The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 3, no. 7 (Apr. 5, 1974)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 9, 1976 called v.4, no. 27 but constitutes v.5, no. 1; issue for July 7, 1989 called v.18, no. 11 but constitutes v.18, no. 13.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44570954
lccn - sn 00229545
ocm44570954
System ID:
AA00014312:00301

Related Items

Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
UJA Women's
Conference Sept. 11-12. ..
v ms
See Page 3
JCC Programs
In Coral Springs.. .
See Page 8
Cult Awareness
Program. .
See Page 10
lor idian o
OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE
EjneU Number 27
Fort Lauderdale, Florida Friday, August 30, 1985
rmt tMn
42 Years of Educating the Community ...
Central Agency for Jewish Education
forld News
fSTRAI.IA Mindful of ftnan-
nstrictions. President Her-
|, who has rtveived an official
notion to visit Australia at the
I of this year, is letting Foreign
uter Yitzhak Shamir and the
et decide whether he should
l The trip would take Herzog to
r Zetland, Fiji and Papua New
, as well as Australia.
1ST GERMANY Of the 20
tries with which the Science
Development Ministry of
I maintains professional con-
West Germany is now its
partner, with 80 to 90
"fe project* under way
Now entering its 42nd
year of operation, the Cen-
tral Agency for Jewjsh
Education, commonly called
CAJE, was established and
continues to operate as the
major communal agency in
the field of Jewish education
in the South Florida area.
The agency is based in Miami,
with a Fort Lauderdale branch
located in the Federation building
at 8368 W. Oakland Park Blvd.
Suite 106. Serving as CAJE assis-
tant executive director and
Federation's educational director,
is Dr. Abraham J. Gittelson. Git-
telaon is responsible for all the
educational programming in the
North Broward area. Staffing the
CAJE office in Ft. Lauderdale are
Judaica High School ad-
ministrator, Sharon Horowitz,
and Helen Weisberg. ad-
ministrator of the North Broward
Midraahi Institute. Both pro
Krams fall under the auspices of
the Central Agency.
Over the past decade, the major
priority of the Central Agency has
been the continuation of Jewish
education beyond Bar/Bat Mitz-
vah. Over 2,000 students par-
ticipate in post-Bar/Bat Mitzvah
instruction conducted with the
cooperation of the area
synagogues and Jewish youth
organizations in the community.
A second major priority of the
Central Agency has been that of
teacher enrichment and licensing.
Over the past decades, there has
been an ever-increasing number
of Hebrew and Early Childhood
teachers licensed, with ever-
expanding courses and seminars
for teacher professional growth
and development. In addition, the
Educational Resource
Center/Library facility, located in
the Greater Miami Federation
building at 4200 Biscayne~Bhrcf.,
Coatinaed on Page 2
BAL The community
|Sephardk Jews in Montreal is a
I one and it has both inter-
im! external problems, accor-
n to the Communaute
i du Quebec (CSQ). The
ffl^n^S9 Socio-Economic Problems and Conflicts
I to offer a youth a
Agency for Jewish Education of-
fices %m extended by Paul Frieeer (right), chairman. Committee on
Education of the Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale, to
AbrahemJ. Gittehon, director of the North Broward agency which mov-
ed into the first floor suite in the Jewish Federation building at 8SS8 W.
Oakland Park Boulevard.
Argentine Jewish Community Survives New
KM Israel .
banks to operate in
the Voice of Israel
f Israel already has
1 indications that at least
unamed U.S. bank
>*> among the top 10 -
P*n branches in final,
pnnga boost to the troubled
*!iiL.b*nkineT system,
"^iUshskeytrodflaaly
1 *ond financial market.
t *?* Sovirt Vr^on
<*t changed its Mideast
J 12**ems to be steering a
i'***rit* course in its rela-
," I*reel, according to
^reign Minister Roland
isl?**" met closely with
[J** Pore.gn Minister and
?* that he sees a definite
n m Moscow's policy in the
tt^^rs. mc the
l* leadership took over.
iJger Mikhail Gorbachev
g*W to vuut France in
yi~Bn,uB'rith Inter-
la^ **n ext*nd [^ a. a group of Jewish
7forl?ls ''"tern African
** new lodge here.
IJjtjA are outaid. of the
X w^Uutchvjetfaisofthe
{**raj hundred Dutch
*', murdered in
BJJadunng World War II.
E> ^morUU will be the
* WA Sernem
BUENOS AIRES (JTA) This
is a superb, proud city, easily the
moat cosmopolitan, after New
York, in the Americas, and its
Jewish community of more than
200,000 po.......the vitality and
sopliistieation of the city it so pro-
udly inhabits. It also shares the
socic-ecoDomic woes of the new
rtesnorrary that dawned in 1983
after the long night of the
Aires community to prevent the
closing of the schools, and
negotiations are now in progress
for an extra $760,000 subsidy
from hard-pressed Israel.
Another anomaly is that the
wealthier Argentine Jews refuse
to support bask Jewish institu-
tions and stand by silently, while
Israel must dig down deep into its
nearly depleted treasury to bail
out a far-distant enclave.
A major problem, according to
Dr. David Goldberg, president of
the DAIA (Delegation de Aeocia-
tiones IsraeKtas Argentines), the
an Peae IN-
COMING. .
September
Highlights
High Holy Days
Hebrew Day School
'86 UJA Campaign
CAJE Classes
Despite prior estimates of twice
the amount, the actual number of
Argentine Jews, including the
50,000 residing outside Buenos
Aires, appears to be a bit less than
a quarter of a million, still one of
the largest communities in the
diaspora. The vast majority are
Ashkenazi, but the 10 percent who
are Sephardic (primarily Jews
who originated in Aleppo, Syria)
are Orthodox and tightly
organised.
On the economic scale. 16 to 20
percent are well-to-do, and about
the same number are poor, suffer-
ing from high unemployment and
a bare subsistence level. The 60
percent comprising the middle
class are finding it more difficult
to maintain their status and are
being forced to eliminate many of
the comforts of life.
A serious problem for many is
the inability to afford membership
in Jewish dabs, and expensive
Jewish schools for their children,
who are now attending the ex-
eaOent puhUe school, in increasing
A Staggering Paradox
A staggering paradox is that the
government of Israel has been
forced twice in recent years to
disburse SI inilhon to the Bueaos
Largest Group of U.S. Jews Emigrate
to Israel at One Time Since 1983
NEW YORK (JTA) One hundred and forty American Jews, from 12 states, the :
largest group to emigrate to Israel at one time since 1968, left on Aug. 1 from JFK
Airport on an El Al flight.
Twenty-five famines, including many small children, and 16 single young adults,
jammed the third floor lounge of the El Al terminal to bid good-bye to families and
friends and to be briefed on what to expect upon their arrival in Israel.
Chain) Shine, director of the Israel Aliya Center, told the new immigrants, "We
at the Israel Aliya Center are so proud of all of yeu. Despite the economic crisis in
Israel, you have chosen to make aliya now. And by your very numbers, you are an j
inspiration to others who may be considering the option of aliya. We know that you
will succeed in Israe."
Earner, *t the check-in area, as skycaps streamed into the terminal bearing carts
piled high with suitcases and huge cartons, and young children scrambled about
playing with ballons given them as they entered the terminal, some of their parents
and others expressed strong sentiments concerning their impending Aliya.
Michael Brand, a businessman from Queens, who is emigrating with his wife and
three young sons, explained that the family is following a religious injunction in
making Aliya and that they are also doing so "for the children."
Obja Sanders, who is emigrating with nine other family members, and had flown
in during the afternoon from San Francisco, was observed dashing through the ter-
minal to respond to a telephone page: "It was my best friend calling from Califor
nia," she reported. "It suddenly dawned on her that she won't see me for a long :
time Shefn have to come to Israel."
David Miller, a journalist from Houston, said: "I hope to use my professional skills
to counter anti-Israel attitudes in the media."
In commenting on the evening's events, Shine stated, "We at the Israel Aliya
Canter view the departure of such a large group of Ohm as the beginning of a
i significant trend of increased aliya.'*
rjuimijwswiiiiinnnfrirmii-------- ..............................^^^^^^^^


Page 2 The Jewfah Floridian of Greater Fort I^erdaie/r^y^^Augugt 80, 1986
Marvin Le Vine Named New Communications
Director for Jewish Federation of Greater Ft. Lauderdale
I
Marvin Le Vine, former
publicity and advertising
manager at the Jewish
Federation of Metropolitan
Chicago, has assumed the
newly created position as
director of communications
at the Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale.
The announcement was made
jointly by Brian J. Sherr, presi-
dent and Joel H. Telles, executive
director, who stated that the new
director will have multiple respon-
sibilities in his current role. In ad-
dition to the day-by-day opera-
tions of the Federation/United
Jewish Appeal campaign, the
communications department will
conduct an intensive internal and
external public relations program.
Specific attention will be focused
on the editorial, graphic design
and policy content of the Flori-
dian, in an effort to make the
publication an integral part of the
community.
Le Vine, who served as public
relations director for the South
Florida Israel Bond Organization
in Dade and Broward counties,
began his career as a reporter on
the Honolulu Star Bulletin and
has held positions in corporate
and industrial public relations and
advertising.
According to Sherr, "We are in-
deed fortunate to have a man of
Mr. Le Vine's caliber whose
knowledge and expertise will play
an important part in showing the
critical work accomplished by the
Federation through its
beneficiary agencies and the
United Jewish Appeal programs."
The new communications direc-
tor is a graduate of the University
of Illinois and Boston University
and is active in the Public Rela-
tions Society and the Jewish Com-
mittee on Scouting.
Education and Social Acti
Marvin Le Vine
Central Agency for Jewish Education
CeauMei frees Page 1
Miami; has continued to grow and
over the last several years, has
grown to be a major Jewish film
library.
According to Gittelson, the need
for such a Resource Library has
developed in Fort Lauderdale. To
meet these needs, the new offices
of the Central Agency are equip-
ped with a library, word pro-
cessor, video cassette recorder,
and a resource center, for area
teachers.
"We are a broad, community
comprehensive agency," stated
Gittelson, "Our goal is to enhance
the Jewish community and educa-
tion on all age levels."
To meet the needs of the grow-
ing community, three new depart-
ments have been created over the
past years by CAJE a Day School
Department, the Jewish Special
Education Department, and the
synagogue Supplementary
Religious and Hebrew School
Department.
Some of the other program
areas in which CAJE participates
include:
Community services, in which
the Central Agency works with
the public and schools of the
community.
Publications, in which the
Central Agency produces many
teacher resource pamphlets.
Adult Education programm-
ing involving all the synagogues
and the Jewish Community
Centers featuring outstanding lec-
turers and artists.
Hebrew Ulpan program.
"We are generally responsible
for all facets of Jewish education,
both, in. tta. Federt>or>. *"$ >" **
general Jewish Community," G4v
telson added.
The Central Agency for Jewish
Education is a major beneficiary
agency of the Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale receiv-
ing funds through the annual
United Jewish Appeal Campaign.
The funds raised during the cam-
paign are used to provide social
welfare and humanitarian pro-
grams in Greater Fort Lauder-
dale, in Israel, and in more than
SO lands around the world.
By RICHARD C. ENTIN
CRC Chairman
The Community Relations Com-
mittee is, in a sense, the trouble
shooter of the Jewish Federation
of Greater Fort Lauderdale, con-
fronting the issues that affect
American Jews, Israel and Jews
throughout the world. Through a
coordinated program of education
and social action, our local Com-
munity Relations Committee
(CRC), like CRC's around the
country, directs its activities
toward the enhancement of condi-
tions conducive to secure and
creative Jewish living.
The CRC includes represen-
tatives from the various Jewish
organizations in our community,
so that all significant voices and
resources in the Jewish communi-
ty are involved. Through an ex-
change of knowledge and opi-
nions, the CRC can identify the
issues of concern to the Jewish
community on which we need to
take a position, define our position
and reach consensus on the pro-
grams needed for united action to
effectively advance our position
for the welfare of the Jewish
community.
Through a coordinated prom
of education and social action
CRC seeks to interpret la*
position and needi to tl
American public and govern!,
to marshal] public opbfco^
behalf of justice and freedom !>
Soviet Jews and other opprest
Jewish communities; to pros*
American equality of opportaj
for all and defend freedom
thought, opinion and uaocoao
to insure freedom of religion
separation of church and state; 1
condemn anti-Semitism u
bigotry of all types; and to foster
climate in which differeno
among groups are accepted;
respected.
The Community Relations Ca
mittee of the Jewish Federation
Greater Fort Lauderdale proria
an effective process for deahnr
a cooperative and coordmu
manner with the challenges L,
the Jewish community. If you i
concerned about the issues ta
affect the Jewish community,!
would like to become invornfl
contact the CRC Director, Deb
Roshfeld, at the Jewish Feden
tion, 748-8400.
'The Shalom Show' Features
Jewish Federation Agencies
Fort Lauderdale and Palm Beach residents will have
the opportunity to view a new series of television pro-
grams, focusing on Jewish life in North America and
Israel beginning in September on The Shalom Shaw, it
was announced by Brian J. Sherr, president of the
Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale.
The Shalom Show, produced and hosted by Richard Peritz, is
seen on independent Channel WDZL TV-39 at 10:30 a.m. on Sun-
days and also on WPEC TV 12. the ABC affiliate in West Palm
Beach.
In making the announcement. Max Buck, chairman, Federation
communications/editorial board, stated that during the next nine
months, programs segments, produced by the Council of Jewish
Federations in cooperation with Federations and national agen-
cies, will be featured. Among the highlights of the magazine type
format show will be high tech programs in Israel, the elderly pro-
grams in Los Angeles and computer day schools in Cleveland.
Richard Peritz, who was born in London and worked 10 years
for Israel TV before coming to Florida, said that the addition of
the specially prepared segments which will feature interviews,
entertainment, holiday celebrations, news about Israel and
Federation-related programs will help to maintain and promote a
better understanding of Israel and of Jewish life in general.
The Shalom Show receives a grant from the Jewish Federation
of Greater Fort Lauderdale, through funds raised by the annual
Federation/United Jewish Appeal campaign.
West Germany Jewish History

