The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 3, no. 7 (Apr. 5, 1974)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 9, 1976 called v.4, no. 27 but constitutes v.5, no. 1; issue for July 7, 1989 called v.18, no. 11 but constitutes v.18, no. 13.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44570954
lccn - sn 00229545
ocm44570954
System ID:
AA00014312:00296

Related Items

Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward


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Full Text
State Legislative
Affairs
Day
Pag* 3
New Chaplain For
Florida Medical
Center
Page 3
Governor's Wife
Commends
Federation
Page 2
he Jewish FL
*:
IMAN
OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE
14 Number 22
Fort Lauderdale, Florida Friday, June 21, 1985
Fr1S*oclt
Prlcr <"> Cents
.eonard L. Farber elected chairman of Brandeis University Board
nnard L. Farber of
[Lauderdale, nationally
j in the real estate in-
y, prominent civic and
nunal leader, and a
of the Board of
ttors of the Jewish
tration. has been
^ted chairman of
deis University Board
stees.
er is chairman of
J L. Farber, Inc., of
no Beach, one of the
b's leading real estate
jopment firms which, in
', years, has developed
Chopping centers
jighout the United
as well as many
^ntial projects in the
York metropolitan
He succeeds Dr. Henry L.
Foster of Newton, Mass., as
chairman of the Brandeis
board. Citing family and
business obligations, Foster
announced in April that he
was stepping down after six
years as chairman.
"Leonard Farber's com-
mitment to the philosophy
of education at Brandeis is
underscored by his long and
generous association with
the university," said
Brandeis President Evelyn
E. Handler.
Brandeis is a leading
liberal arts and research
university and the nation's
only Jewish-sponsored,
nonsectarian university.
Farber, whose $2.25
million lead gift initiated the
campaign for the univer-
sity s new Leonard L.
Farber Library, which was
dedicated in 1983, was
elected to the board of
trustees in 1980 after a long
association with Brandeis in
a variety of capacities.
This spring, Farber was
among 10 prominent
Americans, including New
York Governor Mario
Cuomo, to receive the 1985
Horatio Alger Awards,
given by the New York bas-
ed Horatio Alger Associa-
tion of Distinguished
Americans to people who
"exemplify the merits of
America's free enterprise
system."
Farber is a former presi-
dent of the International
Council of Shopping
Centers, an 8,000 member
organization of the leading
shopping center developers,
chain store executives and
mortgage lenders in the
United States and Canada.
He has lectured on shopp-
ing center development and
investment at educational
institutions across the coun-
try and has developed shop-
ping centers in California,
New York, New Jersey,
Connecticut, Virginia,
Florida and Puerto Rico.
A participant in many
civic and communal ac-
tivities, Farber is on the
boards of directors of the
Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale
and tiie National Council of
Christians and Jews of
Broward County.
Leonard L. Farber
ee Rauch named 1986 Oceanfront Area UJA campaign chairman

t
ffeifh
John Streng, 1986 Jewish
Federation/United Jewish
Appeal genera] campaign
chairman, has named Lee
Rauch to succeed him as
Oceanfront Area UJA cam-
paign chairman for the 1986
campaign.
Rauch has been co-
chairman of the Gait Ocean
Mile UJA campaign for the
past year and a half. He has
been an active volunteer
with the Federation for the
past five years.
"We couldn't have found
a better man for the job,"
stated Streng, "1 have all
the confidence that Lee will
continue to generate excite-
ment in 1986."
The 1985 Oceanfront
Area campaign has reached
almost $1 million. "With the
assistance and guidance of
John and the many Ocean-
front Area workers, I hope
to surpass the 1985 UJA
total," Rauch stated.
Currently Lee serves as
president of the Kol
Haverim Lodge of B'nai
B'rith. A native of Chicago,
Lee has lived on the Gait
Ocean Mile for the past 13
years. He is past president
of the Gait Ocean Mile Com-
munity Association and an
active member of the Com-
mon Cause.
Local leaders named to CJF's
National Women's Division Cabinet
|Govt. Wins Confidence Vote
On Exchange of Prisoners
JUS ALE M (JTA) The government has won an
jjlming vote of confidence in the Knesset for its con-
** prisoner exchange. The Knesset also rejected
weition motions to establish a commission of in-
l the Lebanon war.
{vote of 65-6 with 16 abstentions, the Knesset ac-
Ifti Mini8ter Yitzhak Rabin's statement last
I*1 Israel had no option but to accept the terms of
r exchange in which 1,150 Palestinians serving
"J terrorist offenses were released on May 20 in
fJJ toree Israeli soldiers held captive by a Palesti-
*">nst group in Damascus.
^NEGATIVE VOTES were cast by the rightwing
>rarty and the extremist Kach Party.
J^ against an inouiry into the Lebanon war was
^abstentions. Likud was vehemently opposed
" "*>r MKs, by pre-arrangement, abstained.
J'mon Peres made it clear that he felt this was
r* .[or a probe of the war which could bring down
Hikud
unity coalition government.
NEW YORK, N.Y. -
Alvera Gold, Deborah F.
Hahn and Barbara K.
Wiener have been named to
serve on the Council of
Jewish Federations Na-
tional Women's Division
Cabinet, it has been an-
nounced by Deanne Stone of
Framingham, Women's
Division Chairwoman. This
Cabinet will meet at the
CJF spring and fall
meetings as well as the an-
nual General Assembly.
The CJF Women's Divi-
sion serves to link local
Federation Women's Divi-
sions throughout North
America, developing collec-
tive policy and direction. It
functions as a clearing
house and initiator of in-
novative concepts in leader-
ship training, Jewish enrich-
ment and fund raising skills.
Alvera A. Gold, a Fedora-
tion Board member, serves
as Project Renewal
chairperson for the Federa-
Deborak F. Hahn ****** A- Q^A
tion and 1986 Women's
Division campaign co-
chairperson. Deborah F.
Hahn also serves as 1986
Women's Division campaign
co-chairperson with Bar-
bara K. Wiener serving as
Women's Division Ex-
ecutive Vice President in
charge of campaign.
The Council of Jewish
Federations is the associa-
tion of 200 Federations,
Welfare Funds and Com-
munity Councils which
Continued on Page 3
Barbara K. Wiener


Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, June 21, 1985
i
Pictured (left, to right) are: Sheldon Polish,
outgoing president; Steven Fayne, treasurer;
Dr. David Sachs, president; and Norman
Ostrau, first vice president. Absent from
photograph: Elaine Pittell, second vice presi-
dent and Dee Hahn, secretary.
Mrs. Bob Graham
commends Federation1!
work with elderly i
The letter below was written to Federation't Cu**~.
Elderly Services, Sandra Friedland, by Aa>U Gr^T^i.
Florida s Governor Bob Graham. Mrs Graham rSfisT
done by the Federation on behalf of the elderly eitiuJati
Broward County. *
My24,l*
Jewish Family Service installs officers
The 23rd Annual Meeting of
Jewish Family Service of
Broward County was held on May
22 at the Jewish Federation of
South Broward.
The Nominating Committee
proposed the following slate for
the Board of Directors: Dr. Linda
Benlolo, Joseph BerkoviU, Ben
Dantzker, Gladys Daren, Peter
Deutach, Dr. Robert Dolgow, Lee
Dreiling, Judy Feldman, Libo
Fineberg, Jerome Gevirman, Ber-
nke Goldstein, Rabbi Bennett
Greenapon, Steven Hersch, Deb-
bie Hirschorn, Lynda Levin, Dr.
George Lipton, Rabbi Richard
Margolis, Merle Oriove, Charlotte
Padek, Israel Resnikoff, Jean
Rosenberg, Dr. Steven Schacter,
Reuben Schneider, Bobbie
Simonds, Felice Prensky, Rabbi
Elliott Skiddell, David Sommer,
Florence K. Straus, Herb Tolpen,
Howard Wacks, Philip Weisberg.
The officers nominated: Dr. David
Sachs, president: Norman Ostrau,
1st vice president; Elaine Pittell,
2nd vice president; Steven Fayne,
treasurer; Dee Hahn, secretary.
The entire slate was unanimously
accepted.
The Esther Lowenthal Com-
munity Service Award was
presented to Sherwin H. Rosens-
tein, executive director of Jewish
Family Service, for his
distinguished community con-
tributions. John Stokesberry,
District administrator, District X,
HRS, was the guest speaker. He
spoke on the "Future of Social
Services in Broward County."
Awards were presented to the
following volunteer workers of
the Medicare Information Service
El Al Frequent Flyer program takes off
NEW YORK If you fly to
Israel often, now you can earn big
discounts and free trips on El Al
Israel Airlines by joining MAT-
MID, the airline's new frequent
traveler club.
Passengers traveling on any of
El Al's worldwide routes can earn
from one to six bonus points on
every trip. It takes only 11 bonus
points to earn an 80 percent dis-
count on a roundtrip ticket to
Israel from New York, Boston,
Chicago or Miami. And just 14
points from Los Angeles!
"MATMID is our way of saying
thank you to the passengers who
regularly fly El Al, as well as
means to encourage others to join
their ranks," said David
Schneider, El Al's general
manager for North and Central
America.
MATMID membership is open
to anyone who flies El Al regular-
ly. Bonuses are awarded for
points accumulated over a 12
month period and are redeemable
for travel between the United
States and Israel. First class and
business class fares earn more
points than lower promotional
fares. Longer trips offer more
points than shorter ones. To
register bonus points, passengers
must mail boarding cards in
envelopes provided or drop their
cards in the special "President's
Mail" box on each plane.
As the world's only Jewish
airline, El Al observes Halacha, is
strictly glatt kosher and Shomer
Shabbat, and offers other special
services to serve the needs of its
religious passengers.
For complete details on MAT-
MID. call El Al at (800) 223-6700,
or contact your travel agent.
El Al Israel Airlines is head-
quartered at 860 Third Avenue,
New York, New York 10022
212/940-0600.
A JEW
CHRIST
'AWry
A SCHOLARLY
WHODUNIT!
Upely and ttmrtllnm InmlohU
W on rHImUm cholmrmMp
MNWCM, CONIC to light In Ihl.
*crcccc yt h4,hly
r*mdmble .rudy
J* **" "*o/*m,/br
theflnt time, why Jomm neve
been the rictlmt of mmti-
memlHtm for mlmtomt tmo
mlllennlm
NAME
ADDRESS
_ copMs-papartMcfc o MS-iS
M.M plus $1 50 portage and handkng
_ copki-hardcover 114.00
U.M pk $1 50 pottage and handing
~Tf*X
crrv
STATE
OP
7W .M8T..NYC1M1I
in appreciation of their help and
guidance to residents of our com-
munity: Avner Lewis, Richard
Chernok, Frieda Kramer, and Sol
Bratt
Jewish Family Service of
Broward County is a recipient
agency of the Jewish Federation
of Greater Fort Lauderdale,
Jewish Federation of South
Broward, and the United Way of
Broward County.
Jewish Family Service will be
moving into the Federation
building at 8358 W. Oakland Park
Blvd., prior to July 81.
Mrs. Bob Graham
The Governore's Mansion
Tallahassee, Florida 32303
Sandra Friedland, Coordinator
Elderly Services
Jewish Federation of Greater Ft. Lauderdale
Post Office Box 26810
Tamarac, Florida 33320
Dear Sandra:
Thank you for your kind invitation to visit The Gathering PW
Pat has told me about the wonderful facility you hsve Wbaa
schedule permita, I will make every effort to visit your propj
The Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale is to be cw
mended for its commitment and concern for care for the eHah
The valuable services your organization provides has graft
enhanced the quality of life for older people in Broward Counti.
Thank you for your assistance with the production of the mm
about outstanding older Floridians. I am looking forward tob
ing the opportunity to meet you someday.
Smordj,
ADELE GRAHAM
Sam learned about
The GUARDIAN PLAN, program and
changed his mind about
buying cemetery property in Florid
Like your family. Sam s family also had strong traditions One of those was
burial in the family cemetery property in New York But now that he and his wire
have retired to Florida, he was led to believe that his family tradition was no
longer practical, even though he would prefer to have funeral services back
home Sam was worried about the emotional burden on his family And franwy.
he was worried about the cost
Then a friend told him about The GUARDIAN PLAN, insurance funded
prearranged funeral program Here are the facts Sam got. ,.
He learned he could have funeral services in New York at a very reasonable
price He learned he could arrange all the details in advance and set the price
he could afford to pay for the services he wanted. And The GUARDIAN plaj
program would guarantee the amount would never increase. He also earneu-
could select RIVERSIDE or one of the other guardian family of lewish funerai
directors including BOULEVARD PARK-WEST. SCHWARTZ BROTHERS or
IEFFER who honor The GUARDIAN PLAN program in Florida and in New rw
It answered Sam's problems It could answer yours. Can t0|| free
For more information without obligation, call toll free _~" aiUMM
1-800-432-0853 Do it today while it s on your mind. 1-800-432 W
Or write to Guardian Plans Inc P.O. Box 495. Maitland FL 32751
Riverside sponsors
The GUARDIAN PLAN*SEU*
insurance funded prrrMMjad funeral program
The most respected name In funeral preplanning
An INSURANCE FUNDED prearranged funeral service provided by Guardian ^J^S^fJ
contunction with Family Service lie Insurance Company (Forms Nos ObOIM-AAJoOIW-W" ^
OI020?-C/OI020JB-2/IOIOWJ-B-VI81456-l/l8M56-2|andpartlclpalK funeral n^*"Eidil*
Slates and Canada In the Stale of Florida the Initial face amount of the benefit P*V*^.UT_C0of
insurance or annuity contract shall not exceed $5 000 00 and al ptearranejed '""""Vaib^
XX)00sbal.befunded,hrc^a,ru^^^^^^W^..I-:-^--------^


