The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 3, no. 7 (Apr. 5, 1974)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 9, 1976 called v.4, no. 27 but constitutes v.5, no. 1; issue for July 7, 1989 called v.18, no. 11 but constitutes v.18, no. 13.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44570954
lccn - sn 00229545
ocm44570954
System ID:
AA00014312:00298

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Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward


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Full Text
he Jewish FLORINAN
OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE
, 14 Number 24
Fort Lauderdale, Florida Friday, July 19, 1985
FrdSliochtl
.Prki' 13 Cents
U.S. Jewish population grows;
Florida shows largest increase
I cutting the ribbon at the opening of the new Leonard L. Farber
i Center on the JCC campus are (left to right): Alvin Capp, JCC
id; Samuel M. Soref; and Leonard L. Farber.
[JCC opens new pool
)se to 200 people
ited the opening of
new Leonard L.
er Aquatics Center by
gating in a ribbon-
ceremony Sunday
n June 23 at Fort
erdale's Jewish Corn-
Center, 6501 West
Blvd.
)nard Farber, for
i the pool is named, ad-
;d the group of
ers, guests, campers,
Jts and grandparents,
how pleased he was
' make this new pool
|ex possible. It was his
id expectation that
ew Farber pool will
be a center of water-
related activity for the en-
tire community.
JCC President Alvin Capp
and JCC Executive Director
Phil Cofman also spoke
from the podium thanking
other major contributors to
the Farber Center in-
cluding: American Brands,
Howard L. Block, Mr. and
Mrs. Harry Brody, Mr. and
Mrs. Jacob Brodzki, Mr. and
Mrs. Alvin Capp, Mr. and
Mrs. Philip Cofman, Mr.
and Mrs. Leonard L.
Farber, Mr. and Mrs. Milton
S. Frankle, Mr. and Mrs.
Albert Garnitz, Mr. and
Mrs. Seymour Gerson, Mr.
and Mrs. Alvin Ghertner,
Continued on Page 2
NEW YORK (JTA) The
Jewish population in the
United States in 1984 was
estimated to be 5.817
million, an increase of
89,000 over the year prior,
according to statistics
released in the 1985
American Jewish Year
Book, published by the
American Jewish
Committee.
Florida, according to the
Year Book, registered the
largest gain in Jewish
population during the last
year, substantially leading
other sunbelt states mark-
ing increases.
Florida's gain of nearly
80,000 Jews pushed its
statewide total to 558,820
giving it the third largest
concentration of Jews 5.2
percent in the nation, led
only by New York with
1,879,955 10.6 percent -
and New Jersey with
433,475 5.8 percent.
Florida is also the third
most populous Jewish state
in the U.S. after New York
and California.
Increases Mostly In
Southwest
Other states listing
significant gains were
primarily in the Southwest;
Arizona, 53,285, up 4,000;
Colorado, 44,365, up almost
3,000; and Texas, 78,470,
rising by over 1,000.
In the Southeast,
Georgia's Jewish population
rose by 1,300 to 42,156.
Other Southern states
meanwhile showed slight
drops, including Alabama,
Louisiana, and North
Carolina and South
Carolina. In the Far West,
Oregon recorded some
population loss while
California's Jewish popula-
tion was up slightly from the
year before, at 792,515.
Pennsylvania followed
fifth in Jewish population at
412,210, succeeded by Il-
linois at 261,320;
Massachusetts, 248,395;
Maryland, 199,415; Ohio,
104,435; and Connecticut,
at 107,575.
Smaller Household Size
According to the Year
Book article "Recent
Jewish Community Popula-
tion Studies: A Roundup"
written by Gary Tobin and
Alvin Chenkin, all cities
studied, with the exception
of Cleveland, reported a
smaller mean household size
than the 2.8 figure recorded
by the National Jewish
Population Study in 1970.
Denver, Los Angeles, and
Miami showed the least
number of Jews per family,
with 2.2. members.
According to the article,
St. Louis households
reported the biggest annual
incomes, with 43 percent
earning more than $40,000
annually. New York City's
Jewish families showed the
>ha B'Av destruction to tragedy to the anticipation of redemption
BRAHAM J. GITTELSON
Director of Edaeatioa
Jwuh Rdaeatioa
ps more than any
[aspect of Judaism, the
> calendar reflects the
g of the Jews to re-
in his own life, the
I historical experiences
} people.
1 Exodus from Egypt,
Nmple, is the prime
1 o* the Providence of
[and the promises of
Jption for all mankind.
Modus from slavery to
i is the common
that is interwoven
H tne holidays of
h- Shavuot, Sukkot
vn the Shabbat. At
*[. m the Sukkah,
tne Shabbat table,
enact and relive that
! *> as to internalize it
J* y the historical ex-
Pto which it expresses.
[Jerc are tragic times
T nistury as well and to
Jnem would be false
il event and to
the lessons that can be
derived from it. Tisha B'Av,
the ninth day of the Hebrew
month of Av, which begins
at sundown on Saturday Ju-
ly 27, is the paradigm of
defeat and destruction, of
sadness and mourning, and
yet of future redemption as
well.
Tisha B'Av com-
memorates the major
tragedies of Jewish history
the destruction of the
First Temple in 586 BCE by
the Babylonians, and of the
Second Temple by the
Romans more than 500
years later in 70 CE. Tradi-
tion assigns Tisha B'Av that
day on which the generation
of Israelites which had left
Egypt were decreed to die
in the desert, while a new
generation of free men
would enter the Promised
Land.
Tisha B'Av marks as well
the fall of the fortress of
Beitar to the Romans in the
year 135 CE, symbolizing
the crushing of the revolt of
next largest incomes, with
33 percent earning over
$40,000 yearly. Approx-
imately one-third of Jewish
households in Denver
reported incomes of more
than $40,000.
"On the other hand," the
authors wrote "in every
community except
Washington, D.C., at least
10 percent of the population
have household incomes
under $10,000, and many
report incomes under
$5,000." According to the
authors, Los Angeles had
the most households 21
percent of the community
with earnings of less than
$10,000.
According to the study,
cities showed a substantial
variation in the denomina-
tional affiliations of their
Jewish residents. St. Louis
and Milwaukee reported a
larger percentage of
Reform Jews 52 percent
than other denomina-
tions. Conservatives com-
prised the majority of Jews
in Minneapolis St. Paul.
Seattle reported the largest
concentration of Orthodox
Jews, at 15 percent.
Religious zealots
demonstrate
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
About 4,000 religious zealots
demonstrated over the weekend
against a new municipal swimm-
ing pool in the Ramot
neighborhood because it will be
open on the Sabbath and will per-
mit mixed bathing men and
women.
Several motorists were slightly
wounded Saturday when their
cars were stoned by ultra-
Orthodox Jews in the adjacent
neighborhood of Ramot Eshkol.
KSTtUCTIOM OF THF. TEMPLE
Bar Kochba against Roman
dominance. But a year later,
it was to mark the plowing
up of the Temple Mount by
the Romans and the
establishment of a Roman
temple on the site.
Nor was tragedy to cease
in the centuries that follow-
ed. The prayers of mourning
said on Tisha B'Av, the
'kinot,' refer to the burning
of 24 cart loads of the
Talmud in Paris in 1242 ind
the destruction of scores of
communities during the
Crusades. Tradition dates
the expulsion of the Jewish
community of Spain, in
1492, after centuries of a
"Golden Age" of Jewish and
culture in that land, to the
day of Tisha B'Av.
Traditional Jewish law
and custom concretize the
feelings of anguish that in-
tensify during the three
week period preceeding
Tisha B Av that marked the
increasing destruction of
both the First and Second
Temples. From the 17th day
of Tammuz, of the
preceeding month, to Tisha
Continued on Page 12


P*g2 The Jewish Flbridian of Greater "Port Laoderdd^nday. July 19, 1^6
Seen at the ribbon ceremony art (left to right): Alvin Capp. JCC presi-
dent and Mr. and Mrs. Samuel M. Soref.
JCC pool
Continued from Page 1
Mr. and Mrs. Seymour
Goldstein, Mr. and Mrs. Leo
Goodman, Mr. and Mrs.
Alvin S. Gross, Mr. and
Mrs. Henry F. Hyman, Mr.
and Mrs. Milton Keiner, Mr.
and Mrs. Harry Klinghoffer,
Mr. and Mrs. Harvey
Kopelowitz, Hildreth K.
Levin, Dr. and Mrs. Ken-
neth Levine, Dr. and Mrs.
Lawrence Levine, Mr. and
Mrs. Ben Marcus, Mr. and
Mrs. Allen Morris, Dr. and
Mrs. James Morris, Mr. and
Mrs. Jack Nudelman, Anita
M. Pearlman, Mr. and Mrs.
David Schulman, Mr. and
Mrs. Abram Silverman, Mr.
and Mrs. Samuel M. Soref,
Dr. and Mrs. Denis Trupkin,
Josephine Wolf and Wilson
Wright.
Helping cut the red ribbon
stretched across the guard
rails at the shallow end of
one pool were Capp, Farber
and Samuel M. Soref,
another major contributor.
As the ribbon was cut,
everyone was invited to
swim or just drop in and test
the new facility. The many
adults and children who ac-
cepted the invitation en-
joyed the experience of be-
ing "first ones in the pool."
The new Farber Pool was
planned to open before the
JCC Summer camping pro-
gram, which began on Mon-
day June 24. During the
two, four week sessions, 500
children, ages two through
high school age, divided into
six different camps within
the camp, will have the op-
portunity for two swim
periods every day, in addi-
} tion to joining in other
i sports, enrichment, cultural
S and Judaic activities.
The Aquatic Center is the
JCC vice president Jeff
Streitfeld ana daughter Rachel
are among the first to get wet in
the new pool.
first major facility to be
completed as part of the
Center's new building and
development program. Next
on schedule is the remodel-
ing and air-conditioning of
the JCC gym to begin in
September. Made possible
by a funding program in-
itiated by the generosity of
Samuel M. and Helene
Soref, it is planned for com-
pletion this winter.
With the addition of the
Farber Aquatics Center
which has a Jacuzzi, a
wading pool, locker and
changing facilities, and the
newly renovated gym hav-
ing the most modern equip-
ment for floor hockey,
basketball, volleyball, and
other games, exercises, and
gymnastics, the JCC hopes
to serve many members in
the community in the areas
of the most popular Florida-
style sports and recreation.
The JCC i a major
beneficiary agency of the
Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale.
Temple Emanu-EI
Outreach program
As part of the Union of
American Hebrew Congregations
National Program for Outreach
Rabbi Jeffrey L. Ballon will offer
it* annual Conversion and
Outreach workshop. Beginning
October 2, the course will be con-
ducted on Wednesday evenings
7 for 12 sessions. This program is
-. designed to service and inform
those who weald like to learn
more about the Jewish faith,
customs and ceremonies. The
course will fulfill one of the
minimum requirements necessary
for purposes of adoption of the
Jewish faith. Often this workshop
is attended by those who have a
desire to reacquaint themselves
with Judaism, its history and
traditions. Information about
registration and tuition is
available at the temple office,
3246 W. Oakland Park Blvd.. Fort
Lsuderdale, or cad 731-2310.
'Shalom Show' features Federation Preside
Brian Sherr, President of the
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale, accompanied by
Federation assistant executive
director Janice Salit, were guests
on the July 14 edition of the
Shalom Show.'
'Shalom Show' host, Richard
PeriU. questioned Sherr about the
many aspects of Federation; pro-
blems, main issues, trends and
services.
"The main issues facing the
Federation," Sherr said, "is the
growing need for local services,
the increased needs of Israel, our
growing elderly population, and
the need to involve more people in
the Federation process."
Asked whst is the Federation?,
Sherr responded, "It is the cen-
tral address of the Jewish com-
munity. The Federation brings
together all elements of the
Jewish community to respond to
Jewish needs locally and in Jewish
communities around the world."
Salit added, "Through the
United Jewish Appeal campaign,
which is the central activity of the
Federation, we can bring together
the resources to respond to
Jewish needs."
nt
The show highly,
serves profllJP*M
?on; ConJ*
Committee, WhjT
Semitismaswella,
Jewish community',
public issues; the
tion program, wo*
meals and recre^l
citizens; the ChaplZ
vided indirectly th*
tion's support of the
munity Center, the Je
*31
Come! Celebrate Israel on UJA's
Student Leadership Mission
Dec. 24-Jan. 3
A Mission is a very special event
designed for United Jewish Ap-
peal leaders a unique ex-
perience packed into an intensive,
full ten days. An unforgettable
journey into Israeli life and
society.
The 1986 UJA Student Leader-
ship Mission to Israel is a unique
opportunity to explore the ruins of
Masada, celebrate Shabbat at the
Western Wall, visit Yad Vashem,
compare lifestyles, concerns and
priorities with Israeli students,
and much, much more.
The UJA Student Leadership
Mission, departing for Israel on
Dec. 24, 1985 and returning on
Jan. 3, 1986, is open to 130
American Jewish college
students. As a prerequisite, par-
ticipants must serve m\
UJA campaign leaden i
1985-86 school year.
This is a unique Missksj
designed for the unique i
student. Come!
Call Mission coordinate,!
Jackowitz at 784-8
reserve a place on the)
Leadership Mission to I
Sam learned about
The GUARDIAN PLAN, program and
changed his mind about
buying cemetery property in Flor
hOfibSS ftmi]T Sam s family also had strong traditions One of those was
ounai m the family cemetery property in New York. But now that he and his wife
have retired to Florida he was led to believe that his family tradition was no
longer practical, even though he would prefer to have funeral services back
home Sam was worried about the emotional burden on his family And frankly.
he was worried about the cost
nrI^rnanQfSnfd t0'dihim about Tne GUARDIAN PLAN, insurance funded
P7 2X5 wml Sr0gram Here are the facts S9"1 ot
He learned he could have funeral services in New York at a very reasonable
E^,X?a h6? C,uld arrange a"thedetails in advance and **the*"*
nfrSram ti m ^fr ^ sen,kxs ne wa"ted. And The GUARDIAN PLAN
3aX r^fSSS* the aTl!nt ^ never increase He also leame?te
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OI020?<70l020VB-2/IOIOIO^^!Ef?^
St*andCanada ,n SuS5 rStJi "4^2'*************,ims^"SHS


