Matinaky Sim-
cha Chapter: 8 p.m. Singles dance
and social. Music by Mini and Ray.
Donation 50 cents. Hallandale
Jewish Center, 416 NE 8 Ave.
741-1136 or 923-8670.
Sunrise Lakes Condo Associa-
tion Phase I: 7:30 p.m. Body and
Soul Dance Co. Donation $4.
Playhouse. 8100 Sunrise Lakes
Dr. N. 742-5150.
Temple Beth Torah-Men's Club:
Show. Tickets $5, $4. At Temple,
721-7660.
Israel Bonds-N. and S. New
Leadership: 9 p.m. Coffee and
dessert night. Sol Robinson will
speak. 962-4001.
Oakbrook Village Condo: 7:30
p.m. Jack Carter and Candi Scott
will perform. Tickets $5.
Clubhouse, 8200 SW 24 St.
722-0410.
Sunrise Jewish Center-Men's
Club: 8 p.m. Show featuring Mac
Robbin8 Kanner-Wheatley and
Bobby Carroll. Donation $5, $4.
Sunrise Jewish Center, 4099 Pine
Island Rd., Sunrise. 741-0295.
Lauderdale Oaks: 8:30 .pm. The
Jerry Grant Broadway Hall of
Fame Show. Clubhouse, 3060 NW
47 Terr. 733-9338 or 731-7874.
SUNDAY FEB. 16
Temple Emanu-El-Men's Club:
Breakfast. At Temple.
Temple Beth Am: 8 p.m. Fourth
Annual Cantorial Concert featur-
ing Irving Grossman, Saul Ham-
merman and Elaine Shapiro.
Tickets $5, $6 and $8. At Temple.
Odd Fellows and Rebekahs
Social Club: 1 p.m. Meeting. Odd
Fellow Temple, 1451 N. Dixie
Hwy. 974-5946.
MONDAY FEB. 17
B'nai B'nth-Sunrise Lodge: 7:30
p.m. Meeting. Whiting Hall,
Sunrise.
Hadassah-Ariva Chapter: Noon.
Mini-lunch and meeting. Oakland
Estates Social Hall.
B'nai Zion-Southeast Region:
7:30 p.m. Executive Board
meeting. Shirley and Bill Weitz
will speak about their trip to
Israel. Sunrise Savings, 1110 E.
Hallandale Bch. Blvd. 456-1999.
Brandeis University NWC-West
Broward Chapter: Second An-
nual Book Sale. Coral Springs
Mall. 971-5565.
Hadassah-Bat Ami Tamarac
Chapter: 9:30 a.m. Board
meeting. Tamarac Jewish Center,
9101 NW 57 St.
WLI-Hatikvah Chapter: 11:30
a.m. Meeting and mini-lunch and
white elephant sale. Whiting Hall,
6767 NW 24 St.
Brandeis University NWC-
Inverrary Woodlands Chapter:
11:30 a.m. Luncheon honoring life
members and library benefactors.
Sarah Filner will entertain. Reser-
vations $10. Inverrary Country
Club. 731-4143.
TUESDAY FEB. 18
Temple Emanu-EI: Sisterhood
meeting. At Temple.
NCJW-Plantation Section: 7:30
Organizations
AMIT
Amit Women has accomplished
much in its 60 years of growth,
over 20 facilities including youth
villages, junior and senior high
schools, a junior college for prac-
tical engineering, community
centers (for young and old) and a
Beit Hayeled live-in facility in
Gilo, Jerusalem. Amit Women
supports over 20,000 orphaned
and needy children, including hun-
dreds of Ethiopian children
recently airlifted to Israel.
Amit Women has many
chapters in Dade, Broward and
Palm Beach Counties who enjoy
and perform Mitzvahs. You too
may join Amit Women today and
help an Israeli youngster.
For further information, please
call Ida Sussman or Jeanne
Finkelstein at the Florida Council
office of Amit Women, 651-1444.
KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS
Knights of Pythias. Coral Spr-
ings Lodge No. 215 is having a
membership drive. This non-profit
fraternal group is seeking can-
didates who have never been
associated with the Knights of
Pythias, former members who
desire to be reinstated, dual
members who live in Florida now
and those who wish to transfer
membership. Please call Nathan
Schweitzer at 753-9272 or
Howard Friedman at 752-7167.
p.m. Lecture on "Mysticism."
Sunrise Savings.
Jewish Book Review Series:
1-2:30 p.m. Review of "Davita's
Harp." Tamarac Branch.
ORT-Lauderdale West Chapter:
10 a.m. Bus trip to library to hear
book review followed by lunch at
Swiss Chalet. Cost $12.50.
472-6332.
WLI-Coconut Creek Chapter:
9:30 a.m. Meeting. Coconut Creek
Comm. Center, 900 NW 43 Ave.
972-0239. State Reps. Peter
Deutsch and Roger Sheffey will
speak.
B'nai B'rith Women-Lauderhill
Chapter; Noon. Meeting. Rabbi
Albert Schwartz will speak. Cas-
tle Rec. Center, 4780 NW 22 Ct.
Hadassah-L'Chayim Plantation
Chapter: Noon. Lunch and
meeting. Deicke Aud., 5701
Cypress Rd., Plantation.
473-5379.
WEDNESDAY FEB. 19
Jewish Book Review Series:
1-2:30 p.m. Review of "Davita's
Harp." Coral Springs Branch.
Brandeis University NWC-West
Broward Chapter: Card party
and luncheon. Deicke Aud., 5701
Cypress Rd., Plantation. 741-6717
or 741-0572.
Hadassah-Oriole Scopus
Chapter: Noon. Meeting. Har-
monitones will entertain. Cong.
Beth Hillel, 7638 Margate Blvd.