Friday, June 21, 1985/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 3
Icommunity interest sparked at State Legislative Affairs Day
ding the Fort Lauderdale area at
\ Legislative Affairs Day in Tallahassee
\(kfl to right), Sherwin Rosenstein, ex-
- director, Jewish Family Services;
Lijmack, chairman of Die Federa-
tion's Government Affairs Committee; State
T^T P?jK*in*teiw'' Rhonda Putterman,
t2SriES wecare "* "^
Leibo Esther Lerner, Women's Division
V*****: and Lawrence Sehuval, Federa-
tion s director of Community Relations.
Chaplaincy Commission appoints
Chaplain for Florida Medical Center
Tallahassee, Florida's
capital, was the setting for
an all-day program entitled
"State Legislative Affairs
Day."
Taking part in the day
were representatives from
ten Jewish Federations in
Florida, making up the
Florida Association of
Jewish Federations. This
association boasts a State
Government Affairs Com-
mittee, which is chaired in
Fort Lauderdale by Martin
Lipnack, a prominent at-
torney and a member of the
Fort Lauderdale Federa-
tion's Board of Directors.
The purpose of such a
committee is to monitor
legislation affecting the
community at large, and of
special interest to the
Jewish community. An ex-
ample of such legislation are
bills affecting programs for
the elderly ana services for
special populations (i.e. the
handicapped).
Federal dollars are
dispersed by the State
government rather than
directly to local com-
munities, according to Lip-
nack, therefore, he said,
there is a need for a Federa-
tion to get involved in the
area of State government
affairs.
Representatives met with
Florida State Represen-
tative Peter Deutsch and
State Senator Peter Weins-
tein. A proclamation was
issued commemorating the
Holocaust by both the
Senate and the House.
"I found the day to be
very enlightening," Lipnack
said. "It was truly beneficial
for all who attended."
iJewish Federation's
Commission, under
lirmanship of Alfred
has appointed Rabbi
erman, spiritual leader of
oward Jewish Congrega-
plain of Florida Medical
M. Lerner, assistant
itor for the Medical
ated, "I am so pleased
appointment. The
ministered to our
dds a dimension to the
recovery." Lerner
plaincy Commission
Rabbi Albert B.
L that the hospital will of-
:al leaders
med from Page 1
inearly 800 com-
Ses embracing a
i population of more
~ million in the U.S.
Wished in 1932, the
| serves as a national
ent to strengthen
"k and the impact of
[Federations through
top in developing
""> to meet changing
the Jewish corn-
trough the ex-
f successful ex-
es to assure the most
1 community ser-
ough establishing
*s for fund raising
ption; and through
tonal planning and
n .^mmon purposes
[with local, regional,
^d international
'WARD
ER4
PAGING

fer its fullest cooperation to Rabbi
Bernmn.
The Rabbi was taken on a tour
of the hospital by Martha Endres,
Patient Services coordinator, and
Ruth Minister, director of Social
Planning, and had the opportunity
to meet with the heads of the
departments of the hospital.
Rabbi Berman is a graduate of
Yeshiva University and attended
the Post-Graduate Center for
Mental Health-Pastoral Counsel-
ing Program.
Berman has served congrega-
tions in Allentown, Pa.,
Washington D.C., and New York.
He comes to Plantation from
Oceansde, N.Y., where he served
as a New York City Hospital
Chaplain for the Department of
Correction at Rikers Island.
He and his wife Audrey, have
two children and reside in
Plantation.
Pictured (left to right) are: Rabbi Albert B.
Schwartz.director of Federation's Chaplaincy
Commission; Alfred Golden, chairman of the
Chaplaincy Commission; Rabbi Stuart Ber-
man, newly-appointed chaplain of Florida
Medical Center; Edward M. Lerner, assistant
administrator of Florida Medical Center;
Martha Endres, Patient Services coordinator,
Fhrida Medical Center; and Ruth Minister,
director of Social Planning, Florida Medical
Center.
IMJLK DAVIS ISNT READY FOR A NURSING
Westbrooke at Inverrary is a full service community
offering gracious living for active seniors. Like Lillie
Davis. LiBe has fond memories of the past. And she has just as
many dreams about what lies ahead. Her visions of retirement
are of continued health and activity. Independence. Involvement.
And free of little household worries. A move to Westbrooke can
help Lillie realize these dreams.
Westbrooke at Inverrary has no entrance fee. The complex
includes a spacious pool area, and sits on the Championship
Inverrary Golf Course. Dining is a delectable experience. Free
transportation is provided. And, as you should expect, there
is a maid and laundry service, complete security, and 24 hour
emergency caD.
Maintain your accustomed lifestyle. Retire to Westbrooke
at Inverrary.
Wtestbrooke
d Inverrary
Tell me more about this rare combination of living.
Name/Phone/Age
Address
Cky/State/Zip
4300 Rock Island Road, LauderhiU. FL 33319 (305) 739-0800
MF-15


Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, June 21, 1986
Ethiopian Jewish Aliyah in Perspective

