The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 3, no. 7 (Apr. 5, 1974)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 9, 1976 called v.4, no. 27 but constitutes v.5, no. 1; issue for July 7, 1989 called v.18, no. 11 but constitutes v.18, no. 13.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44570954
lccn - sn 00229545
ocm44570954
System ID:
AA00014312:00293

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Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward


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Full Text
e Jewish FL
* r
.MAN
OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE
I Number 19
FortLauderdato, Florida Friday, May 10,1986
,Prfci' W Cents'

impaign draws to a close
is annual meeting nears
the 1986 Jewish
ration-United Jewish
i campaign draws to
e, and the annual
_j nears, Brian Sherr,
ation general cam-
chairman and
_tial nominee, urges
ee North Broward
bents who have not as
[made their 1985 UJA
oitment, to do so now.
records indicate
over 3,800 1984
Lributors have not made
pledge for the current
dgn. If the corn-
is to reach our goal,
imperative that those
are received im-
ately," stated Sherr.
herr pointed out that
bout the dollars raised
in the annual Federation-
UJA campaign, such
community services as the
Kosher Nutrition program,
the frail elderly "Gathering
Place," the North Broward
Midrasha, which sponsors
community lectures and
book reviews; and major
beneficiary agencies such
as the Jewish Community
Center, the Hebrew Day
School and Jewish Family
Services, would not be
possible.
By the annual meeting,
which is scheduled for 7:30
p.m. Tuesday May 21 at
the JCC, Sherr hopes to see
the campaign figure in-
crease tremendously, "If
Jews will not help other
Jews in need, then who
will?" he asked.
Awards presented at JCC
stallation Dinner-Dance June 2
Jewish Community
iter of Greater Fort
dale will present two
during its first
ation Dinner-Dance,
iy, June, 2 in the
Ballroom of the
Country Club,
i Capp, JCC president
nnced.
Center s Anita and
>L. Perlman Volunteer
1 Year Award will be
nted to Steven Feller,
chaired JCC's
W8 Development
littee this past year.
' has spearheaded the
ation of JCC facilities
m air-conditioning
making major im-
wnents in the gym-
, He has also played
N* role in the planning
^"projects on campus
the new Early-
Parking Lot,
m use for several
months, the new swimming
pool complex about to be
completed and the new
front entrance project.
The Helene and Samuel
M. Soref Annual Com-
munity Service Award will
be presented to Marsha and
Alan Levy, founding
members of the Jewish
Community Center as well
as actively involved
members of the general
community of Greater Fort
Lauderdale. Mr. and Mrs.
Levy were recipients of
Federation's Young
Leadership Award last year
and they were recently
named "Farm Family of
the Year."
Marsha Levy is a
member of the JCC board,
and a member of
"Leadership Broward"
sponsored by the Fort
Lauderdale Chamber of
Commerce. Ms. Levy has
Jewish Federation of
VJreater Tort Lauderdale
8358 W Oakland Pafh SouM. tf<
Ft. Lau.'erdale. FL 33321
(305) 748-8400 I Miami: S45-9/3I
Mailing Address.
P.O. Box 26810
Tamarac, FL 333204810
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FEDERAL EXPRESS April 29, 1985
President Ronald Reagan
The White House
1600 Pennsylvania Avenue
Washington, D.C. 20500
Dear President Reagan:
As an involved American citizen and as President
of an organization representing over 100,000 American
Jews, I have on occasion written to you on issues that
have affected the Jewish people, your contemplated visit
to the military cemetery at Bitburg where 49 Nazi SS
soldiers are buried has deeply troubled our Jewish community.
I realize your deep sensitivity to the victims of the
Holocaust. For this reason. 1 cannot understand how you
can visit this cemetary where the murderers of so many innocent
people are buried. I do not believe we can forget their
deeds. If we forget or forgive, these deeds may happen again.
I realize the great pressure you are under from the
German government to stop at the Bitburg cemetary; however,
I hope you will somehow avoid this stop. For the sake of
the millions of Jews and non-Jews who were killed by Nazi
SS soldiers, I ask (and pray) that you will change your
planned trip.