Friday, July 19,1985/The Jewiah Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdalc Page 3
New York's Mayor says absorption role makes
clear importance of Federation/UJA campaigns
fork's Mayor Edward I.
i light of a recent visit to
Olim at Mevasseret
bsorption Center near
said, The vigil made
Hi/ support of UJA and
un is >rry important
fund these projects."
I special interview with
fetch IVsk," Koch said he
ressed i hat UJA/Federa-
ugn funds were helping
had made Aliyah, for a
ms, to become ab-
[srael. He cited three
he met at the Center, one
fled from Ethiopia's
mother whose family had
pogr"iii in Morocco; and a
family came from
| for religious reasons.
were ill together at the
mi ("enter, he noted, be-
bv the campaign.
American Jews
laid Israelis even if they
with Israeli policies.
makes mistakes like
; else." he said, "but all of
an obligation to keep
trong. So I give to UJA,
notwithstanding my criticisms."
Koch said some anti-Israeli
criticism by others is an Anti-
Semitic ruse. He noted that Shiite
Muslims, who had hijacked TWA
Flight 787 near Athens June 14
spirited away passengers with
Jewish-sounding surnames.
They weren't seeking only those
with Israeli passports he
said."The hatred is directed at
Jews. The fate of Jews worldwide
is tied up with the fate of Israel."
He said U.S. Jews should aid
Jews overseas despite needs at
home and feel good about it.
"When Catholics give to the
Bishop's Fund to propagate the
faith and save Catholics and
others from famine," Koch said,
"are they doing something that is
immoral or anti-American? It's
ridiculous to think that you are
limited to providing only here in
America your charitable contribu-
tions. No other group believes
that, nor should they." And why
should Jews believe that par-
ticularly when, if they don't pro-
vide for these Jewish communities
out of Israel and in Israel
who will?"
New York's Mayor Edward I. Koch greets
Ethiopian Jewish immiorants at the
Mevasseret Zion Absorption Center near
Jerusalem.
Chaplaincy Commission presents
'Dr. Alvin Colin Memorial Award' to Rabbi David W. Gordon
I
Golden, chairman of Federation's Chaplaincy Commis-
pnd Rabbi Albert B. Schwartz, Commission director, pre-
'Dr. Alvin Colin Chaplaincy Memorial Award' to Rabbi
Gordon, as Federation executive director Joel Telles
k
l'">re (left), ad-
,f of North Ridge
"Tntal- Presented a
*JCommendation to
y*}* W. Gordon, on
R*w outstanding work
wn of the hospital.
Rabbi Israel Halpern,
spiritual leader of Hebrew
Congregation of Lauderhill
and a member of the Commis-
sion, presented North Ridge
Hospital administrator Ray-
mond Poors, with a Sabbath
Candelabra, a gift from the
Commission, for use by the pa-
tients of the hospital.
Private Jewish School
Seeks Professional to establish develop-
n! office. Responsible for fundraising and
R'ic Relations. Position available Sept. 1,
ro Deadline for applications, July 25,1985.
^ Resume to: Director
5801 Parker Ave.
West Palm Beach, FL 33405
Rabbi David W. Gordon was
presented with the 'Dr. Alvin Col-
in Chaplaincy Memorial Award,'
by the Federation's Chaplaincy
Commission on behalf of his
outstanding work, service and
dedication to the North Broward
Jewish community.
Rabbi Gordon serves as chaplain
of North Ridge General Hospital.
"Rabbi Gordon is always available
to lend a helping hand whenever
he is needed," stated Rabbi Albert
B. Schwartz, Chaplaincy Commis-
sion director. "He donates
countless hours of his time to the
Commission, doing such things as
conducting High Holy Day ser-
vices to shut-ins at nursing homes,
and prisons. He is truly most
deserved of this award."
The 'Dr. Alvin Colin Chaplaincy
Memorial Award' was established
by the Federation in memory of
Dr. Alvin Colin, the founder and
first chairman of the Chaplaincy
Commission.
Paying special tribute to Rabbi
Gordon's achievements was Rabbi
Mordecai Brill, who represented
his colleagues of the Chaplaincy
Corps of Volunteer Rnhhic .
AUJA
Mission
to
Israel.
More than you can imagine...
Not an ordinary trip, but an extraordinary experience.
October 9-20 Campaign Leadership Mission.
Poland and Israel. (Limited space available).
October 16-20 National Women's Mission. Morocco
and Israel or Poland and Israel.
December 24-January 3 Student Leadership Mis-
sion. Israel only.
December National Singles Mission. Israel only.
For reservations and information, please call Mis-
sion coordinator Sandy Jackowitz at 748-8400.


Page 4 The Jewish FToridian of Greater Fort LmderdaWFrkky, July 19, 1985
Catch-22 Situation
Cause for Concern
At the time, Defense Minister Yitzhak
Rabin seemed to have a good point but a
private point, and only for the troubled
leaders of the Unity Government. The
American hostages were still languishing in
the TWA jet that had been hijacked by
Shiite terrorists over Greece and that stood
silently at Beirut International Airport.
Both the United States and Israel were
making public statement after public state-
ment reiterating their position that there
would be no caving in to the demands made
by the Shiite terrorists.
The problem was that the hostages were
Americans, but the demands were directed
at Israel: Release the 700-odd Arabs in-
carcerated at Atlit Prison, or the hostages
will suffer a terrible fate.
The public statements had no impact on
the terrorists. Instinctively, they knew that
the Reagan Administration was talking
tough on the outside but applying as much
"secret" pressure as it could on the Israelis
to let the prisoners go.
At the same time, a somewhat less than
subtle media blitz cooked up an anti-Semitic,
anti-Israel drive at home to force the Israelis
to act. Although they had declared only-
weeks before the hiiaciang that they intend-
ed to release the Atlit prisoners shortly, now
they felt they could not, for that would be in-
terpreted as giving in to the terrorists'
demands, a consequence both they and the
United States had publicly abjured.
Rabin Reacted to 'Games'
Reacting to the Catch-22 situation.
Defense Minister Rabin made three public
observations: 1) Let the Reaganites "stop
playing games"; 2) Let them tell us outright
what to do Israel had repeatedly said it
would let the prisoners go if Washington
made public acknowledgement that that was
precisely what it wanted; 3) Short of these
two alternatives, Israel had no reason to do
anything, since the hostage situation was an
"American problem."
This last was perhaps the worst of the
things that Rabin said. It enflamed the Ad-
ministration, the media and therefore the
American public in general, which was sud-
denly spurred on by the media to wonder out
loud if perhaps U.S. aid to Israel shouldn't
be reconsidered a strange thought, in-
deed, since U.S. aid to Israel is after all a
two-way street, and those in the know
understand that this nation gets back many-
fold in a multitude of ways the investment it
makes in foreign aid to Israel.
Future Concessions on Tap
In retrospect, and with our hostages now
back home, we are not sure that the crisis
unduly strained the U.S.-Israel relationship.
Both Secretary of State Shultz and Presi-
dent Reagan have since been at pains to
write to Prime Minister Shimon Peres to ex-
press their gratitude for Israel's cooperation
during the hostage crisis.
More than that, to stand up to the
criticism of the American public and its
media masters who had demanded the
release, forthwith, of the 700-odd Atlit
prisoners. Especially, not to submit to the
blackmail of the hijackers' demands.
OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE USPS 899420
FA6DK iHOCMeT VMocM SUZANNC SMOCMtT
EdrtorendPuoI.eher Execum, tfator
FuWrehed Weekly Mtd Septan** mrouof. MhJM., Weekly Mianc*of n*
Second Ctoee Foetaoe Paid at Hellendeie Fla
POSTHASTE* tin, s-Jsss rtwyi lo The Jewish Flortdhw,
P.O. Sox 0173. Mian*, Fla. M101
AoVartiemg flupervieoi Aoreftem Hilpirn
"* Leudaraale Hollywood Office MM W Oakland Parti two. Fort Leuderdaie Fl 331
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Went laONCWh SI. ahem.. Fla 33132 Phone i 3^K>5
JTA. Seven Arta. WHS. NCA. AJPA. and FPA
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But the almost angry statements of
Defense Minister Rabin seem not to want to
go away in any case, for the U.S. did play a
strange game baaed on a hijacker's
methodology all of its own.
In this respect, it seems urgent to us that
Rabin's most recent observations on the
crisis be taken seriously indeed. There will,
he said, inevitably be more terrorist attacks
on the United States. More important, these
too will offer crisis resolutions once again in-
volving Israeli concessions, not American
concessions.
Rabin did not spell out his futuristic
scenario, but it is not hard to imagine
possibilities. How about Israel's ceding all
sovereignty over East Jerusalem for
another 30 or 40 American hostages? Or
over the Golan Heights? Or folding its tent
on the West Bank, the Camp David Accord
not withstanding?
Under these circumstances, this or a
future Administration may well make the
painful public assertion that there can be no
concessions and this time mean it.
Still what would be the impact on
American citizens generally should
Americans be forced to die because Israelis
refused to come to their aid? Would they
care that the quid pro quo was impossible
they who could hardly give a single hoot,
given the circumstances, about Israeli
sovereignty, but only want their hostages
back home?
What would be the impact on Israel. gw
a decision in Jerusalem to refuse an ex-
change so painful to its own interests?
Now is the time for free nations retroac-
tively to say "No!" to hijacking and to mean
it And to show that they mean it Now.
Before the next terrorist try.
vrr
Diaspora Jewry said to be shrinking
communities will ^s*P^ltm
has been preserved over ceoflg
of suffering is in danger oi w
Jew m the wo*
SUeSCFrrPTIOff KATES 7 Vaar Mmunum t7 SO (Local Area UM Annual) or by mantteramp
Jeewen Federation of Greater Fort Leuderdaie
Jewter. Federation of Greater Fort I udardete Brian Sherr. Preetdent. Joat Tenet. Executive Dtejctsr.
Man*! La Vina. PuWlc AeieMone Director, Lort Omeoerg. Aeeletant PuoMc Halation. Director mm
W Oakland Perk Blvd. Fort Leadordele. FL 33321 Phone (306| 714*00 Mall for tne Federation end
Tke Jewteft Ftortdtan of Greater Laudnrdali ehouM be irtdnmJ Jeaeaft Federation of Greater
Fort I endirdiH. P.O Bo* 2MM. Tamarac, FL MMOMtO
Friday, July 19.1966*
I Volume 14
1 AB 5745
Number 24
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Diaspora Jewry is shrinlyn-'
rapidly and by the year 290o'wflr
Member only ;000,000 compared
to 9.7 million Jews who presently
live outside Israel, according to
Minister of Labor and Welfare
Moshe Katzav.
By 2025, the end of the first
quarter of the next century, there
could be as few as five million
Jews left in the diaspora, Katzav
warned in the course of an ad-
dress to the Zionist General Coun-
cil which ended a week-long
meeting last month He said the
forecast was based on scientifical-
ly conducted studies by
demographic experts at his
ministry.
The cause of the shrinkage will
not be aliya to Israel but the ero-
sion of Jewish population by a low
birth rate, assimilation and inter-
marriage, Katzav said. He stress-
ed the contrasting demographics
of diaspora Jewry and Israel. To-
day, children under age 14 com-
prise only 15 percent of diaspora
Jews compared to 30 percent of
the Jewish population in Israel.
Projected to the year 2000. the
difference will be 12 percent to 26
percent respectively, he said.
Diaspora Jewry Aging
Katzav, one of the younger
generation of leaders in the Herat
I'ranch of Likud, noted further
that the Jewish population abroad
is aging rapidlf while the opposite
U true in Israel where births out-
number deaths and intermarriage
is virtually non-existent.
He said the negative
demographic trends in the
diaspora go hand-in-hand with
what he called the "lamentable"
state of Jewish education abroad.
A high proportion of diaspora
Jews receive no meaningful
Jewish education at all, Katzav
said.
"The crisis is much more
his life's purpose M
Katzav said.
His own prescnP110"^
"Philanthropic contnbuw*"
ho substitute for *y***T
minister said. He sound*
long familiar criticism oTU"
I^^intheduisporawhoW
hMjd their own preachinp'j.
settling in I*"*1- W/
nm tion of diaspora
i necrisu is mucn more urgent position <
than people tend to realize. Whole leaders, be said
School Kids Got Certificates
TEL AVIV (JTA) Elemen
tary school children were happy
last week. It was the last day of
the school term, and they received
their certificates of completion
because an 11th hour settlement
between the teachers' onion and
the Education Ministry averted a
teachers' strike.
But the mood of motorists and
cigarette smokers was less than
joyous. The owners of g*J
and serrice stations sWj
their facilities for three dj
back up demands to"*"
charges for vefcele repairs.
Dubek. which moDopoto-_
domestic cigarette rnart*
tinued its lockout begua ~(-
claim, it is losing *:
goYefiment tobacco prod ik