Hadaasah-Gilah Inverrary
Chapter: 12:30 p.m. Education
Day by Minerva Kaplan. Inver-
rary Country Club, 3840 Inver-
rary Blvd.
B'nai B'rith-Lauderdale Lakes
Lodge: 7:30 p.m. Meeting. Laud.
Lakes City Hall, 4300 NW 36 St.
484-9326.
Temple Ohel Bnai Raphael-
Sisterhood: Noon. Meeting. Ed
Sanders will entertain. At
Temole.
Sunrise Jewish Center-
Sisterhood: Noon. Meeting.
Sarah Filner will present a bio of
Kathryn Hepburn. At Temple.
THURSDAY FEB. 20
Jewish Book Review Series:
2-3:30 p.m. Review of "Davita's
Harp." Deerfield Beach Library.
Hadaseah-Ilana Chapter: 12:30
p.m. Anne Ackerman will present
a book review. Laud. Lakes City
Hall.
Na'amat USASimcha Chapter
of Sunrise: 11 a.m. Meeting and
mini-lunch. Whiting Hall, 6767
NW 24 St., Sunrise. 742-9988.
Jewish War Veterans and
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lovely accommodations featuring color
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Olympic size swimming pool Tea room
2 fully conducted Seder services by well-
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Ladies Aux. 266: 7:30 p.m.
Meeting. Temple Beth Israel,
D.B. Election of officers.
Independent Order of Odd
Fellows-Hatehee Lodge: 8 p.m.
Meeting. Odd Fellow Temple,
1451 N. Dixie Hwy. 974-5946.
ARMDI-Col. David Marcos
Chapter: 11 a.m. Meeting and
mini-lunch. Sunrise Lakes Phase I
Playhouse.
Hadaasah-Blyma Margate
Chapter: Noon. Meeting. Ira
Popolsky will speak on Youth
Aliyah. Cong. Beth Hillel, 7638
Margate Blvd. 974-9599 or
974-7612.
Skerwin H. ReaaaoUia, Executive
Director
JEWISH FAMILY SERVICE OF BROWARD COUNTY
WE ARE PRODUCTS OF
HABIT AND OFTEN
UNAWARE
We are products of habit
and often unaware;
until death of a spouse
Ushers in a nightmare.
The beginning is the hardest,
Half ourselves we feel is gone
The hurt begins to escalate
And we begin to mourn.
Upon the death there is support
And people show they care,
But as the time begins to pass
It vanishes in thin air.
Its' not that people are hard or
cruel
or are not considerate of you,
It's a matter of their own lives
And their own problems too!
Death as well, is hard to face,
Its our society's taboo.
People can avoid the pain
by distancing from you.
Overnight, your status has
changed
Self-esteem has begun to erode,
You've entered role of anomie
and you're now labelled
"widowed."
This is a time of emotional crisis
A myriad of feelings prevail
Your mind reacts with many
defenses
But most are doomed to fail.
Loneliness is hard to handle
The shadow of despair creeps in
Appetite and energy wane
and feelings of depression begin.
Further aspects of a loss
keep the bereaved in pain
Entering a dark and noiseless
home
repeat the terrible strain.
People who you felt you knew
those you thought were friends,
Slip beyond your quiet life,
And with it friendship ends.
Dreams are dreamt of a beautiful
past,
now beyond your reach,
What has happened to you
recently
No mortal could even teach.
There can be life beyond your loss
Although never the same.
The love you feel for your spouse
However will always remain.
By Dr. Clifford Golden, ED
If you need help getting
through a difficult change or loss
in your life, we can help. Jewish
Family Service group for qualified
counselors: Please call at our
Hollywood Office 966-0956, Fort
Lauderdale office 749-1505, or
Deerfield Beach office, 427-8508.
Jewish Family Services is a
beneficiary agency of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale, the United Way and
Jewish Federation of South
Broward County.
Mission Department
The Israel Mission Depart-
ment has relocated from Tel Aviv
to Jerusalem, and is now situated
within the new UJA offices. The
move is expected to greatly
facilitate mission programming in
Israel.
The UJA is increasingly becom-
ing an important factor in Israel's
tourist industry. Last year, some
6,000 Americans visited Israel
under the auspices of the UJA. In
1986, the goal is to bring 10,000
mission participants and in-
dividual visitors to Israel and ex-
pose them to UJA funded pro-
grams, including projects and in-
stitutions sponsored by the Jewish
Agency and JDC.
OPEN HEART SURGERY
HOLLYWOOD HEART SURGERY
Bypass Surgery, Valve Surgery, Pacemakers
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Medicare Participating Memorial
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(JV THE RESORT WITH A PERSONALITY
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1
ommentary
Friday, February 14, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 13
THE JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE
6501 W. Sunrise Blvd.
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33313 792-6700
By Muriel Haskell. Director of Public Relations
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION AND FEES CONCERN-
ING THE EVENTS OR PROGRAMS LISTED PLEASE CALL
THE CENTER.
SEE
THE YOUNGEST AGE
PARTICIPANTS FEB. 23
JCC's Early Childhood Depart-
ment is scheduling a Family Pic-
nic during Jewish Community
Connection Day Sunday, Feb. 23.
Visitors can observe teachers,
pupils, parents and siblings all
getting together to enjoy Bar-B-
Que-Pony Rides Surprise and
good times!
THE ROBERT KLEIN-
LAINE KAZAN SHOW
IT'S A BENEFIT
APRILS
What is the JCC Scholarship
Fund? Who benefits?
The JCC files contain dozens of
heartbreak and hard luck
situatioons .. such as the young
mother working part time and go-
ing to school at night. She's am-
bitious. She wants to learn a
special skill and be qualified for a
better job. Why? She has three
young children. The husband and
father of the house has disap-
peared. How can she send her
oldest to camp? He's so anxious to
go! But there's no way ... JCC
Scholarship made the way.