Thank you for listening be my thoughts.
respe
REINSTEIN
JR:alg
cct Secretary of State George S
Senator Lawton M. Chiles, Jr
Senator Paula Hawkins
Congressman Lawrence Smith
Congressman E. Clav Shaw
LOCAL AOfNClCt ANO MtVtCta V* OaOw.lAi* CwiMi* Ay*'' '"' **** t **">- Gu*"*H, -> l.fc-'
r..i......, owe, Oamu Go~.i nm eiim Cm- -,. SjHiiu i '" oi jaa >- .."I-.W-.
A If.. C,VO IWOlc~ A H.J* CN t TiL*--l IM>CMW|I
'a** toM. AMOMO f*>l*m# **'* .>-.*.l-.*. IV.%
i., S*c"a Kara* t.lC'M 'ow* it^-u-* *o*a

recently completed a four-
year term as a member of
the Judicial Nominating
Commission of the 17th
Judicial District. She is
Vice^hairman of the City
of Plantation Landscape
Planning and Review
Board and Secretary of the
"Adolescents in Distress"
program. Ms. Levy con-
tinues as a Special
Education teacher with
Continued on Page *
. v.v.-.:.:.:.v.:.x.v*:vx.^^
JEWISH FLORIDIAN
::
I
goes bi-weekly
'ifco
"d Alan Uvy
This Friday, the May 10 issue of THE JEWISH
! FLORIDIAN published by the Jewish Federation of
1 breater Fort Uuderdak, is the hurt iroe of the 1984-
:: 85 series of weekly publications.
Bi-weekly issues begin on Friday May 24 con-
* tinuing every two weeks until the Friday September
S 13 issue. The bi-weekly schedule is as follows: May
1 10.24; June 7,21; July 549; August 2,16,30; and
I Sent 13 Deadlines still remain the same. Copy must
I be in THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN office no later
| then two weeks prior to the Issue that it should
appear in.
-wish Federation 1985 Annual Meeting
Tuesday May 21, at JCC


Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale / Friday, May 10,1986
n
I
i
CRC ACTION ALERT
An Important Matter: Your
urgent help is needed in op-
posing the U.S. Treasury
Department proposal to cut
federal tax benefits for charitable
donations. Congress will soon be
asked to respond to this proposal
which contains provisions that
would seriously hamper the
efforts of charitable
organizations to provide services
to those in need and to improve
the quality of life for all
Americans through education,
cultural arts and vital health and
social services.
The Issue: The U.S. Treasury
Department's proposed changes
include:
. .Repeal of the charitable
deduction for non-itemized
"short form" taxpayers. (This
denies equitable treatment for
charitable gifts to the two-thirds
of all taxpayers who do not
itemize deductions).
. .Limiting the charitable
deduction to the amount con-
tributed in excess of 2 percent of
adjusted gross income. (This will
mean that most gifts will lose
their deducibility entirely since
the average contributiion is
under 2 percent).
. Limiting the charitable
deduction for gifts of appreciated
property to the purchase price
adjusted for inflation. (This will
create a disincentive for the
donation of appreciated property
to charities resulting in sub-
stantial losses).
Some economists have
projected that charities could
lose as much as 20-31 percent of
their contributed dollars because
of the proposed changes. This
annual loss of billions of dollars
cannot be absorbed by the very
same non-profit organizations
which the Administration has
requested to assume a larger role
in providing for health and
human services subjected to
federal budget cuts. It is difficult
to reconcile this call for services
with attempts to diminish our
ability to respond to it.
Action: Your communications
to public officials are very im-
portant. Write to President
Ronald Reagan, The White
House, Washington. D.C. 20600;
and our Senators Lawton Chiles
and Paula Hawkins, United
States Senate, Washington, DC.
20510; and our members of
Congress, Representatives E.