Miss Barbel Otten, Nordwall
122, D-4160 Krefeld (W. Ger-
many) is writing the history of the
Jewish community of Rheinberg
(near Moers, Lower Rhine Area)
and would be grateful for any in-
formation concerning people who
once lived in Rheinberg or its
vidnity (Alpen, Oraoy, Moers,
Xanten).
Miss Helga Piepef, Papendyk,
874 b, D-4160 Krefeld (W. Ger-
many) welcomes any information
and help for her studies on the
Jewish communities in Huls and
Kempen, both near Krefeld.
Both women are trying to write
the history of many former Jewish
communities in the Lower Rhine
Area, with the help of students at-
tending the university of
Duisburg, West Germany. U you
can help, please contact them at
their above addresses.
Sam learned about
The GUARDIAN PLAN, program and
changed his mind about
buying cemetery property in Florida.
Like your family. Sam s family also had strong traditions. One of those was
burial in the family cemetery property in New Vbrk. But now that he and his wife
have retired to Florida, he was led to believe that his family tradition was no
longer practical, even though he would prefer to have funeral services back
home Sam was worried about the emotional burden on his family And frankly,
he was worried about the cost
Then a friend told him aboyt The GUARDIAN PLAN, insurance funded
prearranged funeral program.* Here are the facts Sam cot.
He learned he could have funeral services in New York at a very reasonable
price He learned he could arrange all the details in advance and set the price
he could afford to pay for the services he wanted. And The GUARDIAN PLAN
program would guarantee the amount would never increase He also learned he
could select RIVERSIDE or one of the other guardian family of Jewish funeral
directors including BOULEVARD PARK-WEST. SCHWARTZ BROTHERS or
IEFFER who honor The GUARDIAN PLAN program in Florida and in New York
It answered Sam sproblems.lt could answer yours m^ntrm*
For more information without obligation, call toll free CjU tOUl**
I-80O432-0853. Do it today while its on your mind I-800-432-O853
Or write to Guardian Plans Inc. P.O. Box 4W. Mattland. PL 12751
Riverside sponsors
The GUARDIAN PLAN*$ES]<
The mo* respected name In funeral i
An INSURANCE FUNDED prearranged funeral service provided by Guardian Ptam. mc (Flondal >
n.n<5?f?^!^F,am,,V Sen"c* ** "Company (Forms Not 060IS4-A*60I84-SI0WVA'
*-0l?r02^*2/VOIOJ0^^
States and Canada in the State of Florida the mtttal face amount of the benefit rjayable under such *W<
'^U^^^0L.*ln,"? contract shall not exceed S5 000 00 and a* prearranged funerals excess of
S V000 00 thaN be funded through a trust tabiahedinsccoitiancewlthOuj|jier6W.r1a S^


n Briefly
1 i ..
Jpwsh" JEWISH FED LAUOJ | $
^^Ammmp0MH|V'
"Tfj
> p
Fnday, Augut 30, 19 Jewish Federation Women's Division
'Task Force for the Future' Sept. 11-12
at Marriott to Enhance'86 UJA Campaign
Lee Raurh chairman of the Federation/UJA Oceanfront cam-
,mpm tederation'B satellite office located at 8356 N.E. Sh St.,
iLmirrdale.
|ederation/UJA Oceanfront
Bee to Open Sept. 3rd
Jewish Federation/United
i Appeal Oceanfront Office
I reopen on Tuesday Sept. 8.
[office is located at 3356 NE
t, Fort Lauderdale.
i Oceanfront office provide!
i for the Fort Lauderdale
i community who live east
95.
"We're very excited about the
upcoming Federation/UJA cam-
paign on the Oceanfront," stated
Oceanfront chairman Lee Rauch.
For any information about the
Oceanfront area, contact Steven
Perry, Federation/UJA campaign
associate, at 563-5202.
jh Drive Effort to Help
rtain Vital UJA Programs
le are responsible ior
ating an unprecedented
effort to insure the
[ofcritical human ser-
i here in Greater Fort
Wale, in Israel and in
rlands," Gladys Daren,
collections chairper-
I Jewish Federation of
ter Fort Lauder-
UM stressed as she
onced the Federa-
"JA cash collection
t situation in our area is in-
to difficult," she added.
V percentage of the Jewish
"mi here is in serious finan-
ce or on the brink of it
tyment has hit hard at
white collar workers.
fnwnesses are failing. OJder
'*tt eating fewer meals,
.""not afford prescription
- Younger people cannot
l* Families are split by
T Pressure They are com-
Pw for emergency food,
P* w and guidance. Only
I *> permit us to provide
r^rvm."
"Streng, general campaign
1 reminded Federa-
Gladys Daren
tion/UJA contributors that a
"pledge is a promise and promises
mustbe fulfilled through cash
payments." He also added the
urgency of procuring the cash
funds to ease the economic burden
facing Israel's men, women and
children, in order to maintain
their vital social welfare and
humanitarian programs.
Nixon on Israel
r rresuiem Richard Nix-
F interviewer that "most
eg* beeaffected if there
IJt<> Saudi Arabia and
W*s <>f the WeaL Oh
rnj Israel has no oil. It
an the state of
I wu Only four million
gmjhon peo^ who live
g** I've ,n Iarad. It is
ITL" >; o' the United
K Sii ******b*
^ Israel hat been at-
tacked, every President has made
it clear that we could use military
power to prevent Israel's defeat.
Our interest in Israel's survival
extends far beyond the profound
moral issues involved and the fact
that Israel is an island of
democracy in a sea of
authoritarian states. Israel's
regional presence and substantial
military capability make its sur-
vival an important interest of the
United States. And we cannot ig
nor. the fact that the Soviet
Union is providing virtually
unlimited anna to some of Israel's
On Wednesday Sept. 11
and Thursday Sept. 12, the
Women's Divisions from
throughout Florida will
come together at the Mar-
riott Hotel in Fort Lauder-
dale for a conference entitl-
ed, "Task Force for the
Future."
This conference, hosted by the
Women's Division of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale, will be a gathering of
women who hold leadership posi-
tions in their local Women's
Divisions.
The women will spend two days
in workshops, plenaries and
discussion groups in preparation
for the 1986 Jewish Federa-
tion/United Jewish Appeal
campaign.
Debra Lipstadt, an outstanding
Jewish woman who serves as an
assistant professor of Jewish
Studies at the University of
California, Los Angeles, will be
the scholar-in-residence. Lipstadt
will address the main theme of the
Conference, "Task Force for the
Future."
Judith Levy, National Women's
Division chairperson, will present
The Case for '86; which focuses on
the reasons for supporting UJA.
"The Conference is designed to
prepare the participants to return
to their communities with tools
and skills which will enhance the
1986 UJA campaign," stated
Esther Lerner, Fort Lauderdale's
Women's Division president
. The following is the agenda for
the two-day conference:
Wednesday, September 11,
1*85
12 noon Registration and Mini
Lunch
1 p.m. Opening Plenary Case
for 1986 Judith Levy
2 p.m. Concurrent Workshops
- Speakers Training Part 1 Mikki
Futernick Judy Eichenblatt. New
Gifts Ellen Mandler Margaret
Kottler. Methodology of
Facilitating Part I Joyce
Newman.
4 p.m. Concurrent Seasioaa
Small Cities Dialogue Lili Kauf-
mann Elisa Greenberg. Com-
munity Consultations. Multi
Media Presentations Charlotte
Padek.
5 p.m. Business and Profes-
sional Program Penny Beers -
Amy Dean Nola Goldberg.
5:30 p.m. Cocktail Party
Hosted by the Jewish Federation
of Greater Fort Lauderdale.
6:30 p.m. Dinner
7:30 p.m. TASK FORCE FOB
THE FUTURE: The Problem -
Debra Lipstadt.
8:30 p.m. Round Table Discus-
sions Meral Ehrenstein Ellie
Katz Lois Chepenik.
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER
12, im
8 a.m. Breakfast Community
Confutations.
9:30 a.m. Concurrent
Workshops Speakers Training
Part II Mikki Futernick Judy
Eichenblatt. Management Skill* -
Reva Wexler. Methodology of
Facilitating Part II Joyce
Newman.
11:45 a.m. Luek.
Smorgasbord Sessions Cynnie
List. Developing a Women's Divi-
sion Structure in a Small or Non-
Federated Community Marsha
Sherman. Endowment for Women:
Let's Get Going Nancy Lipoff.
Soliciting Gifts from Leadership -
Terry Drucker. Campaign Ideas
that Click Judy Eichenblatt -
Suzanne Schechter. Education
Programs that click Judy
Eichenblatt Suzanne Schechter.
Breaking Those Campaign Chains
Maxine Schwartz. Women's
Division Directors Dialogue Bar-
bara Goldman.
1:30 p.m. TASK FORCE FOR
THE FUTURE: The Challenge -
Debra Lipstadt.
2:30 p.m. Wrap-up Nancy
Lipoff.
Added to the program will be a
workshop on Project Renewal led
by Alvera A. Gold, 1986 Women's
Division campaign co-chairperson,
Federation's Project Renewal
chairperson and Project Renewal
chairperson for the Florida
Regioh/UJA.
Also leading a workshop entitl-
ed, "Multi-Media Presentations,"
will be Charlotte Padek, Women's
Division vice president of
education.
The Conference Committee in-
cludes some of the top leadership
of the Fort Lauderdale communi-
ty. They are: Lee Dreiling, Alvera
A. Gold, Dee Hahn, Hilda Leibo,
Esther Lerner, Jo Ann Levy,
Pearl Miller, Charlotte Padek,
Claire Socransky and Barbara
Wiener."As 1986 Women's Divi-
sion campaign chairperson, I feel
that this Conference is an ex-
cellent learning opportunity,"
stated Barbara Wiener. "We hope
that women will take full advan-
tage of this program," she added.
For information or reserva-
tions, contact the Women's Divi-
sion of the Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale at
748-8400.
'86 Leadership Development
Group Features JFS Sept 5th
The Women's Division
Leadership Development
Committee of the Jewish
Federation will kick-off its
monthly morning lecture
and discussion group from
9:45 to 11:30 a.m. Sept. 5 at
the Plantation home of
Karen Waxman.
The Committee has met
throughout the summer and has
planned a wide array of lecture
topics for the coming year.
"Our Committee is very excited
about the upcoming year," stated
Christian Clerics
Given Certificates
JERUSALEM (JTA) Fiftv
Christian clerics from South
Korea received certificates at-
testing to their completion of an
intensive three-day course on
The People, the Book and the
Land" at the Martin Buber In-
stitute for Adult and Continuing
Education of the Hebrew Univer-
sity of Jerusalem. This was the
largest such contingent to par-
ticipate in this program at the
University since it was begun 13
years ago.
Committee chairperson Jo Ann M.
Levy. "We feel that we have plan-
ned some fascinating and thought-
provoking discussions."
Guest speaker at the Sept. 5 lec-
ture will be Maria Gale, ACSW,
LCSW, supervisor of the Fort
Lauderdale office of Jewish Fami-
ly Service of Broward County.
Gale will focus her talk on, "Deci-
sions, Decisions, Women today
Dealing With Our Choices and
Changes."
"There will be no solicitation of
funds at the lecture," stated Com-
mittee co-chairperson Carole
Skolnik. "The lecture is designed
to inform and enlighten Fort
Lauderdale's Jewish women."
Serving on the Leadership
Development Committee are:
Susan Canarick, Jo Ann M. Levy,
Marcia SchwarU, Carole Skolnik,
Marcia Stemfeld, Karen Waxman
and Esther Wolfer with Florence
K. Straus serving as advisor.
The next morning lecture is
scheduled for Oct. 29. An in-
teresting speaker is being plann-
ed. For further information or
reservations, contact the
Women's Division of the Jewish
Federation at 748-8400.
Briefly^
The JCC Wants You Now!
The Jewish Community Center of Greater Fort Lauderdale
wants you! The Center, a central place to see friends, seek
friends, learn, enjoy and celebrate your Jewish identity. The JCC
offers a multitude of programs for young and old alike.
The 16 acre JCC Periman campus located at 6501 W. Sunrise
Blvd., Plantation, boasts a gymnasium, theater, tennis courts,
athletic fields, and the newly-opened Farber Aquatics Center.
Participate! Enjoy! Become part of a growing North Broward
Jewish community. Call the Center for details, 792-6700.
The Jewish Community Center i* a beneficiary agency that
receives funds from the Jewish Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale through its annual United Jewish Appeal campaign.


Page 4 Ttte Jowali Floridian of Greater Fort LauderdaleflFriday, August 30, 1986
Jewish Federation of
Cjreater .Tort Lauderdale
S30S W. Oakland Park Boutavard
Ft Laudardaia. FL 33331
(305) 74e001 Miami: WM731
Mailing Addraaa
P O Box 28610
Tamarac, FL 3332O6B10