.:..
,provements make Ben-Gurion
ilrport one of the safest in world
Friday, July 19, 1966/Ttic Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page S
tL AVIV (JTA) Im-
JLents at Ben-Gurion Air-
tin Lod near Tel Aviv, make
ne of the safest and most
Urn airports in the world, ac-
r to Arieh Grozbord, chair-
*f the Israel Airports
ority.
major advance was the
Ugcenu'nt "f the old control
iJer. dating back nearly 50
IB.'when there was virtually no
nmercial air traffic, by a new
i-foot hijrh tower containing
[newest and most sophisticated
uipment. In the old tower, the
uipment was 30 years old.
-Now, a long range radar, a com-
|ter terminal and computerized
mmunications systems enable
r traffic controllers to track air-
t at a distance of 165 miles
about 20 minutes flying time from
the airport and to reduce the
distance separating them from
9.9. to 4.9 miles while maintaining
the same margin of safety. This
means more aircraft can land
within a given time frame.
The only problem that remains
unsolved is the constant noise of
arriving and departing jets which
has residents of the densely
populated area around the airport
up in arms. Night operations have
been restricted because of the
noise problem but complaints
persist.
Aviation experts say Israel
must soon make a long delayed
decision to build a new interna-
tional airport far from populated
areas if it 15 to cope with the ex-
pected increase in air traffic in the
next century.
TWO TEACHERS retiring from Jewish
education after SO years of service were
rumored at the closing supper meeting of the
^fTl m thetsynagogue and day schools of
North Broward. Lee Gornstein, left, educa-
tional chairman of Temple Sholom, is shown
honoring Mildred Epstein. Stanley Cohen,
educational director Temple Beth Israel con-
gratulates Mollie Lewis.
UJA reports 25%
increase in pledges
New B'nai B'rith Calendar Workbook
tells how to get involved in Jewish life
ERUSALEM (JTA) The
^ited Jewish Appeal has record-
23 percent increase in
ges toward its 1986 target of
i million, the largest ever for a
rle year, UJA chairman Alex
told the Jewish Agency
embly meeting.
i said about $48 million has
ay been raised to fund
eration Moses," the immigra-
i of Ethiopian Jews to Israel.
on Dulzin. chairman of the
ish Agency and World Zionist
nization Executive, reported
Project Renewal, the
labilitation of slum
hborhoods, should be conv
I in this decade. He said the
Jewish Agency would allocate
about $1 million this year for the
vocational training of youngsters
in development towns.
Jewish Agency Treasurer Akiva
Lewinsky told the Assembly that
in the last five years the Agency
has invested about $300 million in
welfare and educational projects.
He said a special effort was made
to improve the quality of life in
Galilee settlements. The Agency
allocations were supplemented by
government funds. Lewinsky said
that this year the Jewish Agency
would put more stress on develop-
ing existing settlements than
building new ones.
Two More Jewish Activists
Arrested in Imprisonment Wave
NEW YORK (JTA) Two
Jewish activists have been
ted by the KGB in a recent
of imprisonments in the
t Union.
i (Leonid) Volvovsky, a long-
refusenik leader who has
fd continuous harassment
ing dismissal from jobs, con-
tn of property, and exile to
was arrested in Gorky, ac
: to the Coalition to Free
Jews. "The arrest is par-
"tarly frightening," com-
nted Herbert Kroniah, chair-
of the Coalition, "because he
major figurehead in refuaenik
JVERNMENT HOMES
*1 IU repair). Also
quent tax property.
U9 for information.
The 47-year-old Dnepropetrov-
sk poet Evgeny Koifman was also
arrested during a raid by the KGB
on his home for alleged "drug
possession" on June 18, the Stu-
dent Struggle for Soviet Jewry
reported. The secret police con-
fiscated his Bible, Hebrew books
and typewriter.
Back in 1843, B'nai B'rith In-
ternational was founded as a vehi-
cle to reach four major universal
goals: unite all Jews, nurture
Jewish learning and life, perform
good deeds, and defend human
and Jewish rights everywhere.
Today, nearly 142 years later,
these goals remain as important
as ever.
If you are interested in trying to
make the world a better place but
aren't sure the best way to go
about it, then a good starting
point is to get a copy of B'nai
B'rith's newest Program Calen-
dar Workbook.
Just off the press, this eight-
and-a-half-by-eleven-inch 30-page
publication tells you, step-by-step,
how to get involved in your B'nai
B'rith lodge or unit, in your com-
munity and in your country. It
also offers ideas and suggestions
on many Jewish concerns, such as
adult Jewish education, relations
with Israel, racism, cults, and the
future of Jewish youth.
The calendar workbook, which
starts with the month in which the
Jewish new year begins,
September 1985 (Tishri 5746), and
goes through October 1986 (Tishri
5747), is considered a "must" for
lodges and units. Not only does it
describe the array of commis-
sions, councils and committees,
but it also cites their major pro-
grams and describes how you and
your lodge or unit can participate
in them.
In addition, the workbook offers
suggestions on fundraising,
publicity and program planning
and tells about B'nai B'rith's new
Jewish Book Club, Bowling
Association, International Israel
Lodge, tour opportunities,
members insurance program and
its hospital for arthritis victims.
For those who wish additional
information about specific agen-
cies or prorams, there is a return-
card listing them by number.
The calendar itself has the days
blocked off in inch-and-a-half
squares, naming major Jewish,
U.S., and Canadian holidays and
Torah and Haftorah readings for
each Sabbath and still leaving
you room to write notes.
Designed primarily for use by
B'nai B'rith members, the cakfr
dar workbook is available to the
general public at $2 a copy, wit*
bulk orders of six or more costing
$1.50 each. For your copy, contact
Mrs. Edith Levine. Program
Area, B'nai B'rith International,
1640 Rhode Island Avenue, N.W.,
Washington, D.C. 20036.
Half million petitions sought
to free Soviet Jews
Soviet Leader Mikhail Gor-
bachev is being petitioned by at
least a half million Americans,
urging him to abide by the
Helsinki Accords which state that
"everyone has the right to leave
any country including his own"
(Article 13/2). This appeal is being
emphasized at this time as we ap-
proach the 10th anniversary of the
humanitarian principles of the
Helsinki Accords of which the
Soviet Union was one of the
signators in August, 1976.
In the North Broward area,
Esther Cannon, Soviet Jewry
chairman for Broward Hadassah,
is collecting signatures during the
month of July. She hopes to have
several hundred in time to be in-
cluded in the nation-wide petition
to Gorbachev.
"There are hundreds of
thousands of Soviet Jews," she
said, "who have applied to
emigrate but have been refused,
and further, many of these have
been fired from their jobs, im-
prisoned on fabricated evidence,
deprived of all rights, many
brutally beaten, all because they
want to be free to practice their
religion."
Requests for petition forms may
be made to Esther Cannon,
782-5352.
T LAUD 77S-S2T2
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.__I


Page 6 The Jewish Floridlah 6f Greater fart Lauderdaie/Friday, July 19, 1985
U.S. accuses Soviets
Charges anit-Semitic 'Schizophrenia'
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
The United States accus-
ed the Soviet Union last
week of a eovernment-
sponsored "schizophrenic"
anti-Semitic policy toward
the Jews in the Soviet
Union.
"It would appear that the
Soviet leadership follows a
schizophrenic policy with regard
to Jews, on one hand making life
miserable for them, and on the
other hand not letting them out of
the country," Richard Schifter,
the chief U.S. delegate to the six-
week conference on the human
rights aspects of the Helsinki ac-
cord in Ottawa, said last Tuesday.
SPEAKING TO a plenary ses-
sion of The Conference on Securi-
ty and Cooperation in Europe,
Schifter, who is also the deputy
U.S. representative to the United
Nations in New York and the U.S.
representative to the UN Human
Rights Commission in Geneva,
said the Soviet signature on
Helsinki Final Act pledges the
Soviet Union to free emigration.
"There is no doubt that a signifi-
cant irritant to good international
relations would be removed if the
Soviet leadership were to decide
to relax its present severe limita-
tions on emigration," he said.
In his speech, which dealt with
the discrimination against
minorities in the Soviet Union,
Schifter said that not only were
the estimated some two million
Jews in the USSR suffering
discrimination, but so were per-
sons of partially Jewish ancestry.
HE SAID that anti-Semitic
policies have increased through a
"creeping process" since the
Stalin era to where it has now "af-
fected all aspects of
governmentally-regulated life."
He said Jews are discriminated
against in employment and have
been barred or severely restricted
from certain departments of
government.
There are also limitations on en-
trance by Jews to the most
desirable educational institutions.
"THis policy of limiting the oppor-
tunities of Jews in employment
and education has been accom-
panied by a step-up in anti-Semitic
propaganda" veiled as anti-
Zionism, Schifter charged.
"But it does not take a great
deal of political sophistication for
any reader of the material in ques-
tion to recognize that the views of
the persons who are the object of
attack on Middle Eastern politics
are irrelevant. It is their ancestry
that counts."
SCHIFTER SAID that because
of this "virulent" anti-Semitism,"
Jews have turned inward, have
rediscovered their religion and
their culture and, above all, want
to leave the country that they
believe has made it clear to them
that it does not want them."
But, he noted, "they are
hindered in the teaching and prac-
tice of their religion, hindered in
the study of their culture, with
particular obstacles placed in the
way of Hebrew teaching, and they
are prevented from leaving the
country."
FIRST RIDE ON A MERRY-GO-ROUND Some 170 Ethio-
pian Jewish children and their mothers were entertained recently
by Na'amat at the fairgrounds in Tel Aviv. In foreground is
Masha Lubelsky, secretary-general of Na'amat, which is aiding
the new immigrants through day care centers, counseling ser-
vices, nurseries and special educational courses. Na'amat
receives major support from Pioneer WomenlNa 'amat, its sister
organization in the United States, which this year is celebrativg
its 60th anniversary.
Reserve Now For The
HIGH HOLY DAYS&SUCCOTH
Traditional Services Will Be Conducted By
Cantor YITZCHAK HAMMERMAN
Tennis Facilities Sauna Handball Volley-
ball Olympic Swimming Pool Full Slock of
Private Beach with Easy Access to Boardwalk
Poolside Therapeutic Whirlpool Color TV In
AN Booms Appropriate Entertainment
BEAUTIFUL
EUS
THE tMRTMMUMII SLUR lOStHS
MOTH