There are now well over 10,000
Ethiopian Jews in Israel. Like
earlier groups, they have come for
many reasons and after a
dangerous trek. They have come
to study Torah in their national
homeland, fulfill mitzvot (com-
mandments) in Judaism's
historical center, speed the advent
of Messiah by ingathering, and
escape terrible persecution and
famine.
Like other groups of Jews,
those from Ethiopia, who are
black, bring their own culture and
heritage, enriching the diversified
mosaic of Israeli life. The Ethio-
pian branch of the world Jewish
family was certified as Jewish by
both the Chief Ashkenazic and
Chief Sephardic rabbis of Israel in
1973.
When Independence was
declared (5 lyar 5708, May 14,
1948), there were fewer than
700,000 Jews in Eretz Israel, but
their numbers would double in
three years as Jews would begin
to return to the homeland they
had lacked for nearly 2,000 years.
Here are highlights of some major
waves of immigration, that may
show Ethiopian Jewish immigra-
tion in perspective.
The first Jews to arrive after In-
dependence were 25,000 East
European Jews whom Britain had
jailed on Cyprus for daring to seek
entry into what was then a British
Mandate with strict immigration
quotas barring Jews. They were
soon joined by other Holocaust
survivors men and women with
battered lives and tattered
clothing, the vestiges of once-
large and prosperous Eastern
European families. They were,
like immigrants to follow, without
funds but with confidence and
hope.
In 1949-50, Operation Magic
Carpet provided a dramatic exam-
ple of ill yah or the "going up" to
Israel by Olim (immigrants) fore-
seen by the Prophets (Ezra 1:3).
Operation Magic Carpet airlifted
to Israel virtually all 47,000 Jews
in Yemen, who first had to survive
an arduous journey on foot to
Aden. The Yemenite Jews called
the planes eagles' wings after
G-d's words, "And I bore you on
eagles' wings and I brought you
unto myself (Exod. 19:4)."
Operation Ezra soon followed
(1950-51), bringing out 114,000
Jews from Iraq, after Iraq
enacted the Special Law Authoriz-
ing Emigration of the Jews that
United Synagogue Youth NATIV
program gears up for Fall 1985
Rabbi Paul Freedman, director
of the Department of Youth Ac-
tivities of the United Synagogue,
has announced that the NATIV
enrollment for 1965-86 represents
a significant increase over past
years. Nativ, USVs one year pro-
gram in Israel, which includes two
semesters of study at the Hebrew
University, leading up to 36 points
of transfer credits for college,
open to all high school graduates,
will have 13 of its 17 USY Regions
represented in the enrollment this
coming year. Tliere are now some
85 Bogrei Nativniks, with 30 cur-
rently in Israel on the 1984-85
program. Thus, the total number
of Bogrei Nativ available from
services to the Conservative
Movement next year will number
115.
One of the goals of N'ativ is to
produce Advisors and Leaders for
the youth programs of the Move-
ment and each person who par-
ticipates agrees to give two years
of service to the United
Synagogue and its Youth Pro-
gram upon his/her return. In re-
cent publications, the Hebrew
University in Jerusalem has writ-
ten that NATIV is regarded as
one of its best overseas programs
and has worked out additional
cooperative ventures with the
Youth Department for supporting
special activities and assisting in
the planning and development of
other study opportunities in Israel
for USY graduates.
A number of Movement
members serve today as faculty
and administrative staff at
Hebrew University, and the cur-
rent Shaliach lferkas of USY,
Mr. Yair Sagi, acts as Associate
Dean of students there. Nativ is
made possible through the
cooperation and support of the
Noar VChahit* Department of
the World Zionist Organization
and the Joint Program for Jewish
Education as well as the
American Zionist Youth Founda-
tion. Graduates of Nativ serve as
staff at USY Regional Encamp-
ments and as full time Advisors
for Kadima or USY groups in
United Synagogue congregations.
Additionally, graduates serve as
staff on USY on Wheels and USY
Israel Pilgrimage programs. Cur-
rently, one Bogeret Nativ is
employed on a professional basis
with the National Youth Activities
Department, indicating that the
leadership training potential of
the program is being realized in a
most meaningful fashion.
A number of special Kinnusim
and training sessions have been
conducted this year for Bogrei
Nativ throughout the country,
designed to maintain the contact
with the graduates of the program
and to continue the development
of youth activities skills on the
part of the participant.
For more information on this
program for firtt-year college
studmte call the Youth Activities
Department of United
Synagogue.
permitted the exodus if all proper-
ty would be left behind. They
came by sea and air. over 18
months.
Throughout the 1950's the
return of Jews to their homeland
continued, including many from
Arab lands such as Tunisia and
Morocco, where oppressive anti-
Semitism sparked depart'ire.
In the early 1960's Brazilian and ,
Argentinian Jews came in larger
numbers, and after the Six-Day
War in 1967, Jews flocked from
Britain, France, the U.S., Canada,
Australia, South Africa and New
Zealand.
In the 1970's, with Soviet
emigration restrictions eased
somewhat, thousands of Soviet
Jews made aliyah. And in the
1980's Jews continue to come, in-
cluding from Ethiopia, fulfilling
the mitzvot of living in Israel.
The decision by Ethiopian Jews
to exercise their right to make
aliyah under the Law of Return
(1950), which confers Israeli
citizenship on arrival on all Jewish
immigrants, fulfills an ancient
dream that scores of their genera-
tions have kept alive. They leave
behind rampant anti-Semitism,
persecution, discrimination and
oppression; domestic political,
economic and military turmoil;
and a sub-Saharan famine of
shocking proportions.
Jewish immigrants from
Ethiopia have many problems
common to other olim, but include
a far higher proportion of children
under 14 without parents. And
each is challenged by the needed
transition from an ancient culture
to a contemporary Western-style
democracy.
They are being helped, as have
all 1.8 million other olim since
1948, by the Jewish Agency, main
beneficiary agency of the United
Jewish Appeal/Federation Cam-
paigns in the U.S. Hie Campaigns
enable American Jews to play a
role in pidyon kathevuim.
redemption of the captives, and
help improve the economic and
social life of the people of Israel.
rTRp^^JJ
Soviet emigration drops
NEW YORK (JTA) Only 51 Jews were permitted to leavetl
Soviet Union in May, marking a sharp decline from the some)
who were permitted to leave during April, the Nations! I
ference on Soviet Jewry (NCSJ) reported.
In April, among the 166 Jews permitted to leave were soul
who were residents of Moscow, where no movement ocean
May. At that time, a premature euphoria developed in soon
of the Soviet Union, according to NCSJ chairman Morris J
"Recent speculation, based upon rumors of a possible i
was misleading to people who want to see real progress,"
said. "At that time, the NCSJ urged a careful astessnenti
reaction based on performance rather than promise."
According to Abram, "the May trends are notencoungingi
bear out the need for caution in evalustiong monthly figures mi
indicator of significant change." He urged the Reagan
ministration. Congress, the State Department, the Jewish o
munity and its supporters to "be persistent" but to avoid the t
of "assuming that if you wish it, it will become reality."
Taste new Maxwell House
instant Decaffeinated
It couldn t be anything but delicious.
W
UVH
si-
wJemsfi Meridian
OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE USPS 899420
FREOK SHOCHET
Editor and PuOiisnar
I fftSMOCt
SUZANWE SHOCMCT
Puohaftad Waakly IM-Saptambar ttvouor. MkJ-m., aY Waaki, oaianca ot
P.O. Box 012t73, Miami, Fla. 33101 "*"wn-
___, Advanteing Supervisor Abraham S Haloarn
Fort ^ro.^rto.hr.ood Of he 83M* 0.^K. -* sT^Er, n^da*. Fl Wl
Plant 1t*SmSl..M.am..Fta.lM.ion1.37WS0S
amoar JTA. Sffran Art.. WNS. NEA. AJPA. and FPA
aJuaMnSii
SUSSCWITK^ RATES 2 Vav ^.munTITsflTo^A^ M Ann^Z"
__^__ JawtafiFaoaat>onotOaatarfoftL*odanjata
*"" Fadaralion ot Graaiar Fort Laudardaia. Jo* Rwnatam. Praaxtant Joat Tattaa Emci.
^, efC stvEst ttJX^zxszx'&B
Friday, June 21,1985
Volume 14
2TAMUZ5745
Number 22
**
House
*'^ Certified
Kosher
1
tcl to ihi* hiHi i lro,)'


Friday, June 21, 1985/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 5
Luna Gal A water wonderland on the Sea of Galilee
1 f*^
a

Ming network oftoater slides at Luna Gal offer children of
[endless hours of fun and amusement. The adjacent Golan
Torino- boasts a wide ranc-
hing to kayaking through
farina boasts a wide range of sports activities ranging
ugh lush lagoons in the Jordan
\ttorney General pledges full
\port for U.S. Nazi prosecution
ey General Edwin Meese
wish leaders that the
[Department was giving
Bed support to the Office
rial Investigations and
I that it would have the
j continue \A|h its work
Tittle ahead," the World
fongress reported.
i of Special Investiga-
te special unit of the U.S.
lent of Justice responsible
titrating and, where ap-
, taking legal action
U.S. residents suspected
in Nazi war crimes
against humanity,
path, the WJC disclosed
i was a nationwide cam-
headed by various
Ukrainian emigre
ashut down the OSI and
Me House Communica-
Patrick Buchanan
I a nationally syndicated
authored two articles
in their entirety to at-
OSI.
[met privately with some
Tsl Jewish leaders at the
Club in New York. The
wt hosted by Jacob
.*"! as President
niaon to the Jewish
1 during the administra-
tterm.
Kersified
fish Quiz
bah a stadium in New
Jm order to improve the
[ of the masses?
* the Shofar made off
,if ^y* we shoes
[*">* Services in the
MMensshaSkulniekT
2J Jews all over the
Ti to a pitch of near
year 1666?
,, the name of the
J?^ worts, "Tliou
;^iwh0<*wed
f*"y have no more than
If* oWe8t Synagogue
Jjftt unlque awwer
K^Aaa. a Second
KrS7rPvefornotbr-
^to marry?
LNku
i the
"The assurances by the at-
torney general that this nation is
fully committed to proceed
against the Nazi war criminals
still among us, is a renewed affir-
mation that the United States
stands firmly against those who
seek to rehabilitate or whitewash
the Naai horrors of the past," said
Israel Singer, Executive Director
of the World Jewish Congress.
NEW YORK, N.Y. The
recently opened Luna Gal -
(Kilan Beach water amusement
park and sports complex offers its
guests a wide range of aquatic ac-
tivities. Located on the pictures-
que northeastern shore of the Sea
of Galilee, ftc site has quickly
become a faverite vacation spot
for tourists and Israelis alike.
Founded by five area moshavim
cooperative settlements, the
enterprise is the largest of its kind
in Israel.
Luna Gal's celorful, high and
winding water slides are its main
attractions. For the very young
(or the timid) there's a mini-slide.
Twin blue "hurricane" slides
specialize in curves and turns. The
park's crowning glories are the
two "Kamikaze" water slides, 52
feet, the tallest in Israel, definite-
ly not for the faint-hearted, but
are an exhilarating experience for
the fearless. The all-encompassing
view of the Sea of Galilee from the
slide's top is a fringe benefit to be
enjoyed during the short wait for
a turn. The breathtaking ride
down the water coated, bright
orange slide lasts less than a
minute but the memory lingers
on. The admission fee to the Luna
Gal area, allows for unlimited ac-
cess to the slides and the tenth
trip down is just as thrilling as the
first.
Should one want a diversion
from the slides, the bumper boat
pool offers motorized boats which
dodge and ram into each other, ac-
cording to one's luck and skill.
Children can frolic for hours in a
water amusement pool specifically
designed for the younger set
climbing in and out of gaily col-
ored barrels connected by nets,
bobbing up and down on a bridge
of plastic containers in the water.
For landlubber children, there's a
sandbox with large plastic struc-
tures to crawl through. Comfor-
table lounge chairs abound as do
protective umbrellas for those
who've had enough sun. Nights at
Luna Gal include disco music,
flashing lights and special live per-
formances in addition to the
regular daytime activities.
I ^js Summer at
With day camp for the kids, a
teen program, and computer education
seminars, everyone enjoys Grossingers in the
summertime. Full American Plan three meals daily.
JUlY4th WEEKEND. July 4-7
Starring Helen Reddy-July 6.
ALL SPORTS MINI-CAMP. July 10-12
Featuring: NY Giants stars Rob Carpenter and
Jim Burt. all-time-great Earl "The Pearl"
Monroe, and NJ Nets star Darryl Dawkins.
SOAP OPERA WEEKEND. July 12-14
John Gabriel {Dr. Seneca Beaulac of RYAN'S HOPE),
Janice Lynde 'Laurel Chapin of ONE LIFE TO LIVE) and
Candice Earley {Donna of ALL MY CHILDREN). They'll
perform in a musical revue on Sat. night. Also: Kim Zimmer
IReva Lewis of GUIDING LIGHT). Chris LeBlanc
{Kirk McCoIlofAS THE WORLD TURNS) and soap
columnists Dorothy Vine. Seli Groves and Toby Goldstein.
"LET THE GOOD TIMES ROLL-
SINGLES WEEKEND. July 18-21
Starring: "MEMBERS ONLY" HAPPY TOGETHER 85
TOUR Featuring The Turtles. Gary Lewis and The
Playboys. The Buckinghams. and The Grass Roots Also
appearing. Thurs.. 7/18-The Marvelettes. Fit. 7/19
The Clovers. Special parties and programs for singles.
OTHER STARS SHINING THIS SUMMER AT GROSSING ElfS
Larry Storch-July 13 Sh-Na-Na- July 27
Red Buttons- August 10
Allen h Rossi- August 17
The Spinners- August 24
Pearl Bsiley-Sept. 1
-----?!^?^iRii^88TSTg*"*0*^-?*-"? % ""' ou ir"iaooia74 74
_________ *"" "**'-WOO."r wnlf l.rinwinarr v I.n^Mimrr NY 12734 IUI4I292 5000
Itirlirtl Umth .,1 li'ispiiuliit
Asalways...
Half the calories
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Most people are surprised to find out that
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hod half the cakxies of butter or margarine. But
fortunately they've always known that Phllly
cream cheese tastes twice as good.
The good news is, now that they know PhiHy
cream cheeseeither soft or regular- has hat
the calories of butter, they can enjoy twice as
much Philadelphia Brand cream chew or
twice as often.
Whether you use our super-spreodable soft
package, or the regular PhHry cream chmi,
your whole family wil enjoy a terrific spread.
What a mechayeh for your bagel, moteoh, Wasy
or toast!
So. pick up a package of Philty cream cheese,
because haft the calories means a great deal