Touching Jewish History
By GADI BEN-ZUR
"ne cheapest toy you can give a child in Israel todav is money
Jars and jars of it.
With inflation currently running at over 400 percent a year,
coins are diminishing in value at such a rate that they are hardly
worth carrying around. So these days, almost every household
has its jars of coins practically worthless except for their enter
tainment value in the nursery.
"When we arrived her in 1978," said an immigrant from the
United States, "we bought a brand-new, five-room penthouse
apartment in Jerusalem. Today, the money we paid for it
wouldn't cover half a week's shopping at the supermarket."
In those days, there were about 600 agurot to a dollar. Today,
there are over a million.
Ironically, though, as modern Israeli coins become worthless
almost before you can spend them, ancient coins found at ar
cheological "digs" around the country are increasing in value.
Of course, not all the ancient coins discovered at these "digst"
find their way into museums. Most are, in fact, sold on the private
market to coin collectors and jewelers.
The most common of the ancient coins on the market these days
were minted by the Roman emperors Emperors Constantine,
Severus Alexander, Diocletian and Maximianus around the
third and fourth century.
But Roman emperors weren't the first in the business of pro-
ducing coins. The Greeks, the Hebrews and the Macedonians, of
whom Alexander the Great was the favorite son, were producing
coins long before the Romans arrived on the stage of history.
Perhaps one reason why Roman coins are found in relative
abundance by archeologists today is that Rome, too, experienced
periods of hyper-inflation, which led to massive mintings of coins
->nd consequent devaluations*; >; .*^fla>
VunoMly,1fayar^Ttoi^iniQf**3lim!*Mha3$ spirals af#\ V
similar to those detected by economic analysts in Israel today -
wars and the tendency of both societies to live beyond their
means.
But while Israelis today indulge themselves in international
travel, electronic gadgetry and high living, the Romans were
obsessive consumers of expensive silks, spices, slaves and
entertainment.
"There has recently been an upsurge of interest in ancient
coins." says Moshe Vol. a Jerusalem-based jeweler and coin
dealer, who is cashing in on this new fascination.
Mr. Volk was "turned on" to the idea of reproducing ancient
coins because he realized that his own fascination with these
pieces of antiquity would be shared by millions of others who
regard the Holy Land as their spiritual home.
"Perhaps," he says, "my fascination with these antique coins
was heightened by the fact that I was actually handling objects
which had been handled by my ancestors thousands of years ago.
"The coins themselves are a concrete expression of Jewish
hietory. Some date from the very beginning of the Second Com-
monwealth, others are from Hassmonean times. Still others were
minted by King Herod and King Agrippa, or during the ill-fated
revolts by the Jews against Rome.
"But original ancient coins in good condition are probably out of
the reach of many people who would treasure such objects, so I
decided to make them available to the widest possible audience by
reproducing them, using the very latest technology available."
Now he is ready to share his treasures with the world and,
perhaps, provide a painless history lesson in the process.
Says Mr. Volk, who taught mathematics at Adelphi University
in New York before moving to Israel with his wife and six
children: "These coins are a tangible link with the past. And
reeearching the origins of the coins for the brochure which accom-
jewishF loridian o
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FHtO K SMOCMET MARVIN LE VrMf SUZANNE i-nr-ct
U*o, and PUM.MWT aneto, of Commune.* iSSSS
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POSTMASTER: Send address char**, to The Jawlah FtorMian.
P.O. Boa OiatTS, Miami. Fla. SS101
i m. Advartiaing Suparvtaor b.w.m a Halpam
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r^L^*""T Z' a"Stm fon Ltt"* Bfian J Sharr. Praa.dar.1. Joai M Twiaa. Exacul.va
Director; Marvin U Vina, Diractor ol Communicationa Lori Omioaro Aaaiaianl Diractor o( CsJZm.
mcat-on.. S35o w Oakland Park Bi.d Fon Lauo*da... FL 33321 Phon. ,,Jo0 M.^oTTh.
Fada.at.on and Th. Jawiah F l.an ataiaj*,Paft Laudardaia ahoo.d o. adW.^k\SLm
Fradlaoeaat
August 28,1985
Dear Friends:
In Israel, electric bills are up 53 percent. Water bills up 82 percent. Transporta
tion costs up 100 percent. Not to mention leaps in the price of basic food staples
like bread, eggs and frozen meats. Or increasing wage cuts and freezes, unemploy.
ment and mandatory government dismissals.
While costs are soaring, the shekel is diminishing. And the new, tough economic
program entails major government cuts in health, education and social programs
This has serious consequences for hundreds of thousands of Jews in Israel.
And we can help. Our Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale/United
.Jewish Appeal provides social welfare and humanitarian programs here in Greater
Fort Lauderdale, in Israel and more than 30 lands around the world. Our support is
vital in sustaining those humanitarian services affecting the new immigrant, youth
programs for disadvantaged teens, a variety of activities preserving dignity for
Israel's aged community, renewing hope for residents of Project Renewal
neighborhoods, education for Jews of all ages, and innovative rural settlement pro-
grams in Israel. Through our annual campaign, we are helping to secure the Jewish
people's future. Our commitment to Israel demands immediate action to meet the
most difficult economic burden confronting our people.
Cash is urgently needed now, as Israel's newest economic measures bite into those
vital programs that affect so many Jews in need. They are biting the bullet right
now. So let's do our part to help ease the economic burden facing our brethren.
If you have already made your pledge, please honor your word and fulfill your
good intentions. Send your check today.
Sincerely,
3^2^ 0>~^& **
U~
JOHN STRENG
General Campaign
Chairman
BRIAN J. SHERR
President
GLADYS DAREN
Cash Collections
Chairperson
ViewDOint
.Z --.- > v wrmvi ryii uaiAMroaf* anouio Da
fOtmion ol Greater Fort Lau .a. PO Boi 2S810 Tama/ac. FL 3332M810
Friday, August 30. 1985
Volume 14
13 ELUL 5745
Number 27
panies each set of reproductions is a challenging intellectual
exercise."
Perhaps in a couple of thousand years time, one of his descen-
dants will be sitting in Jerusalem researching the authenticity of
coins issued by the national unity government of Israel in 1986.
Together We Can Help Now
From the boroughs of New York City to the rural townships
of Georgia, the windy lakefront of Chicago to the shores of
Maryland, by the thousands come the men, women and children to
Greater Fort Lauderdale. And as they come, they bring with
them their cultures, lifestyles and heritage.
Here in Broward, there is such a mixture of accents that it's
hard to tell what is naturally a West Browardite or Fort Lauder-
dale native. But one thing is for certain, there is a camaraderie
a joining of purpose and force to unite into a cohesive community
with one common goal the ultimate goal of helping our
brethren for they so desperately need our help.
As we tit in our ocean front apartments and enjoy the
crashing of the waves or play a round of golf on the green and feel
the good warm earth under our feet, there are the tens of
thousands searching for the scraps of food lodged beneath the
dumpsters hidden from view or the body slumped against the
park bench using a newspaper for a pillow.
Yes, our community has the sick, the tired, and poor, and only
we can help.
Did you know that. recently a family of nine needed sup-
plemental kosher food packages, free medical services and
counseling.
Did you know that ... a 21-year-old battered and abused
Jewish woman with her infant daughter recently needed safe
refuge.
Did you know that... last month a 78-year-oki Jewish man,
forceahJy evicted while he was ill in the hospital, was found sleep-
ing in a friend's car with nowhere to go.
Did you know that thousands of individuals yearly turn to the
Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale, her beneficiaries
and supported agencies, seeking direct crisis intervention in keen-
ing with the highest standards of Jewish tradition.
!fiy?u^v* alre*dy made vour PM& to the annual federa-
tion/United Jewish Appeal Campaign, we urge you to how* that
responsibility by providing the much needed dollars to a*, our
fellow man in need. If you have not yet made a contributien we
urge you to help us at this time of grave consequences and search
your heart for hfesaving, lifegiving commitment.
Yes, Fort Lauderdale, we have the needy and the vulnerable
tand we can make the difference in the quality of their lives As the
onomic tide rises the poor, have not been lifted. We must shape
r awareness of the needs within our community and beginan
aggressive effort to meet them. For tl but for the graceof God
Congress
i
Approves
Aid for Israel
In separate actions
House and Senate approi
the fiscal 1986 Fore]
Assistance Authorizatj
Act conference report
the fiscal 1985 Suppler
tal Appropriations Act
ference report.
The authorization
which passed the House I
262-161 vote and the Ser
by voice vote, contains!
billion in all-grant, rr
and supplemental assis
for Israel, as well
numerous other pro-Is
provisions. This marks
first time since 1981
Congress has enact
foreign aid authorize
legislation. The suppler
tal bill, which passed
House by a 320-106 vote i
the Senate by a voice vt
includes $1.5 billion in
grant economic assist"
for Israel. Both bills
await presidential appr
The State Departr
authorisation confere
report, including $251
for Ethiopian refugees]
Israel, strong anti-ter
language, and prow
protecting Israels
ticipation in the U.N-
ed the Senate by voice
last week. The Hou
scheduled to take up
report before it adjour
the August recess.


Friday^ Auguat 30, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Pag* 5
Judaica High School Begins 7th Year
ir.t\ ctuAante will incluHo M2aa>^K__i___i
\
, 250 students will include Missionaries at
expected to participate the Door, Modern Medicine
nore than 25 different and Jewish Law, Literature
.... in thp Judaica Hifirh of the Holocaust, Family
Relationships in the Bible,
Jewish Short Stories,
Sociology of the American
Jew, and Behind the
Headlines.
chool of the Jewish
deration of Greater Fort
derdale. sponsored by
tnagogues in North
oward and the Federa-
l's Central Agency for
swish Education.
enagers from 8th through
i grades from Temples
i Am. Beth Israel, Beth
rBethTorah. Emanu-El,
at Shalom and Temple
olom of Pompano will
ct for three trimesters
ring the course of the
j)5-86 school year the
irenth year of operation of
Oration's Judaica High
Classes of the first
nester start Monday,
pt 9, 1985 in classrooms
the northern branch,
ated at Temple Beth Am,
5 Royal Palm Blvd.,
ate and Tuesday, Sept.
1985 in classrooms
I at the Jewish Com-
nity Center, 6501 West
Blvd., Plantation.
at both branches
North Broward's Judaica High
School is administered by Sharon
S. Horowitz. The South Florida
Judaica High School program is
coordinated by the Miami based
Central Agency for Jewish Educa-
tion. Dr. Abraham J. Gittelson
serves as North Broward's Direc-
tor of Education.
Judaica High School provides a
five-year curriculum, devised by
Educational Directors of the
synagogues in consultation with
Mrs. Horowitz and Dr. Gittelson,
leading to graduation. Courses
are also credited toward Confir-
mation in respective congrega-
tions which the students attend.
The faculty has been selected
from those teachers in the com-
munity who are both
knowledgeable in Jewish studies
and who have special rapport with
teenagers.
Students who complete the five
year program and who are enroll-
ed in special teacher training
courses are eligible for Sunday
'AJE Begins Planning
r Jewish Book Month
celebration of Jewish
Month goes back to
(25 when a Boston
Irarian named Fanny
(in set up a Judaica
t to mark the first
Book Week. It later
national acceptance
popularity. By 1943,
the Jewish Book
nncil was formally
the week long
t had expanded into
Book Month.
Sixtieth Annual Jewish
Month stirs excitement in
j**w of Jewish books," says
~"Jm J. Gittelson, direc-
*education for the Jewish
'of Greater Fort
"It provides an im-
w all of us to enlarge our
and to increase our
[e."
I 'Sorth Broward Midrasha of
I Mitral Agency for Jewish
Education is planning to publish a
brochure listing interesting pro-
grams for Jewish Book Month
which is Nov. 7 to Dec. 7, 1986.
They have asked each one of the
organisations to let then know
what their programs for Jewish
Book Month will be; the place of
the program; the tune and date of
the program; fee; a short explana-
tion of the program and whether
it is opened or closed to the public.
Helen Weisberg, Administrator of
the North Broward Midrasha said,
"In this way we hope to bring to
the community the total program-
ming for Jewish Book Month,
therefore encouraging everyone
to participate in the 60th year of
this celebration."
To be listed in the brochure for
Jewish Book Program, an
organization need just send all the
above information to Mrs.
Weisberg at the Jewish Federa-
tion of Greater Fort Lauderdale.
For further information call
748-8400.
TMt AIR CONDITIONID
Va/dman *.
*i>i Bach's Hnnt Omt Kothw CuWne u
' HOBi DM VtaMmon tWlMM FOI*M
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iff*)*, Sot rwi hnMtf "-%
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D^Y SVAT!0HS SUGGESTED
phor* 1-39.5731 or 1-634-4751
ON THE OCEAN AT 43B SHEET
A
School Certificates awarded by
the Board of License of CAJE. In
addition. North Broward students
can participate in the Akiva
Leadership Development pro-
gram which meets each week, and
is designed to provide the
American Jewish Community
with future leaders who are
knowledgeable about their Jewish
heritage and the American Jewish
communities.
Special programming is of
prime importance in the Judaica
High School. Judaica High School
teenagers meet with other
teenagers throughout South
Florida for study, recreation,
prayer and an examination of
Jewish identity. In addition there
is a series of special trips cor-
responding to each grade level.
An exciting development in this
year's Judaica High School will be
the sponsorship of students to at-
tend programs in Israel. Through
a grant from the Jewish Federa-
tion of Greater Fort Lauderdale.
Judaica High School students will
be able to attend summer pro-
grams in Israel. Incentive grants
will be available for any student in
the Judaica High School who has
completed three years of their
Jewish education. Special pro-
grams in the High School also con-
tinue on a weekly basis. In the
planning stages for this fall are
Jewish cultural activities, Israeli
folk singers, dance troupes.
Holocaust survivors and holiday
celebrations.
Sharon S. Horowitz, Ad-
ministrator of the Judaica High
Dr. Abraham J. Gittelson, Federation's director of education, is pic-
tured addressing a group of students who attend Federations Judaica
High School.
School of North Broward, noted
that "the high school years are
crucial in the determination of an
individual's life long values.
Judaica High School seeks to pro-
vide the student with a sense of
belonging and pride in his or her
Jewish heritage."
Inquiries for registration and
ripation in the Judaica High
ol should be directed to CA-
JE at the Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale, 8358
West Oakland Park Blvd., Fort
Lauderdale, Fl. 33321, telephone
748-8400.
CAJE is a major beneficiary
agency of the Jewish Federation
receiving funds from the annual
Federation/United Jewish Appeal
campaign.
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are family times!
What better way to enjoy your holiday with family and friends
than to gather around a bountiful holiday table set with all the
festive foods of the season, including a big. beautiful Empire
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of quality and good eating enjoyed by families like yours for
over three generations!
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(305)824-5780_____________