There are many additional
stories of people in every age
group who need help ...
JCC WOULD LIKE TO
PROVIDE FOR EVERYONE
Helping all who apply is the goal
of JCC's Scholarship Fund Com-
mittee. That is why it is so impor-
tant to support the major JCC
Fund Raiser this spring by rais-
ing additional funds through the
Robert Klein/Laine Kazan Show
at the Sunrise Musical Theater,
April 6 at 8 p.m. Be a Sponsor for
the best seats and a sumptuous
champagne reception after the
show, with Lainie there to greet
you. Be a Patron for the next set
of choice seats plus the reception.
Or just come and enjoy the show!
JCC office has the details. Please
call.
HOW'S LEBROWSE
"Growing Nicely, thank you,"
says Hildreth Levin, the shop's
present chairperson. JCC's
LeBrowse, the Thrift Shop at
4814 N. State Rd. 7, specializing
in "gently used" furniture, ac-
cessories and clothing, provides
major support for the JCC.
ALMOST
SEVEN YEARS OLD
"When the store was establish-
ed we started with four store
fronts and 5,000 square feet of
space," says Levin. "Now we've
taken two more store fronts and
have a total square footage of over
11,000 square feet. Now we have
the advantage of displaying our
furniture just like a department
store!"
Helene Soref and Selma Streng,
long time active LeBrowse Com-
mittee Members, say that the suc-
cess of the shop has depended
upon the valuable contribution of
time and effort by the shop's
devoted corps of volunteers. The
LeBrowse professionals, as well
as LeBrowse Committee
Members, are very grateful for
the help the volunteers offer to
mark, sort, display or sell all the
furniture, clothing, antiques and
bric-a-brac the shop stocks.
"Come and visit," they say and
think about giving LeBrowse
anything "gently used" and
saleable." The shop's phone
number is 735-6050.
COMING UP VERY SOON
For kids of every age! "The
Sorcerers Apprentice" at Planta-
tion High Sunday, Feb. 16 at 2
p.m. A marvelous show featuring
Marshall Izen himself as the
Sorcerer and great big paper bag
puppets. Second in JCC's "Once
Upon A Time" Theatre Series,
Next one "Dinosaur Rock"
Thursday, March 27 during Spr-
ing Break. Tickets at the JCC.
CULTIVATING
CULT-EVADING
Tuesday, Feb. 18, 8 p.m. at the
JCC.
Parents! Teens! Everyone is in-
vited to hear noted authority Dr.
Sandy Andron talk about the
dangers of cults and how impres-
sionable teenagers can avoid the
temptations they offer!
Rescheduled from the fall
because of Hurricane Kate.
The JCC is a major beneficiary
agency of the Jewish Federation of
SPRING WATER
- 3500 YEARS PURE!
Geologists report that the pure and
delicious spring water emerging from the
Mountain Valley Spring today in Hot
Springs, Ark., first entered the ground as
rain about 3500 years ago. Salt free.
Moderately hard. Delivered to your home
or office.
Dade Broward
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TOURtothe
GREAT AMERICAN WEST
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t Y0SEMITE CARLSBAD CAVERNS MUCH MUCH MORE
* Teenagers 13 to 18 years of age ere eligible
* Supervision provided by experienced counselors
* Package Includes all transportation, lodging, entertainment,
eals^ttefcaa^eansi anH All mAaalft
* Departs Ft. Lauderdale, June 21, 1986 and Returns July 25.
* Accommodations In Rustic Lodges, Modern Motets.
Mountain Cabins, and College Campuses.
Cai\ lor Free Brochure and More Information
HOURS. Inc. 782-1777
a\\\*\
CstCsHd
JCC Le Browse Thrift Shop specializes in quality furniture for
the buyer on a budget! Pictured are just three dining sets of the
many modern and traditional ones on display, along with a fine
selection of lamps, china and bric-a-brac. The shop located at US1U
No. State Rd. 7, is open Mon-thru Fri. 10-U, closed Sat. Open Sun.
10-t. Both donors of "gently used'' furniture and buyers welcome!
Greater Fort Lauderdale, receiv-
ing funds from the annual United
Jewish appeal campaign.
qteat (jiffts!
Great Gifts! Offers timeless
Judaic symbols fashioned Into
fine quality pendents.
tactroplate
Matching chains
tncludad
OmboMd
Shown actual
TforMi."
9." each
Reuben Strashinsky, (far right) President of the North Broward
Council ofB'nai B'rtth presents a generous contribution in the
form of a check to the Jewish Community Center's WECARE
Volunteer Services Dept. Accepting (from the left) are Phil Cof-
man, JCC Executive Director; AUyn Kanowsky, WECARE-
Director; Ruth, Horowitz, WECARE Chairperson; and Anita
Perlman, a JCC Founder and Past Pretid"*
-
For A Minimum Of Only $2,000
AN ISRAEL BOND FOR YOUR I.R.A.
With An Attractive
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If you are one of 37 million Americans who places $2,000
annually in your Individual Retirement Account, your IRA
investment can now help to strengthen Israel's economy and
at the same time give you an attractive annual return.
You can now purchase an Israel Bond of the Individual Varia-
ble Rate Issue (IVRI) for your IRA for a minimum of only
$2,000, or integral multiples of $2,000.
This Israel Bond offers an attractive interest ratea minimum
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Your investment in an IVRI Bond for your IRA works for you
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This is not an offering. For additional information and a pros-
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STATE OF ISRAEL BONDS
Development Corporation for Israel
8358 W. Oakland Park Blvd.
Ft Lauderdale, Fla. 33321
(305)748-8301
Thru Marcr^ 2" 1986

^zz:
i


1 .