Page 6 Tbe Jewish Fioridiao of Greater Fort LauderdJe/Fridy, June 21, 1985
'The World is a Room'
The World it a Room. Yehuda
Amkhai. Trie Jewish Publication
Society of America. 1964. 197
pages. $13.96.
Reviewed by Joseph Lowin
Among Israeli writer Yehuda
Amichai's previous volumes
published in English are a haun-
ting novel and several books of
searing love poems. With this
book a collection of some of his
most poignant short stories, all
written in the 1950s Amkhai
demonstrates once again that he
has equal artistic dexterity in pro-
se as well as poetry.
In The World it a Room,
Amkhai proves himself ambidex-
trous in another way as well. On
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the one hand, he dons the gauntlet
of the dtasen-sokfaer. complete
with the psychological armor that
profession implies. He sings here
not the praises of war, but its pain
and anguish. On the other hand,
he wars a kid glove, humming
sometimes plaintively, more often
erotkally, of his love.
In either case, the incantatory
quality of Amichai's writing
creates effects of intense reading
pleasure, especially for the re ider
willing to let himself be dazzled.
The richness of Amichai's prose,
like that of his poetry, derives
from his extraordinary skill with
language. Here he is for the most
part well served by his
translators, Elinor Grumet, Hillel
Halkin, and others. Despite one or
two infelicities, they succeed in
conveying the texture of
Amichai's own rich vocabulary.
There are ten stories in The
World it a Room. Each one raises
the reader's level of con-
sciousness, about life in Israel and
also perhaps about good
literature. One also learns, if one
didn't known it before, that the
land of Israel is fertile not only in
citrus fruits but also in the fruits
of the creative imagination.
It seems as though every trivial
thing the narrator sees in these
stories is an image for something
else more profound, more serious.
It appears that every word is a
metaphor, containing hidden
messages of hope contending
with despair, of modernity striv-
ing to reconcile tradition.
Like all good Israeli writing.
The World it a Room brims over
with allusions to Jewish texts and
celebrations. Purim, with its
revelry, its costumes, and its illu-
sions, plays a major metaphorical
role in these stories, similar to the
importance the holiday has in
Israel. In one of the stories the
narrator compares his life to a
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Tatepnone-
Haftorak, a Sabbath reading from
the prophets which must contain
some allusion to the portion of the
Pentateuch read that week. In
another story he reverses a pro-
verb from the liturgy of the Days
of Awe, asking us to "Behold the
potter in the hands of his clay." In
still another instance, the tiny lad-
der of a slide in a playground
reminds the narrator of the ladder
in Jacob's dream, complete with
"make-be he ve angels."
There is very little plot to speak
of in these stories, for, to tell the
truth, nothing much "happens."
"Battle for the Hill" is about the
preparations for a battle that does
not take place. "The Bar Mitzvah
Party" is a pretext for a
philosophical search for meaning
in the presents given, the
speeches made, and the rehgious
ritual. "Nina of Ashkelon" is tbe
portrait of an untamed, sexually-
*r0UBed woman. aaL.
Brad's SoruaBnV.**
My Father 5i3^r%
combination ken* fa
duh, and y,^r"
wrouShta*i finely^
A world of pr^^i
Adnanne OrxJerdonk
bhe does as much to
stones tootheruthe,
themes and variatiom |
from the creative unaamai
very fine verbal virr^L
b* congratulated for treathJ
book with all tfctenderT
care it deserves.
Dr-Joseph Lowin i,,
Adult Jevith Eiu,
Hadattah and editor a
TURES, a periodical fa tUi
ofjewuh Culiurt.
PETTING THE CHILDREN
TO EAT A DELICIOUS
HOT MEAL IS EASY AS
ABC's &123's
from
Chwf Boy-ar-dse
ABC s& 123 s
from Chef
Boy-ar-dee"
2^--^*"J ar tasty
C iilV^aV P38*3 alphabet
Wif**^ letters and
v/v' numbers covered
with a rich tomato sauce. The
children will absolutely love it as
a dekaous hot lunch and as a
tasty dinner side-dish. And so
will the adults! Either way you
serve it. getting the children to
eat is as easy as AJephBez'
Sa^forsummec
Suchamechaieh!
55*"

,afrash*r*-P0f
[**," RrondDace**""
ka ood .arva Jm end wgar ^ 0*
, for h of r^^^. WSJS-'^
Kghtfui .ummar coo*' *?< r*"V .
cofWfrM. AndICo*".'*. S**^
for uaaar it tuch o T1**"*"*" _
of your uiranwr *ouW only ba *>
rafretKingl
RCarWiadKoaW
mm
\<-.


NAAM sponsors first singles pre-Aliyah seminar in Israel
Friday, June 21, l985fThe Jewish Florldian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 7
LEW YORK CITY NAAM,
[North American Aliyah Move
nt is proud to announce its first
Ml Seminar specifically geared
,ards singles. This two week
t finding tour will focus on the
oal concerns of single olim and
include discussions on single
tin Israel, visits to absorption
Biers just for singles and
etings with olim from English
iking countries. In addition,
i will hear professionals speak
jout housing, banking, finances,
hployment, health care and
dical insurance.
his seminar which may include
Hes from the British Aliyah
bvement. will afford par-
nts the opportunity to meet
[speak with singles who have
jady made Aliyah, and to share
Jrir ideas, plans, hopes and fears
other singles contemplating
iyah.
KAAM's Israel seminar for
ties is scheduled for July 8-22.
cost is $1400 and includes
kind trip airfare from New York
Tel Aviv with an optional
over in Europe and all hotel
land arrangements. Upcom-
r seminars will take place Aug.
Oct. 21, and Nov. 12 for
tirees.
North American Aliyah
bvement is a grassroots
nization dedicated to the pro-
Jtion of aliyah in communities
hout the United States and
Its more than 4,500
nbers include individuals and
nilies of all ages who are plann-
\, in the near future, to settle in
NAAM sponsors 60
JOWARD COUNTY'S
fitter Action Center
wJf honored Ruth
vUz, WECARE
9er^n of the Jewish
if**? Center of Greater
x l^f^'Vho received
\**ri of certification for
l"* as an outstanding
^WECARE (w3L
W. Compassion and
rt* Effrt). sponsors
J**,a dozen different
iMrM/f)r volunteer service
r^Uteg/or tKe needy and
ttWVECAREDireo
c^Unent^wShTo'Su^t Work8hoP8' lectures, and future olim to meet and discuss write or call Uri Cohen, Israel
seminars providing a forum for their Israel plans. Aliyah Center, 4200 Biscayne
^^^^^MBHUii^^^M For information about the Blvd., Miami, Fl. 33137,
Singles' Seminar and NAAM, (305)573-2556.
BRIDGING THE SCIENTIFIC GENERATION GAP: US
nuclear physicist Dr. Alvin Radkowsky (left) and British
physicist and mathematician Prof. Cyril Domb listen with keen
interest as 19-year-old Yitzhak Cohen, a student in Boys Town
Jerusalem'sCollege of Applied Engineering, describes a project
he designed in the College's electronics laboratory. Dr.
Radkowsky and Prof. Domb are members of a committee of pro-
minent scientists, engineers and executives in high technology in-
dustries who are advising the faculties in Boys Town's College
and High Schools on ways to improve the course content and
teaching methods in their technical curricula.

0CEMFKW
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---iaooolfflP(*cWt*fl.ttndloc*lx Apphio.nr-LATAtong*tncc*ony
orl


Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, June 21, 1985
to walk around Coconut Grove
with its many shops, restaurants,
and artisans. Time: Leave JCC 10
a.m.. back approximately 4 p.m.
Fee: $10 members $12 non-
members guest*.
Aug. 29 Beach Day at John
Lloyd Park.
EXTENDED TRIPS
Aagast New Jersey YM
YWHA Summer Camp in the
Poeonos!? Aug. 2 to Aug. 16.
News
JCC Senior Adult Activities
Laura Hochman. Director of
Senior Adult Services of the
Jewish Community Center of
Greater Fort Lauderdale, an-
nounces that programs are of-
fered throughout the Summer,
primarily on Mondays, Tuesdays
and Thursdays. The schedule of
programs is as follows:
Mondays: Beginning June 24,
Jewish Festival Chorale directed
by Hollie Berger will meet from 4
to 6 p.m.
Tuesdays: 55 YES CLUB, a
special club for married and single
people 55 years or older. Summer
program will begin on June 25. 5
p.m. Discussion Group with
Laura Hochman or Canasta,
Cards and Man Jong; 6:30 p.m. -
Dinner $4 per person members
$5 per person non-member
guests; 7:45 p.m. Meeting and
Program.
Progress Schedule
June 25 Gary Stein of the
Fort Lauderdale Sun Sentinal.
July 2 Pre Independence Day
Party Entertainment and Sur-
prise Special Guest Speaker.
July 9 A performance by
Hollie Berger and her talented
young students.
July 16 Israel revisited with
Laura Hochman.
July 23 Home Talent Night.
Aug. 6 Another performance
by Hollie Berger and her
Students.
Aug. 13 BUI Kattberg of the
Broward Jewish Journal.
Aug. 20 Jewish Trivia Night
with Laura Hochman.
Aug. 27 Pre Labor Day Party
Entertainment.
THURSDAYS
Starting June 20 there will be a
day trip every Thursday for
Senior Adults.
The schedule is as follows:
June 27 Royal Palas Dinner
Theater The Boy Friend." Din-
ner. Show and Transportation in-
cluded. Tune: Leave JCC at 5 p.m.
Return approximately 10:45 p.m.
Fee: $32 members. $36 non-
member guests.
July 4 NO PROGRAM
July 11 Beach Day at John D
Lloyd Park (see June 20 for
details on Beach Days).
July 17 Wednesday (Note day
change) Guided Tour of the Fort
Lauderdale Historical Museum.
Lunch (at your own expense) at
Gfoby's. Leave JCC at 10:30 am.
Return approximately 3 p.m. Fee:
$5 members. $7 non-member
guests.
July 18 Beach Day at John
Lloyd Park.
July 25 Gourmet Luncheon
and Matinee at Naples Dinner
Theater to see a comedy, "Mary
Mary" by Jean Kerr. Luncheon,
theater and transportation includ-
ed. Time: Leave JCC 9:16 am. -
Return approximately 5 p.m. Fee:
$28.50 members $32.50 non
member guests.
Aug. 1 Beach Day at John
Lloyd Park.
Aug. 8 Enjoy a morning
Water Cruise on the Inter-coastal
Waterway on the Jungle Queen
then on to Lunch at your own ex-
pense, at a lovely restaurant along
the Intercoastal. Fee includes
boat ride and transportation only.
Leave the JCC at 9 am., return
approximately 2:30 p.m. Fee: $10
members $12 non-member
guests.
Aug. 15 Beach Day at John
Lloyd Park.
Aug. 22 Enjoy the beauties of
Vizcaya Museum and its beautiful
Gardens. Lunch on your own at
the Cafeteria in Vizcaya. Then on
The JCC is now taking
tions for the very few rooms still
available. We will be leaving by
plane from Fort Lauderdale Air-
port. Don't miss out on this fan-
tastic Summer Vacation!!
Call Laura for registration form
and information.
September four-day/S-night
cruise on the Carnival Fun Ship!!!
Sept 6 to Sept. 9.
Cruise to Nassau includes two
kmvt beds i^
m*l. entertiin^1
"-I****. Fat'SEl
*nmmbers((kx*in,P SOL*" person notH
(double occupancy). Add
P>n for outside cab*
***** depoat needed byiua
For any information. .L*
at the JCC -79247W '
^nlc ? a f ""J^fon dinner-dance held June 2 The
coupJe was honored for their dedication and commitment to the
civic, business and charitable sectors of the community A
Levy serves as a Federation vice president w^B re
JCC Singles 35-55
to meet June 27
CAKLY TIETZER ts thinking
of her next project in
"Ceramics" Enrichment Class
at the JCC, while specialist
teacher Gloria Weiss puts a
finishing touch to Cariy's
ceramic dog. The Jewish Com-
munity Center of Greater Fort
Lauderdale offers a variety of
Enrichment Classes for Pre-
School, Elementary and Teen
Age children. For further in-
formation call 792-6700.
Nili Kimelman, JCC Singles
Coordinator for the 35-55 age
group, announces a special pro-
gram taking place at the Jewish
Community Center of Greater
Fort Lauderdale. Thursday, June
27 st 7:30 p.m.
The speaker will be Louis
Soskin of the City of Sunrise, a
member of the Pharmaceutical
Staff of Doctor's General
Hospital, whose topic is "Analyz-
ing a Program for Nutrition and
Fitness."
All singles 35-55 are cordially
invited to attend. Refreshments
will be served.
Fee for members $3 non-
member guests $4- Call Nili at
792-6700 for further information.
Beatrice
TV JCC-is-a major i
O0* Greater Fort LauderdaU
No cholesterol
.. .which is
always
good news!
Made by the
people famous
for trying!
100% pure...
to give you
100% delicious
fried foods!
100% pure
corn oil-
great for
salads too!
Nothing artificial to get in the way of flavor!
THAT FRIES
LIKE WESSON