Page 6 The Jewiah Floridian of Greater Fort L>uderdWFnday. August 30. 1985
North Broward Midrasha Institute Offers a
Multitude of Jewish Programs for Adults
Special emphasis on adult lectures in Hebrew it but one of the counties*
programs offered by the Sortk Broward Midrasha Institute of Adult
Studies, funded by the Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale.
In the audience. Rabbit, educator* and community lay people listen to
speaker. Miriam Schnexd Ofteyer. a Hebrew poetess and critic
The North Broward
Midrasha Institute of Adult
Jewish Studies is a com-
munity program of adult
Jewish education. It pro-
vides a broad range of pro-
grams and enables the in-
dividual to gain greater
understanding of liis/her
own Jewish heritage and
identity through special pro-
gramming open to the com-
munity. It highlights events
and occasions on the Jewish
calendar.
An Adult Education Commit-
tee, with representatives from
area institutions, work with the
staff to develop the programming.
Ongoing events are: Contem-
porary Itsuet of Jewish Lift lec-
ture series. Community Hebrew
Ulpan Classes. Yom
Yerushalayim celebration. Ad-
vanced Bible Study Group-Hug
Tanach. Library Book Review
Series, "Chanukah Festival of
Musk Concert," and coordination
of community Jewish Book Month
programs.
Participants in the Midrasha
program are: Temples Beth Am,
Beth Israel. Beth Israel Deerfield
Beach. Beth Orr, Beth Torah,
Emanu-EI. Sha'aray Tzedek,
Sholom, Ramat Shalom
Synagogue. Hebrew Congrega-
tion of Lauderhill, Liberal Jewish
Temple of Coconut Creek,
Southeastern Region United
Synagogue of America. Jewish
Community Center, and Omega
Condominium. All events are
under the auspices of the Central
Agency for Jewish Education of
the Jewish Federation/UJA.
Helen Weisberg serves as North
Broward Midrasha administrator.
For further information, contact
Helen at 748-8400.
Levi Views
Jordan
Israel's Chief of Staff L,,
Moshe Levi. believes '$
dan s King Hussein unZ,
reestablish too large a onL,
his kingdom. Levi thinkTS
will continue to tr> to prevent
ronst infiltration frorn l
ntory into Israel. Notin_
Israel struck terrorist site, j
Kingdom in the past, Levi su
current situation is different
Jordan is used for j^
directed against us, the!
ministration there that is
King and the forces subonja
to him will have to prevent!
activity."
I0ROWARD
(JAPER a
IJACKAGING
Early Childhood Teachers Attend
Professional Growth Institute
&t4* &
C*VUf
FT LAUD 776-8272
"Children We are the
World" was the theme of
the Semi-Annual All-Day
Professional Growth In-
stitute of the Jewish Council
of Early Childhood
Educators, held on Aug. 27,
at Temple Beth Shalom,
Hollywood.
Nursery and kindergarten
teachers in the synagogue and day
schools and Jewish Community
Centers %f Dade. Broward and
Founder of
Israel Tennis
Center Wins
Cappy Award
Dr. Ian Froman. co-founder and
executive director of the Israel
Tennis Centers Association, was
designated as the winner of this
year's Cappy Award at the Jewish
Sports Hall of Fame annual induc-
tion ceremonies, held at the
Hebrew University of Jerusalem's
Mount Scopus campus.
The award, presented for
outstanding contributions to
sports and physical fitnesa, is
named for the late Cappy
Greenspan of Los Angeles, who
along with her husband Bud
Greenspan, was a noted producer
of sports documentary films. Last
year's winner of the award the
first time it was awarded was
Dr. Hillel Raskin, head of the
Howard and Mary Edith Coaell
Center for Physical Education at
the Hebrew University, who was
master of ceremonies at this
year's induction event.
Froman, a South African im-
migrant who has been the driving
force behind the popularization of
tennis in Israel in recent years
and in the construction of tennis
facilities around the country, also
was one of four Israeli sportsmen
named as 1985 inductees to the
Jewish Sports Halla of Fame.
Palm Beach counties attended the
program, which was highlighted
by over 50 workshops on various
aspects of early childhood educa-
tion for the over 250 teachers who
participated in the institute.
Robin Eisenberg, president of
the JCECE and Director of
Education at Temple Beth El,
Boca Raton, noted that "The All-
Day Institute provided the early
childhood educator not only with
an opportunity to attend
workshops and seminars, but also
the chance to meet in collegia!
fellowship and realize that each
teacher shares the same problems
and the same moments of joy and
success."
The Institute, which is co-
sponsored by the Central Agency
for Jewish Education of the
Jewish Federation, included such
sessions as "Jewish Parenting Ac-
tivities and Programs"; "Non
Sexist Childrearing"; "Delayed
Childrearing: Issues and Implica-
tions"; "Teaching Tricks of the
Trade"; "Musical Games and
Rhythms for the Fall Holidays and
Year round"; "Outdoor ECE
Games"; "Using Bulletin Boards
as a Teaching Tool"; and "A is for
'Adam': Incorporating Jewish
Content into the Early Childhood
Curriculum."
Workshop leaders included
university faculty members, staff
of the Central Agency for Jewish
Education, associates of the
Jewish Family and Children Ser-
vice, staff members of the Dade
and Broward Public Schools and
teachers and directors in Jewish
early childhood education. In addi-
tion, local school supply firms pro-
vided displays and exhibits.
In addition, the incoming slate
of officers of the JCECE. now
marking its 30th year, were in-
stalled at the luncheon portion of
the program. Officers serving
with Mrs. Eisenberg, president,
include: Vice-presidents Harriet
Spitzer (North Dade); Anita Kop-
pell (Miami Beach); Judy Kuritz
(South Dade) and Linda Harris of
Ramat Shalom (Broward);
Secretary Judy Balletta and
Treasurer, Arlene Lasko. Serving
as immediate past president is
Shulamit Gittelson.
The JCECE, the professional
organization of Jewish early
childhood instructors, was found-
ed in 1954 and serves to enhance
the professional status of the ear-
ly childhood educator and elevate
Jewish early childhood programs.
Its membership includes over 400
teachers from South Miami
through West Palm Beach.
The Council, in cooperation with
the Central Agency for Jewish
Education, sponsors on-going in-
service courses and workshops, a
second All-Day Professional
Growth Institute in the winter, an
All-Day Directors Workshop, and
an Israel Study Tour during the
summer, in cooperation with the
Department of Education and
Culture of the World Zionist
Organization.
Attending the program were
representatives from the follow-
ing local groups: Ramat Shalom,
Temple Kol Ami. Temple Beth
Israel, Temple Beth Orr. Temple
Beth Torah, Jewish Community
Center, and Hebrew Day School.
[JROWARD
IJAPER
IJACKAGING
WANTED:
Social And
Recreational |
Director.
We need a real profession
willing to relocate to SoutJ
Florida. A self-starter wid
experience in planning I
implementing socu
recreational & enter)
tainment activities i
events for large residential commumtie
Must be able to handle administrative dettill
Terrific benefits.
Write: A. Krieff. 3844 Sheridan 8C. Hollywood. FL i
All repim will be kept in ttncl confident

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^giAugugtjO, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 7
Rosh Hashanah 5746


^wh^&ZZ



'
''
Tbourfriends
irvtfie ILS. A*
jrxmtyourfriends
mlsraeL
Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale
8368 W Oakland Park Boulevard Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33321
(305) 748-8400/Mlaml: 945-9731
BRIAN J.SHERR
President
JOHNSTRENG
General Campaign Chairman
JOELH.TELLES
Executive Director
m
ONE PEOPLE, ONE DESTINY
Prepared by the national Omted
;^^AppeaMaJe^Ht.*>tperti*faW


Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, August 30, 1985
JCC and Temple Beth Orr to Offer
Teen Programming in Coral Springs
The Jewish Community
Center of Greater Ft.
LauderdaJe will extend its
program services into the
Coral Springs area, an-
nounced Alvin Capp, JCC
President, and Johl Rotman
of Temple Beth Orr.
Phil Cofman, JCC's ex-
ecutive director, stated that
junior and senior high school
age boys and girls will be
the initial age group to
benefit from the various
programs and functions the
Center will conduct, beginn-
ing this Fall, in the facilities
of Temple Beth Orr, 2151
Riverside Drive, Coral
Springs.
"We are pleased with this
cooperative arrangement to
serve our Jewish youth who
live just a little too far from
our main campus to take ad-
vantage of our programs on
Sunrise Boulevard," stated
Cofman. "We will work side
by side with the Temple
leadership to avoid any con-
flict with Beth Orr's own
programming for their
young people."
Cofman added, "Follow-
ing the establishment of the
youth program, the Center
will conduct activities for
children and adults."
Alvin Capp expressed the
JCC Board's deep apprecia
tion and gratitude to Tem-
ple Beth Orr's Board of
Directors for the use of their
facilities, and stated that.
"We look forward to a long
and mutually satisfying ar-
rangement between JCC
and Beth Orr for the benefit
of the entire Jewish
community."
The JCC, located at 6501
W. Sunrise Blvd. has 13
buildings on a 16 acre cam-
pus. Its most recent addi-
tion is an aquatic center, in-
Landmark Bank Contributes
to JCC Scholarship Fund Program
eluding an olympic-size
swimming pool. The Center
serves every age group,
from one year olds to senior
adults, in a variety of
cultural, social, and recrea-
tional activities.
Parents interested in
assisting staff in the plann-
ing of activities, or for fur-
ther information about the
new program either in Coral
Springs or on Sunrise Blvd.,
may call David Surowitz,
assistant executive director,
at 792-6700.
The JCC is a major
beneficiary agency of the
Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale,
and receives funding
through the annual United
Jewish Appeal campaign.
UJA cancels
Skpt. opening
The 1966 United Jewish An,
nual Leadership ConfpiL
scheduled for SeptembS S
Chicago, has been canHU
535^ fc "*"*:
The announcement was
today by BnanJ.Sherr.presKj
of the Jewish Fwlenttion
Greater Fort Lauderdale
John Streng. general campjjj
chairman of the 19kk p^j
tion/United Jewish Add?
campaign.
The men stated that those con
munity leaders attending c
be advised of the new dales a
later time.
Funds raised by ike ,
FederatwnlUJA campaign arfx
ed to provide social vel/art g
humanitarian program* kert
Greater Fort Lauderdale
Israel and in more than so in
around the world.
Agency
Focus
News
Roger L. Arndall. senior vice
president of Landmark First Na-
tional Bank, recently visited the
Jewish Community Center of
Greater Fort Lauderdale. to see
the new Leonard L. Farber
Aquatics Center and the popular
summer camp program in action.
On behalf of the bank. Mr. Arn-
dall presented a generous check to
JCC executive director Phil Cof-
man (left), earmarked for the
JCC's Scholarship Fund.
The fund helps needy families
provide a valuable and beneficial
camping experience for their
children. The camp is located on
JCC's 16-acre Perlman Campus
at 6501 W. Sunrise Blvd.. Planta-
tion. For information about the
Fund or the camp please contact
792-6700.
THE PURITY BEGAN
3500 YEARS AGO!
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Friday, August 30, 1985/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 9
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Page 10 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, August 80, 1985
Federation's Cult Awareness Program NeWSWJre/ISrael
Keeps Community Alert of Cult Activities
As recently as 1981, the
Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale
did not have any programs
specifically designed to, or
related to, cult awareness,
although there was a need
for it out in the North
Broward Community.
The major problem was that of
evangelical missionaries ap-
proaching teenaged kids, par-
ticularly in the high schools. In-
itially, it was thought that this
problem was isolated to the Coral
Springs area, through the efforts
of Youth for Christ Youth for
Christ, which went under the
name of Campus Life, focused on
those children who attended both
Coral Springs and Taravella High
Schools.
It was learned however, that
Campus Life was active in virtual-
ly every high school in the county.
Leadership of the group often in-
cluded teachers, who recruited
kids right in the classroom.
As the Jewish Federation
became aware of this, a program
was formulated entitled, Cult
Awareness Program.
Efforts were focused on
educating both high school kids
and their parents about Campus
Life. Initially, a Federation
representative spoke to several
youth and parent groups and en-
couraged the kids to become ac-
tive in Jewish youth groups. At
one point, it was estimated that
over 50 percent of the member-
ship of Campus Life in Cora! Spr-
w&*
Shalom. Id Like To Be Your Fnend. Thisisoneofthe many Ethiopian
Jewish children, safe, fed and receiving medical care in Israel, their na-
tional homeland. Some 70 percent of Ethiopian Jews in Israel are under
the age of U and arrived without parents. Funds raised by the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale through the annual UJA earn-
PfV". ee to it that such immigrants not only receive nutritious foot
fg^ ***** out that their medical and psychological needs are
Samsonov Promotes Contest on
International Jewish Heroism
During World War II
Gil Samsonov was recently in
South Florida to publicize the In-
ternational Contest on Jewish
Heroism during World War II
Currently, Gil is Executive
Director of the International pro-
ject on Jewish Heroism in World
War II. The Project involves
every Jewish school or Institution
of Higher education in the world.
It is designed to emphasize the
Race of Jewish Soldiers, partisans
and Ghetto fighters during the
years of the Nazi Holocaust. Most
recently, it has completed the
production and screening of a
nine-week television presentation
on the subject, which was shown
on national television in Israel.
"The contest on Jewish heroism
during World War n is both an
educational project and a means
of communication in which
thousands of young people in
Israel and throughout the
Diaspora take part During the
Holocaust, many acts of heroism
were undertaken by Jews, who
took up arms against the Nazi
enemy,' Samsonov stated.
The present contest will review
the deeds of these people; it is be-
ing held now, over forty years
after the victory over the Nazis. A
relatively long time has passed,
and the generation which lived
through that period is now on the
wane. And so there is a danger
that the members of the new
generation, whose interests
naturally lie in their day-to-day ac-
tivities, will forget those historic,
dramatic events. .
Information can be obtained by
contacting the Israel Aliyah
Center in the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation at (305)
573-2556.
ings was Jewish. The kids involv-
ed stated that they did not know
that they were a part of a group
called Youth for Christ, whose
real purpose was to teach the
Gospel and get people to accept
Jesus.
To combat this, articles ap-
peared in The Jewish Floridian
warning kids to be aware of these
groups. Pamphlets and brochures
were distributed throughout the
community alerting kids, as well
as parents, of this problem.
During its first year of opera-
tion, the Cult Awareness Program
held an awareness weekend,
sponsored by Federation's Com-
munity Relations Committee, the
JCC, Temple Beth Orr in Coral
Springs, and the Coral Springs
Coalition of Jewish Organizations.
Experts in the field of cults and
missionaries were brought in and
spoke to an audience of approx-
imately 200 at Beth Orr. Other
weekend events included a talk
given by the director of Youth
Services of the Central Agency
for Jewish Education and a film
showing how a person is recruited
and ultimately deprogrammed.
Over 400 people attended the
viewing of the film.
Over the past three years, over
15,000 brochures entitled, "It's an
Offer You Better Refuse," have
been distributed throughout the
community. In the brochure the
Federation's phone number is
listed and readers are encouraged
to call if there are any problems.
Also helping to combat this pro-
blem is Federation's Judaica High
School. A course in cults has been
added to the curriculum as an
elective. Each year almost 80
ninth graders take this course, ac-
cording to Judaica High School
administrator Sharon Horowitz.
"The children are really afraid of
these cults," she said, "they want
to know how they can protect
themselves and their friends from
falling into a cult recruiters
grasp"
Each week approximately three
to five phone calls are received at
the Jewish Federation office from
individuals who are having
specific problems relating to cults
within their own family. If anyone
you know has a problem, or if you
would like more information, con-
tact the Jewish Federation at
748-8400.
High Holy Days
Package
Roah Hashaiuh Sept 15, 16, 17
Yom Kippur Sept 24, 25
Deluxe accommodations for 5 nights
8 kosher meals including a sumptuous
break-the-fast buffet of traditional
delicacies prepared under the supervision
of our Mashgiach, Nathan Hershberg
Rabbi Arnold Lasker and Cantor Yehuda
Mandel officiating
Tickets for Rosh Hashanah and Yom
Kippur services
$345 $400
Extended packages available.
All lax and gratuities included
For reservations call 472-5600
ft!
1711 N. University Drive, Plantation, Florida
ISRAEL Former Soviet Jewish Prisoner of Conaoa
goo
permission to emigrate to Israel, the National" ConE
Shkolnik, who served seven years in the Soviet Gul^
charges of "treason" and "anti-Soviet ajritati "T5^
Soviet agitation,'
Soviet Jewry reported. Shkolnik, who first applied form
in 1972, is the first former prisoner to be permitted to I
from the Soviet Union in nearly 10 years. His arrival in In
reunite him with his wife, Feiga, and his daughter who
not seen since their departure from the USSR in 1973 m
JERUSALEM On July 29, for three days, nearly 200
Jewish leaders from several lands, convened in JerusaU
vance creatively the Zionist agenda. This was the Pint
Conference of Dor Hemshech which acted as a turning
Israel-Diaspora relations. The conference brought togethe
categories of Jews the Israelis who care about their son
their links to the Jewish people; the Western Jews who
running their communities and setting trends; and the
from smaller countries like Spain, Yugoslavia, and Turk*
rarely have the opportunity to meet with the first two p