Far I
Your Hosts:
atari
>t*4IMM 11C*
531-5771
> Berfcowtti Family 4 Alex Smllow, Aaaoc.
Matthew A. Segall is scheduled
for a November Lamp of
Knowledge Award under the
auspices of American Friends
of Everyman's University.
HIGH TECH LAB FOR BOYS TOWN JERUSALEM:]
Nakash (right), president of the Boys Town Jerusalem |
shows New Jersey communal leader Leonard Diener an c
rendition of the new academic building for Boys Tom'tCd
Applied Engineering that will house a communication! 1
electro-optics laboratory funded by a $100,000 gift fa]
Diener and his wife Bea. The Dienert' gift, will liquidated
expenditures for Uie 650-square-foot laboratory and enoife]
Town to equip it with 18 work stations and a full tno
video transmitters, generators, oscilloscopes and
sophisticated high tech instruments.
BBYO to help In search for missing children
WASHINGTON The B'nai
Brith Youth Organization will
take an active role in the quest for
missing children beginning in
August when it begins a year-long
program aimed at educating the
community and helping families in
their search for their missing
youngsters.
With that in mind, some 90
members of the organization's
Executive Boards recently passed
a resolution commending the Na-
tional Child Safety Council, the
Milk Industry Foundation, and
the manufacturers of milk cartons
"for their efforts to assist in the
location of missing children." The
BBYO leaders also offered new
support to the national network
that provides help to missing
youth. .
Members of the Executive
Boards, who represent 37 regions
in the United States. Canada,
Great Britain, and Ireland, also
agreed to "continue to condemn
acts of terrorism" and to urge
governments to take positive ac-
tion to curtail terrorism
originating within their |
borders.
In other resolutoni
during the Executive
gathering in WuhingtoaJ
youth called for:
Educating BBYO
about the risk of "increued
sion of religion into
education;"
Opposition to iparthefl
South Africa and instituting
rights both m the work plac
at home for all races; and
Opposition to "effort
outlaw abortion."
OUR ISN'T
A FLASH IN "
THEPAI
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Star-KM-
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Friday, July 19, IWThe, Jewjgh Floridian of Greater fort Lauderdaie Page 7
London businessman recalls fervor of Wallenberg
.._. *.iamm Strict Chriatian forv.il,, k. ____
JOSEPH FINKELSTONE
Loto Chronicle Syndicate
DNDON Raoul Wallenberg,
young, handsome and
^tic Swede who, single-
kJIv snatched probably as
,u1100,000 Hungarian Jews
the death claws of the Nazis,
[become the most renowned
\rt among the righteous Gen-
who were ready to sacrifice
r lives to rescue Jews during
. Second World War. The
Ul, deep affection which Jews
'for Wallenberg has been
wned by his callous im-
jjmfnt by the Russians when
i entered Budapest, and his
nee ever since.
. what made a fun-loving
r Swede give up his easy ex-
! in Stockholm and involve
f in the horrors of wartime
jrt? And why did years
'after his mysterious im-
[onment by the Russians,
,. his compatriots made
ius efforts to have him
d'
E MAN who believes he can
I answers to these ques-
i is a Danish Jewish former
jnan. Kay Meyer, who
I lives in London. He and
llenberg were childhood
land, when they grew up,
s partners.
ten I was a schoolboy in
in 192f>. our school
.... a group of Scandina-
lschool children. Among them
|Saoul. Because he was so tall,
ways carried the Swedish
Ion outings. We became very
idly. We were almost the
(ige Raoul was born two
before me, in August,
en he returned to Sweden,
[corresponded. I wrote in
^^Swedjsfe bitf we
1 'wftyin wderstandtng
Later we lost touch
I Raoul went to Chicago,
' He studied to be an ar-
.and South America.
began to show an in-
I in the business affairs of his
J.ho were noted bankers in
*n and owned large in-
J concerns. The family had
I Wo a bank in Haifa, and
iMoul spent several months
HAS AT that time, Meyer
> that Raoul Wallenberg
[lamed about the Jewish
* this affected him
Iftw was an additional fac-
Pwogh Raoul came from a
strict Christian family, he was
proud to tell me that he had one-
eight Jewish ancestry. He was
very serious gbout ^
When Kay Meyer learned,
together with other Danish Jews
in 1943, that the Nazis were plan-
ning to deport them and that the
Danish resistance was prepared to
transport the Jews to Sweden, he
grabbed at the opportunity to
save lives. On arrival in
Stockholm, he immediately got in
touch with his old friend.
"Raoul had not become a
banker. He was running an
import-export business, together
with a Hungarian Jew. Raoul sug-
gested to me that I should decide
exactly what I wanted to do and
that we should become partners,
which is what we did. We bought
up a great number of neckties,
and I traveled throughout Sweden
selling them, while Raoul and a
secretary in Stockholm looked
after the accounting side."
By that time Wallenberg was
aware of the desperate position of
Hungarian Jews. As a
businessman of a neutral country,
he was able to travel to Budapest
and was profoundly shocked to
see the suffering of Jews there.
AN OPPORTUNITY to help
them arose quickly and unex-
pectedly. The American State
Department, says Kay Meyer,
was searching for a go-between
for the United States, Sweden and
Hungary to bring some aid to the
Hungarian Jews. Raoul
Wallenberg seemed the ideal
person.
R*oul says, his friend Kay
Meyer, did not hesitate. The year
was 1944, and Raoul, still a young
man, had a comfortable, even
privileged, ..existepce i8
StpqktaH As.*, member of a rich,
aristocratic family he could savor
all the delights of Stockholm high
society. He had a flat in the city
where he lavishly entertained his
friends, including many pretty
girls.
Yet all the time the knowledge
that a people whom he had come
to admire and respect was being
systematically murdered affected
him deeply. When the request for
him to leave Sweden came with
the blessing of the King of
Sweden and the Swedish Chief
Rabbi, Wallenberg promptly
accepted.
He refused to dramatize the
decision. When Kay Meyer rang
him one day, Raoul told him. "By
the way, I am going away for
Tiffany house
VafJWS
t+^^lJT*"Aukm **" Hou" *""*
l_ 't*phon, *, haa^taaded mnd morr
Ka S~THy/24 hr..
MakTSfcrvice
Trvntportatton
(we chauffeur you
to shopping, banking.doctor]
"4 Activities
Ocean/two blocks
[ J*kdi nurse
PV/barber.hop
-CoaocMrte/Waworl..^-^
I
>'. I (III,
I^Tr"***- "* *" *** F-**c for a* m~U
some tune. You just carry on.
When I come back, we will expand
the business and make a real
splash."
BUT RAOUL never returned.
In Budapest, he worked feverishly
to provide the doomed Jews with
Swedish documents and work.
Kay Meyer rejects the Russian
claim that Wallenberg died of a
heart attack in a prison camp.
Kaoui he says, was always in
superb physical shape tall, wiry
and vigorous.
He showed amazing
ef,!Jr^efulne88 in combating
Adolf Eichmann and his murder
machine. But he could not escape
the brutal grip of the Russians,
who never explained why they ar-
rested him.
Kay Meyer accuses the Swedes
of cowardice in not pressing for
Raoul Wallenberg's release. He
feels they feared Russian
displeasure. He now believes
there was an additional cause:
anti-Semitism.
A FORMER private secretary
to the Royal Court, Carl Frederik
Palmstjerna, states that the
Swedish King was prepared to
press the Soviet Foreign Minister,
Andrei Gromyko, during a visit to
tmt9tmxmcarnnnm.tm
Stockholm in March, 1984, to friend. "Raoul was the greatest
release Wallenberg. But the King humanitarian of the century not
was persuaded to desist by his a saint but an ordinary man who
own Marxist Foreign Minister. became a wonderful hero because
Kay Meyer mourns daily for his !?e loved h" feUow men and suf-
fered with them."
2KLVlS,T A DENTI?T A group of 120 immigrant
children from Ethiopia recently paid their first visit ever to a
dentist when they were examined and treated at Tel Aviv Univer-
sity s School of Dental Medicine. This newly-arrived Ethiopian
girl says Ah as Prof. Haim Sarnat instructs her to "open
wide. Her younger brother (right) seems apprehensive. The
youngsters, who live in the Kiryat Tivon Absorption Center near
Haifa, were individually examined and received tooth brushes
along with instruction in proper dental care.

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,


Pag* 8 The
Fkridmn of Gwtw Fort UudwdaWFiiday. July 19. 196S
JWV Presents new flag to JCC
News
JCC WECARE special program
to prove*.'
WECARE rolunteers.
repreaentatrve from the
Walsh Reaoorce Center and the
City of Plantation Polk* Depart
cut have jchtduhd: Saaiwav-
Aagnat SS. far
rhidrm Time: 10 ajn.-2
call
WECARE
Director, 79MT0O.
JCC Activities
The eight by
was recently prmated to JCCs
Executive Director Phil Cofman.
by Aaroa (Art) Horowitz and Sam
both high officials of the
banter of the Jewiah War
Pact NV 73t.
of Greater Fort
W Sunrise Blvd.
RULES: Children 3 and
are encouraged to have
1
SINGLES
JCC Smgies Aces 20-40 wfl fat
together far a pooi partv from 1 to
4 pirn. Sanway Jnhr 21 at the
Center. 501 W Saw Bhrd
The fee m S3 far aaianriiru $4 far
DONATION. $1
far the Adam Wi
Center, cam* and
WECARE (With Energy
pnanoa and Reapoosable Effort!
b the Volunteer Serricea arm af
Port LnaderdnW's Jewva Corn-
Center For farther awbr
the ranety of
Horowitr. the National Recrurtiag
far JWV. He explains the
"First we contacted
E. Clay Shaw.
for the JCC Ha
office procured the flag and sent it
to Washington where it took its
tan for a fly over the Capitol
Prenrnttng anew American flag to Phil Cofman, Executive I
tor o/Fort LoMderdakt Jewish CmwS^Cel^^Li
IZH 8^5? *??" Natumml B~**1 Qffi^X
Jewim War Veteran '$ Amanahm and Sam MtiLr r*
qftneJWVWiUnnmKTetcnmanPomtNo.790.
Volunteers needed
The Heals on Wheels Program, to ehfarhr bomebound
rha iJ by Human Sereieaa hoaraweekT'
Network, is actively recreating Cal Horaan Services Setvo
drivers to denver meals today 5CS-1411
Centuries-oW Jem
music manuscr
discovered
JERUSALEM A
with the aaaneai notanon of 1
Sabbath table
brad
Hebrew I
lody '1
BgbyJ
> fan i
by
Cer.tc' at
Prof
CAMP DIRECTORS OF THE LOCAL JEWISH COMMUN1-
TT CENTERS ai rwoandy tke Jemm Cnmmaa.f, Center a/ f
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Mamma. Karen Tmmdk. JCC of Fort f tmindmit; Dmeid Sheriff.
JCC of Boca Raten and Jmri Dnmrrmtetn. JCC of Palm
THE GOLD COAST SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION of
Florida recenttg donated a eniiiuaj dhae* to tke JCC Camp
ca-ii^ kv-^ j.-.^j -,B|| imjn n||J (miUtm ^ ,^7
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Friday, July 19, 1985/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort
Foundation created for educating
Americans, Germans on Nazi period
Page 9
YORK (JTA) The
w Jewish Congress an-
the establishment of a
tion that will sponsor
ional programs in
xtn schools and universities
itf exchanges between Ger
| American students and
_g to study the lessons of
^Germany and the model of
MX* offered by the anti-Nan
lose Movement.
White Rose Movement con-
i of a small group of Chris-
es who in 1942 banded
her in Munich and
nbuted leaflets opposing
rind his policies. Some 160
i were arrested for being
| the movement. Eighteen
rough execution or in con-
idon camps and 36 survived
t terms until being liberated
t allies in 1945. Among those
d by guillotine on
r22,1943, after a trial by
)A spends the
\mer in Israel
f the most important com-
jnts an American Zionist
i it to visit the homeland as
as possible. Touching the
s of the Western Wall, try-
nwim in the Dead Sea, join-
i the continuous prayers in
or a beach holiday in
inya are all part of the re-
sting of the .It-wish spirit.
matter where we have
1 or lived the source of our
i can be felt as we enter
ilem. There and only there
e and feel the full freedom of
s. Jerusalem, the City of
d. is our own capital, a pssee
r expresses tht longing of cen-
the desires of our own
0 touch heaven and unders-
i the righteousness of our God
ITorah.
^ in Israel can the American
gin to understand his long-
1 commitment to the never-
l task of Zionism. With this
a, the Zionist Organization
it possible for many,
I d old and those in bet-
to find adventure and
nt by traveling through
etch summer. Starting with
^ fte ZOA Presidential Mia
."wght the leaders and
of ZOA to Israel to visit
I** with the leaders of
0 government and the
Agency. July saw hun-
Jewish youth travel
1 toe Masada Israel Pro-
every corner of Israel to
] the treasures of Jewish
. > This is followed by a
[Usdershij, tour. A sub-
Participation plan for
ti^.40*"" wish to learn
i**6' a< an intimate level
T_return as ZOA leaders to
the ever-increasing
up. The summer ends
?*Return. Those who
"before take those who
^T *? to the ebights of
B Pledge with the elite
"never again"; to
"HthefJolan to protect
"* to the narrow waist
|nd Sameria never to be
,:, t0 the glory of
*l^lln8p!re ^m in the
^WtelandJudaiBn,.
not only a Jewish
'!," ,s *n American
to protect, build and
**"*< only democracy
th^A """i* no other
iS* to ** fol than
f** *e know it!
KEL ^ "PPort of
t oeen continuous for 88
a Nan "people's court" in Munich,
were Hans Scholl, 25, and
22-year-old Sophie Scholl. Also
beheaded on that day was 24 -year-
old Christoph Probsp. Several
months later three others who had
joined in the same activities,
Willie Graf, Kurt Huber and Alex
ander Schmorell, were also tried,
convicted and executed. After
their death, a Hamburg group of
the White Rose emerged to con-
tinue the work of the Scholls and
their co-workers. The leaders of
the Hamburg group were also
tried, convicted and executed by
the Nazis.
At a dinner at the Park Avenue
Synagogue, tribute was paid to
the White Rose Movement. A sur-
vivor of the movement, Franz
Josef Muller, a surviving sister of
Hans and Sophie Scholl, Inge
Aicher Scholl, and a sister of
another executed leader, Annalise
Knoop-Graf, were guests of honor
at the tribute. The three flew in
for the occasion from Munich.
AJC executive director Henry
Siegman said the need for the new
foundation was highlighted by the
controversy generated by Presi-
dent Reagan's visit ot the military
cemetery in Bitburg where
Reagan's visit to the military
cemetery in Bitburg where
Reagan and West German
Chancellor Helmut Kohl honored
German war dead. There are some
49 members of the Waffen SS
buried there among the some
2,000 other war dead.
"The justifications that were of-
fered for that visit indicate that
the lessons of that tragic period of
our recent history have already
faded," Siegman said. "The tragic
relevance of these lessons was
underscored once again in the hi-
jacking of TWA's Flight 847, in
which Shiite terrorists sought to
select and separate Jewish
passengers from the rest. Forty
years after World War II there
are still those who are in the
throes of the anti-Semitism that
so obsessed Nan Germany."
Just two days before Reagan's
visit to Bitburg, several hundred
people participated in a memorial
service sponsored by the AJC to
Hans and Sophie Scholl. White
roses were placed on the graves of
the Scholls in Munich.
THE GATHERING PLACE. ADULT DAY CARE CENTER of
Uu Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale, hosted a com-
bined Mother's and Father's Day party on June 8. The after-
noon's entertainment was provided by Murray Ferguson. Mur-
ray records and programs music for listening, singing antfdanc-
ing to compliment any theme or event. The participants enjoyed
the day topped off with special Mothers and Father's Day
cakes! For further information about Adult Day Care at The
Gathering Place, call Bonnie Kraus, Program Director at
797-0330. Pictured above (left to right) Joseph Springer; Joseph
bclman; Belle Wiener, aide; Marjorie Reibel, aide; and Murray
Ferguson, entertainer.
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Pge 10 The Jewish FtoridJan of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Fnday, July 19, 1965
Federation/JCC Intercongregational Oneg Shabbat
They come in vans or their
children bring them. They are the
"Frail Elderly" who come to live
it up a little at the JCC. They are
the "regulars" who come to the
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort'Lauderdale's program called
"The Gathering Place" on the
JCC Campus, to schmoox.
socialise, learn something new,
exercise, be entertained or just sit
quietly, enjoying their
surroundings.
They come in car pools or their
parents bring them. They are the
"Youngest and the Livliest" who
come to live it up a lot at the JCC.
They are the "regulars" who
come to the Fort Lauderdale's
Early Childhood program to
"show and tell." socialize, learn
something new. to run. dance,
sing and play and to sit quietly
when they join in prayer or listen
to a storv.
On Fridays, for a weekly Oneg
Shabbat. they get together This
is Federation's and JCC's In-
tergenerational program when
the children visit The Gathering
Place." They sing. They say
prayers. They usher in the coming
Sabbath together.
The intergenerabonal program
is equally important for the
children and the seniors. Many of
their families are very far away
and Fridays are a wonderful op-
portunity for all the participants
and the children to enjoy each
other.
"For the little ones it is like
entering a roomful of loving
grandparents," says Bonnie
Krauss. Program Director of
"The Gathering Place."
-When they see all these little
ones walking in it reminds them of
their children, their grandchildren
and their great-grandchildren
that they don't see so often
anymore." adds liarjorie Reibel
who is also on deck from 9 to 1
five days a week as one of Federa-
tion's aides assigned to "The
Gathering Place." She agrees
with Director Krauss that Fridays
are very special for their people.
"Your Light Up My Life" must
have been written for these Fri-
day meetings of the generations,"
ssys Belle Wiener, another
Federation aide who is present
from 10:30 to 2:30 every day.
"Some of our people are on the
quiet side. But on Fridays when
die little ones come, they come
alive! Their eyes twinkle and their
faces light up as they bold a little
one on their laps to say prayers,
light candles, make N'amotzie and
sing together."
For many participants who are
limited in their physical
capabilities, this activity allows
them to become completely in-
volved and forget their own
troubles for awhile, the group's
leaders report.
The young ones. too. enjoy the
attention and ceremony. Some of
them do not have the opportunity
to come in contact with people of
this age.
"It's different, and exciting for
them, too." says Shira Cofman. an
Early Childhood staff associate.
'They love parading across the
campus Friday mornings knowing
they are going to get a hearty
welcome."
In addition to the Early
Childhood groups other classes
getting a hearty welcome from
"The Gathering Place" during the
year, are the JCC Children's
Chorale Group, or the JCC Dance
Troupe who come to help
celebrate Thanksgiving. Punm.
Passover, all the holidays,
together
In summertime JCC Camp
Directors schedule a variety of
camper visits for Shabbat or to
show off a special project or a live-
ly group of singers and dancers.
THE GATHERING PLACE
HAS VARIETY FOR
THEIR PARTICIPANTS
Knock on the door of Room
B101-102 any weekday between
9:30 and noon and you'll be invited
in to find as many as 25 of Federa-
tion's "Frail Elderly," age 60 ish
to 96. sitting on comfortable
lounge chairs enjoying a pleasant
homelike atmosphere facing a
blackboard and listening atten-
tively to Anne Schulte. their
teacher who comes from the
Elderly Services Division of
Broward County's Adult Basic
Education program. She might be
leading a discussion on current
events ... or geography ... or
mythology ... or any "point of in-
terest" topic brought up by a
member of the group. A sittercize
class breaks up the more scholarly
pursuits and stimulates the body
as well as the mind.
The program also depends up-
pon the services of volunteers who
interest the participants in Arts
and Crafts projects and. together
with staff, help serve
refreshments, play card games,
earnes. rummy Q or who are just
STATE OF
ISRAEL BONDS
BOUGHT AND SOLD
Invest in
Israel Securities