Clay Shaw, Dan Mica and Larry
Smith, U.S. House of
Representatives, Washington,
D.C. 20615. Urge them to oppose
these changes to the charitable
contribution deductibility Write
them in your own words and use
your own experiences as
volunteers in community
agencies to personalize your
letters. Cite local examples of
services and agencies that might
be affected by reduced resources.
DO IT TODAYI
Eppy's receive 'Gates of Jerusalem' medal
Federation Annual
Meeting May 21
The Jewish Federation of Greater fort UurWrf.u
I to its By-Lswa. is presenting the following !!%"**
directors, as certified by theRominating SrS fr*
at the annual meeting st 7 p.m.,Tuesoay mSS^o**^
JCC Campus, 6601 W. Q.T/' p2r.?l;'tSowfH4
tributors to Federations 1966 United J^KKS^ *
are welcome. ***** fn^
'*" BRIAN SHERR
*^E?7i: DANIEL CANTOR
V PwaMeat: ALAN LEVY
m Vice President. MARK LEVY
^J^ffS' ***"** K. MILLER
VI2j^T,d"t: *>" 8TREN0
Vies rWdant: ETHEL WALDMAN
Secretary: IRVING LIBOW8KY
8ecretsy: WILLIAM KATZBERG
earner: SHELDON POLISH
It Treasurer: SIDNEY SPEWAK
RE-ELECTED
FOBTWOYEAR8
ALAN BECKER ALFRFn an rm.
GLADYS DAREN MARtTnltoS
PAULFRIESER ^rTAlfflS
MORRIS FURMAN ISRjCel. rSS!
SEYMOUR GERSON M. MO^WItBK
NEW BOARD MEMBERS
ELECTED FOR ONE YEAR
MARTIN CAIN
RICHARD ENTIN
DEBORAH HAHN
DANIEL KLEIN
STEPHEN LeVWl
STEVENLEWB
SIGMUND NATHAM
NEW BOARD MEMBERS
ELECTED FOR TWO YEARS
MAX BUCK
ABE DAVID
RICHARD FINKELSTEIN
JOSEPH NOVICK
HAROLDOSHRY
STUART REIffl
Dr. MARC SCHWAETII
JEFFREY STREITFEU)
IRVING SPECTOI
RABBI JEFFREY BALLON
RABBI ELLIOT SKIDDELL
Publication of the Nominating Committee's slit* in Tb
Jewish Floridian, which is mailed to the homes of 24,000 con-
tributors to Federation's 1966 United Jewish Appeal cimprap,
is deemed, in accord with the By-Laws, to be "ipproprattj
publicity" to the Federation's general membership.
Additional nominations for any officer or for the board may b |
made by filing a petition containing the signatures of
members of the Federation.
Gen. HaUvy, Ben and Ruth Eppy, Robert Adler.
Ben and Ruth Eppy were the
recipients of the prestigious
"Gates of Jerusalem" medal at
the 11th Annual Woodlands
Community State of Israel
Bonds Campaign Cocktail Party.
Leo Kaplan was the General
Chairman of the affair, Co-
Chaired by Robert Adler,
Norman Lazar, Charles Locke,
Leon Messing, Al Sharenow and
Dr. Justin Msy.
Robert Adler made the
presentation to the Eppys, who
have a long record of
schievements in the Jewish
communities in their home town
of Canton, Ohio and in Florida.
Chairman Kaplan made a special
presentation to Blanche Miller,
in recognition of the con-
tributions made to the Jewish
community by her late husband
David Miller.
General Yehudah Halevy
President and Chief Executive
officer of the worldwide Israel
Bond Organization, was the
honored guest speaker.
r
1
i
GRANDPARENTS:
Come Stay With Us For A Week or More
and Well Give Your Grandchild a
Winter Weekend Absolutely FREE!