ISRAEL Israel's Foreign Minister Yitzhak Shamir
cent terrorist-style murders of Israeli citizens "are the ,m
the fact that the terrorist organizations cannot carry 00
tacular and big attacks since their bases in Lebanon havi
destroyed, and therefore they decided to return to the pri
terrorist methods of the 1930's... Let us recall that in the
we were a minority in Israel and nevertheless we overcame
will certainly overcome the current wave of attacks no
Israel is a sovereign Jewish state."
TEL AVIV The Foreign Minister of Honduras, Dr. E
Paz Bamica recently met with Foreign Minister Yitzhak S
and presented him with a note from Egyptian President
Mubarak for Premier Shimon Peres. Bamica told reporte
Honduras hopes to receive additional agricultural and tec
aid from Israel, but no further military assistance.
ISRAEL The Roman Catholic cathedral dedicated this
by Pope John Paul II in the Ivory Coast capital of Abidji
built by the Israeli construction firm of Sole! Boneh, worl
joint partnership with the Ivory Coast government.
TEL AVTV Visiting United States Sen. Jesse Helm
to)d reporters that he will initiate a defense agreement bt
the U.S. and Israel that would include military air strips
research and development, and cooperation in other fields

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Friday, August 30, 1985/The Jewi
Olympic and Maccabiah Gold
Mark Spitz and Mitch Gaylord
.vth U.S. Maccabiah Committee of
14/ a receptum during the recent ltth
jMacrabiiih (i ' i Sherman. U.S.A. Maccabiah Team
_, Smtz. who became the first non-
ito light the Maccabiah torch during the
mi'. "/ who holds 10 Mac-
liuf W Olympic gold medals in swimm-
iOSii M^KaelK<^^i. International Mac-
cabiah Committee Chairman; Gaylord, holZr
Win,&Z Aan ever t0 """d perfect
Ri^rt F^ TWPY comPetition; and
ChTd,M VlVOkt P'A- M the) de Mission and president of the United
States CommUtee Sports for Israel, the
'[Sanitation that sponsors the U.S. team in
the Maccabiah Games.
PLO Games
is still behaving like
| It says that two i'alesti-
pUbir to l-rael as
I members of a "peace
l"ire nut a"'ptable to
The two are from
lud Gaza ami had been
I originally by the PLO
, Now, however, PLO
Committee member
I Milhelm asserts that
[could only participate as
tt" because "they are
kr occupation "In other,.
(PLO does not want to
Arabs who live and
l the Israelis to join in
They want the
I to come from parts of
Jordanian Palestinian
under its thumb. It
Indicals, radicals who
ice reality and accept
P kind of radicalism
tot in areas far from
p* Bankers, in growing
are becoming more
|*ut the Israel they
i to know since 1967.
r*"ot like it i,ut they
[jw going away. A
lany including the two
law reject.,I |,y the
I be amenable to
*i the last thing the
i II *nts all of
r*goal it hopes to
rah a two-pronged
Vomacy and terror.
,F that approach can
JV* wterm i nation to
pmuon by the United
~K>t negotiations with
h *nd ^ be seen in
^attacks m Israel
"W the Middle East
L V** Maimed
^ mne mostly im-
"* actions m Israel
wmmunique reads:
I t2T,1?nK '"side our
ff^- have con
M mk operations
L*'^ opera-
. lM8 July 1985
I?* ^eluded an "ex-
, ,.* entrance of
Un.versity" jn
Jerusalem; another "explosive
charge near the Zionist Zim shipp
ing company in Haifa"; two "ex-
plosive charges inside the Rinati
Hanan (sic) kibbutz in Haifa," and
another six bombings. The com-
munique ends with the words: "It
is a revolution until victory."
None of the acts for which the
PLO so proudly claims credit ac-
tually took place. They were
either thwarted by the Israel
"Defciise" l^ii'L'CT ~TJr""fire tBfai
fabrications. Still, there are two
things worth noting. The PLO's
Arafat wing still claims credit for
terrorist attacks, even while sup-
posedly pursuing the diplomatic
option. It also considers its "oc-
cupied homeland" to include not
S j:
V2
IU
pT HOMES
Also
"pair)
** property.
W7-60O0 Ext.
w 'formation.
just the West Bank and Gaza, but
also Jerusalem, Haifa, Tel Aviv
and assorted kibbutzim. In short,
the PLO still believes that
violence is the way to "final vic-
tory" and that victory requires
the "liberation" of all
"Palestine."
Does the Reagan Administra-
tion need any more evidence as to
why the PLO is an unfit partici-
pant in any delegation assembled
for peace tafks?The PLO that pro-
udly claims to set off "explosive
charges" in Jerusalem cannot
claim a place at the peace table. If
it wants that, it must abandon ter-
rorism and accept Israel's right to
exist. There is still no evidence
that it has.
.ghjToridianof Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 11

Viewpoint
EGYPTIAN MOVES
Prime Minister Shimon Peres reports that President
Mubarak told him that he is lifting restrictions on trade and
tourism with Israel. He also said that Egypt will establish a scien-
tific center in Israel, similar to one Israel has in Egypt.
This is genuinely good news. In the years since the signing of
the 1979 Camp David peace treaty, Egypt has moved steadily
away from both the letter and spirit of that historic document. Its
most flagrant violation was the recall of the Egyptian ambassador
from the Tel Aviv embassy, supposedly to protest Israel's inva-
sion of Lebanon. But he was not returned, even after Israel pulled
out of that country.
The lifting of restrictions on trade and tourism may mean
that Egypt is again ready to advance along the path toward full
peace, as envisioned at Camp David. If that is the case, this move
will be followed by others including the return of the
ambassador.
But even taken alone, the Mubarak steps are worthy of com-
mendation. In the years since the first historic Sadat-Begin sum-
mit, it has become all too easy to take the Israeli-Egyptian peace
for granted. It shouldn't be. The Camp David peace treaty re-
mains the only peace agreement between Israel and one of its
Arab neighbors. It has maintained the peace between Israel and
its moat powerful Arab neighbor, sparing lives on both sides.
Twenty-nine years of war and near-war have been followed by six
years of Israel-Egypt peace. Who would want to go back to the
days before Anwar Sadat and Menachem Begin embarked on
their historic mission?
The latest Mubarak moves should remind those who need
reminding that the only means to Arab-Israeli peace is through
direct negotiations. Anwar Sadat did not assemble a congress of
notables to talk to Washington and then Jerusalem. He did not
pursue in fact, he purposely avoided a Geneva conference.
Instead cut through the rhetoric and what he called the
'psychological barrier' and flew to Jerusalem, where Begin and all
Israel awaited him. This breakthrough led to direct negotiations,
and those resulted in peace between Israel and Egypt and the
return of the Sinai. The West Bank and Gaza Strip are not the
Sinai, but the lessons of the Israeli-Egyptian peace process are
obvious. Let us hope that they are not missed in Amman,
Damascus or even Washington.
SYRIAN THREAT
Syria issued a blunt warning to Palestinian Arabs and to Jor-
dan for considering U.S.-backed negotiations with Israel: "If
these sides decide to proceed with their conspiratorial plan, they
will pay the price, which will be very dear this time. There will be
ho security br stability" for those who join the peace process {Al
Thowrah, July 17). The newspaper vowed that TSyria will not
humor anyone on pan-Arab stands" and "will never let them
rest."
The paper also charged that those promoting an Arab summit
meeting to be held this week want to "cover the capitulatory
moves of (Yasir) Arafat and the Jordanian regime to bless direct
negotiations with Israel" and to help Egypt escape "the isola-
tion" of the Camp David settlement.
ri
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Page 12 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, August 30, 1985
Community Calendar
Newswire/Florii
Compiled by Lori Ginsberg.
Federation 748-8400.
SUNDAY SEPTEMBER 1
Temple Beth AmMen's Club.
9:30 a.m. Monthly breakfast
meeting. The Sally Sherman
Variety Players will perform. At
Temple. 7205 Royal Palm Blvd..
Margate.
MONDAY SEPTEMBER 2
Sunrise Jewish Singles 21-35:
Noon. Picnic and beach party.
Quiet Waters State Park.
TUESDAY SEPTEMBER 3
Hsdassah- Armon Csstle
Gardens Chapter: Noon. Meeting
and speaker. 733-0332.
Pioneer Women N'amat-
Hstikvah Chapter: 11 a.m.
Meeting. Book review given by
Jerry Layton of "Citizen
Hughes." Sunrise Lakes Phase I
Playhouse. Mini-lunch.
WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 4
Pioneer Women Na'aasat-Negev
Chapter: Trip to Burt Reynolds
Dinner Theater. 426-1941.
Snsrise Jewish Center-
Sisterhood: Noon. Meeting. At
Temple. 4099 Pine Island Rd..
Sunrise.
THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 5
B'nsi B'rith Women-Sunrise
Chapter: Noon. Opening meeting.
Mini-lunch. Sunrise Lakes Phase I
Playhouse.
FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 6
Brandeis laiversity NWC-West
Broward Chapter: 1 p.m. Rap
session. 972-0092.
Yiddishe Gezelshaft: 2 p.m.
Fabreng. Discussion: "The Future
of Yiddish in the Jewish Com-
munity." Broward Federal. 3000-
N. University Dr. Admission free.
SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 7
Temple Beth Am: 10:30 a.m.
Selichot services. At Temple.
7205 Royal Palm Blvd..
Margate
SUNDAY SEPTEMBER 8
Temple Beth Orr: 7:30 p.m. Open
house coffee reception. At Tem-
ple. 2151 Riverside Dr.. Coral
Springs.
MONDAY SEPTEMBER 9
ORTPine Island Chapter: 11:30
a.m. Meeting. Nob Hill Rec.
Center, 10400 Sunset Strip.
1 WEDNESDAY
SEPTEMBER 11
ARMDI-Ashkelos Chapter:
Noon. Meeting featuring guests
Robert Schwsrtz, Southeast
District Dir., Jayne Coraggio,
RSN; and Doug Martin. Biofeed-
back advisor. JCC. 6501 W.
Sunrise Blvd. Plantation. Mini-
lunch. 792-6162.
Pioneer Women Na'amat: 12:30
p.m. Holiday celebration and
Israel update by Ruth Fallick. Le
Club. Century Village. Deerfield
Beach.
Sanrise Jewish Center-
Sisterhood: One-dsy bus trip to
Marco Island. 741-5107.
ORT-Ceder Ridge Chapter: 7
p.m. Paid-up membership tea.
Coral Springs. 755-0448.
THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 12
Hadassah-Sunrise Shalom
Chapter: 11:30 a.m. Fashion
show. Sunrise Lakes Phase I
Playhouse.
ORT-Tamarac Chapter: 11 am.
Meeting. Italian-American Club.
6535 W. Commercial Blvd.
Hadaassh-Orah Sanrise Lakes
Chapter: 11:30 a.m. Installation
of officers. Oscar Goldstein will
entertain. Tamarac Jewish
Center, 9101 NW 57 St.
Hadassah Zionist Youth Commission
MIAMI The Consul General for Flonda and Pmrt I
Yehoehua Trigor, has announced the following chaiw
staff of the Consulate General in Miami: w
The tour of service of Consul Dorit Shavit was ter
the end of July. Mrs. Shavit has left the U.S. and has rt
duties in the Research Centre of the Ministry of Foreign
The new Consul, David Cohen, accompanied by his w
three children, arrived in Miami at the beginning of Am!!\
recently, Cohen served as the assistant director oftheT
Delegation to the World Organization of Tourism in Madrid]
a graduate of the Hebrew University in Jerusalem and iS fl
English and Spanish.
FORT LAUDERDALE On the 50th anniversary of the!
tion of Social Security, Broward County has more Social S
beneficiaries than any other county in Florida, and ranks in
tionally. There are presently 260.500 people receiving i
checks. Figures were compiled by financial instil
Broward County.
FORT LAUDERDALE The average days of hospiu_
of Broward County Medicare patients from August 1984 ttl
1985 was 7.7 days according to a list compiled by the Profa
Foundation for Health Care.
Organizations
Appoints Young Judaea Staff Members
Sylvia Herman. Newly elected
Chairman of the Florida Hadassah
Zionist Youth Commission, an-
nounces the return of Lisa
Synalovski as Regional Director
of Young Judaea, and the appoint-
ment of Mindy Lessem as Assis-
tant Regional Director. Also
returning this year is Zeev
Shafnr as the Regional Shaliach.
and Michelle Rapchik in the new
position of Regional Coordinator.
Young Judaea is one of the
oldest and is the largest Zionist
Youth Movements in the United
States. It is peer led and has three
levels: Ofanm 4-6 grades:
Tsofim 7-8 grades: Bogrim -
9-12 grades. The college-age level
is called "Hamagshimim."
For information regarding
Young Judaea or its Camps, the
office is located at: 2020 N.E. 163
Street, Suite 108, North Miami
Beach. Florida 33162; or call:
Dade 947-0637; Broward
941-2377.
Kampelman to Receive HIAS Liberty Award
The Hon. Max M. Kampelman.
who is currently heading the U.S.
Delegation to the arms negotia-
tions in Geneva, will be honored
by HIAS at its Annual Awards
Dinner on Sept. 4 at the Waldorf -
Astoris Hotel in New York City.
Dr. Kampelman will receive the
Liberty Award, HIAS* most
prestigious honor.
In announcing the 1985
Awards, Robert L. Israeloff,
HIAS President, noted that,
"This year's Liberty Award
honors one of America's most ad-
B'nai B'rith Hillel Publishes New
High Holy Day Prayer Book
Ever since its founding in
1923, the B'nai B'rith Hillel
Foundations has sought to
meet the challenge of
democratic pluralism in
Jewish life. Presently the
Jewish address on more
than 400 college campuses.
Hillel has introduced the
values of pluralism to tens
of thousands of fetudent
participants.
The latest contribution in the
area of religious practice is a new
prayer book for the High
Holidays, Roah Hashanah and
Yom Kippur, published by the
Hillel Foundations in conjunction
with Ktav Publishing House.
"On Wings of Awe" provides
alternatives for worship during
the High Holy days: faithful
translations of the Hebrew; poetic
interpretations of traditional
prayers; new prayers permitting
readers to deal with the themes
and experiences of the Awesome
Days; and choice of traditional
and Reform versions of both the
Hebrew and Emrlish
"On Wings of Awe" may be ob-
tained at $9.95 a copy-for up to 49
copies (phis $2 for postage for
more. Send checks payable to
B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation.
1640 Rhode Island Avenue. N.W..
Washington. DC. 20036,
mired statesmen. Max M.
Kampelman." he said, "is a man
who has earned great distinction
as s tireless champion of human
liberty. It is most fitting that he
receive the HIAS Award that
each year is presented for
'outstanding contributions to the
furtherance of peace and
freedom.' "
HIAS the Hebrew Immigrant
Aid Society it the international
migration agency of the organized
Jewish community. HIAS is a
beneficiary of the Jewish Federa-
tion of Greater Fort Lauderdale,
which receive* funds from the an-
nual Federation/Jewish United
Fund.
Tiffany house
'ir.ii imis Living tor Senior Adults
^S^>
A new flfcfrnjfee. for Scator Adadsd Tllaay House ofiers furnished
and unfurnished private rooms with bath. wall-to-wall carpeting
and draperies (soaae rooaas have kitchenettes) AM utilities,
including local telephone service sre included
Elegant Dining
(3 meals daily)
Weekday nurse
on premises
Pool. Jacuzzi.
Club House and T
Library lounge
Beauty /barber shop
From t900 per month (everything Uxluasa)
NO ADMISSION or ENDOWMENT FEE* Moor* open duly 9-5 p m
Co* or write for brochure
more.
Security/ 24 hrs.
Maid Service
Transportation
(we chauffeur you
to shopping, banking.doctor)
Planned Activities
Atlantic Ocean/two blocks
WOMEN'S AMERICAN
ORT
The Woodlands North Chapter
of Women's American ORT
recently sponsored a very suc-
cessful dinner-dance, billed as the
"Passport to Karmiel." Karmiel is
a small town in the Western
Galilee in Israel.
The proceeds from the dinner
went to the construction of a new
Institute of Technology and to the
town of Karmiel. Co-chairing the
affair was Helen Etkin and Gert
Jaffee. Serving on the committee
were: Ruth Drotch, Dorothy
Frankel. Yetta Katz. Helen Falk,
Mildred Rakofsky, and Chapter
oresident Bea Rhodes.
ARMDI
American Red Magen David .
Israel's Red Cross, will present
"An Evening of Melodic Enter-
tainment and Dance," at 7:30
p.m. Sunday Nov. 24 at the
Sunrise Musical Theater. Tickets
sre $10, $8. $6 and $5. For reser-
vations call 742-4272,71
742-8801
The show will fe
Williams. Alex Redhill i
tistic dance group,
choreography of
Pearachio.
The Ashkelon
ARMDI will begin its
with its first open meet
Wednesday Sept. list!
Community Center,
6501 W. Sunrise]
Plantation.
ARMDI Southeast I
director, Robert L. ScM
Ashkelon president
Horowitz, will reportl
highlights of the recentj
convention thev atti
Israel.
Guest speakers will
Coraggio, RSN at Flor
Hospital Pain Center
Martin, Biofeedback
information call 587-001
STATE OF
ISRAEL BOND
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WERE SPECIALISTS IN
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NASO