Friday, June 21, 1985/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 9
Pan Am.
ITieKeyTb
A ureat European
vacation.
P^w Fares. No airline has lower fares to
"~7 turopean destinations than Pan Am.
1 only Pan Am flies all 747's to Europe.
Affordable
Hotel Accom-
modations.
Thanks to
Pan Am, you
can rest as-
sured that al-
most anywhere
you spend a day,
you'll nave a place
to spend the night.
You'll be able to
check into any of
these select ho-
tels: Holiday Inn
$26 a night, Best
Western$28 a
night including
breakfast, Trust-
house Forte Hotel
$27 a night including
breakfast The only
thing harder than finding a
hotel room in Europe is finding
one at these prices.
Lowest Priced
Car Rentals.
With Pan Am, you're
free to see as much or
as little of Europe as
you want. And, at
your own pace.
Rent a Kemwel
economy car,
with unlimited
mileage, for as
little as $69 to
$79 a week. No
one has lower
prices.
Call Yourlravel Agent Today.
^gjh Way, Baaed On Roundtrip Purchaae And Do Not Include $3 Departure Tax.
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449*0
fl- */1*W
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Stuttgart
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* lynl-rnr k Mntwl to US*B-*
The key to a great European vacation this summer is flying
Pan Am. For starters, Pan Am is the key to incredibly low fares,
spacious 747's, and the choice of the most cities in Europe of any
airline. Then you get a key to something to help you see Europe
once you've arrived. A Kemwel rental car with unlimited mileage
for as little as $69 a week. And last, a key to one of the rarest sights
in all of Europe: Hotel Accommodations. Hotel vouchers must be
purchased in advance for the number of nights you plan on being
in Europe. And, they're refundable, in case you have a change of
heart or plans.
Pan Am. We'll get you keyed up about going to Europe this
summer.
For more information on Pan Am Holiday 497, call your
Travel Agent or Pan Am in Miami at (305) 874-5000, en espanol
(305) 874-4455, in Ft. Uuderdale/HoUywood at (305) 462-6600,
and in other areas at 1-800-221-1111.
October 31. N85 There are some age requirement* and gay
optional insurance. collision damage waiver, taxes and drop
ofi charge* are extra .ii^a.;-
IMtl fct: Hotel accommodation* not available in
Athens Belgrade. Bucharest Budapest, Dubrovnik.
Istanbul, Warsaw, or Zagreb Hotel *k-**99*>*
baaed on double occupancy Seasonal supptements
apply in certain cities ~Trusthouse ForteWotel* available
only in UK
# Pan Am
^"T \buCant Beat The Experience:


Page 10 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday. June 21, 1986
"* AIM COMOITlOWf D
MOTH.
Waldtnan
HIGH HOLIDAY SPECIALS
ROSH HASHANA YOM ffiu,
12Doy-llNtghts '^T
Sept. 15 to Sept. 26 ?AA">
3 mwH Sot, mt HMow "-* 'V?
WALDMAN
Fonnarty me ANonMc Towers
12dor* 11 nights (*M
J235
ISRAEL BONDS HOLDS FIRST CASH
COLLECTION PHONE-A-THON: The Fort
Lauderdale Israel Bonds Campaign held its
opening phone-a-thon for cash collection
recently. Israel Resnikoff, chairman, urges
the community to take this opportunity dur-
ing the month of June to honor their Israel
Bonds commitments. Seated (left to right),
Jules Lustig, Sylvia Abrams. Ann Klempner.
Martin Lipnack, chairman of the North
Broward Israel Bond Campaign, Rose Hersh.
Berte Resnikoff. Standing (left to right).
Emanuel Bregman, Esther Lerman, Fred
Weinberger, Moe Levenson, Sam Lezell, Ida
Chariit.
lAJ Marts Ot WALDMAN I
[Steep ot WALDMAN II
SPUTSTAY
Sept 15 to Sept 18 ft Sept. 24 to 26
inducing moan
Group 6 Orpontzottuod dbcounts Awlotm
SERVICES CONOUCTED 6Y RENOWNED CANTM
EA&Y K^VATJONS SUGGESTED
Phonu 1-538-5731 or 1 534-4751
ONTHE0CEANAT43K.STPEET
B'nai B'rith hails High Court ruling
on prayer in public schools
WASHINGTON B'nai B nth
International hailed the U.S.
Supreme Ceurt's ruling that
states cannot use periods of
meditation in public schools for
prayer.
Dr. Daniel Thursz, B'nai B'rith
executive vice president, said the
court's decision "clearly main-
tains the wall separating church
and state.
Thursz added that the Jewish
service organization believes the
decision protects children from
having public schools turned into
religious battlegrounds.
"While proponents of prayer in
schools seem determined to pro-
vide a type of corporate prayer ac-
ceptable to all, we believe that
such an effort would dilute the
solace that prayer provides to
deep believers," Thursz stated.
"Although we may have a ques-
tion about 'meditation,' which the
Supreme Court allows, we believe
it is better than offering exercises
which only heighten the dif-
ferences in religious practice in
this country."
The B'nai B'rith executive said
the strength of America has been
and remains its diversity.
"We fear that injecting religion
into the schools would impose a
conformity on impressionable
children that Americans should
not feel," said Thursz.
COME UP TO THE
AT BROWN'S!
: i i
In The Comfort Ot The CattMW
ALL INCLUSIVE
TWO-WEEK VACATION
$998
om tm* occ
$1,464
3 WEEKS
Inquire About
Non-Package Rates
DELUXE
ACC0MM00ATWNS: 2-WEEKS 3-WEEKS
Ong. SecfiorvMan Bid
Bel At I il
Caftyrai & Cettrty
MMrly HMl
anaarai a lagaxy
$986
1.073
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$1736
ftrtoswMt*
$.*
$1,570
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$1,724
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$1,814
o
EVERYTWNG INCLUDED!
lArfUiwTraa****!
TflM FfMR
>AI Taxes a* Grammes Included m tote
Snonatteti Serwee tttn Etra C*e Fcmr Spec* o*
.j Gourmet Me* Daly tf^CJT
^GieaiEniertawnent f32Sho**Qf*
VOwong to 4 OrclWWS
Free Go* on Tw 18-** Go*fc*"sJfSexW
Ska Hm Oat. tod^g*SStaatoK
8 ferebes and Am 8 Crate Gasses-*""*"
Zi^w^!*
1966 SUMMER OFSTARS
* COM* FWyjCtt TW^fOJg
* torn mm +Jggp! BgLJJi

i-""1*-.
DIET
CENTER

H.1 u*
61


Friday, June 21, 1985/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 11
SPECIAL
SURPRISE PACKAGE
INDEPENDENCE
if
Now
from
only
On the
largest
lake in
Broward
County.
Patio
Homos

Em*
'-#
-W-
4 SflFGMt "HES" MCNMfiE HAS BEEN DESIGNED WITH YOU IN MIND.
YES... We have SPECIAL DISCOUNTS on Fall, '85 deliveries.
YES... We pay your CLOSING COSTS. <*.****>. ow
YES... We include a quality name brand APPLIANCE PACKAGE.
YES... UPGRADED LUXURY CARPET in a
choice of 50 colors included.
YES... You can have IMMEDIATE OCCUPANCY
on a limited number of lakefront locations.
YES... You can enjoy the luxurious LIBERTY
CLUB, a million dollar clubhouse on the shores
of the largest lake in Broward County
YES... You can own a home at Independence Bay with a
DOWNPAYMENT OF LESS THAN $3,000.*
VISIT OUR DESIGNER DECORATED MODELS ^ TODAY,
INDEPENDEN(mBAY
A|olntotofpriivolvlnaOlymp*\brfc,Ronto DIRECTIONS: Take 1-95 to HHjt^Boutevwd, west to ~>zS
Corporation Sales Pavilion. TELEPHONE: 305-421-1776, Broward jr-Jr-^.
305-527-1776 or CALL TOLL FREE 1-800-336-1776
tnc an. p*c*lcanor>a
M|KII>lMIIM
i