-
Page 14 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, February 14, 1986
Mitzvahs
Mobile Gymnist Hopes to Add
to His Impressive Credentials
Harr
Fishbein
Meisel
Finkelatein
TEMPLE BETH AM
The Bar Mitzvah of Michael
Moakowitz, son of Barbara and
Ted Moskowitz, will be celebrated
at the Saturday morning Feb. 15
service at Temple Beth Am,
Margate.
TEMPLE KOL AMI
Elizabeth Harr, daughter of
Rabbi Sheldon and Fern Harr,
celebrated her Bat Mitzvah at the
Saturday morning Feb. 8 service
at Temple Kol Ami, Plantation.
TEMPLE BETH ORR
The Bar Mitzvah of Brian
Fiachler, son of Barbara and Nick
Fischler, will be celebrated at the
Saturday morning Feb. 15 service
at Temple Beth Orr, Coral
Springs.
TEMPLE BETH TORAH
At the Friday night Feb. 14 ser-
vice, Helene Kroger, daughter of
Candy Kaplan and Allan Kruger,
will celebrate her Bat Mitzvah.
The following day, the Bar Mitz-
vah of Adam Klein, son of Ande
and Neil Klein, will be celebrated
at Beth Torah, Tamarac.
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL
Andy Fishbein, son of Joan
Fishbein, celebrated his Bar Mitz-
vah on Saturday Feb. 8 at Temple
Beth Israel, Sunrise.
Adrianne Meiael, daughter of
Fyllis and Stuart Meisel, will
become a Bat Mitzvah celebrant
at the Friday Feb. 14 service at
Temple Beth Israel.
Ben Finkelatein, son of Iris and
Leo Finkelstein, will be called to
the Torah in honor of his Bar Mitz-
vah at the Saturday morning Feb.
15 service at Beth Israel.
Editor's Note: Brian Ginsberg,
grandson of Mr. and Mrs. Sam
Diemar of Plantation, will be na-
tionally televised at the America's
Cup Gymnastic meet, March 2-3,
in Washington, D.C. The United
States is rating Brian as their
number two man on the Olympic
gymnastic team.
By ROBERT ASHBROOK
Press Register Reporter
Mobile's Brian Ginsberg, a
member of the University of
California at Los Angeles Gym-
nastics Team, will be competing in
a couple of major tournaments on
an individual basis in the coming
months.
He has been selected to par-
ticipate in the Baton Rouge (La.)
Mardi Gras Invitational Gym-
nastics Meet on Feb. 8.
Ginsberg will then represent the
United States in the America's
Cup Gymnastic Meet on March 2-3
in Washington, D.C. Only the top
three ranked male and female
gymnasts in the nation will com-
pete in the meet, which has
athletes from 22 countries vying
for individual and team trophies.
He will also be competing for
UCLA in the coming months,
because the Bruins season does
not end until the NCAA cham-
pionships in April.
GINSBERG FINISHED sixth
A Diversified
Jewish Quiz
-ir
By RABBI
DAVID W. GORDON
1- What is the Biblical saying
often quoted in introductions by
authors from the Book of Ec-
clesiastes (Kohelet)?
2- Who is known as the Father
of Reform Judaism in the U.S.?
3- What is a "met" Mitzvah?
4- What are "Arba Kanfot"?
5- When and where did Baruch
Spinoza live?
6- What is a "Melammed"?
\ 7- What prayer is recited for the
recovery of one who is acutely ill?
8- By what name is the Greek
translation of the bible
designated?
9- The Reader of the Torah is
called "Baal Kriah" or "Baal
Koreh (Master of the Reading).
Which is correct?
10- Who were the Marranos?
Answer*
1- "Of making many books
there is no end."
2- Rabbi Isaac Mayer Wise.
3- The bringing to burial of a
friendless corpse is an obligation
as well as an important religious
duty.
4-Four cornered ritual
garments worn over the chest of
pious Jews. Is a shortened form of
the Tallit or Tallit Katan (small).
5- During the seventeenth cen-
tury in Amsterdam.
6- A Hebrew teacher of young
children.
7- A "Mee Sheberach" (May He
be blessed).
8- Septuagint (meaning seven-
ty) scholars who translated the
Hebrew into Greek in Alexandria.
9- Both.
10- Secret Jews who observed
Judaism in Spain while outwardly
appearing to be non-Jews.
?
v?
WILSON'S RETIREMENT
CENTER
Located In a Quiat Area
FEATURING:
Spcl. Prepared Gourmet Meals
Special Diets
Medical Supervision 24 Hours A Day
Administration of Medication by R.N.
Structured Activities and Planned Outings
Laundry and Maid San/lea
Personal Service Transportation
Private and Semi-Private Accommodations
Wilson's R.C. provides a social and cultural
environment with security, comfort and
professional care. New residents are made
to feel at home right away.
All the comforts of Retirement Living provided
by professionals.
2233 N.W. 56th Avenue
Lauderhlll, FL 33313
(305)733-9614
all-around in the Brussels Interna-
tional Cup competition, which was
held Dec. 14-15, in Brussels,
Belgium. He qualified for the
finals in four events, where he
placed fourth in the floor exercise,
high bars and pommel horse.
The Brussels International cup
had the top gymnasts in Europe
and Asia competing against
athletes from other parts of the
world.
Ginsberg is the son of Dr. and
Mrs. Nathan J. Ginsberg of 5605
North Regency Oaks Drive in
Mobile.
Ginsberg's father, who is a
radiologist, said he and his wife
(Iris) are proud of Brian, who in
the last year has moved up from
12th to second in the national
gymnastic rankings, and that
their son could be competing for
the United States in the 1988
Olympic Games at Seoul, Korea.
"We are really proud of Brian,"
Ginsberg said. "Hopefully, if he
With Rhyme
and Reason
Brief Encounter
It's hard for us to realize
We're here for just a while,
And so we waste our precious
time,
And chapels stay in style...
From day to day we never know
Just when the journey ends.