>ntine Jewish Community Survives
Fri^Augurt.80^^J:985^heJJewi8hi;iori(iian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 13
Ljfro-P***1
Eebodvofl30iMtitu-
^ only one-third of the
fc j, involved in suppor-
B, clubs, schools and
rations. Most Jews,
Kjthe synagogue for
Lj weal purposes Up-
u tjui and wealthier
PL of aiding their leas
rjo-reliponisw. spend
L ms on ostentatious
Lmd bsr-miuvahs.
Lj Stronjthold
Lj born in Buenos
Criy with the Tel Aviv
f^j now manager of
P.., Aires Sheraton.
yhis hotel often seems
r^nghnid, for hardly a
Ines by without two or
[elaborate Jewish
this reporter heard the
ifectious strains of Yid-
llneli folk songs and
bounding throughout the
Ens. One culinary note:
bind challah at the
Cbuffet were distressing-
Lot among Jews in high
IjCesar Jaroslavsky, ma-
ber of the House of
Egim; Dr. Adolfo Gaaa,
Ef the Senate's Foreign
fcCooimittee; Dr. Bernar-
Lb, Secretary of Plann-
KTofficers of the Central
be ire 15 to 20 Jewish
Ik Parliament.
to be borne in mind, said
L that Argentina is 90
Catholic, and that there is
fcn between church and
buiunity." he added,
km, but in the cities of
[Hendoza, Rosario, and
b operates within the
l^i Catholic nation,
hbns with the Church
Bsfikiwly"
insiptink! To open An
10 is attempting to open
lanlar t<> tiie one it has
life DA1A is marshall-
Bkfarces ui oppose such
Pity There are some
Argentinians < if Syrian
i descent, but they
her organized into a
MtitY to speak out on
Proletariat
"""dor to Argen-
BFnWk, points out
P* of the very few
ties with a pro-
I "12 to 14 percent
J* Poverty line."
^* We here, he
IMO-30,000 in this
). the central
**. has tried
F A duly 8ignt tt it
lTS!**u Street
we and healthy
P women waiting
R?** job 6
PJ Schmorak. to
T'1"**!, but few
C*Pnnewlifeina
IJ^^ome funds to
R*head start.
P^een Israel And
tS"! extremely
CUy*n Argen-
rj^*e' ^roughout
UJ*^ Schmorak
|C nly to the'
E? t*nized by
E ** cultural ,x.
J*njdical and
l2?,,,uch *
JJ* y Iwael to
T"*1 country.
Jji an agreement
KtZ pnnc,p*
" Airlint.8 and
Aeroiineaa Argentines to share
flight* between the two countries
would be put into effect by the
government of Raul Alfonain
Schmorak deplored the fact that
the considerable Argentine in
tereat in Israel is not reflected in
its attitudes in international
organizations such as the United
Nations, where its voting pattern
with regard to Israel has not im
proved with the recent change in
government.
There had been considerable
discussion of a state visit by Presi
dent Alfonsin to Israel, but the
trip has been postponed
Schmorak considers a meeting
between Argentinian and Israeli
leaders to be crucial and a turning
point, when it takes place, in the
history of relations between the
two nations.
When asked what he considers
as his most important achieve-
ment as he prepared to return to
Israel after a period of five years
* Israel's top representative,
Schmorak's response was swift
and unequivocal: it was saving the
live* of Jews detained by the
previous regime, whose leaders
are currently on trial in a Buenos
Airea court. There was nothing he
could do about the
"deaaparecidos," those who were
picked up in their homes, most
often in the middle of the night
and who were never seen again'
During those years, the waiting
room of the Embassy was full of
wives, mothers, and grand-
mothers of those who had "disap-
peared." They were there to seek
information concerning their lov-
ed ones and begged him to help.
Schmorak knocked on every
but to absolutely no avail.
Where he was much more sue-
OtSStt was with known Jewish
prisoners who were beaten and
ESS far W0r9e *" non-
in^QW |Uine?He reCalled that
VI v if*6 Foren Master
Yitzhak Shamir, during a vist
presented the authorities with a
list of 400 Jewish prisoners and
urged their release.
Schmorak intervened in nun
dreds of cases and he was able to
obtain their release, only with the
generals' stipulation that each
Jew be taken directly from the
prison to the airport, given a one-
way ticket and placed on the plane
with Israel as the ultimate
destination.
Newswire/Washingti
The residents of South_Florida's 16th Congressional district
will have a chance to find out what Congress is doing to deal with
tne recent wave of international terrorism attacks during Con-
gressman LARRY SMITH'S (D-Hollywood) second monthly news
report from Washington. Smith's guests will include Con-
gressman DAN MICA of Lake Worth, chairman of the House
Foreign Affairs Subcommittee on International Operations, and
or. Kay Uine, senior associate at the Georgetown University
oenter for Strategic and International Studies and former deputy
director of the CIA. M y
Authorization for the United States International Narcotics
ontrol Commission, radio programming for Soviet Jews and in-
creased funding for Radio Marti was passed as part of the U.S
ui^Tv*1* DePartment authorization bill. Senator PAULA
HAWKINS, sponsor of the amendments, said that she was pleas-
ed with the action and the "hours of hard work have resulted in a
victory for the people of Florida in the nation."
AFL CIO President Lane Kirkiand and Secretary Treasurer
Thomas Donahue endorsed a petition campaign calling upon
Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev to honor the Helsinki Accords by
making "significant and visible changes in Soviet emigration
policies and the treatment of Soviet Jews," the Jewish Labor
Committee reported.
President Reagan signed a $25.4 billion foreign aid bill that pro-
vides for the resumption of direct U.S. aid to the anti-government
rebels in Nicaragua and awards the largest amounts of support to
Israel and Egypt.
where shopping is o pleasure 7days a week
Publlx
BNUL
BAKERY
Publix Bakeries open at 8:00 A.M.
Available at PuMx Store, with
Fraah Danish Bafcarlat Only.
Chooaa from Our Sanction of
Variety Cakes
$9
7-factt f
99
Available at Publix Storat with
Fraah Danish Bafcarlaa Only.
Top with Publix
Pramium lea Craam
Blueberry Pie
$199
aach
a
Availabia at Publlx Storaa with
Fraah Danish Bafcarlaa Only.
Bakad Fraah Daffy
Hamburger or
Hot Dog Rolls
0-ct
pfcff.
59
at AN Publix Storaa
Danish Bakarias.
For tha Chocoiata Lover
Gourmet Brownies.......-* $169
Chocoiata Chip, Sugar, Oatmaai, Peanut Butter
or Chocoiata Paean
Assorted Cookies........ *T*2
ach$1W
at.$ffj
Availabia at Publix Storaa with Fraah
Danish Bafcarlaa Only.
Plain or Saadad
Rye Bread
loaf
69*
Apricot Coffee Cake.
Banana Bran Muffins
Prices Effective
Aug. 29 thru Sept. 4,1985
bo*
W