Page 12 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, June 21, 1985
Community Calendar
Compiled by Lori Ginsberg,
Federation 748-8400.
FRIDAY JUNE 21
Temple Beth Orr: 6 a.m. Summer
Solstice service, followed by
breakfast at Maxwell's. Hillsboro
Beach. Meet at Beth Orr.
SATURDAY JUNE 22
Sunrise Lakes Condo Associa-
tion Phase I: 7:30 p.m. Show
featuring Phyllis Green, Bobby
Byron and Chuck Lyon. Donation
$4. Dancing to follow. Playhouse,
8100 Sunrise Lakes Dr. N.
742-5150.
SUNDAY JUNE 23
Temple Beth Orr: 7:30 p.m. Open
house reception. Rabbi Levy and
Cantor Hausman wil be on hand to
answer questions. At Temple,
2151 Riverside Dr., Coral Spr
ings. 753-3232.
Jewish War Veterans Ladies
Aoxiliary-Broward/Palm Beach
County Council: County meeting.
971-4983.
MONDAY JUNE 24
B'aai Brith Women-Deerfield
Beach Chapter: 12:30 p.m.
Meeting. At Temple Beth Israel.
Deerfield Beach.
B'naiB'rith Women-Oakland
Estates Chapter: 11 a.m.
Meeting. Oakland Social Club.
4200 NW 41 St.. Lauderdale
Lakes.
WLI-Tamarac Chapter: Summer-
time card party and brunch. 6535
W. Commercial Blvd. 722-0853.
TUESDAY JUNE 25
Pioneer Women Na'amat-Debra
Club: 12:30 p.m. Meeting.
Hawaiian Gardens Phase 5 Rec.
Hall. 485-3699.
Hadassah-Somerset Shoshana
Chapter: Noon. Meeting. Har-
monitones will entertain.
Somerset Phase I Rec. Room.
WEDNESDAY JUNE 26
Jewish War Veterans Ladies
Aaxiliary-Wm. Kretchman:
Noon. Card party and luncheon.
Members $1, guests $2. Broward
Federal, 3000 N. University Dr.
Call Myrtle, 483-7351.
ORT-Laaderdale West Chapter:
Noon. Lunchen and card party.
Deicke Aud., 5701 Cypress Rd.,
Plantation. Donation $5.
473-6338.
THURSDAY JUNE 27
Sunrise Jewish Center: 7:30 p.m
Congregation meeting. At Tern
pie. 4099 Pine Island Rd.. Sunrise
Free Sons of Israel-Fort Lander
dale Lodge: 7:30 p.m. Meeting
Whiting Hall. Sunrise.
THE CENTURY VILLAGE EAST WECARE FUND was in
creaaed recently by a donation from Temple B'nai Sholom, Deer-
field Beach. Pictured (left to right) are Leopold Van Blerkom,
IeJnJP,eJ)re8ident' "^ Rabbi Nathan Pish, presenting a check to
WECARE treasurer Irving Better.
GULFSIDE GETAWAY*
$54.95
3 Days 2 Nights
Tanas
A9!H?J"?9'Um:' ""*--Vs*n*stlMi
onthtGglf YoulflndttMMaarMndbMctiMrfttwGuifofMn
ico at your door Mate* awfcnmWa pod. aicaHam nm. tw
entertainment in tounat. term* and ootf nearby wtOi SPtCIAL
CXXJDeKOUm5AVAiCu3UBotnpiavadaforiUhOwnQ
fishing and shtHing galort ChNdrtn 18 and under Ffffi in room
with parents ChSdrtn meats at menu pram
Package includes
Two nights doubt* occupancy
Conttnmtai breakfast for two for two mormnos
Dinner for two on* evening in Garden Room Restaurant
Welcome cocktail for two in Gangplank Lounge
ComparaWt package for 5 dm. 4 nights only $104 JS
par par aw. aataMa irnipaacy
Price* do not indua* taxes aad |rmttw
OfFEBGOOD APRIL 13 THROUGH DECEMBER IS 198S-.
excluding Memorial Day and Labor Day weekends
Offer cannot b* combined with any other discount packages
* Present this ad at check-in time to qualify for package rate
Contact your travel agent for rasarvations or cai:
VinavMt Beach 11000 Gut* Start Dm*, north Naples, noma 33663
The
Brlckman
Hotel...
a catsklll
resort
that lets you
stop eating
long enough
to have
some fun...M
$375-5390
Per week, per person (dbJ.occ.)
Every room with Private Bath,
Air Conditioning and Color TV.
For reservations and
Tfccmaiion phone
TOLL FREE
1-800-431-3854
HotH Bnckman
South Fatsburg. NY 12779
Master Card. Visa. Amex
Overlooking a great
18 hole goaf course.
Brie:
When you escape the Florida heat this
Sunarwj.escar^tosorr^r^gmore
than non-stop overeating.
Escape to the Bnckman.
^^goonvaratkxitodortxjrehhant-
from one meal to the next. That s whv wL
surnptiiousrneafedaiV Breakfast(u5i US)
am), and Damer (from 6 JO to 830 rW
WkMay snacks? Magnificent ftJs*
Coffee Shop.
There wibe no announcement at 1 am
cain9 ******* to ** t^^g Room-Ad,
you just left, no need to rush off gof course
or tennis courts. Linger at the pool al day J
you choose. We have one outdoor and
hdoor (containing health dub and jet
whir^ool spa). Ptaydupfcatebndge. take
artdas^gofokdanctTg,jog,orwTjrkou
^Jf 4?wer?'minJ" 9^"-" ^ otoya
ful day of outdoor activities and surahK
and al the other fabulous tfangs we hsveto
otVr.inctudtigentHieMgiwR^ssecond
to none.
So come to the Bnckman. Where the
meals are fun...rot something that gets
in the way of fun! ^
Cdonll" ^ mold.
Your host for three generations,
The Posner Family
R slice of lochs.
Was it really the game of golf that tempted Jewish immigrants to call
Scotland their home? Was it the taunting call of the little white ball? The
lure of those internal sand traps? ftrhaps some strange appeal in the
monstTous-ness of the lochs? And just what accounts for today's weekly
pilgrimage to the country club outside Glasgow?
One thing we can account tor. After an invigorating day chasing
divots those frazzled duffers are apt to require a neat shot of Scotch
whisky. For that is surely one of Scotland's more soothing pleasures. The
one preferred stateside is J&B Rare Scotch. It is btended from the best
whiskies its native country has to offer. That makes for a scotch that*
smooth. A far cry, indeed, from the strokes seen on the back nine.
m
"~***m>+vfm*,Hmllimc*mmmMi
J&B Scotch


.


Friday, June 21, 1985/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 13
Jewish settlers try friendly persuasion
UsALEM(JTA)-Jewish
L in the West Bank are
U to friendly persuasion to
L local Arab leaders to
|8 hand in ridding the ter-
of Palestinian terrorists
in the May 20 prisoner
Waration of settlers from
fMoreh near Nablus, visited
, village of Deir el Khatab
to urge the mukhtar (village
leader) to make sure that freed
terrorist Samir Saleh Yussef
departs. Yussef was convicted on
December 2, 1980 of murdering
an Arab suspected of collabora
tion with Israel. He was serving a
25-year prison sentence when he
was among the 1,500 Palestinians
freed from Israeli jails in ex-
change for three Israeli soldiers
25 released terrorists
to leave Israel
JtUSALEM (JTA) About
[the 1,150 convicted Palesti-
lerrorists released in the May
oner exchange are schedul-
leave Israel but not
_ of pressure or harass-
ty Jewish militants.
125 are part of the 600 freed
lers who remained in Israel
[the West bank and Gaza
Ithe exchange. The Israeli
pities claim they have no
) be here because they did
.ssess local indentification
prior to their arrests.
I authorities said it had been
I clear to those prisoners
[they were released from jail
1 could not remain in the
longer than 21 days.
ire will be assisted by
temational Red Cross.
i of the freed terorista who
had returned to their homes in the
West Bank, left for Jordan shortly
after their return because of
threats and harassment by Jewish
settlers. The three had been serv-
ing time in connection with the
murder of a Jewish settler from
Tekoa.
Shmuel Goren, coodinator of
government affairs in the ter-
ritories, is trying to curb Jewish
militants, he met yesterday with
members of the Kiryat Arba town
council to urge the settlers to
amintai law and order.
Meanwhile, members of the
disbanded Arab Council of
Hebron, various clergymen and
other public figures in that Arab
town, sent a telegram to Defense
Minister Yitzhak Rabin asking
him to prevent further harass-
ment of the released prisoners.
First we created
the complete
summer vacation*
|TWSerfec
That's a big statement. But Kutsher's is a big
vacation Even by Catskills' standards. We're
big enough to offer poolsindoors and out-
held captive by a Palestinian ter-
rorist group in Damascus.
Some 600 of the released con-
victs were allowed to return to
their homes in the West Bank
Gaza and Israel. Jewish settlers in
the territories are determined
that they leave. At least three are
known to have fled to Jordan after
several days and nights of harass-
ment and threats by settlers.
The settlers are now employing
peaceful means, to avoid interven-
tion by the security forces, but
mainly not to spoil the chances for
the early release of alleged
members of a Jewish terrorist
underground presently on trial or
serving sentences for acts of
violence against Arab civilians.
A spokesman for the settlers
told the mukhtar of Deir el
Khatab, Suleiman Mustafa Abdul
Kanm, "We come to you as a
friend." But there was an
underlying threat of violence as
the spokesman added, in broken
Arabic, "We are telling the
residents of the village that there
are those among us in the Jewish
settlements who will not remain
idle if the released terrorist does
not get out of here. We want to
avoid unpleasantness and to main-
tain good neighborly relations,"
he said. The settlers came to the
village apparently unarmed, ex-
cept one of them who openly car-
ried a gun. He was identified as
Avner Uzan. He wore a yarmulka
with the symbol of Rabbi Meir
Kahane's extremist Kach Party
which advocates the expulsion of
all Arabs from Israel and the ter-
ritories regardless of whether or
not they are guilty of crimes.
The settlers have the names of
the released Palestinians, obtain-
ed from the International Red
Cross which participated in the
prisoner exchange. The mukhtar
told the visitors politely that he
would convey their demands to
the family of Yussef but that he
was in no position to force the
man to leave his home.
The settlers went to Yussef s
home to be told by his brother that
he had gone to the Jordan valley.
They said they would return to
make sure he had left.
Security forces in the West
Bank have not intervened so far in
the settlers' drive to oust released
terrorists. But sources in the
defense establishment called their
tactics childish.
Meanwhile, one of the terrorists
freed on May 20 and re-arrested
three days later for allegedly in-
citing against Israel in a local mos-
que, was released by order of a
Jerusalem magistrates court after
he promised not to engage in anti-
Israel activities. The man, Mussa
Awda, had been serving a life
sentence for murder. He has since
returned to his home in the Silwan
quarter of East Jerusalem.
We Added
One Thing To Our
Pure Spring Water: -
The Glass Bottle.
When a water has been
hidden from man-made
pollutants for 3500years, it
deserves glass bottles to
preserve its purity.
That's Mountain Valley
Water from Hot Springs,
Arkansas. Salt-free. Natu-
rally hard. Excellent to
taste.
Have Mountain Valley
Water delivered to your
home and office.