Of this we are reminded when
We mourn departed friends.
Too late, in retrospect, we find
Omissions we deplore:
A ready smile, benevolence
We should have shown before.
Too late we try to compensate
For what we failed to share.
We wish we had the chance again
To show how much we care ...
We seem to live such random
lives;
Indifference, our big crime.
Oh, would that we could make the
best
Of our allotted time!
JACK GOULD
r+*\
Candlelighting Times
Feb. 14 5:55 p.m.
Feb. 21 6:00 p.m.
Feb. 28 6:04 p.m.
Mar. 7 6:07 p.m.
Mar. 14 6:11 p.m.
doesn't get hurt he'll be able to
compete in the 1988 Olympics. At
least that is what everybody says
he is capable of doing.
"IN THE last year," he con-
tinued, "Brian has moved up from
12th to second in the men's na-
tional gymnastic ratings."
The elder Ginsberg then said
Brian's accomplishments in gym-
nastics are no real surprise to him
or his wife.
"Before we moved here from
Colorado, where I was doing my
residence work, the coach, who
worked with Brian in Denver, told
me he had the potential to make it
to the Olympics in gymnastics,"
Ginsberg said.
During his stay in Mobile, Brian
Ginsberg attended St. Paul's
Episcopal School and worked
under Coach Guy Weaver at the
University of South Alabama in a
program that used equipment
donated by the YMCA.
CONSERVATIVE
CONSERVATIVE SYNAGOGUE OF COCONUT CREEK, meets Broward
Federal Savings, Lyons Road and Coconut Creek Parkway, Coconut Creek. Ser-
vices: Friday at 8 p.m. and Saturday at 9 am. Rabbi Josish Darby.
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER (721-7660)..9101 NW 67th St, Tamarac, 33321.
Services: Sunday through Friday 8:30 am., 5 p.m. Late Friday service 8 p.m. Satur-
day 8:45 am. Rabbi Kart F. Stoae. Anxiliary Rabbi Natbaa Zoloadek. Cantor P.
Ml
TEMPLE BETH AM (974-8660), 7206 Royal Palm Blvd., Margate, 33063. Services:
hloodsy through Friday 8:80 am., 5p.m. Friday late service 8 p.m.; Saturday 9s. m..
5 p.m.; Sunday S am.. 5 p.m. Rabbi Paal Ptotkia. Rabbi Eateiitas. Or. Bolssasa
Geld. Caator Irving Groeaaua.
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL (742-4040), 7100 W. Oakland Park Blvd., Sunrise. 38318.
Services: Monday through Thursday 8 am., 6JO p.m.; Friday 8 a.m., 5 p.m., 8 p.m.;
Saturday 5:30 p.m.; Sunday 9 am., 6:30 p.m. Rabbi Albert N. Troy. Caator
MaarieeNoa.
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL OP DEERF1ELD BEACH (421-7060), 200 8. Century
Blvd., Deerfield Beach, 88441. Servieos: Sunday through Friday 8:30 am., 5 p.m.
Friday late service 8 p.m.; Saturday 8:45 a-m., and at cairitotightmg time. Rabbi
TEMPLE BNAI M08HB (942-6880), 1484 SB 3rd St, Pompano Beach, 33060.
Servieee: Fridsy 8 p.m. Caator Jehadaa Heilbraaa.
TEMPLE SHA'ARAY TZEDEE 741-0296), 4099 Pine Island Rd., Sunrise. 88821.
Services: Sunday through Friday 8 am., 6 p.m.; Late Friday service 8 p.m.; Satur-
day 8:46 am.. 6:30 p.m. Caator Jack Marcaant.
TEMPLE SHOLOM (9424410), 132 SB 11 Are.. Pompano Beach. 38060. Services:
Monday through Friday 8:46 am., evenings: Monday through Thursday at 6 p.m.,
Friday evening at 8. Saturday and Sunday 9 am. Rabbi Samel April. Caator
ResaddGranar.
CONGREGATION BETH HILLEL OP MARGATE (974-3090), 7640 Margate
Blvd., Margate, 88063. Servieee: Sunday through Friday 8:15 am., 6:30 p.m. Late
Friday service 8 p.m. Saturday 8:46 am., 5:80 p.m. Caator Joel Cokes.
HEBREW CONGREGATION OF LAUDERHILL (738-9660), 2048 NW 49th Ave.,
Lauderhill, 38813. Bankes; Sunday through Friday 8.30 am., 5:30 p.m.; Saturday
8:46 am. Rabbi Israel Hah era.
NORTH LAUDERDALE HEBREW CONGREGATION (722-7607 or 722-2722).
Servieee! at Baayon Lakes Coado Clubhouse, 6050 Bailey Rd., Tamarac, Friday at 6
p.m., Saturday 8:45 am. Charles B. Frier. President.
ORTHODOX
TEMPLE OHEL B'NAI RAPHAEL (733-7684), 4861 W. Oakland Park Blvd..
Lauderdale Lakes, 33813. Services: Sunday through Thursday 8 am., 5 p.m., Friday
8 am., 5 p.m., Saturday 8:46 am., 5 p.m. Caator Paal Stucrt.
SYNAGOGUE OF INVERRARY CHABAD (748-1777), 4661 N. University Dr.,
Lauderhill. Services: Sunday through Friday 6:46 a.m, 8 anv, 5:15 p.m., Saturday 9
am., 5:30 p.m. Stady grease: Maa, Baa days feUewiag services; Wossea,
>8 p.m. Rabbi Area Lieberssaa.
YOUNG ISRAEL OF DEERFIELD BEACH (421-1367), 1880 W. Hillaboro Blvd.,
Deerfield Beach. 88441. Builsas. Sunday through Friday 8 am. and sundown.
Saturday 8:46 am. and sundown.
YOUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOODFORT LAUDERDALE (966-7877), 3291
Stirling Rd., Fort Lauderdale, 33312. Servieee: Monday through Fridsy 7:30 am.,
and sundown; Saturday, 9 am., sundown; Sunday 8 am., sundown. Rabbi Edward
Ma
CONGREGATION MIDGAL DAVID 726-8888), 8676 W. McNab Rd., Tamarac,
33321. Services: Dairy 8 am.; mincha 6 p.m.; Saturday 8:45 am. and 5:16 p.m. Rab>
bi Caaba Bihaiieir. Caagrsgatieai iriilliat: Horasaa Fleischer.
RECONSTRUCTIONIST
RAMAT SHALOM (472-3600), 11301 W. Broward Blvd.. Plantation. 38326.
vices: Friday. 8:15 p.m.; Saturday. 10 am. Rabbi Elliot SkiddeU. Caator Bella
REFORM
TEMPLE BETH ORR (763-3232), 2161 Riverside Dr., Coral Springs, 88066. Ser-
vieee: Friday 8 p.m.; Saturday 10 am. Rabbi JerreU M. Levy. Caator Naacy
TEMPLE BNAI SHALOM OF DEERFIELD BEACH (426-2682). Servieee at'
Menorah Chapels. 2806 W. Hiuaboro Blvd., Deerfield Beach, 33441, Friday 8 p.m.
Rabbi Natbaa H. Flak. Caator Morris Leviaeea.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL (731-2810), 3246 W. Oakland Park Blvd.. Laudardale Lakes,
38311. Sairkaa. Friday 8:15 p.m.; Saturday, only on holidays or celebration of Bar-
Bat Mitsvah. Rabbi Jeffrey Bailee. Caator Rita Shore.
TEMPLE EOL AMI (472-1988). 8200 Peters Rd., Plantation, 38824. SaMkoei Fri-
day 8:15 p.m.. Saturday 10:30 am. Rabbi Bhilaia J. Harr. Caator Geae Carbarn.
LIBERAL JEWISH TEMPLE OF COCONUT CBEEE (978-7494). Ssrvieeei Fri-
day night services twice monthly at Calvary Presbyterian Church, 8960 Coconut
Creek Parkway. Rabbi Brace S. Warsbal. Cantor Barbara Roberto.
TEMPLE BAT YAM (661-6808). McGaw Hall. 1400 N. Federal Hwy. (adjacent to
Second Presbyterian Church), Ft Lauderdale, 38304. Service: Weekly on Friday
evenings at 8 p.m. Caator Richard Brown.


-.....
Friday, February 14, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 15
Leonard Farber to Head
NCCJ Brotherhood Dinner
Leonard L. Farber, Chairman
(of the Board of Leonard L.
Farber, Inc. will chair the 1986
Broward NCCJ Brotherhood
Awards Dinner, which will be held
Saturday, March 1 at the Omni
Hotel in Miami. Farber, active in
numerous Jewish organizations, is
a member of the Jewish Federa-
tion Board of Directors. Vice
chairmen of the dinner-dance will
be Gerald Mager, partner in the
law firm of Abrams, Anton, Rob-
bins, Resnick, Schneider and
Mager, Hollywood; Gene A. Whid-
don, president, Causeway Lumber
Company, Fort Lauderdale and
David A. Wollard, president, The
First Bankers, N.A. in Pompano
Beach.
The dinner dance, which will br-
ing together 1000 business and
J community leaders from Broward
Jp and Dade Counties, is the one-
time-only fund-raising event of
the non-sectarian human relations
organization, which carries out
educational programming to bring
ibout better intergroup and inter-
religious understanding in the
community.
Buses will be available, at no
cost, to take Broward guests to
the dinner.
Leonard Farber
For more information, please
call the Broward NCCJ office at
749-4454.
LUCILLE STANG AND LOE
BAER, co-chairpersons, an-
nounce that Hawaiian
Gardens VII will honor Bella
and Martin Klarman Wednes-
day evening, Feb. 26, 8 p.m. in
the recreation Room. For their
dedication to all Jewish com-
munal causes, they will be
presented with the coveted
Israel Bond Scroll of Honor.
. Sol Robinson, author and
Daniel Cantor Appointed ^^ ex^ m ^ MiMU
Chairman of the Am- E(Ut> ,& be the featured
bassadoe s Society of ^ Hawaiian Gardms
Trustees for State of Israel VII Israel Bonds Committee
Bonds North vro*** sponsoring the event.
Campaign
is
Heritage:
Chronicled on Channel 17
The origin and evolution of attitudes and practices that have
become the heritage of Jewish men and women are investigated
in the series "Heritage: Civilization and the Jews," which was
filmed and researched over the span of four years in more than 18
nations on four continents. "Heritage: Civilization and the Jews,"
airing on WLRN/Channel 17 Mondays at 10 p.m., is hosted and
narrated by Abba Eban. Art and artifacts, historical sites and
primary literary sources are used to tell this compelling story.
WLRN/Channel 17 air dates for the series are as follows:
Monday, Feb. 17, 10 p.m. "The Crucible of Europe." The
saga of the evolution of Jewish life in the turbulent Middle Ages is
told from the flourishing of Jewish culture in Muslim Spain, down
to the deterioration of European Jewish life with the first crusade
in 10%.
Monday, Feb. 24, 10 p.m. "The Search for Deliverance."
Focusing on the experiences of European Jews, this program
describes the Jewish communities in Eastern and Western
Europe and their interaction with the surrounding cultural cur-
rents of the Renaissance, Reformation and Enlightment.
Monday, March 3,10 p.m. "Roads from the Ghetto." Study-
ing the confrontation between European Jewish society and
modernity, this program covers the struggle for Jewish eman-
cipation from the Industrial Revolution to the birth of Zionism.