Page 14 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Laudeniale/Friday, August 30, 1985
.'
Bar/Bat Mitzvahs
TEMPLE KOL AMI
Derek Gordon, son of Jade and
Michael Gordon, and Michael
Goldmark, son of Jill and Steve
Goldmark celebrated their B'nai
Mitzvah at the Aug. 23 service at
Temple Kol Ami. Plantation.
On the following morning. San-
di D'Azevedo. daughter of Billye
and Thomas D'Azevedo. and
Todd Kiamelaaa. son of
Mariene and Michael Kimmelman.
celebrated their B'nai Mitzvah.
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL
Scott Weiatraab. son of Nancy
and Harvey Weintraub.
celebrated his Bar Mitzvah at the
Aug. 24 service at Temple Beth
Israel. Sunrise.
On Saturday. Aug 31. Daaiel
Slowik. son of Ethel and Jacob
Slowik. will be called to the Torah
in honor of his Bar Mitzvah.
TEMPLE BETH TORAH
TV Bar Mitzvah of Daniel
Sagaraaa. son of RacheUe and
Alien Sugarman. will take place at
the Saturday morning Aug. 31
services at Temple Beth Torah.
Tamarac.
TEMPLE BETH AM
Adas. With, son of Adrienne
and Barry Wish, will become a
Bar Mitzvah celebrant at the
Saturday morning Aug. 31 service
at Temple Beth Am. Margate.
Slowik
Weintraub
The Bar Mitzvah of Todd
Silvenaaa. son of Ernestine and
Jeffrey Silverman. will be
celebrated at the Saturday morn-
ing Sept. 7 senice at Beth Am.
TEMPLE BETH ORR
Adria Orsolek. daughter of
Joan and Stanley Orsolek. will
celebrate her Bat Mitzvah at the
Saturday morning Aug. 31 service
at Temple Beth Orr, Coral
Springs.
Robert Oppeabeiater, son of
Janet and Peter Oppenheimer.
will be called to the Torah on the
occasion of his Bar Mitzvah at the
Saturday morning Sept 7 ser-
vices at Beth Orr.
RAMAT SHALOM
Gregg Ferstzaaa will become a
Bar Mitzvah at the Saturday mor-
ning Aug. 31 service at Ramat
Shalom, Plantation.
Rabbi Troy to Officiate Shabbat
Services at Temple Beth Israel
Temple Beth Israel. 7100 W.
Oakland Park Blvd.. Sunrise, has
announced that Rabbi Albert Troy
win be offtriafmg at Shabbat
Services.
Rabbi Troy has been a resident
of Sooth Florida since 1977. when
he served as Rabbi at Sunrise
Jewiae Center before retiring.
Rabbi Troy is s native of Penn-
syhraais and received his degree
from Yeahrva University in New
York. He was ordained at the
Jewish Institute of Religion in
1943 and has been a member of
the Rabbinical Assembly of
America for many years. In 1975,
be received the degree of Doctor
of Divinity from the Jewish
Theological Seminary of Amenca.
Before moving to Florida, Rabbi
Troy had been extremely active in
leader ship positions with many
civic, service and religious
organizations.
Rabbi Troy has s daughter liv-
ing in Boston, and two daughters
residing in Israel He is married to
the former Roselyn Tsvd and
they reside in Pompano Beach.
Temple Kol Ami Appoints
First Rabbinic Assistant
Temple Kol Ami aaaMMaaj the
appoinment of Rabbi Rachel Hert-
rman who will be Rabbinic assis-
tant for Youth and Edaration.
Rabbi Hertzxnan was ordained on
Junsjl tease afeeww Union Col-
lege Jewish Institute of Rehgxm.
Cincinnati Campos. She holds her
undergraduate degree in Judaic
Studies from Ohio State Universi-
ty in Cohunbos. Rabbi Hertzman.
for the past eight summers, has
served on the faculty of the
Goldman Union Camp Institute in
Zionsville. Indiana. From
1982-1984 she was director of
youth programs at HUC-JIR
(Hebrew Union College Jewish In
titute of Religion.)
Rabbi Hertzman's respon
of the expanded youth group pro-
gram for Grades 6 through 12.
She wiD be the ........a eeor
dsBator for the High School Pro-
gram of Kol Ami. and w
grades 7-10. In addition
be a teacher and hasp _
the Adult Education Programs of
the Coagregatjoe, She began her
duties at the beginning of August.
Robot Halpern of the Hebrew Congregation of LamdorntU presents a
check to Hebreu- Dag School of Ft. Landerdale$ Stk erode graduates
Jewish State-of-the-Art
technology of computerized
scanners.
This state-of-the-art develop-
ment is the result of years of
research conducted by Vaad
Mishmereth STaM, a consumer
protection agency dedicated to
"preserve and promote the
halachic integrity of the scribal
arts."
The Apple of that famous
story in the Bible is about to
meet the Apple of our com-
puter age.
And that event will make
it easier for ritual inspection
of the holiest artifacts in
Jewish life the scrolls of
the Torah, Tefillin and
Mezzuzot.
For though Jewish tradition
strictly maintains that these
sacred objects must be hand-
written by a eofer or scribe, he is
now being helped in dealing with
the host of laws regulating the
formation of the aleph-bet on par-
chment. by the space-age
Temple Emanu-El Appoints
New Religious Education Director
The Vasad, in association with
Dr. Charles Naiman of the
Massachusetts Institute of
Technology, has developed
specially designed software,
which allows computer scanners
to locate missing or extra letters
and words, as well as identify let-
ters that touch each other, all of
which render sacred objects
invalid.
Richard J. Levy, President of
Temple Emanu-El. 3245 W
Oakland Park Blvd.. Ft. Lauder
dale, has announced the appoint
ment of Leonard Kaufman
recently of Maiden
Massachusetts, as the new Direr
tor of Religious Education for the
synagogue.
Mr. Kaufman has been a
Resource Specialist in Jewish
Education for Temple Emanu-El
of Marblehead, Massachusetts for
the past fifteen years.
Mr. Kaufman, among his other
talents, has been at other times s
lay participant in the Cantonal
and Rabbinic services of the New
England region of the UAHC His
participation in the educational
circles of curriculum development
B'nai B'rith
Hails U.S.
B'nai B'rith International hail-
ed the United States government
for the agreement "to expunge
any reference to Zionism" from
the final United Nations docu-
ment on the closing women's
conference in Nairobi,
Phihp Lax of the United States,
chairman of the International
Council of B'nai B'rith, said the
accord "is s tribute to the hard,
diligent and creative work of the
delegation under the leadership of
Maureen Reagan and Alan
Keyea." He also praised other
Western nations for their efforts.
The B'nai B'rith leader
the world Jewish service
i is grateful for the ef
forts ef Egypt and Kenya for see-
to it that the conference "was
wrecked over the Tinaaaii
ine."
Karen Mima, Michael Soeua and Gregg Polity These ttndenU were
honored for laser ewotUencm xn Talnmiat the Day School $ yradaafisa
ceremony. Fran Mmnutew, Director of the Dm* School holds the pirn ftti
on Mkuak the erudentl name* were engraeed. Hebrew Day Scaeei u e
bmdtnary eftke Jemxmh Federation of Greater Fort LauderaaU.
|puVhwM9mnWaWKkWkn% /*VV "'- .HbbbbbWMIiBMHflaaa
a\
Candlelighting Times
Au.30-7:22i
g**- 7:11 p.a.
* 17 fell lm.
have placed him within the inner
circle of distinguished educators
in the Reform movement.
An immediate benefit
will be a dramatic red,
time required to exami]
scrolls. For example, a i
which consists of 713 ^
be read electronically
seconds; the 3.188 lettej
Tefillin will be able to I
one minute, and the So-
lera of the Torah will ujj
imately four hours -
the time it would or
quire to examine.
Rabbi David Greenfe
Mishmereth STaM, not
new system will uit
crease the number
Torah scrolls available
"Many Torah scrolls wl
written during the last!
years are not r^ing
because the\ are
suspected of being so."
Greenfeld added, hove
in no way will coropotj
replace the sofer, out se
assist him. "As a res_
computerized system,"
"the scribe will be affo
time to the actual
scrolls."
I exsask
Ann
miNW7uSt..Tim.ritl
t fta*. Lew Ptiaw Mm* 8
awl Plan Who.. Margatt 1
L Tntmf a* aarriea 8 p m.;!
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jl. iJOp-BL. rndtj8a.m..5[
m
(421-7060). SMS
rhdaySJOi
at caadMhtmg I
Aral St.. PowBHio Baal
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Part Wia*.
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SJO ajn.. 530 fM.,1
conqktcation cm-wi i
Bd.. Tamarac. r
(TSS-iaSU *1 OaUl
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(TaS-lTTTfc T770 NW 44 9d
frtday 8 ... #
(4M ism. is*
Prtaw 8 m
Kan- SiSMT
CONCatGATTON BDDGAL DAVID
Daily 8 aja.. aaadai 6 i
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LAUDCRDAU <**'
aaew through ?"*! 1
8 aan* *r aaWI
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8:48 aaa. and W
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tAMAT SMALOM HTI-aaMi 11S01 W. BWard BM-. ?*****-
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_ ^*y^gJgL8Mgg5mie Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 15
Literary Responses to Catastrophe.
At Apocalypse.
Catastrophe in
\Cult*re. By David
IIVtrd University
s. $20.
to Catastrophe
\ire. By Alan
Jimbia University
s. $26.
^JieobKibakoff
-years ago David R.
j Alan Mintz col-
, iwnching Proq^art*.
I devoted to Jewish
,frjty. It is notewor-
. j editors have also
r research interests,
r culminated in the
,ander review.
and Mintz's books
jwtinuum of Jewish
latastrophe beginning
Bible and extending
emodern period. Of the
Lthat of Roskies is the
sing. While Mintz
ifccussion to Hebrew
Rojkies surveys also
i cultural heritage
Jewry and in-
his purview folk
ttto writings, and
i of leading Jewish
i hu provided a valid
framework for his
[ nrious literary texts
iTt responded to
.Inthese writings he
evocation of blind
lawalyptic despair, but
l for meaning and a
r Jewish living. He in-
ut how various
> made use of specific
) express their inner-
i to suffering.
> by it was concepts
nt idea and martyr-
at the heart of
many literary outpourings. With
the advent of modernity and the
outbreak of pogroms, writers like
Mendele Mocher Seforim, Sholem t*came a means for coping with
Aleichem, and Bialik developed trauma of Jewish suffering
their own individualistic models of By viewing the totality of a cen-
tury of Yiddish and Hebrew
writing against the background of
classic literary texts. Roskies has
opened up new vistas for grasping
the forces at work in modern
Jewish literature.
The Hebrew term Hurban
(destruction) has come to be ap-
plied to the literature of the
Holocaust. Mintz has employed
this term as the title of his book
which focuses attention on the
reaction to the Holocaust in
Hebrew literature. In seeking
paradigms of meaning in Hebrew
writing he, too, is led to analyze
the traditional responses of
classical Hebrew literature. He
contrasts, for example, the horror
of destruction that is expressed in
the Book of Lamentations with
the midrashic interpretation of
that book and of the events that
precipitated the destruction of the
Temple. The Rabbis of the
Midrasha made use of additional
biblical texts, of parables, and
hermeneutical methods to account
for the destruction and to
strengthen the hopes for ultimate
redemption.
Moving to the medieval period,
Mintz discusses various liturgical
poems and chronicles which offer
a rationale for martyrdom and
Kiddush haShem. He contrasts
their approach with that of the
modern authors Mendele Mocher
Seforim, Tchernichowsky, and
Bialik who were no longer ready
to view martyrdom as an explana-
tion for suffering. His detailed
readings of the poems, Baruch of
Mayence by Tchernichowsky and
In the City of Slaughter by Bialik
underscore the new emphases of
these leading poets of the Hebrew
rebirth. t #
RegMflsAJi Itertflre;-*
Mintz points out that the Palmach
generation of authors paid virtual-
ly no attention to the Holocaust
during the fifties. It was only
after the Eichmann trial that
writers like Gouri, Bartov, and
Amichai devoted major novels to
this theme. Outstanding among
the authors who did not fail to
make the Holocaust their central
concern were the Poet Uri Zvi
Greenberg and the prose writer
Aharon Appelfield. Individual
chapters are devoted to an
analysis of the motifs in
Greenberg's Streets of the River
and to the literary language and
technique of Appelfeld's short
stories.
Mintz's volume ably sup-
plements that of Roskies.
For Sutzkever, as for many of his ToSetner they point up the role of
colleagues, literary expression Ur literature in making creative
Jewish survival possible in the
face of catastrophe.
Jacob Kabakoff is professor of
Hebraic and Judaic Studies,
Lehman College, City University
of New York. He is also editor of
the Jewish Book Annual.
response. The reader is introduc-
ed not only to the world of these
major writers, but also to that of
numerous other authors who
wrote in Yiddish and other
languages. In no other recent
critical work will the reader find
such a mine of insights into a
whole assemblage of writers,
many of whom have hitherto
received but scant treatment in
English. The works of Ansky,
Weiseenberg, Olitky,
Katzenelson, Shayevitch and
Rabon, to mention but a few, are
here illumined from the special
vantage-point of the author.
During the modern period which
saw the development of a secular
literature, many writers refused
to accept as explanations for
catastrophe such traditional ar-
chetypes as guilt for sin and the
hope for redemption. Beginning
with Bialik, they were led to
challenge the traditional bond bet-
ween God and His people which
they felt had been shattered by
destruction. Such ancient ar-
chetypes aa the akedah (binding of
Isaac), the covenant, and even the
crucifixion were given new ap-
plication and were imbued with
new relevance.
Of Roskies' special treatments
of individual authors one may
single out the chapter devoted to
Abraham Sutzkever. the Yiddish
partisan poet of Vilna. who today
makes his home in Israel. Roskies
traces the various stages in Sut-
zkever's writing on Holocaust
themes in which the poet bears
witness to many searing events.
wswire/U.S.A.
I ANGELES The Governments of West Germany,
, Hungary and Romania have independently agreed to
k heretofore confidential archives of the Holocaust
|th scholars from Israel's Yad Vaaem Martyrs and
Mmembrance Authority. The German state central ar-
iludwigsburg, which contains essential information on
renminals, will be made available for researchers.
1 A Boston psychologist who made a study of 75
mthe Boston area said one of his findings was that a
" to conceal one's Jewish identity, the extend to which a
[comfortable with the public references to Jews, and
.kL00"**"1 for wnat non-Jews felt about Jews "was
[Mate to high self-denigration and low self-esteem."
**J0N Prominent member of the Jewish communi-
iawn of Los Angeles, was honored in Waahington
1 the National Federation of Republican Women's
. Jj *** of America." In a tribute to outatanding
iT""**"' she was cited for her efforta to help L.A.
a drug habits. Also honored was Mrs. Barbara Rush.
nce-president and U.8. Senator Paula Hawkins of
JCUT Rep. Nancy Johnaon (R-Conn.) commended
*ent judiciary recently, following the prosecution
terror ring. Johnaon noted that land la "a friend
, *wdle East where justice is sacred and democracy
J!E* *" Prv*lnce in the region of "repwMfre
,nregimes ~< -*-__________-**_____i___
Health/Medical Newswire
Aging and Stress
Some individuals thrive in a "workaholic" environment and a
life stuffed with appointments, projects and schedules. But, to
many older people in the U.S. whose lifestyles have been both
structured and productive, no work way mean no future.
To many, old age has come to mean weeks of solitude, frustra-
tion, loneliness and loss of self-respect. These all add up to the
stress-producing situations that can lead to both physical and
mental illnesses which destroy an otherwise happy retirement.
Stress, in young or old, has been called the hidden killer.
Although not a disease, it does have symptoms and can kill. Stress
can cause a variety of ailments ranging from tension headaches to
ulcers. Other symptoms may include sleep loss, depression, ir-
regularity, gastritis, mental confusion or heart disease.
Experts say that some stress is helpful, even healthy. For in-
stance, it is stress that keeps us prepared for those important or
unusual occasions. As your adrenaline surges, it prepares your
body for the "fight or flight" reaction. You feel more alert, ready
to meet new challenges.
It's when these situations become ordinary or usual in your life
that stress is an unhealthy state. Dealing with that prolonged, or
extreme stress, is a situation that only the sufferer can control
and manage.
According to Drs. Doris and David Jonas, authors of "Young
Till We Die," older Americans are deprived of an emotional level
that affects every aspect of their well-being, whether
psychological, physical or social. Recognizing how and why older
people feel this way, they say, is an important step in improving
their well-being and overcoming stress-related problems.
Stress, like aging, is unavoidable, but we can manage our lives
and continue to plan our daily activities. It is often easier to
manager our own situations rather than allowing the situation to
manage ourselves.
If you are older or retired, there is no reason not to schedule
your life, to make appointments and plan your activities:
* Plan to eat a healthy die. Our diets plan an important role in
our well-being and are the basis for a healthy body. Remember the
four bask food grbupa ihePtheir rtnprtrttnTceto' dur heaMi.
* Make plans to exercise. Daily exercise can help you manage
your reactions to a stressful situation and is an important part of
a healthy lifestyle.
' Plan your other daily activities and, if time permits, be a
joiner. After spending a large share of your life working, why
stop now when you have the system almost perfected. Cultivate
your hobbies. Do all of those things that you never had time for
before.
* During times of exercise or prolonged stressful situations,
professional counseling may be helpful. Counselors and clergy can
be of great assistance during stressful situations such as the loss
of a spouse or child.
Both aging and stress are a part of living. For a healthier and
happier life, recognize them and welcome their advantages.
This column is compiled as a community service by North Beach
Community Hospital, Ft. Lauderdale.
Jt,.. ;.
and
'state sponsored terrorism.
|JL7< ""T Bfcfn**. executive director of the
^*| ongreas, has announced that the organisation
iSEltct,on **mint fed***! officials who use their
;* to further reugion. Siegman noted that the
tZHr ?** iactttnta involved the distribution at
, S??ty US Department of Education official
k^rST* America aa a "Christian nation" that
a Chnauan system of values."
2j Secretary of State George ShuKa cited
J*na against Jews and others in the Soviet
. i.L**** om chievements, "the most im-
f the Helsinki Accords have not been met.
JEWISH ACCORDING TO TRADITION.
Star of David Cemeteries and Funeral Chapels are Broward
County's only all Jewish Cemetery/Funeral Chapelt. Consecrated
by the Broward Board of Rabbis, staffed solely by Jewish Funeral
Directors and Memorial Counselors. Star of David is
concerned about Jewish burial traditions. These
traditions are the laws of our fathers and their forefathers
before them. These traditions are our heritage, so they
are important to us...And they are important to you.
Star of David Cemeteries and Funeral Chapels
Tamarac Lauderhill Hollywood
Broward. (305) 525-0800
Dade. 94*6100 S. Palm Beach. 722-9000 W. Palm Beach. 734-8440
I a* Saw of DavM CssssSsrtw Ftmaral Ch*U. P.O
D I >a*i mot* information on property rfertioM at Star ol David
D I want more information on pre-arranged funeral*
D I *il **"* information on your property exchange program
25700. Taasarac. FL 33320
D North Broward Q South Broward
Our lot* are in


i
"f It Tfre Jfcwjgh Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, August 30. 1985
Warning: The Surgeon General Has Determtrn
That Cigarette Smoking Is Dangerous to Your Head
Nrtmtmmm so good
Youamtasteifmabwtar.
9 mg. "w". 0.7 mg. mm (wr ogarmt by FTC method.