Dade Broward
696-1333 563-6114
Mountaiq-cVSlley
FROM HOT SPRINGS. ARK.
golf racquetball. tennis, indoor ice-skating, a
supervised day camp, two nightclubs with new
shows nightly and that's just for starters! If
you want to find out just how complete a sum c
mer vacation can be come!
MM SIDXKX |1 IY4TH WEEKEND'DAVID BRENNER
I K Whll VALU & THE EOl'R SEASONS
U'l \l VI ANA GLADYS KNIGHT* THE PIPS
KOHt.RT KLEIN VIC DAMOM I \r3
HINURLIV LABOR DAY WEEKtM)
Kutsher's
Monlicello, Nev* York 12701 (914) 794 6000
CAM. TOLL FREE: 1800) 431-1273
.pun facdii*, Ma/of Onto Or* U***m
STATE OF
SRAEL BONDS
BOUGHT AND SOLD
Invest in
Israel Securities
WE"RE SPECIALISTSIN
ISRAEL SECURITIES
**
I^SJP^NS DAILY VIA TELEX
iU ISRAEL STOCK EXCHANGE
****? tum *>* umn i*'m< M
fecurittos
18 East 48th Street
New York, NY 10017
(212)759-1310
tion Toll Free (800) 221 4838
where shopping is o pleasure 7doys o week
PuDM Blk.n.t open at 8:00 A.M.
Avaftabie at PufcNx Store* wtth
Freeh Dank* Bafcertee Only.
Onion Rolls
6.79
Available at PuMx
Fret* Oantafc Bafcertee Only
The Perfect
)atme* Cookies
FREE!
~
D
Available at PuatU Storaa
Fraah Oantafc Bafcartai Only
Deactou* eh
atAMPuUi
Av
$129
Something a BM Wtterent
Rum Rings....................
Fraah From tha Oven
Danish Cherry Strip ^cr1~
For a Healthy BreaMaat ^^
Bran Muffins..............6 99*
Pricss Efffctivi
Jmm 20 tin 26.1985
at PuMx Store, with Fraah
Bakeriee Only.
EqOi Punip#mick#l md RflWn
Bagels........................6 ** 99
Glazed Donuts...........8 99*
$m$&
Melair*
m:i: i Mill
COLLECTION
This week's feature
VOLUME 8
Divine Desserts
1.79 -
Watch for
No* Books Wtckly


Page 14 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, June 21, 1985
Bar/Bat Mitzvahs
TEMPLE NEWS
Segehuck
AKerweia
Coaaa
SeiMr
Feaerberg
Saturday morning June 29 service
at Beth Torah.
TEMPLE BETH ORB
The B'nai Mitzvah of David
MeMaboa. son of Ms. Nancy
McMahon. and David Gardoa.
son of Phyllis and Stephen Gor-
don, will be celebrated during the
Saturday morning June 22 service
at Temple Beth Orr, Coral
Springs.
On Saturday June 29, Erica
Obreati. daughter of Gail and
Martin Obrentz, and Edward An-
thoay Ortll. son of Constance and
Lawrence Orell, will celebrate
their B'nai Mitzvah.
TEMPLE SHOLOM
Allison Hift. daughter of Dr.
and Mrs. Edgar Hift, was called to
the Torah in honor of her Bat
Mitzvah at the Saturday morning
April 27 service at Temple
Sholom. Pompano Beach.
Local Temples pitch in to
help inaugurate services
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL
The Bat Mitzvah of Jeauufer
Coaaa was celebrated at the Fri-
day night June 14 service at Tem-
ple Beth Israel, Sunrise.
The B'nai Mitzvah of Laser
Seiaer and Bryan Fenerberg was
celebrated at the Saturday morn-
ing June 15 service at Beth Israel.
Daaiel Alterweia will become
Bar Mitzvah celebrant at the
Saturday morning June 22 service
at Beth Israel.
On Saturday June 23, Andrew
Segelnick will become a Bar Mitz-
vah celebrant.
TEMPLE BETH TORAH
The Bat Mitzvah of Deborah
Felker, daughter of Marie and
Mel Felker, wiU be held at the Fri- -. #%
&&&.**- at Conservative Synagogue
The following morning, Steven
Spier, son of Diana and Leonard
Spier, will be called to the Torah
in honor of his Bar Mitzvah.
Allison Hnnger, daughter of
Patricia and Errol Hunger, will
celebrate her Bat Mitzvah at the
Friday night June 28 service at
Beth Torah.
The Bar Mitzvah of Alan Mon-
tag, son of Jacqueline and Barry
Montag, will be celebrated at the
PiversHied Quit
Answers
1- Alfred Lewisohn.
2- A ram's horn. (A cow's horn
may not be used)
3- Yom Kippur and Tisha B'av.
4- A Yiddish comic who also ap-
peared successfully on the
American stage.
5- The Messiah was awaited.
6-Nathan.
7- Rabbenu Gershom in the
Tenth Century.
8- The Alte-Neue Shul in
Prague, Czechoslovakia com-
pleted in 1270.
9- Beer made from dates which
were plentiful in Babylon.
10- "My soul is in love with the
Torah."
Temple Beth Am is proud of the
achievements of its Hebrew
School students. According to
David Klempner, publicity direc-
tor, there are now 77 students in
Kadimah. 49 in USY and 25
students who will be attending he
Leadership Training Institute this
summer. The Beth Am Chapter
has also been named "Chapter of
the Year," by United Synagogue,
receiving over 11 awards.
TEMPLE KOL AMI
The Temple Kol Ami Early
Childhood Department is present-
ly accepting applications for the
fall semester for the Pre-school.
In addition to classes for two,
three, and four years olds, there
will be a Toddler Workshop held
twice a week for children not quite
old enough to attend regular pre-
school classes. Please call Roberta
Yudis, pre-school director, at
472-1988, for further details.
Friday night, June 21. will be a
special Shabbat Service. This
summer Rabbi Sheldon J. Harr,
will officiate at the Bar and Bat
Mitzvah ceremonies of 14 children
who are stident, M ^
Rehgious School tC*J"
5" take place h, JJ
Evening Service on j^ 2?
students will be gj
conducting the Ser^S
** tune, the Q^JJ
honor last year's Board U*.
and Rabbi HanTiJ
coming year's Board fetfe
TEMPLE 8HOL0*
Carole and Herb* ri
fc^ Sabbath KidJ
cheon at Temple ShoU
remembrance of Carole h
liberation by the U.S. Ann!
ly 40 years ago on bUy (j
She had been incarcaaj
Auschwitz and Bergen Be*,
The event was celebratsdi
"Simcha" rather thin a nd,
ton, since Holocaust Mr
week was observed the pm
week. Personal friends ofCsa
were in attendance. The? i
Dr. and Mrs. M. HermeaM
and Mrs. Sol Roth whT,
childhood friends in their
town, as well at schoosi
They also were in the cogs]
tion camps and liberated i
same time.
The New Conservative
Synagogue of Coconut Creek held
its first service, celebrating the
Festival of Shavuot, in a meeting
room of Broward Federal Bank,
Coconut Creek. According to
Temple president pro-tern Ben-
jamin Dinkes. "The room was fill-
ed for all services. Over 150 peo-
ple attended, many having to
stand."
The services were made possible
through the generous cooperation
of other local congregations. Con-
gregation Beth Hillel of Margate
loaned one Torah Scroll while
Temple Beth Orr of Coral Spr-
ings, loaned another. Prayer
books, prayer shawls and Bibles
were loaned to the congregation
by the Tamarac Jewish Center
and Temple Beth Israel, Deerfield
Beach.
The services were conducted by
Rabbi Josiah Derby, Rabbi-
Emeritus of the Rego Park Jewish
Center, Queens, New York, who
volunteered his time along with
Dr. Ben Alpert, Morton Klein and
Paul Burstyn. who chanted the
liturgy. Others who made the ser-
vice possible were Dr. Robert
Drimmer, who donated office
space, and David Bergenfeld, who
printed special pamphlets.
Dinkes announced that High
Holy Day services will be held in a
tent to be erected on the parking
lot of the Union Bank on Coconut
Creek Parkway, directly across
the entrance to Wynmoor Village.
Reservations for these services
can be made by calling 979-5852
or 975-6998.
Outreach program
at
Temple Emanu-EI
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL
Your Conservative Temple
Is Now Enrolling New Members:
Registration for Our
United Synagogue of America
Award-Winning Religious School
Sunday School
Early Childhood Center
Plantation Branch
Free Tuition Programs
High Holy Day Tickets
Kadlma USY
Parent Association
Young Couples Club
Men's Club Sisterhood
Adult Education
Call: Norman S. Pollack, Executive Director
Stanley L Cohen, Director of Education and Youth
7100 West Oakland Park Boulevard
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33313
742-4040
As part of the Union of
American Hebrew Congregations
National Program for Outreach,
Rabbi Jeffrey L. Ballon will offer
its annual Conversion and
Outreach workshop. Beginning
October 2, the course will be con-
ducted on Wednesday evenings
for 12 sessions. This program is
designed to service and inform
those who would like to learn
more about the Jewish faith,
customs and ceremonies. The
course will fulfill one of the
minimum requirements necessary
for purposes of adoption of the
Jewish faith. Often this workshop
is attended by those who have a
desire to reacquaint themselves
with Judaism, its history and
traditions. Information about
registration and tuition is
available at the temple office,
3245 W. Oakland Park Blvd., Fort
Lauderdale, or call 731-2310.
r k it
Candlelighting Times June 21 7:57 p.m. June 28 7:59 p.m. July 5-7:59 p.m. July 12 -7:58 p.m. July 19-7:56 p.m.
CONSiaVATIVI
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER (TU-TSS0). 8101 NW S:ih St Tiraiml
Service- Sunday through Friday 8:SO a.m.. S p.m. Late Frldsy nntol
pm Saturday 8:48 a.m 8 p.m. RakW Kiwi Stoe*. A.mni I
Neman aaaalak. Caater P. rWHI Srwimr
TEMPLE BtTM AM i*74-8*Ml. 7818 Royal Palm Blvd. Itarrtuaal
Service* Monday through Friday 8:80 a m S pm Friday lau tenM
p.m Saturday 8 am, 8 p.m Sunday 8 am 8 pm Reboi *i
Rabbi Emerltua. Dr Solomon Geld Cantor Irving Groaaman
i TEMPLE SETM ISRAEL (T4S-40M). TlflO W Oakland Part Bird, Sari
l 31313 Servte**: Monday through Thuredey 8 a m 5 JOpm.FrkByll
8 pm. 8pm Saturday 8: M a.m Sunday 8 am 8:Mp m. Rattf rma*
Leoowlrt, Cantor Maurice Now
, TEMPLE SSTM ISRAEL OP DEERFIELD iEACH Century Blvd.. DeerfleM Beach 33441 Service*: Sunday throu|hFrWjl
'a.m.. 8 p.m. Friday late aervtce 8 p m Saturday 8 45 am., and at
lighting urn. Rat* Jeaea* Imsmt, Caertar SAeMN Ackerteee.
I TEMPLE B'NAI MOSHE (843-88801. 1484 SI 3erd St.. Pompano Bad]
I 33080 Services: Friday 8 p.m. RatM Merr i A. Skop
I TEMPLE SHA'ARAY TZEDEK (741-OSBSi. 4088 Pine Island Rd Surtl
S8SI1 Service*: Sunday through Friday 8 am 5pm 1
pm, Saturday 8:48 a.m., 8:88 p.m.
TEMPLE SHOLOM (848-84101. IS SB 11 Av* ^mP"J^!*"?
vlcee Monday through Friday 8 48 o-m evening. Monday thrcujli t-
aday at 8 p.m.. Friday evening at 8. Saturday and Sunday am -
Samuel April. Cantor Samuel Renter
CONORROATMJN BETH HILLEL OP MARGATE i*74 f'-^"Sj
Service*: Suivday through Friday 8 15a "^"H
5 30 p.m. "M* '
Blvd Margate 83008
Late Friday aervtce 8 p.m
Mariner. Canter Jeel Ceteen
Saturday 8:48 am
tNWI
SI
HEBREW CONGREGATION OF LAUOERMILL 733-8660>.
Av.. LauderhUl 33813 Service*: Sunday through Friday s a
p.m Saturdays 40 am Re*** Israel Malpern
NORTH 1.AIDE3LDA1X MEBJUCR OONOBEGATrON: (JT47_R
77) Service.: at Banyon Lake. Condo Clubhouse M80 aw
Tamarac, Friday at 8 p.m. Saturday 8 48 am Caerte. B- Fyler.
ORTHOOOX
TEMPLE ONEL B'NAI RAPHAEL ,733-788... 4361 W Oa8lartP
lauderdale Lahea 3*313. Servle.ee: Sunday through Thursday
Friday 8 a m 8p.m.. Saturday 8 45 am 8 p.m ,
SYNAGOGUE OP INVBRRARV CHABAO (748-1777'?tjm
coin Park West. Sunrise 33331 Service*: Sunday ^" VT! Mel
, Saturday a.m.. S R.*. Bhety groep*. Men. $**
service*, Women. Teesstays I p.m RaMH AreaLteberman
VOUNO ISRAEL OP OEERPIELO BEACH (431 1J> >f"*,X!
Blvd. Deerfield Beach 33441. Services: Sunday "^* ""' sjBI
sundown Saturday 8:46 a.m and sundown Caater MBsei
YOUNGrisrR AEL SVMAOOOUB OP HOCLVwOOOPORTLJU*^
Fort Lauderdale 333U 1
(008-7877). 8381 Stirling Rd..
Saturday. 8a.m.
fUJglkrvti*'
DevH.
Mel>"*;
through Friday 7:30 I
Sam. eundown.
CONOREOATION MIBOAL OAVIO (TSBBBB). 8B7B
Tamarac. Service*: Dally 8 am ; eatrMta 3 pm Sptuidaysj. ^^
IS p.m Reps* CheiRl tcUlHtr. Ceneregeh.-
Fkwscher CONlTRUCTrONlST
8MAJLOM (473-8800), U301 W. Broward Blwt. rktwsy,^
Friday 8 16 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m.
REFORM
TEMPLE BETH ORR 171*83*8). 31*1 Rlverstde / <**[lJJJjCaR
Service*: Friday S p.m.; Saturday 1* a>m. R*BI Jarrooi -
Nancy Hawainae).
TEMPLE B'NAI SHALOM OP 0MFIB1.0
la. 3*88 W. HUleboro Blvd.. L
fH. PM*. CatHwr Morrte UtrMow. useaai
TEMPLE MANU-tL (Til-SSI*). 3348 W. OW**^ la-MJ.'
Lake, sail Service. Friday **P-*mu*g': hS****9"'
****** rtto^iWM*.********"*^ ^
TEMPLE HOC AMI <7iB>. SSB* Peter. Rd. ?"",", -*"
Friday 8 16 p.m.. Saturday 1080 am BaBBi------
Cereura. ml**' i*r-2
LIBERAL JEWISH TEMPLE OP COCONUT Cti"J^<*2i
Friday night serrieea twice mcerilUy at CBtvan'J^T^m *"
Ooconu Creek Parkway. RaBBI Brvce 8. "'
Menorah Chapela. 388* W. HlUaboro Blvd.. DeerrMld o-
Bokertt.
l7*78
WEST SROWARD JEWISH CONOR B*^TION^T^^*w.l
PkuiUUon Servlcea: Friday
cetebratlooa RaMMSteart L.
K**!
^i*5SSi**~-