Monday, March 10, 10 p.m. "The Golden Land." Jewish
emigration to America from colonial times through to the Great
Depression is traced in this episode. The nature of Jewish integra-
tion into American society and the variety of Jewish experiences
in different parts of the country are examined.
Monday, March 17,10 p.m. "Out of the Ashes." The rise of
Nazism and the mass murder of European Jewry as the universal
meaning of the Holocaust to all mankind is profiled.
Monday, March 24, 10 p.m. "Into the Future." The final
program in the series explores the rise of the State of Israel and
its relationship with Jews in other parts of the world.
AN ADVANCED COCKTAIL Party held in
the home of Sara and Max Modell to plan and
set the tone for the Temple Beth Am Brunch,
honoring Mayor Benjamin and Nora L.
Goldner on Feb. 2, was one of the most suc-
cessful events held. Pictured from left, (stan-
ding,) Sylvea Yacknowitz, Max and Sara
Modell, Rabbi Solomon Geld, Rabbi Paul
Plotkin, Harriet and Joe Zweig. Seated are
Mayor Benjamin and Nora L. Goldner.
Ethiopians Concern for Relatives
By JUDY SIEGEL
Jerusalem Poet Reporter
A year after Operation Moses
rescued nearly 10,000 Ethiopian
Jews from death and persecution,
members of the community are
pleading for information about
what Israel is doing to save
relatives left behind.
About 30 young Ethiopian
Jews, enrolled in universities,
university preparatory program-
mes or vocational schools, voiced
their distress last week to Presi-
dent Herzog at Beit Hanassi.
Referring to a report in The
Jewish Chronicle in England that
1,000 Ethiopian Jews have arriv-
ed recently in Sudan but are
unable to leave, the immigrants
said they fear for their relatives'
plight in the hostile country, and
asked Herzog what Israel is doing
for them.
The president said the story
"may be true, but there has been
no other report to confirm it."
Israel, he added, is "doing all it
possibly can" to save the remain-
ing 10,000 Ethiopian Jews and
public discussion of such efforts
can only harm the cause.
The immigrants said that worry
about their relatives pervades
their consciousness and interferes
with their studies and daily life.
Herzog said he appreciated
their absorption pains, but added
that every immigrant group had
had the very same feelings and
complaints. He predicted that in
"10 or 20 years" an Ethiopian
Jew would be a cabinet minister
and tell newly arrived immigrants
how much easier they have it than
he had.
Absorption Minister Ya'acov
Tsur reported on a "new
strategy" to move the Ethiopians
more quickly out of absorption
centres and into permanent hous-
ing and jobs.
"We want to send them into
real life," he said.
Some absorption centre staffers
who deal with Ethiopians have
told The Jerusalem Post that just
as the immigrants' stay in hotels
was too prolonged, the hasty
Two weeks before the anniversary of Operation Moses, UJA Na-
tional Chairman Alex Grass introduced Moshe Beruk (left) and
Yehuda Kinde at the UJA/Community Forum of the General
Assembly. Yehuda reached Israel three months before Operation
Moses began; Moshe arrived with the airlift. Their stories evoke
all the urgency of that dramatic period. Photo: Robert Cumins.
move out of absorption centres in-
to flats and jobs has been too sud-
den and has caused anxiety among
the Ethiopians, who are not well
enough prepared for life in Israel.
A great deal of effort and
money is being invested in the
18-to-28 age group, 1,000 of whom
are under the aegis of the Student
Authority. Seven are enrolled in
the Technion's preparatory
courses, and 40 in the Hebrew
University's pre-academic
courses. Others are in vocational
courses, yeahivot, and kibbutzim.
One man at the meeting is a
graduate practical engineer,
another young woman is studying
to be a dental assistant, while
another works for the Amharic
section of Israel Radio.
Asked by one young man what
can be done to end the com-
munity's dispute with the chief
rabbinate over "symbolic conver-
sion," Herzog said be couldn't
discuss such controversial issues,
but "don't let the problem stop
you. If you find a nice girl, I
assure you'll be able to get
married.'
CANTOR
For parallel service for High Holidays in
Conservative Synagogue in suburb New York
(Five Towns). Experienced and highly
competent candidates only.
Initial screening in Florida. Salary negotiable.
Send reply to:
Box BE c/o Jewish Floridian
P.O. Box 012973
Miami, Fla. 33101 _________________
COLON-RECTAL
CANCER
PREMAUGNANT
DISORDERS
DETECTED
EASILY
ONE out of every TWO readers
of this notice will nave or develop
col on-rectal CANCER or premalig
nant disorders (polyps) which can
EASILY BE DETECTED by a simple
annual STOOL examination, as re-
cently shown on CBS-TV
SEND for this stool kit, follow the
easy instructions and return the
specimens in return envelope sup-
plied. Our laboratory will Immedi-
ately notify you of the results. This
is a licensed medically supervised
laboratory.
DO YOURSELF A FAVOR
THAT MAY SAVE YQUR LIFE
AND PARTICIPATE IN A
NATIONAL HEALTH SURVEY
Mail to:
CORPORATE MEDICAL
I-----EXAMINATIONS, INC.------1
1672 Commerce St.,
Yorktown, NY 10596
:
NAUF
AQF |
AOTMFS&
CITY
STATF TIP
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Numb*' Of Kilt t6 75Mch
ToW tnclo4 J.F.


.


"

V*
Page 16 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdala/Friday, February 14, 1986
B'nai B'rith Jewish Books
quirie
direct
In response to numerous in-
ies, Dr. Michael Neiditch,
etor of B'nai B'rith Interna-
tional's Adult Jewish Education
Commission, has selected 36
books to form a basic Jewish home
library.
Those books selected are:
BIBLE
The Tanakh (Jewish Publication
Society, 1985)
JUDAISM
Basic Judaism,
Milton
Brace,
Steinberg (Harcourt,
1947).