Full Text
Pig* 4 The Jewiah Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Frkky, AugustSO. 1986
Jewish Federation of
Cjreater Fort Lauderdale
_ W. Oakland Part Boolavwd
Ft Laudardaia. FL 33321
(308) 74M400 / Miami 945-Q731
Mailing Addraaa
P.O. Bo 28610
Tamarac, FL 333204610
Touching Jewish History
By GADI BEN-ZUR
The cheapest toy you can give a child in Israel today is money
Jan and jars of it.
With inflation currently running at over 400 percent a year,
coins are diminishing in value at such a rate that they are hardly
worth carrying around. So these days, almost every household
has its jars of coins practically worthless except for their enter
tamment value in the nursery
"When we arrived her in 1978." said an immigrant from the
United States, "we bought a brand new. five-room penthouse
apartment in Jerusalem. Today, the money we paid for it
wouldn't cover half a week's shopping at the supermarket."
In those days, there were about 600 agurot to a dollar. Today,
there are over a million.
ironically, though, as modern Israeli corns become worthless
almost before you can spend them, ancient coins found at ar-
eheological "digs" around the country are increasing in value
Of course, not all the ancient coins discovered at these "digst"
find their way into museums. Most are. in fact, sold on the private
market to coin collectors and jewelers.
The most common of the ancient coins on the market these days
were minted by the Roman emperors Emperors Constantine.
Severus Alexander, Diocletian and Maxunianus around the
third and fourth century.
But Roman emperors weren't the first in the business of pro-
ducing coins. The Greeks, the Hebrews and the Macedonians, of
whom Alexander the Great was the favorite son, were producing
coins long before the Romans arrived on the stage of history.
Perhaps one reason why Roman eoins are found in relative
abundance by archeologists today is that Rome. too. experienced
periods of hyperinflation, which led to massive mintings of coins
-.and consequent devalaatins; >; fiavy
/eunously.Wany a^tle^rMarTRMha'sMUbdria^ *0rafesfC
similar to those detected by economic analysts in Israel today
wars and the tendency of both societies to live bevond their
means
But while Israelis today indulge themselves in international
travel, electronic gadgetry and high living, the Romans were
obsessive consumers of expensive silks, spices, slaves and
entertainment.
"There has recently been an upsurge of interest in ancient
coins," says Moshe Vol. a Jerusalem-based jeweler and coin
dealer, who is cashing in on this new fascination.
Mr. Volk was "turned on" to the idea of reproducing ancient
coins because be realized that his own fascination with these
pieces of antiquity would be shared by millions of others who
regard the Holy Land as their spiritual home.
"Perhaps." he says, "my fascination with these antique coins
was heightened by the fact that I was actually handling objects
which had been handled by my ancestors thousands of years sgo.
"The coins themselves are a concrete expression of Jewish
history. Some date from the very beginning of the Second Com-
monwealth, others are from Hassmonean times. Still others were
minted by King Herod and King Agrippa, or during the ill-fated
revolts by the Jews against Rome.
But original ancient coins in good condition are probably out of
the reach of many people who would treasure such objects, so I
decided to make them available to the widest possible audience by
reproducing them, using the very latest technology available."
Now he is ready to share his treasures with the world and
perhaps, provide a painless history lesson in the process.
Says Mr. Volk. who taught mathematics at Adelphi University
in New York before moving to Israel with his wife and six
children: "These coins are a tangible link with the past. And
researching the origins of the coins for the brochure which accom-
i*hF loridian o
-------,_______________________OFOWtATtn FOWT LAUntWMU
August 28,1985
Dear Friends:
In Israel, electric bills are up 53 percent. Water bills up 82 percent. Transport.
tion costs up 100 percent. Not to mention leaps in the price of basic food staples
like bread, eggs and frozen meats. Or increasing wage cuts and freezes, unemplov
ment and mandatory government dismissals. '
While costs are soaring, the shekel is diminishing. And the new, tough economic
program entails major government cuts in health, education and social programs
This has serious consequences for hundreds of thousands of Jews in Israel.
And we can help. Our Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale/United
Jewish Appeal provides social welfare and humanitarian programs here in Greater
Fort Lauderdale, in Israel and more than 30 lands around the world. Our support is
vital in sustaining those humanitarian services affecting the new immigrant, youth
firograms for disadvantage^ teens, a variety of activities preserving dignity for
srael's aged community, renewing hope for residents of Project Renewal
neighborhoods, education for Jews of all ages, and innovative rural settlement pro-
grams in Israel. Through our annual campaign, we are helping to secure the Jewish
people's future. Our commitment to Israel demands immediate action to meet the
most difficult economic burden confronting our people.
Cash is urgently needed now, as Israel's newest economic measures bite into those
vital programs that affect so many Jews in need. They are biting the bullet right
now. So let's do our part to help ease the economic burden facing our brethren.
If you have already made your pledge, please honor your word and fulfill your
good intentions. Send your check today.
Sincerely,
3^s^ fi^gS *-+>
$~M~
JOHN STRENG
General Campaign
Chairman
BRIAN J. SHERR
President
GLADYS DAREN
Cash Collections
Chairperson
PUB) K SMOCMET MARVIN L VINE
s^ZZSEi^^
- AOrtniing Supervisor Abraham B MMntn
Fort Laoderdele.HollywoodOff** SMS W (MIMRan, BwTfort laude*.* FL M321
Pone 74S-S400
! 1M NSh Si. Miem..Fla 33132 wneljrM*t
_ MynBec JTA, SMoAmiVNS NEA. AJFA. and FPA
SUSeCMerKMRATES fSXZHOSX"|7SOoSctfVLnj!*U'I*Um**o
* Federation of Oraater Fort Laudardaia
if*** **tf'"oo < OfOdlor Fort Laudardaia Brian j Snori. Prewdent Jo* M Tmm* Fut.h.^
Director Merv.n La Vine. Director ol Communicationa. Lor. Omaoetg Aawatant Oeclo7of
Federation and The Jewten .n of Greater Fort Lauderdale ahouid be eddreaaed J.,.h
Federation ol Greater Fort Lao ... P O Bo. 2M10 Tamarac FL 3332OSSI0
Friday, August 30, 1985
Volume 14
Fred laeeeet
13ELUL5745
Number 27
parties each set of reproductions is a challenging intellectual
exercise."
Perhaps in a couple of thousand years time, one of his descen-
dants will be sitting in Jerusalem researching the authenticity of
coins issued by the national unity government of Israel in 1986.
Together We Can Help Now
From the boroughs of New York City to the rural townships
of Georgia, the windy lakefront of Chicago to the shores of
Maryland, by the thousands come the men, women and children to
Greater Fort Lauderdale. And as they come, they bring with
them their cultures, lifestyles and heritage.
Here in Broward, there is such a mixture of accents that it's
hard to tell what is naturally a West Browardite or Fort Lauder-
dale native. But one thing is for certain, there is a camaraderie
a joining of purpose and force to unite into a cohesive community
with one common goal the ultimate goal of helping our
brethren for they so desperately need our help.
As we sit in our ocean front apartments and enjoy the
crashing of the waves or play a round of golf on the green and feel
the good warm earth under our feet, there are the tens of
thousands searching for the scraps of food lodged beneath the
dumpsters hidden from view or the body slumped against the
park bench using s newspaper for a pillow.
Yea, our community has the sick, the tired, and poor, and only
we can help.
Did you know that... recently a family of nine needed sup-
plemental kosher food packages, free medical services and
counseling.
Did you know that ... a 21 year-old bettered and abused
Jewish woman with her infant daughter recently needed safe
refuge.
Did you know that... last month a 78-year-old Jewish man,
forceably evicted while he was ill in the hospital, was found sleep-
ing in a friend's car with nowhere to go.
Did you know that thousands of individuals yearly turn to the
Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale. her beneficiaries
and supported agencies, seeking direct crisis intervention in keep-
ing with the highest standards of Jewish tradition.
If you have already made your pledge to the annual Federa-
tion/United Jewish Appeal Campaign, we urge you to honor that
responsibility by providing the much needed dollars to aid our
fellow man in need. If you have not yet made a contributes*, we
urge you to help us at this time of grave consequences and sea roll
your heart for lifesaving, lifegiving commitment.
Yes. Fort Lauderdale. we have the needy and the vulnerable
and we can make the difference in the quality of their lives. As the
Economic tide rises, the poor have not been lifted. We must shape
ur awareness of the needs within our community and begin an
aggressive effort to meet them. For tl .but for the grace of God
go I.
Congress

Approves
Aid for Israel
In separate actions
House and Senate appro*
the fiscal 1986 Fowl
Assistance Authorise
Act conference report
the fiscal 1985 Suppler
tal Appropriations Act i
ference report.
The authorization
which passed the House!
262-161 vote and the Sen
by voice vote, contains |
billion in all-grant, re*
and supplemental assis
for Israel, as well
numerous other pro-I
provisions. This marks
first time since 1981 t
Congress has enact]
foreign aid author^
legislation. Thesupoten1'
tal bill, which passed
House by a 320-106 yotei
the Senate by a voice w
includes $1.5 billion in
grant economic asast*
for Israel. Both bills
await presidential appro*
The State Dep--
authoriiation conferg
report, including *fJT1
for Ethiopian refugee
Israel, strong antH*.
language, and prov
protecting Israels
ticipation in the U.r^.
ed thV Senate!t>y v<**
last week. The Hou*
scheduled to take up
report before it adjourns]
the August recess.


Frida^AugMtjO^iggyrhe Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 6
Judaica High School Begins 7th Year
oun ctiiHontQ will inrlnrlo Miooi/,..._.,- ^"^
, 250 students will include Missionaries at
.vnected to participate the Door, Modern Medicine
' than 25 different and Jewish Law, Literature
inHaicaHigh of the Holocaust, Family
Jewish Relationships in the Bible,
Jewish Short Stories!
Sociology of the American
Jew, and Behind the
Headlines.
Kionc.f Greater Fort
derdale. sponsored by
fcnaeogues in North
Ed and the Federa-
Central Agency for
.wish Educate
Lnagers from 8th through
- from Temples
if
|eWisl Education
^ades from Temples
,Am. Beth Israel, Beth
gethTorah. Emanu-El,
X Shalom and Temple
,lom of Pompano will
for three trimesters
the course of the
16 school year the
year of operation of
ration's Judaica High
. Classes of the first
ester start Monday,
[, 9,1985 in classrooms
the northern branch,
at Temple Beth Am,
Royal Palm Blvd.,
,te and Tuesday, Sept.
1985 in classrooms
at the Jewish Corn-
Center, 6501 West
Blvd., Plantation,
at both branches
North Broward's Judaica High
School is administered by Sharon
S. Horowitz. The South Florida
Judaica High School program is
coordinated by the Miami based
Central Agency for Jewish Educa-
tion. Dr. Abraham J. Gittelson
serves as North Broward's Direc
tor of Education.
Judaica High School provides a
five-year curriculum, devised by
Educational Directors of the
synagogues in consultation with
Mrs. Horowitz and Dr. Gittelson.
leading to graduation. Courses
are also credited toward Confir-
mation in respective congrega-
tions which the students attend.
The faculty has been selected
from those teachers in the com-
munity who are both
knowledgeable in Jewish studies
and who have special rapport with
teenagers.
Students who complete the five
year program and who are enroll-
ed in special teacher training
courses are eligible for Sunday
CAJE Begins Planning
for Jewish Book Month
! celebration of Jewish
Month goes back to
i when a Boston
named Fanny
ein set up a Judaica
H to mark the first
Book Week. It later
national acceptance
popularity. By 1943,
i the Jewish Book
:il was formally
the week long
had expanded into
i Book Month.
Sixtieth Annual Jewish
I Month stirs excitement in
Iwrid of Jewish, books," says
[Abraham J. Gittelson, direc-
t education for the Jewish
Jon of Creater Fort
"It provides an im-
I U of us to enlarge our
and to increase our
torth BrowaM Midrasha of
Agency for Jewish
' Garni
Education is planning to publish a
brochure listing interesting pro-
grams for Jewish Book Month
which is Nov. 7 to Dec. 7, 1985.
They have asked each one of the
organizations to let them know
what their programs for Jewish
Book Month will be: the place of
the program; the time and date of
the program; fee; a short explana-
tion of the program and whether
it is opened or closed to the public.
Helen Weisberg, Administrator of
the North Broward Midrasha said.
"In this way we hope to bring to
the community the total program-
ming for Jewish Book Month.
therefore encouraging everyone
to participate in the 60th year of
this celebration."
To be listed in the brochure for
Jewish Book Program, an
organization need just send all the
above information to Mrs.
Weisberg at the Jewish Federa-
tion of Greater Fort Lauderdale.
For further information call
748-8400.
THI AIR CONOITIONIO
Wald
man
MOTEL
Miami Bench/. Hnttt GMt Kotiwr CuWnt
Your Hosts Tlw wattnan ft Wtomr Famtot
HIGH HOLIDAY SPECIALS
K>SH HASHANA Y0M KIPPUR
^istostpTSe $340 ^
1 Sot, and hold '*
,_ WALDMAN II
n*tII ANanfc Towns n*
'^WtOkUN M Sep. 15 to Sept 26 ,iZSf-
JffSTAV
|^'***24.o2e J235
***CB C0H00CTH) IV RENOWNED CANTO*
&KRIY R^RVATJONS SUGGESTED
Phone 1.53$.5731 or 1-534-4751
MTV* OCEAN AT43STREET
OK.
School Certificates awarded by
th;jBwd of License of CAJE. In
addition. North Broward students
ran participate m the Akiva
Leadership Development pro-
gram which meets each week, and
is designed to provide the
American Jewish Community
with future leaders who are
knowledgeable about their Jewish
heritage and the American Jewish
communities.
Special programming is of
prime importance in the Judaica
High School. Judaica High School
teenagers meet with other
teenagers throughout South
Honda for study, recreation,
prayer and an examination of
Jewish identity. In addition there
is a series of special trips cor-
responding to each grade level.
An exciting development in this
year's Judaica High School will be
the sponsorship of students to at-
tend programs in Israel. Through
a grant from the Jewish Federa-
tion of Greater Fort Lauderdale.
Judaica High School students will
be able to attend summer pro-
grams in Israel. Incentive grants
will be available for any student in
the Judaica High School who has
completed three years of their
Jewish education. Special pro-
grams in the High School also con-
tinue on a weekly basis. In the
planning stages for this fall are
Jewish cultural activities, Israeli
folk singers, dance troupes,
Holocaust survivors and holiday
celebrations.
Sharon S. Horowitz, Ad-
ministrator of the Judaica High
Dr. Abraham J. Gittelson, Federation's director of education, it pic-
tured addressing a group of students who attend Federations Judaica
High School.
School of North Broward, noted
that "the high school years are
crucial in the determination of an
individual's life long values.
Judaica High School seeks to pro-
vide the student with a sense of
belonging and pride in his or her
Jewish heritage."
Inquiries for registration and
cipation in the Judaica High
ol should be directed to CA-
JE at the Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale, 8358
West Oakland Park Blvd., Fort
Lauderdale, Fl. 33321, telephone
748-8400.
CAJE i* a major beneficiary
agency of the Jeunsh Federation
receiving funds from the annual
Federation/United Jewish Appeal
campaign.
ire Kosher.*.
idayTradition
Holiday times
are family times!
What better way to enjoy your holiday wKh family and friends
than to gather around a bountiful holiday table set with all the
festive foods of the season, including a big beautiful Empire
Turkey or Roasting Chicken? You II be a part of the tradition
of quality and good eating enjoyed by families like yours for
over three generations!
Empire Kosher.
The Guaranteed Kosher Turkey and Roasting Chicken!
Distributed by
St. Petersburg. FL Q & A Food Service
(813)323-1205
Miami Beech, FL Mendelson, Inc.
(305) 672-5800
Hialeah. FL Tropic Ice Company
(305)624-5750


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