First woman Rabbi In Israel
irforming congregational duties
...
Friday, June 21, 1985/The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 15
LviV (JTA) The first
^5bi in Israel Kinneret
_ is performing con-
] duties for the Reform
bent's Community
Me in Ramat Aviv, a Tel
Ijirt), but she is doing so
[recognition from the Or-
Irabbinical establishment,
1 a government agency.
ael Movement for Pro-
. Judaism said that
|30 was ordained by the
; branch of the Hebrew
lege-Jewish Institution
m 1981 and served as a
ubi in Adelaide, Australia
Klton, Conn, before com-
pel in 1983.
Shirlion is married to an Israeli
scriptwriter. The couple has a
two-year-old daughter.
The Israeli state rabbinate does
not recognize any non-Orthodox
movemnent or its rabbis. ThoBe
rabbis do not have authority to
perform marriages or officiate at
burials which are owned or con-
trolled by the Orthodox Hevra
Kadisha Burial Societies.
Both the Conservative and
Reform movements have
established offices in Jerusalem,
building synagogues, schools and
kibbutzim. Backed by their world
movements, the non-Orthodox
groups in Israel are fighting with
mounting persistence for full
recognition.
June-July Jewish best-seller list
ilNGTON Based on a
i of Jewish bookstores in
cross the United States,
B'rith International
lonthly has selected on its
||y issue the following as
books of Jewish in-
They are Hated
nabetically by title.
)VEB
andmment of the Jam.
|S. Wyman. Pantheon.
U.S. response to the
land Revolution. Michael
I Harper and Row. $15.95.
t of the Book of Exodus
I radicalism.
Vow, When? Primo Levi.
(15.95. Fiction by the
Rt memorialist.
Herman Wouk.
own. $19.95. Memoirs of
a White House Jewish liaison.
Fiction.
Leak's Children. Gloria Goldreich.
M&cmillan. $16.95. A woman
recalls the courageous lives of her
children. Fiction.
PAPERBACK
Brother*. Bernice Rubens. Dell.
$4.50. Generational saga.
Changing Itrael Peter Grose.
Vintage. $4.95. How America
should respond to a changing
Israel.
/* the Land of Itrael. Amos Ox.
Vintage. $5.95. Conversations
with Israelis.
The Jewish Holidays. Michael
Strassfeld. Harper and Row.
$15.95. Interpretations and tradi-
tional commentaries. Illustrated.
Jewith Trivia and Information
Book. Ian Shapolsky. Steimatzky.
$5.95. Q&A in Bible, current
events, personalities.
American Associates,
Ben-Gurion University
forms Broward Chapter
Baer, Southeast Area
nan for American
ies, Ben-Gurion Universi-
1 Negev, announced that
pnizational meeting on
[at the home of Mr. and
(ward Schub of Tamarac,
ncan Associates Chapter
Broward County was
^Marvin Stein, a resident
"inds and President of the
Country Club, was
sident of the Chapter.
I Schub was elected Vice
F in Charge of Member-
"* Cohen and Mary Kaye
^ Co-Chairpersons of
Pter's Special Projects
Ma*Melissa Berkowitx
m Chairperson of the
n'ng Committee. Others
ft*" B,>ward County
V*ri of Directors are-
^J" Berkowitz, Lenore
Lcy Kalusin, Leo
*|nce and Robert Kay,
Uan Levenson, Elsa
"Maharam, Dr. Stanley
' Tl and Leon Mess-
VMENT HOMES
I*1 (U repair). Also
V*t tax property.
(UJ05-687-6000 Ext.
* information.
ing, Harold Oshry, Joyce Schub,
Daniel Simons, Esq., Joseph
Weinstein, Norman Weinstein,
and Senator Peter Weinstein.
The American Associates works
on behalf of Israel's youngest
university, Ben-Gurion University
of the Negev. With local offices in
Tamarac, Florida, the Associates
is a national organization head-
quartered in New York.
On being elected President,
Marvin Stein said that "it is clear
that we have assembled a group of
dedicated and enthusiastic people
interested in developing support
for Ben-Gurion University's
diverse programs of education,
research, and community
outreach.
"Ben-Gurion University has a
unique and invaluable contribu-
tion to make to Israel's nation-
building task and we look forward
during the coming years to mar-
shalling the financial support
needed by the University. A series
of public information programs
are planned for Broward County
utilizing University faculty
members and others involved in
the work of the University."
For information about chapter
membership please call the Ben-
Gurion University office at
722-6100.
Specialized care
frthehomebound
11972
c.. 24 hf nursing aervtce since
inTi"? A" Dade Bro*rd Counties
joJ; ,. N-8- Nurses Aides, Homemskers
''ze in Live-ins & Post Hospital Csre
R.N.
r^33
Insurance Assignments
ALL DADE HOME CARE
Hwd. 963-1417
Ft. Laud
n
ers
566-85031
PICTURED ABOVE are the youngsters who
were confirmed at Temple Kol Ami on May 25.
They are, first row (left to right), Beth
Jacobsen, Joy Polunsky, Niccole Lehwald,
Dana Perkins, Johanna Carr, Mr. Morris
Ezry, Education director. (Second row),
Robert Kramer, Randi Lozowick, Susan Rod-
man, Karen DeRosa, Jill Lefkowitz, David
Shechter, Rabbi Sheldon Harr, Stacy Gandell,
Robin Fisher, Dawn hinder, Robin Raskin,
Shana Levine, Scott Kauffman, Andy Litvak.
(Third row), Howard Fallenbaum, Jonathan
Nacht, Brian Geller, Jeffrey Kane, Morris
Finkelstein, Brian Goldberg, Mark Moll,
Craigg Maret, Jack Polish, Matthew.
Eichhorn, Glen Lindie. Not in picture: Lisa
Okun.
U.S. to inform Holocaust survivors of new policy
on Social Security eligibility
The Social Security Administra-
tion has promised the American
Jewish Congress that it will step
up efforts to inform Holocaust
survivors of their rights to Social
Security benefits previously
denied to them.
In April, AJCongress criticized
the federal agency for failing to
notify Holocaust victims that
reparations payments they
receive from West Germany will
no longer be counted as income
and used to withhold Social
Security benefits.
In a May 16 letter to officials of
AJCongress, Martha A. McSteen,
acting Social Security commis-
sioner, promised to take steps to
identify recipients of reparations
payments and inform them of the
recent change in her agency's
policy regarding such payments.
The federal agency says it will
follow AJCongress' recommenda-
tion that it request the assistance
of the Federal Republic of Ger-
many in identifying the recipients
of reparations payments. Com-
missioner McSteen noted in her
letter that Social Security Ad-
ministration records currently do
not indicate who is receiving such
funds.
The U.S. agency says it will ask
the West German government to
include a notice with all repara-
tions payments to individuals liv-
ing in this country informing them
that reparations payments are no
longer considered income in deter-
mining eligibility for Social
Security benefits.
The elimination of reparations
payments as a consideration in
determining eligibility for Social
Security Benefits grew out of a
case brought on behalf of Felicia
Grunfeder, a disabled Holocaust
survivor who had been turned
down for Supplemental Security
Income (SSI) payments because
she was receiving reparations
from West Germany. AJCongress
argued in that case that such
payments should be exempt, just
as persona] injury awards and
other "tort damages" received as
compensation for civil loss are
exempted.
Jewish Day School
In Tampa
Seeking Full-Time Hebrew Teacher, and
Part-Time Kindergarten Aide.
If interested in either position, please call:
813-875-8287
JEWISH ACCORDING TO TRADITION.
Star of David Cemeteries and Funeral Chapels are Broward
County's only all Jewish Cemetery/Funeral Chapels. Consecrated
by the Broward Board of Rabbis, staffed solely by Jewish Funeral
Directors and Memorial Counselors. Star of David is
concerned about Jewish burial traditions. These
traditions are the laws of our fathers and their forefathers
before them. These traditions are our heritage, so they
are important to us...And they are important to you.
Star of David Cemeteries and Funeral Chapels
Tamarac Lauderhill Hollywood
Broward. (305) 525-0800
Dade. 949-6100 S. Palm Beach. 722-9000 W. Palm Beach. 734jfM4<>
Send to: Star of David Cemeteriea ft Funeral Chapel. P.O. Box 25700. Tamarac. FL 33320
D I want more information on property selection* at Star of David O North Broward ? South B
D I want more information on pre-arranged funeral*
D I want more Information on your property exchange program. Our lots are in
^^_______________cemetery at________ ______
NAME
ADDPESS----------
CITY--------------

PHONE
STATE
ZIP


Page 16 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale/Friday, June 21, 1985
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