The Book of Jewish Belief, Louis
Jacobs (Berhman House, 1984).
Torah From Our Sages: Pirke
Avot, Jacob Neusner (Rossel,
1984).
The Thirteen Petalled Rose,
Adin Steinsaltz (Basic Books,
1985).
'Back To The Sources, Barry W.
Holtz, editor (Summit, 1984).
JEWISH OBSERVANCE
'Jewish Holidays: A Guide and
Commentary, Michael Strassfeld
(Harper and Row, 1985).
'The New Jewish Wedding,
Anita Diamant (Summit, 1985).
HISTORY OF THE JEWISH
PEOPLE
A History of the Jews, Abram
Sachar (Alfred Knopf, I960).
'Heritage, Abba Ebon (Summit,
1984).
A History of Zionism, Walter
Laqueur (Schocken, 1976).
'Diaspora, Howard M. Sachar
(Harper and Row, 1985).
The Holocaust, Nora Levin
(Schocken, 1975).
The Chronicle of the Lodz Ghet-
to, Lucjan Dobroazycki, editor
(Yale University Press, 1984).
ISRAEL AND ZIONISM
The Partitioned State, Amos
Perbnutter (Scribner, 1985).
'In the Land of Israel, Amos Oz
(Harcourt, Brace, Jovanovich,
1988).
"The Israelis, Amos Elon (Holt,
Rinehart and Winston, 1971).
The High Walls of Jerusalem,
79 Jews Get Out
NEW YORK (JTA) Only
79 Jews were permitted to leave
the Soviet Union in January, ac-
cording; to the National Con-
ference on Soviet Jewry.
One of the most beautiful
resorts anywhere salutes
the glorious celebration of
the Holiday of Liberation.
Passover
Wed April 23-Thur*. May 1
Lawrence Tuchmsky
and the Nadd Choir
Services Scdarim
Dr.Chaim
Israel Etrog
wiD offer a program of
lectures and conduct
seminars during the holiday
wvai
ElenvUk. New York 12428
Hotel 914-647-6000
800647-6000
See Your Travel Agent
Ronald Sanders (Holt, Rinehart
and Winston, 1983).
Israel The Embattled Ally,
Nadav Safran (Harvard Universi-
ty Press, 1981).
The Struggle for Palestine, J.C.
Hurewitz (Schocken, 1976).
THE JEWISH EXPERIENCE
IN AMERICA
M Certain People, Charles
Silberman (Summit, 1985).
'Profiles In American Judaism,
Marc Lee Raphael (Harper and
Row, 1984).
World Of Our Fathers, Irving
Howe (Harcourt, Brace,
Jovanovich, 1976).
'Israel in the Mind of America,
Peter Grose (Alfred Knopf, 1983).
'The Abandonment of the Jews,
David
1984).
S. Wyman (Pantheon,
'Between Washington and
Jerusalem, Wolf Blitxer (Oxford
University Press, 1985).
LITERATURE
Night/DawnJDay, Elie Wiesel
(B'nai B'rith, 1985).
'From the Fair, Sholom
Aleichem (Viking, 1985).
"The Penguin Book of Hebrew
Verse, T. Carmi, editor (Penquin,
1981).
The Lover, A. B. Yehoshua (Dut-
ton, 1985).
A Perfect Peace, Amos Oz (Har-
court, Brace, Jovanovich, 1985).
ART
Synagogues of Europe, Carol
Krinsky (M.I.T. Press, 1985).
'Jewish Experience in the Art of
the Twentieth Century, Avram
Kampf (Jewish Publication Socie-
ty, 1984).
REFERENCE
'Atlas of the Jewish World,
Nicholas deLange (Facts on File,
1984).
A Treasury of Jewish Quota-
tions, Joseph Baron (B'nai B'rith,
"The B'nai B'rith History of the
Jewish People, Simon Noveck
editor (B'nai B'rith, 1985. Five
volumes).
'Available from B'nai B'rith
Jewish Book Club.
SPECIALLY FOR
SINGLES
MEET SINGLES THROUGH PERSONAL ADSI SINGLES
CHOICE lists personal ads from all over the U.S.A. For
a 10 issue subscription, sand $10 to SINGLES CHOICE,
P.O. Box 118-D, Brooklyn, NY 11210.
DATELINE For sincere people who wish to meet. (A
Jewish mothsr won't match you mors carefully.) Lot
America's largest dating service re-energize your
social life. VERY LOW FEES. Call DATELINE free:
1-800-451-3245.
Are you Single? Personal Ads get response! Cost is
$10.00 for up to 30 words. To place your special singles
ad send $10.00 and copy of ad to: The Jewish Floridian,
Singles Column, P.O. Box 012973. Miami, Florida 33101.
AvaHabie at Publix Storas with
Froth Danish Bakeries Only.
Plain or Seeded,
Sliced or Unsticsd
Rye Bread
79
i-t.
loaf
Available at PubMx Storas with
Frash Danish Bakarias Only.
A Vaiantlno Treat Decorated
Heart Cake
$425
Mm* Call
size TT
(With Frash Strawberries,
If Avatable 8-inch size $5.06)
Available at Putotix Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
Plain, Ught
CheeseCake
$999
* mm
(With Cherries ... aach$3.49)
Av
at AN Pubix Stores
Danish Bakeries.
Decorated for Valentines Day
Holiday Cup Cakes... 6 ,Gr $1"
Mode with the Freshest Fruit and Raisins
Hot Cross Buns............SSM79
Available at PubMx Stores with Froeh
Danish Bakeries Only.
Plain, Powdered Sugar or Cinnamon
CakeDonuts..............6 tor 89*
Decorated
Mini Heart Cake.............^$129
(With Fresh Strawberries,
If Available................................each $1.99)
Quantity
Rtqrtto Reserved.
Publix


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