WERE SPECIALISTS IN
ISRAEL SECURITIES
*
TRANSACTIONS DAILY VIA TELEX
TO ISRAEL STOCK EXCHANGE
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tana Law >< a M
18 East 48th Street
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(212)759-1310
Toll Free (800)221-48381
Ligk-tiag Caadlei ToJ
Gatkenng Plan: /aw* YeUin, Ray Singer. S
Sckor, Rebecca Kamerman. I
Chiidhood Staff: tUft^
ArUne Weiee. Skin Cpi
Children (left to rigkt) Mi
RoeenthaL Jeffrey GoorlaJ]
Korntpan. Shana Levint ,
Roeentkal.
The candles are lit Gathermg
Plate: lleft to right) Ray Staler.
Rebecca Kamerman, Joeef. Spr-
inger, Joseph Werner. Mary
Serensky. Lena Pearlman.
Seymour Sckor. Rebecca Krim,
Frieda Sckneiderman. Issie
YeUin. Children: Floor (left to
right) Dori Korntpan. Mimx
Levinson, Shana Levins, Justin
Henry, Standing: Andrew
Sperber, Megan Gribitx. Jeffrey
Goorland. Douglas Rosenthal.
Mekssa RoseUMum (with braid*)
Gregory Wo If son; David
Fleishman. (Back row) Austin
Scott
_
there for companionship before
the men and women leave at 2
o'clock.
If you're a visitor, or a
volunteer, you might be lucky
enough to find a terrific group of
entertainers who have come to
perform for the "Frail Elderly."
Other times you might meet Rabbi
David Gordon who is a retired
Rabbi and gives many programs
of Judaic content, leading discus-
sions regularly.
All this phis lunch is available
for these special senior citizens.
They join with members of
Federation's Nutrition Program
for a hot Kosher lunch every day
in the adjacent Building C on the
JCC Campus.
"It is a pleasure to see them
coining in to lunch every dav.
"says Sandy Friedland. Federa-
tion's Elderly Services Coor-
dinator. "Our Gathering Place
gives thrm a reason to get up in
the morning, get dressed, get out
and receive nouhshaient for soul
and body." ,
, -THr/aif-has-ebsarved "that
these elderly "regulars" have
besoms so dependent upon this
way 44* life add the protected en-
vironment they enjoy, that when
the JCC closes in late August for
maintenance arid repairs, many of
them will make arrangements to
ujetanue their relationships dur-
ing the two week hiatus.
"We hear many of our people
exchanging phone numbers, "says
Krauss. It's gratifying to know
they'll be continuing the sociabili-
ty we started. It is also good to
know that we are really filling a
need. Mairy of our participants
would sot be accepted by other
Day Care Centers they're too
healthy! What would all of our
wonderful people do without The
Gathering Place?" asks Krauss.
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HIGH HOLIDAY SPECIALS
ROSH HASHANA Y0M KIPPUR
12 Days-11 Mm* tJUjtS*
3 meo* Sot. and roMom *-%^rW "L
WALDMANII
MMOMMII 12dor*nidQMi
Sept. 15io
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Friday, July 19, 1985/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 11
finds Israelis see themselves as Jews,Zionists; want more Aliya
n. nAVID LANDAU Zionists and regard aliya as
1 ?r-* trrk\ A important to the future of the
^pinl^'poP-leased -fry.
Showed that the vast The poll of 1,200 adults of all
tv of Israelis consider ages and occupations in
Eves part of the Jewish Israel's larger cities and
T define themselves as towns.was conducted by Dr.
Jewish Agency OK's
$413 million Budget
[JERUSALEM (JTA) The
I Agency Assembly approv-
13 million budget for fiscal
1 before the close of its an-
J meeting here plus
lidditional $48 million for Pro-
t Renewal.
, Assembly urged Jewish
nunities abroad to continue
efforts until all deprived
kborhoods in Israel are
Oittted. It also decided to
j new economic projects in
eighborhoods and develop-
t towns where unemployment
1ER decisions were to
from competitive fund-
. All fund-raising, except
t women's organizations,
conducted by the United
i Appeal in the U.S. and the
Israel Appeal elsewhere.
irish Agency departments
t instructed to offer their ser-
i without giving preferential
itment to any trend in
| With respect to immigration
absorption, the Assembly
to consider ways to in-
i the involvement of new bu-
nt associations in Israel.
I delegate, John Najmann of
n, urged greater efforts to
note the immigration of
Jthy Jews to Israel. He told
plenary session of the
nbly that potential wealthy
nts should be invited to
F SOLTHEAST REGION
Hri of Directors' of
"* Jewish Congress
"'t*n*ual election
V a* the home of outgoing
.Z,!?^ Schantx. The
\*"rar: (pictured) Nor-
^prmdent; Herbert
j Vies President;
Mrnan, Vies Pre*
J%*?*> Treasurer;
u*er- s***ry;
ir*2**nt. Board of
^"evretentative Mike
*W DSlWn AUma*>
dn Baron> X*obi
?} W Friedman,
rJ^ Gordon, Kenneth
yjlyta Kaplan, Rob-
1 *,nf k*. Bernard
J??Z. wZi
LH?7V Woljf, Jr'
*. tupnund Miaou)
Israel to see they can enjoy living
standards to which they are
accustomed.
Nina Zermach oi the Dahaf
Research Institute. It was
commissioned by the Zionist
Council of Israel, headed by
Arye Zimuki, a veteran
journalist.
Leon Dulzin, chairman of the
World Zionist Organization
and Jewish Agency Ex-
ecutives, called the results "a
pleasant surprise." He said
they showed that Israel was
"not just a Jewish state but a
Zionist state." He and Zimuki
agreed that the responses to
the poll contrasted sharply
with the often negative image
"Zionism" evokes in the Iraeli
media.
According to the poll, 92 per-
cent of the respondents con-
sidered aliya "very important"
or "important" for Israel's
development; 90.1 percent
agreed with the premise that
aliya is one of the purposes for
which Israel was founded; 56
percent believed each Israeli
family should "adopt" a family
of olim.
The survey found that 85
percent of Israelis feel part of
the Jewish people to a greater
or lesser degree and 90 per-
cent think Israel should be in-
volved in struggles to rescue
Jews from lands of oppression;
86 percent of the respondents
defined themselves as Zionists.
But the poll results also
registered some contradic-
tions. Of the 92 percent who
favored aliya, 41 percent in-
dicated that while they want
immigration, they do not want
olim, reflecting a negative at-
titude toward individual
newcomers.
Another troubling finding
was that the highest propor-
tion of Israelis who did not
define themselves as Zionists
was among the younger, bet-
ter educated sections of the
population.
GRAND
OPENING
Live in our
Premier Golf
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Community
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Gardens from *65,900, Villas from *84,900
The Villages ofParkwalk
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The Moorings.
The Moorings at the VMagee of Parkwaft has Just
opened its luxury two and three bedroom model
visa home* These am the last vitas to be bun m
Parkwa* before the completion of the new
-hote dtamptonship Aberdeen Ooff & Country
Club and the pncee resect it.
Now la your opportunity to sVe In this magnWeent
Qof Country Qub community at a priot which
wa be unheafd of whan the go* course and
country dub are completed
The vMa homes at The Moorings provide the
Meetyte that tts any fancy. Homes with oarages.
vofume casings, gourmet kitchens with bright
. specious Irving and dining
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The Vlages of Parfcwefc te a 1.400 sore
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Visit our sates center today and tot, us show you
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ir*>The Villages Of
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rr^rn**
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V*
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aWiou>natta