When you join the Pines Junior Citizen's Club, for only a
$50 deposit which is credited towards your stay, your
grandchild* can come and enjoy a tree winter weekend at
the Pines! Do something special for you and your
grandchild join the Pines Junior Citizen's Club NOW
This special offer is only good until May 19th
(QUANOCMILD MUST BC UNDER 18 rEAHS Of AOE)
Pita. Stay Two weeks rb* Get A winter mumi Frsei
EXTRA-LOW RATES FOR EXTENDED STAYS
Fun vwywfwr* you turn
right on fn* pramiaat
f'M Go* on Ptamaaa Plu 36
L
Hom o> Go* Naarby Graat indoor
r*nmi Count t Afl-Wanhw Tma
Coons Outdoor Indoor
Poott I Hh Club Indoor
lot Skating (V* Indoor Miniatura
Go* Top Start law Snow* Gala
Eoarana ErManammam N*a Club
Disco- baima Accomodatoni
Suparb Cwama Elavator Sarvice
'nrormatan
At,
Sera Famsunj. nm Ytrt irnt
ftW) 111 MM
Catl Ml fret: (MO) 431-3124
OrSaw TrtwAaax
OWftppSM from Juiy 1 thru S*pt. t mm COara* t vi Honortd
Suparnaao Ch**an s Day Camp
Ptennad Taanagl Program
The
Brlckman
Hotel...
a catsklil
resort
that lets you
stop eating
long enough
to have
some fun..r
$375-5390
Per week, per person (dW. occ.)
Every room with Private Bath,
Air Conditioning and Color TV
For reservations and
irs^xmationphane
1-80*2ftj854
Hotel Brickman
South Faasburg, MY 12779
Wast* Card. visa. Arnex
Overlootrjna a great
18 hole got course.
Hot*
Brie
When you escape the Florida heat this
Summer, escape to sorrething more
than non-stop overeating.
Escape to the Brk*man.
Ybu go on vacation to do more than fc-e
from one meal to the nod That's why we're
on the MocKed American Plan, serving two
sumptuous meats daily. Breakfast (until 11 JO
am), and Dinner (from 630 to &30 pm).
MkMay snacks? Magnltoent Poobde
GofeeShop.
There wbeiarixxaxsment at 1 prn
caing you back to the Dining Roomiwrscn
you just left, no need to rush off gof course
or tennis courts. Linger at the pod al day i
you choose We have one outdoor and
indax(cor>as*TtogrvseJriickjbandjet
whirtpoolspa).^dupfcaterxi^
art classes, go fok dancing, jog. or work out
on our Universal rnW-gym. h short enjoys
ful day of outdoor activities and sunsrane,
and al the other fabulous things we haveto
oiler, rKkxfng qtelarirrtentmats second
to none
So come to the FJrickman. Where the
meals are fun...not sornetNng that gets
in the way of fun!
YrVfe
don't fit the mold.
tbur host for three gent*****
The Posner Family


Yom Yerushalayim
celebration May 19
Friday.May 10.1985 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page3
Sen. Hawkins, Gov. Graham
voice support for Israel
rvations are coming in
for Yom Yerushalayim,
i at Temple Beth Israel,
, Oakland Park Blvd.,
celebrating "L'Chaim,
i of the Reunification of
n." This day marks one
ost significant events in
ory of the Jewish people.
! day that Jerusalem, the
of Israel, was reunited,
g, among other historical
the Western Wall into
i hands for the first time in
This has special
to our generation
s took place within
i lifetime.
program will consist of
nations, prizes for the
contest, workshops,
mnent. refreshments, a
[sale and will be a truly
Yerushalayim happening.
khop No. 1 will begin at
i. Topics include: Heroes
ilem with Dr. Abraham
fcittelson, The Prophets
i of Jerusalem with Rabbi
I Gordon, Ancient Israel as
in Archeology (in
I with Efrat Afek, United
i-Politics of Success
* Yudewitz, Jewish,
Moslem Views of
with Rabbi Mitchell
Itshop No. 2 will begin at
p.m. Topics include:
Echoes of Jerusalem
ntor Nancy Hausman,
ous Life in Jerusalem with
Dr. Meir Felman in
A Walking Tour of
m with Josephine
n. Legends of Jerusalem
with Rabbi Elliot Skiddell,
Airlift to Jerusalem-The
Ethiopian Story with Dov
Goldflam, and Jerusalem in
Poetry with Abraham J. Git-
telson.