Page 12 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdde/Friday, July 19, 1986
Community Calendar
Compiled by Lori Ginsberg.
Federation 748-8400.
FRIDAY JULY 1
Raaest Shalom: 7 p.m. Special
Shabbat Seder program. Families
should bring kosher dinners.
11301 W. Broward Blvd.. Planta-
tion. 472-3600.
Temple Kol Ami: 8:15 p.m. Ser-
vice conducted by Temple Ritual
Committee. 8200 Peters Rd..
Plantation. 472-1988.
SATURDAY JULY 20
Tamarac Jewish Center-Men's
Club: 8:30 p.m. Show featuring
omedian. ventriloquist, singer.
ind pianist. Donation $4. 9101
" W 57 st.. Tamarac. 721-7660.
Bermuda Club Entertainment
Committee: 8:30 p.m. The Loj
Chanteurs Revue. Bermuda Club.
721-6645.
Sunrise Lakes Condominium
Association Phase I: 7:30 p.m.
Three-act show featuring Tina
Wilson. Marty Bell and Donny
Maaeng. Donation $4. Playhouse.
8100 Sunrise Lakes Dr. N.
742-5100.
SUNDAY JULY 21
Sunrise Jewish Center-Men's
Clnb: 9 a.m. Breakfast meeting.
At Temple. 4099 Pine Island Rd.
MONDAY JULY 22
WLI-Tamarae Chapter: Summer-
time card party and brunch. 6535
W. Commercial Blvd. 722-0853.
WEDNESDAY JULY 24
Sunrise Jewish Center-
Sisterhood: 11:30 a.m. Luncheon
and card party. Donation $5. At
Temple. 4099 Pine Island Rd..
Sunrise. 741-9185.
THURSDAY JULY 25
Hadassah-Scopus Chapter:
Noon. Dessert and card party. Le
Club. Deerfield Beach.
SATURDAY JULY 27
Temple Beth Am: 8 p.m. Special
Tisha B'Av services. At Temple.
7205 Royal Palm Blvd. Margate.
974-8650.
Organizations
Ihwheiser
JEWISH WAR VETERANS
Alfred E. Danheiser of Fort
Lauderdale. was installed as Com-
mander of the Department of
Florida, Jewish War Veterans of
the United States of America, on
June 9.
A member of the Jewish War
Veterans since 1963, Commander
Danheiser has served the
organization with dignity and
honor. He served as Commander
of the Crown Heights Post No.
108 in Brooklyn, NY.; Com-
mander of Kings County Council.
New York; and the William Kret
chman Post No. 730 in Fort
Lauderdale.
ARMDI
American Red Magen David,
Israel's Red Cross, will present
"An Evening of Melodic Enter-
tainment and Dance." at 7:30
p.m. Sunday Nov. 24 at the
Sunrise Musical Theater. Tickets
are $10. $8. S6 and $5. For reser-
vations call 742-4272. 742 7536 or
742-8801
The show will feature Rosalie
PLANNING
ON MOVING
TO ISRAEL?
HOW WONDERFUL
Call me. Esther. 1-635-6554
ana ,ei me quote you
rates Also local moving &
long distance moving
anywhere in the U.S. or
overseas.
A.B. VAN LINES INC.
_____(of Miami)
Williams. Alex Redhill and an ar-
tistic dance group, under the
choreography of Marilyn
Pearachio.
B'NAI B'RITH
BONAVENTURE LODGE
Murray Chermak, President of
B'nai B'rith Lodge No. 3111 in
Bonaventure, announced that 61
new members were enlisted dur-
ing a special membership drive of
three months, ending June 1.
The South Broward Council of
B'nai B'rith Lodges held s draw-
ing on June 13, for 57 prizes,
given to those lodges who brought
in the most members. The
Bonaventure Lodge was swarded
15 prises, and declared the leader
in all of District V, which includes
Maryland, District of Columbia,
Virginia, North Carolina, South
Carolina, Georgia and Florida.
BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY
NWC
Brandeis University National
Women's Committee Fort
Lauderdale/Pompano Chapter is
accepting donations of used
books, records, magazines, etc..
all during the summer for their
Fall sale.
For pick up call 974-2044 or
974-8553.
B'NAI B'RITH WOMEN
Hildegard Goldman of
Tamarac, was appointed by
Beverly Davis, president of B'nai
B'rith Women, to serve as a
representative to the Hillel Com-
mission. Ms. Goldman has been an
active member of BBW since
1949. She is a life member of B'nai
B'rith Women and has served as
president of the Hillel Advisory
Board of Broward and Palm
Beach Counties.
Coathraed from Page 1
tJ'Av, the three week period
is marked by the avoidance
of joyous occasions (such as
weddings) and of those acts
which would require the
"she 'hechiyanu' blessing
over something new and
enjoyable.
The prophetic portions
read in the synagogue speak
of moral degradation, and
the punishment that must
inevitably follow. In the nine
days immediately
preceeding the fast day, it is
customary to avoid meat or
wine. Indeed the very last
meal on the afternoon of
Tisha B'Av is one of austeri-
ty and deprivation.
On the eve of Tisha B'Av.
the curtain of the Ark is
removed, as if the very
counenance of God were
veiled and hidden and the
universe empty of His
Presence. The synagogue is
usually in semi-darkness, lit
only by candles, while the
book of Lamentations, re-
counting the destruction by
the Babylonians, is chanted
in dirge-like fashion by the
worshippers seated on low
benches or the floor itself.
The symbolism is that of an
individual mourner grieving
over the loss of a loved one.
Fasting and in mourning,
we reexperience the
tragedy of our people, and
relive it as if it were happen-
ing to ourselves.
At the morning service,
the worshippers do not don
the tallit or tefillin, which
are considered as or-
naments of pride, beauty
and glory. The Book of
Lamentations is read once
again, and mourning elegies
are read. The Torah por-
tions deal with despair and
exile, and yet with the first
echos of comfort as well.
As the day wanes, the
elements of hope and
redemption emerge more
clearly. The tallit and
telfillin are worn at the
afternoon service, prayers
of comfort are said, and as
the fast day ends with the
evening service, the prayer
for the full moon is pro-
claimed. In mystical Jewish
literature, the sanctification
GREAT MOMENTS AT KUTSHER'S
T~ LOLA FALANA-Sat. Jury 20
ROKRT KLEIN Sat July 27 BAHANN CARROLL Sal Aug3
CWVB BRENNR-Sat Aofl K) VIC DAMONE Sat. Aug 17
FRANKIE VALLI & THE FOUR SEASONS-Sat Aug 24
BEN VEREEN LABOR DAY WEEKEND
Kutsher's
. M.V 17701 4tM) 1
CALL TOLL F"CE (SOe) 491-1173
CavDmm Convn** f ic 111 **wx Cm* Cartt Honomo
Tisha B' Av
of the moon is the hope for
the Messiah, and the prayer
reflects the belief that all of
history and nature will be
restored to wholeness and
perfection.
In some synagogues, the
concept of redemption is
linked with renewed ties
with the land of Israel. It is
customary to make con-
tributions to the Jewish Na-
tional Fund.
The dominant theme,
then, that emerges from the
fast of Tisha B'Av, is that
we re-enact past tragedy as
if we ourselves had ex-
perienced its impact. Bi
the re-enactment would
meaningless if it did
stimulate us to ultimj
seek greater spjrit
heights. The days of trap
sensitize us to the histoi
sacrifices of our people
the needs of those who
suffer in our own day,
to the primacy of indivi
responsibility so as to I
of communal redemptio
The rising crescendo!
catastrophe is transfor
into a peon of faith, deed!
loving kindness and
seeking of repemence as
High Holy Days approac
Special Tisha B'Av Quiz
By RABBI DAVID W. GORDON
1- What does Tisha B'Av (The
Ninth Day of Av) have in common
with Yom Kippur?
2- Why do Jews fast on Tisha
B'Av?
3- What changes occur in the
Synagogue on that day?
4- Why are Tefilin not worn dur-
ing the morning Service?
5- Why is it not customary to
read the Book of Lamentations
from a Scroll?
6- What are the poems called
that are recited during the even-
ing and morning Services?
7- What is the Sabbath after
Tisha B'Av called?
8- What change in the name of
the Hebrew month Av was in-
troduced in the Middle Ages?
9- What other historical events
took place on this day?
10- Enumerate other instances
of the mourning for Zion (Zecber
L'Churban) Recalling the destruc-
tion, throughout the year?
Answers
1-The fast begins on the
previous evening. Saturday night,
July 27.
2- As the saddest day in the
Jewish calendar it marks a day of
mourning for the destruction of
the First Temple in 586 BCE by
the Babylonians and the Second
Temple in 70 CE by the Romans
as well as the loss of Jewish
Independence.
3- The lights are dimmed,
Parochet (curtain covering
Ark) removed, the worship
pray in stockinged feet, seat*
low seats. An atmosphert
mourning prevails.
4-Since the phylacteries
considered an "Adornment"
crown of the Jew, we do not
them on when in deep mourn
6- It is read from boob
dinary paper and not from a I
of Parchment since the hope
ists that the time will come I
Tisha B'Av will be transposed
a day of rejoicing.
6- Kinot-Elegies or prayeraj
lamentations.
7- "Shabbat Nachamu" -
Sabbath of Consolation afte
first word of the Proph
reading (Comfort Ye) herald
Isaiah's vision of G-d's promis
Israel's rejuvenation.
8- The name "Menachem" Cl
forter (Menachem Av) was ad
implying that the day will a
when the Lord will comfort
people so that the month of
will be one of consolation ins!
of mourning.
9-The fall of Betar
stronghold) during the
Kochba rebellion in 135 CE
the expulsion of the Jews
Spain in 1492.
10- The breaking of a glass i
wedding ceremony; no instrun
tal musk during Services:
Menorah of seven branci
because it is a replica of the
used in the Temple.
How to Choose
Your Drinking Water
Where,
it from?
bit
pure?
How doe.
it taste?
bit
wef- known?
What
Mountain Valsy comas from a natural sprr* b
catsd in virgin tanberland at Hot Sprw*. Ark
The water riong in the spring today bJ as b 35tx\
years 090, ions betore poaunon
Youl fee it from the (bat sap. ks taste reflects thdj
natural spang source
Mountain Valsy. bottled constantly tor 112 yew*.'
the only water popular across the nation.
The mam minerals are calcium and magnesium*
ideal in water. It contains so htb sodaim it is used*
assJt-frecdbt.
Mountasn Valsy b so fcght on the system, on*
gbsshil mvttss another.
Sonwpeopbliaiwboiiidlinlrinflktor50to70y<^
A abas dome covers the spring. AI bottsng
glass con! amers.
Hav Mountain l/ofley Water cbfruerotf to vour home and ofr
Dade Broward
696-1333 563-611*
<5MoimtaiaeVaUe>/<\rVSter"
FROM MOT IMIMOf, AffK-
are in it?
How is it
tolerated?
Canldrink
t regularly?
bit wal-
protected?


1

Friday, July 19, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 13
Jewish cooking, innovative and traditional
Mrdxc Kosher Kttchen^By
%U; illustrated by Jean
if Jonathan David
trs. 1984- 228 P**68'
,K, Grandmother's Kitehen.
,'lchech Miner with Linda
Tnad Publishing Com-
1984. 16 P8**58- *8-96
Cuww Helen Nash; il-
Ibv Pl Stewart. Random
1984. 319 pages. $17.95.
.'ad Em- Shelley Melvin.
Triad Publishing Company.
248 par* $8.95 (P*Per>-
5 (spiral binding).
I by Gilda Angel.
I are forever seeking new
|u to add to their already
I shelves. The latest addi-
the kosher cookbook
include two Sephardic
ks, one gourmet kosher
and one with recipes
quick and easy to
to
are
i Spanish Jews or Sephar-
I7ere expelled from Spain in
1492, they brought certain
culinary traditions with them to
their new homeland around the
Mediterranean Sea. One of these
countries was Bulgaria, where
local specialities became incor-
porated into the cooking style of
the Sephardim. Included were
many dishes using eggplant,
tomatoes, peppers, onions,
homemade white cheese, and
phyllo dough.
By questioning aunts, cousins,
and friends, Suzy David was able
to collect many recipes which
duplicated the tastes of those
prepared by her mother and
grandmother. The bulk of the
recipes included are for everyday
use, but there are a number of
holiday recipes as well.
The Sephardic Kosher Kitchen is
organized into sections including
first courses, egg and cheese
dishes, meat, poultry, meat-
stuffed vegetables, moussakas
and patties, vegetables side
dishes, savoury pies salads and
pickles, and sweets. The recipes
are, for the most part, clearly
presented and represent an
readers ideas about what foods
houW be served together. The
recipes themselves are original
authentic and important part of ""^ lr1y written.
Jewish culinary heritage. Kogker c%itiiu u a ^^^ of
I have two minor criticisms of 250 recipes for the modem kosher
Ben-Gurion Centennial
l in the autumn of
find culminating in the spr-
1987, the 100th birthday of
Ben-Gurion will be com-
ated in a series of events
activities celebrating the
onial year of Israel's Foun-
[ Father who declared the in-
ence of the Jewish State in
land who became the coun-
i first Prime Minister.
ordingly, the Cabinet of
- in a decision ratified by
! Knesset has declared the
on Centennial to be an
and national event in
I On Feb. 19, a Public Com-
! for the Ben-Gurion Centen-
wm^.-i.iH.JeooiRlam.
i presence of the President of
State of Israel, the Knesset
ker, the President of the
erne Court, and Government
David Ben-Gurion epitomized
laspiration.s of the Jewish peo-
and lovers of freedom
rywhere Therefore, centen-
Icelebrations are being plann-
|aot only in Israel, but also in
! I'mted States and several
r countries The Chairman of
! Ben-Gurion Foundation and
Ambassador to France
Germany, Asher Ben
i in his capacity as chair-
L and representative, of the
"mial organizing committee
*' is nw-MAbusivfl* mes
ibr^8 iMbCe'th?
al activities. -The Ben-
n Research Outer and Ar- |
"1in ''" /eloping the
Pamatic and educational
* for the entenniaL
1 committed co-chaired by
^Ambassador of Israel to the
P Mates. Dr. Meir Rosenne.
* President of the American
"s. Ben-Gurion Universi-
eNegev, Jack J. Spitxer -
5 formed to promote, plan,
Tfy out centennial activities
fchl .?LJunel0- meeting
;2the Embassy of Israel
lZyn DC- inaugurating
Jjtenwal project. National
*. the centennial is
' W'ng organized and will
| ** the autumn of thi*
"> the participation of
J from the Jewish communi
"* American public fa-
through
history.
a most crucial era in
the book. It was translated from
Hebrew and, unfortunately, the
Spanish titles for the recipes are
poor transliterations of the proper
terms. And it would have been
helpful to have illustrations to
show some of the more difficult
techniques used.
Another cookbook dealing with
Balkan Sephardic cuisine is From
My Grandmother's Kitchen. The
recipes in this volume are similar
in scope to the ones in The Sephar-
dic Kosher Kitchen and include a
mixture of turkish, Greek,
Bulgarian, and Roumanian dishes.
Interesting reminiscences about
life in Switzerland (where the
author's family migrated from
Salonika) and many quaint
photographs add charm to the
book.
The organization of the book is
confusing and makes the volume
difficult to use. The chapters in-
clude, Reminiscing, My Grand-
parents' Fruit and Vegetable
Cart, Taking a Tour, Making
Multilayered Treats, Sabbath,
Sunday Morning Bread Baking,
Desayuno (breakfast), and
Passover. It would have been
helpful to have menus to (rive
cook. Helen Nash wanted to prove
that Kosher food need not be of
the heavy Eastern European
variety with which she was
familiar. By adapting recipes from
non-kosher cookbooks, as well as
taking down recipes from
numerous cooking classes, she has
put together an eclectic repertoire
of foods.
French, Italian, Greek, Indian
and Scandinavian adaptations are
just some of the entires in this
book. While studying kosher
Chinese cooking with Millie Chan,
Mrs. Nash discovered how well
Oriental recipes fit into the re-
quirements of kashrut and added
some of these recipes to her collec-
tion. The foods in this cookbook
include not only the usual gefilte
fish, kugels, tsimmes, and
borscht, but also caviar roulade,
steak in dill sauce, bouillabaise,
and moussaka.
The introductory section deal-
ing with the laws of kashrut is
clearly explained and will be very
helpful to those who are just star-
ting to keep a kosher kitchen.
Under each chapter heading like
appetizers, soups, main dishes,
and desserts, the author has
designated those recipes which
fall under the categories of meat,
dairy, and parve (neither meat or
milk) so that the reader will have a
clear idea about which foods may
be served together. Kosher
Cuisine is a nicely done book with
many interesting recipes.
Quick and Easy is the third in a
series of cookbooks from Triad
Publishing which cull their recipes
from Jewish organizational
cookbooks. In Quick and Easy,
recipes were selected based upon
the ease and speed of preparation.
However, the 330 recipes are not
based on "convenience foods,"
but rather rely predominantly on
fresh meats, fish and vegetables.
The recipes follow the laws of
kashrut, although there were a
few ingredients used in some
recipes that I have been unable to
find under kosher supervision
(like mango chutney). The recipes
fall under the general categories
of appetizers and beverages,
soups, salads, sauces, main dishes,
quick breads, coffee cakes,
desserts, and Passover. There are
even recipes for homemade ket-
chup, mayonnaise and tomato
sauce. The recipes are very ap-
pealing and carefully rewritten
for consistency in style.
-------
Gilda Angel writes a "kosher
gourmet" column for The Jewish
Week (New York).
where shopping is a pleasure 7doys a week
AvaHeble et Publlx Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
Baked Frash Dally
AvaHabls at Publlx Storaa with
Freeh Dantah Bakeries Only.
Another DeHcious Haw Item
Cherry
Crumb Pie
$009
aach m__________
Available at Publlx Stores wrttf
Freeh Danish Bakeries Only.
Filled with Bavarian Cream and
Topped with Chocolate Icing

tor
"&* Participation in the
onUntennialwillbeen
- "this manner, fitting
.^^paidtooneoTS
* of this century:
['" of spirit and deed,
klTttWnry and fighter,
[* of truth and juatice.
[^Wofhupaople
Available art All PuMx Stores
end Danish Bakeries.
MapkrWaimit $ fl
Coffee Cake *"*"*
Perfect for Dunking, Plain 1fr MiniDonuts................... ^ B*r
Golden Loaf S439
Pound Cake..................-**'
Ws the little things that make
the difference at Publix.
Prices Effective
July 18th thru 24th J 985.
Quantity MgM Rasacvad
MK'air*
COOKBOOK
COLLECTION
This week's feature
VOLUME 12
No-Time-To-Cook
Cookbook
*1.79
Watch for
New Books Weekly



P^ll TW
FlondiM of Greater Fort LandenhWFriday, July 19, 1966
'<>;
Funds will go to battle assault on Separation Principle
By KEVIN FREEMAN
NEW YORK (JTA) -
The American Jewish Con-
gress announced here the
formation of a new fund-
raising organization of pro-
minent lawyers to oppose
what the AJC described as a
"growing assault" on the
Constitutional principle of
separation of church and
state.
The new group, the Fund for
Religious Liberty, will provide
financial support for a broadly-
expanded program of litigation,
education and research by the
AJC It hopes to also provide the
AJC with finances in order to
enlarge its full-time legal staff
from three to five lawyers.
THE FIND for Religious
Liberty was introduced at a
1500-a'-plate dinner at the Park
Avenue Synagogue. Ira MiUsteic
a senior partner in the law firm of
Weil. Gotshal and Manges, will be
chairmari of the new group. Co-
chairmer. are Edgar Bronfman
Klututk,
honorary president of the
American Jewish Congress.
According to MiUstein. the
United States is being subjected
to "a powerful t *g" against
Constitutional guarantees of
religious liberty and the separa-
tion principle."
He citeo recent developments
including attempts to seek
b pubbc schools and
growing display of nativity :
and other religious symbols on
pubbc property as examples of
what he termed "a growing
assault on constitutional
principles."
-I < H 4 VISION of
Mfflstein said, leaves tittle room
for religious minorities who would
be made to feel as strangers in
their own land a threat that
Jews particular?} view with the
grawfl n Mm
i told the dinner that the
i of the fund "is eritica
to provide the AJC with
adequate resources to act with
president of the W>rid Jewish 'pnident jealousy" regarding the
AMIT Women to attend National Convention
This year marks the 60th an-
niversary of Amit Women. To
celebrate six decades of national
activity. Amit will hold its Na-
tional Convention in the nation *&
capital. Washington. D.C.. or.
August 11-13. 1985.
Amit Women (formerly
.American Mirrachi Women) is the
major women's religious Zionist
TEMPLE
NEWS
TEMPLE BETH ORR
While Rabbi Jerrold M. Levy
and Cantor Nancy Hausman are
on vacation, the following
members of the congregation will
lead the July services: Friday July
19 Carl. Shirley. Minna and
Sharon Berman; Saturday July 20
- Peter and Janet Oppenheimer
and Friday Jury 26 Ed Wolfson
TEMPLE SHOLOM
Pninah Braun. Sisterhood presi-
dent, accompanied executive vice
president RocbeUe Stenn and
Esther Cannon, Chairman of the
Florida Branch on United Nations
and Social Actions, to the Spring
Conference of the Florida Branch
of the Women's League for Con-
servative Judaism, which was held
recently in Florida.
organization, and for sixty years
has been operating high schools,
community centers and youth
villages and today. 20 projects
in Israel provide more than 16,000
needy youngsters with education
and social care. Amit Youth
villages are also home to almost
200 Ethiopian children recently
airlifted to Israel.
Highlights of the convention
will be the keynote address given
by Israel's Ambassador Meir
Rosenne; presentation of the
American-Israel Friendship
Award will be made to U.S. Am
hassador Samuel Lewis and Mrs.
Sallie Lewis who have just com-
pleted their assignment in Israel.
Delegates will be getting the in-
side track to Middle East update
by Steve Rosen, Director of
Research and Information,
American Israel Public Affairs
Committee, and Martin Indyk.
Executive Director. Middle East
Institute.
There will also be a special
tribute to Raoul Wallenberg, and
a dramatic reading by Michael
Moriarity, star of screen, stage
and television.
A large contingent of Amit
delegates from Florida are plann-
ing to attend.
Further information can be ob-
tained by calling Amit Women
Florida Council office at 531-5344.
First Amendment. We obviously
have no quarrel with any group's
right to hold whatever beliefs it
wanta
"But we will fight vigorously if
anyone seeks to enlist govern-
ment in their efforts to spread or
enforce their bebefs." he said.
"For such efforts are destructive
of rengious liberty and particular-
ly that of religious minorities.
Let's never forget that the time to
resist intolerance is when it first
shows its head.''
AJC ASSOCIATE executive
director Phil Baum expressed con-
cern that the Reagan Administra-
tion, unlike previous administra-
tions, is concerned with seeking
an accommodation with religions,
instead of seeking a separation of
state and religion.
Baum noted an increased direct
mail campaign by Christian fun-
damentalists to enlist support for
their causes and charged that
"highly placed persons" within
the Reagan Administration have
indirectly encouraged the efforts
of the Moral Majority and other
fundamentalist groups.
Bar/Bat
MICHAEL PAUL SANDS
Michael Paul Sands, son of
Beverly and Raymond Sands of
Tamarac. will be called to the
Torah on the occasion of his Bar
Mitzvah on Saturday morning, Ju-
ly 20 at Temple Sha'aray Tzedek.
Candlelighting Times
July 5 7:59 p.m.
July 12-7:58 p.m.
July 19 -7:56 p.m.
JEWISH ACCORDING TO TRADITION.
Star of Ddvid Cemeteries and Funeral Chapels are Broward
County's only all Jewish Cemetery Funeral Chapels Consecrated
by the Broward Board of Rabbis, staffed solely by Jewish Funeral
Directors and Memorial Counselors. Star of David is
concerned about Jewish burial traditions These
traditions are the laws of our fathers and their forefathers
before them These traditions are our heritage, so thev
are important to us ..And they are important to you.
Star of David Ceeaeierie* and Funeral Chapels
Tamarac Lauderhill Hollywood
Broward (305) 525-0800
Dade. 949-6100 S. Palm Beach. 722-9000 W. Palm Beach. 734-8440
Scad to: Star of David Cemeteries Funeral Chapels. P.O. Boa 25700. Tamarac. FL 33320
I u I uiinl more information on pre-arranged funerals
I ini more information on vour property < hang* program Our lots are m
cemetery al ___^
NAMJ
ADDHISS
UT,
PtiONr
MATF.
ZIP
Contemporary Issue* to be discussed
at Women's League for
Conservative Judaism conference
NEW YORK The Content
porary Jewish Woman: Profile
and Potential" will be the theme
of the National Conference and
Open Board Meeting of the
Women's League for Conser-
vative Judaism, which will take
place in St. Paul and Minneapolis.
Minnesota October 20-22, Selma
Weintraub. National President.
has announced.
Hundreds of local Women's
League leaders from Sisterhoods
affiliated with Conservative
agogues throughout the
I'nited States and Canada are ex-
pected to attend the three days of
meetings, which will focus on ho*
current secular and religious
women's issues affect the
organization's membership. "Con-
fronting Women's Issues: Law
and Ethics" will be the theme of
the opening plenary session. After
presentations by experts in the
fields of women's equity, legal ad-
ewl
vocacy, and bio-medical
members will have the
ty to discuss these is*,,
open microphone dialogue.
Dr. Gerson D. Coh
Chancellor of the J
Theological Seminary
York, will address the
on -Judaism ir, a liapidly
lng World," and
panel will discus Styles in the rllem
Jewish Community." (
highlights mdud
by Seminary rabbin al scho
dent Marion SI iiewiti
women's participation in
synagogue, a trigger script en
ed "The Ego -x^"
a group dynarr.
Pursuit of Your Poteati
Delegates will also rave the
portunity for informal c
ferences and OMtsulUtioej
Women's League Nat
Leaders.
conservative
tamarac jewish center 'tz1-tsss). 8101 nw
Servtcoe Sunday through Friday 8:88 e.m.. n.m.
p.m Saturday 8:4* am p.m ReAR* I
. caatar f>. MH*l
St. Tamarac nut.
Lata Friday mrrietll
Auxiliary IUMM
TEMPLE BETH AM Services: Monday through Friday 8 JO a m .5pm. Friday iate email
p m Saturday a m 5 p>tn.. Sunday 1 a m 5 p m Rat** Pant r>te*la.|
Rabbi Ementua.Dr Solomon Geld Cantor Irvmg Groaamar.
TEMPLE IITB IJMLAJCL 742-4040t, 7100 W. Oiktnart Park Brva Pinnae Will
1 anas Miavlaj tm nit Tlawaea, I a S:J0 pm; Friday 8 am 5 p m .. 8p.m.;|
Saturday 8 45 am : Sunday aav. fc a.m Caatar Maertre Sea
TEMPLE EETH ISRAEL OF OEERFIELO REACH itB-TOAV 300
Century Blvd Deerfleld Beach 33441 Secvieea: Sunday through Friday 8a|
a m S p m. Friday ate acrvtce 8 p.m Saturday S 45 a m and at candle-
lighting time Rat*. Jet* Laetncr. Center SheWN Acker***
TEMPLE R'NAI MOSHE (8434880 >. 14S4 RE Sard. St. Pompano Beach|
t 33080 SarvlOM: Friday 8pm RaRM Merris A. Ska*
TEMPLE SHA'ARAY TZEOEK .741-OSMl. 4888 Pine laland Rd Sunrtal
33331 Service* Sunday through Friday 8 am 5 p an Late Friday iervlc*I I
pm Saturday 8:48 am.. :88 pm Raeat Reward 8. Bneeaa Qatar Jatl|
RaM
TEMPLE SHOLOM l043-8410i. 183 8R U Av*.. Pompano Beach J3O40Ser
vice. Monday through Friday 8 48 a-m. I vantage Monday throurh Tnur |
aday at 5 p m Friday evening at 8. Saturday and Sunday t am
limaN April. Caatar Seme* R
CONGREGATION BETH HILLEL OF MAROATE (874-88801. 7M0 Marftti I
Blvd Margate UOta Service*-. Sunday througAFriday 8 15am !
Late Friday eervloe S p.m. Saturday 8: am 5 SO p.m
Cl
t, aSM Bailey M.
Rao*. DavM
HEBREW CONGREGATION OF LAUDERHILL (TO-SBM). SMB NW Rtkl
Av* Lauderhul 33313 Service* By day through Friday 8 30 am.. 1:1
pm Saturday 8 at am Rat** torse* Hataara
!toRTn mmmatMM amaaaw oohorsoatbon: (ru-ran m
>TBI Servteae: at Banyon Lafeea
Tamarac. Friday at tp m Saturday 8: OS am. I
ORTHODOX
TEMPLE OHEL R'NAI R APHAE L (7M-788* I. 4S81 W. Oakland Park Blri.|
Lauderdale Lake* 33313 Sarvicat: Sunday through Thuraday 8 a m 5 p.m.,
Friday 8a m 3pm Saturday 8 45 am 5pm
SYNAGOOWE OF INVERRARY CHABAO (TaVITT7). TT1B N 14 St.. LR-I
coin Part Weal. Sunrtae 31831 SanricM: Sanday RWSR Frlaav 8 a.m-J-"I
p.m.. Satwrday a.m.. s M p.m. Srawy faraaaa: Maa. Semlav*
trrvicat; Wamaa. Taatdayt p.m. Ream Area LleAarmae.
YOUMO ISRAEL OF DRERFIELD BEACH (4311*7). 1880 W HUKboK
Blvd Deerfleld Beach 33441 Services: Sunday Utrough Friday 8 am
aundown Saturday 8 48 am aad aundown Camir MHtea Rart. SklatJ
Ha~ RaaBP a#> r f* ^aaaafani at*
YOUNG ISRAEL SYNAGOGUE OF HOLLYWOODFORT LA"0ER,^*h^
9e-7rni tsti Stirung Rd Fort Lauderdale 88813 Service! M""J
through Friday 7 SO a m and aundown. Saturday. 8 em .aundown. a""'
Sam. aundown Raetx Edward Davit.
CONGREGATION MIODAL DAVID <73*488*I. SS78 W. McSab R4.
Tamarac Service*: Dally S a.m.. mlncha 8 p.m Saturday 8 46 a maao
5 15 p m Rapb. Chain tcAniHai Caagrianrlaa aratider.1 ?
Ftorttaar. RRCONSTRUCTIONIST
RAM AT SMALOM (473-88801. 11801 W. Broward Bird. Plantation IB*
Friday 8 15 pm Saturday. 10 am RaaAa SJawl SalaeeU. Caala*
REFORM
TEMPLE RETH ORR (Ta*-83U|. SSI RJveratde Dr.. Coral rn*',/.*"?J
Sarvicat: Friday 8 p m Saturday 10 am. RaRM JdrraR) M Levy. Caiaw
Naacy Haatmaa.
TRMPLE R'NAI SHALOM OF DEERPIELD BEACH <*i!*'?fD*-J
Menorah Chapela. S88S W. lllltaRnm Blvd.. Det-e-M Raacfe. F
RalHH Nataaa H. FtoA. Cantor MarrN LevMaea.
TEMPLE EMANU EL (183-8818). SMS W. OaAaaad Part Bred.. ]*"*^
Laaea 38811 Servtcat: Friday 8 18 p.m.; Saturday. ^'.^"SiV,
cetearaUon of Bar-Bat MitovaA RaRM J'" CAtRRT
TEMPLE ROL AMI ,473 1888). 8300 Patera Rd.. Ptaurtatton 8Ja4 S*r ^
Friday 8 IS p m Saturday 10 SO am ReRm SBllSia J. Herr. camw
CartMra.
LIRHRAL JEWISH TEMPLE OF COCONUT CRBBK (F-748*, iefvlct
Friday night mrvlcea twice monthly at Calvary Praaaytarhui Ch
caawaut creek Parkway. RaRtM Brvce I '
WEST BROWARD JEWISH CONGREGATION 783-48*8) )W unJ*?JjLtl
Plantation Sarvicat: Friday 8 15 p.m I Saturday, only asr RarBai
calebrauona RaRM Staart L. Rarmaa. Caatar Richard "-




devastating' Decisions
Ugh Court Upholds Separation Rule
Friday, July 19, 1985/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Laudgrdale Page 15
Dramatic increase in Child
abuse in Israel is reported
I BjBENGALLOB
fcwYORK-(JTA)-A
tsh expert on legal
L affecting observant
Kys described as
instating" two decisions
the U.S. Supreme Court
Kjday both by 5-4 votes,
Ljng unconstitutional
Eprograms by which, at
Ejc expense, remedial
Kotional services had
[a brought to pupils of all-
\religious schools on the
Knises of the schools.
me majority ruling held in both
L that "even a praiseworthy,
br purpose of providing for
Jiucation of school children
Lm validate government aid to
Ehiil schools when the aid has
ifftct of promoting a single
Lot or religion generally or
Ei the aid unduly entangles the
tnment in matters religious."
Epneral decision was that the
Emms have the principal effect
Enncing religion in violation
Ke Constitution.
DENNIS RAPPS. executive
rector of the National Jewish
omission on Law and Public
lairs (COLPA). which had filed
fttnds-of-the court briefs in both
Iks, said the Supreme Court had
eld decisions of federal Courts
Appeal in the Second and Sixth
cuts. The briefs were prepared
I Nathan Lewin of Washington,
BLPA vice president.
Iln one case, the Second Court of
peals had invalidated a pro-
Eam under Title I of the Federal
Itmentary and Secondary
taxation Act nf 1965. Under
lit program, the federal govern-
Iml provided funding for local
dk school boards to arrange
pedial mathematics and
lading courses to all
pcanonally-deprived children in
P income areas.
p part of the Title I program,
fcichool boards provided public
pol teachers to teach the
pdial classes at the parochial
pU, including yeshivas, in the
Pf way that such services were
PjW to public school children.
P this arrangement, public
^teachers taught the
F*l courses on the premises
l non-public school.
fJJPS SAID that, although
Fd been no evidence, in the
p 20-year history of the pro-
trf LMy min&lin the con-
Cl reliou* Programs of
C*"00!* with the Federally-
remedial programs, the
|r* Uurt accepted the Cir-
F^urt of Appeals ruling that
l2j!ltential of such ""*!-
gjwd the entire progrim
Pwtuuonal.
tS ?Te ,effect f the in-
rjenofTnlelwUlbesevere
Ljw attending Jewiah
P* "cnoolg. He said it ap-
El1" the light of the
tT U)urt rulings Monday
Klnli ^"stituCai
P*^ services by pubhc
^W^*liousachool.
P^thi. would mew that
EJ* Publlc cho' t to
K ^T1*1 t^ching dur-
f^l day or after hours.
KS?.D < that. nc
E*** extremely tunt-
Cg-thudidnot^to
FcWi j^8 ln the non-
| fa01 *?" the repakr
Pa L. ** "w^ such
K -tt-d *
Lr^530 *-. remedial
programs could not realistically be
scheduled after that hour, he said.
In addition, he asserted, the
cost of transporting the students
to such neutral sites have been
estimated as involving about 40
percent of the total allocation of
federal funds for the remedial
services.
In a parallel case in Grand
Rapids, Michigan, Rapps
reported, the impact on Jewish
religious schools is indirect
because no students in Grand
Rapids parochial schools had been
directly benefitted by the
remedial programs under Title I.
Also there appear to be no Jewish
day schools in Grand Rarids.
NEVERTHELESS, COLPA
intervened in that case on the
premise that the principle of
whether supplementary publicly-
financed educational programs
may be conducted under the con-
trol of public school personnel is of
major importance to observant
Jews, Rapps said.
He explained that if non-Jewish
private schools are denied that
benefits of such federally-financed
programs, they are effectively ex-
cluded from such help from educa-
tional benefits offered to the rest
of the student population, because
Travel affected
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
economic crisis seems to have its
affect as less Israelis are going
abroad. Some 42,000 Israelis left
Israel in May, a drop of 22 percent
compared to the same period last
year. This drop was recorded even
before the doubling of the travel
tax to $300 at the end of May. It is
likely that the statistics of this
month will show an even larger
drop.
of the religious beliefs
parents of non-public
students.
of the
school
He said that in the Grand
Rapids program, enrichment pro-
grams for mathematics, reading,
art, music and physical education
were provided to non-public
school students on parts of the
public school premises set aside
for the time needed to implement
the aid programs. Rapps said
COLPA had filed friend-of-the
court briefs in both cases on
behalf of major national Orthodox
organizations.
By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK (JTA) The
problem of child abuse has come
to the surface in Israel in recent
years with a dramatic increase in
the number of reported cases.
Dr. Hanita Zimrin, a professor
at Tel Aviv University's School of
Social Work, asserted here that
last year alone there were more
than 600 reported child abuse
cases. However, she said that the
actual number of child abuse cases
in Israel is much larger, in the
neighborhood of some 3,000 a
year.
ZIMRIN SAID that abused
children in Israel are exposed to
physical abuse such as cigarette
bums on their bodies and other in-
juries inflicted upon them; neglect
which includes starvation; sexual
abuse and emotional abuse.
According to Zimrin, most of
the abuse is done by the parents.
"Our experience shows that about
95 percent of the abuse cases are
committed by one or both parents
of the child," she said.
Claiming that Israel has a "nice
welfare system for children," in
the form of child care clinics
known as Tipat Halav, Zimrin
charged however that the system
"is not effective when children are
abused." In Israel, she continued,
a person cannot be charged with a
crime for failing to report a case
of child abuse, and in many cases
child abusers are not punished, or
are punished lightly.
So. Florida AH yah Council host farewell party for Olim
The South Florida Aliyah Coun-
cil held a farewell party for olim
(new immigrants to Israel) on
Thursday, June 13, at the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation. An an-
nual event, the party was held to
honor those of the community who
are moving to Israel to make a
new life for themselves, and leav-
ing sometime during the next few
months.
Morris Futernick, president of
the Alliyah Council, lead the even-
ing festivities, presenting cer-
tificates of honor from the Council
and the Jewish Federation, to
each new oleh going.
Norman Lipoff, past president
of the Jewish Federation, and a
member of the Board of Gover-
nors of the Jewish Agency, ad-
dressed those attending, wishing
them well in their endeavors in
Israel.
Also present to bring their good
wishes were Dork Shavit, consul
to the Embassy of Israel in Miami;
Rabbi Solomon Schiff, director of
Chaplaincy Services for the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion; Gilad Shafran, shaliach to
the Israel Programs Office in the
Federation, who will also be retur-
ning to Israel after serving the
past two years in his position; and
Uri Cohen, director of the Israel
Aliyah Center, located in the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion, the office which helped ar-
range everything in Israel for the
new olim.
Pictured above from left to right: Uri Cohen, director of the Israel
Aliyah Center; Morris Futernick, president of the South Florida
Aliyah Council; Norman Lipoff, Past President, Greater Miami
Jewish Federation and member of Board of Governors of Jewish
Agency.
UUJE DAVIS ISN'T READY FOR A NURSING
Westbrooke at Inverrary is a full service community
offering gracious living for active seniors. Like Lillie
Davis. Lille has fond memories of the past. And she has just as
many dreams about what lies ahead. Her visions of retirement
are of continued health and activity. Independence. Involvement.
And free of little household worries. A move to Westbrooke can
help Lillie realize these dreams.
Westbrooke at Inverrary has no entrance fee. The complex
includes a spacious pool area, and sits on the Championship
Inverrary Golf Course. Dining is a delectable experience. Free
transportation is provided. And, as you should expect, there
is a maid and laundry service, complete security, and 24 hour
emergency call.
Maintain your accustomed lifestyle. Retire to Westbrooke
at Inverrary.
Utestbroote
al Inverrary
Tell me more about this rare combination of living.
Name/Phone/Age
Addreas
City/State/Zip
4300 Rock Island Road. Lauderhg. FL 33319 (305) 739-0800
-MF-15


i
Page 16 The Jewiah Floridian of Greater Fort I^ider^effiTday^ July 19. 1985
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