Registration, displays and
refreshments will begin at 12:16
p.m. The program will begin
promptly at 1 p.m. Registration
must be made in advance to the
Central Agency for Jewish
Education. Brochures are
available at participating in-
stitutions and at Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale in the CAJE office.
Fee for the program is 12 which
includes refreshments. Space is
limited.
Yom Yerushalayim is spon-
sored by the North Broward
Midrasha of the Central Agency
for Jewish Education of the
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale and its par-
ticipating institutions-Temple
Beth Am, Beth Israel, Beth
Israel of Deerfield Beach, Beth
Orr, Beth Torah, Emanuel,
Sha'Aray Tzedek. Sholom,
Ramat Shalom Synagogue
Hebrew Congregation of
Lauderhill, Liberal Jewish
Temple of Coconut Creek,
Southeastern Region United
Synagogue of America, Jewish
Comunity Center, Omega
Condominium, in cooperation
with the Department of
Education and Culture of the
World Zionist Organization.
American Section. For further
information call Helen Weisberg,
748-8400.
Paula Hawkins
The American Israel Public
Affairs Committee (AIPAC)
recently held a day long political
action workshop for some 300
Florida Jewish leaders.
Among those participating in
the program were Thomas Dine,
executive director of AIPAC,
Senator Paula Hawkins,
Governor Robert Graham and
Representative Larry Smith.
BOTH GRAHAM and Sen.
Hawkins expressed strong
support for Israel during their
speeches before the state
members of AIPAC.
"I felt a very personal sense of
kinship to the Jewish religious
shrines and to those which were
particular to Christianity,"
Graham said of his visits to
Israel. "I also felt a very strong
appreciation of the way in which
all of the religious institutions,
whether they were Jewish,
Moslem or Christian, were
treated.
Sen. Hawkins IR-F1.)
reiterated several times during
her speech that a strong United
States means a strong Israel.
"We walk together," she said.
THE SENATOR came down
hard upon Nicaragua, where
PLO terrorists are being trained.
"We're not sitting down with the
PLO," she said, adding that as
long as the PLO refuses to
recognize Israel and its security
needs, the U.S. will not recognize
the PLO.
In a speech that covered
several top issues facing U.S.-
Israel relations, Sen. Hawkins
said there is going to be a fight
on a new arms sale to Saudi
Arabia. "I don't see a need for a
sale," she said, referring to a
proposed sale of 40 F- 16s as well
as air-to-sea missiles. Sen.
Hawkins said the administration
is trying to sell the new pur-
chases as an update, and not as
a new sale.
In interviews with The Jewish
Floridian, both Sen. Hawkins
and Graham expressed deep
support for Israel as a strategic
ally in the Middle East.
"Yes I'm pro-Israel because
I'm pro-feedom, pro-liberty and
pro-justice for the Judeo-
Christian world," Hawkins said,
adding that she receives flak
from some people for being too
pro-Israel.
Response strong for Women's Division
morning lecture May 22
Jo Ann M. Levy, chairman,
and Carole Skolnik, co-chairman,
of the Women'8 Division Young
Leadership Development
Committee, have annouced that
response is strong for the
morning lecture and discussion
scheduled for Wednesday May
22. from 9:46 to 11:30 a.m.
The lecture, to be held in the
Plantation home of Marcia
Steinfeld, will feature as guest
speaker, Lawrence Schuval,
Federation's Community
Relations Committee director
and director of planning.
Schuval will address the topic of
"Cults."
For further information please
contact the Women's Division at
748-8400.
inrise Lakes IV kicks-off first campaign
with successful 'special' gifts party
Shultz urges Arab government to agree
to direct talks with Israel
i
ARLINGTON, Va. -
(JTA) Secretary of State
George Shultz stressed his
commitment to Israel and
urged Arab governments to
agree to direct negotiations
with the Jewish State.
"Those who take risks for
peace should know that the
United States will help them
defend themselves," he told
some 1,200 persons attending
the opening session of the 26th
annual policy conference of the
American Israel Public Affairs
Committee (AiPAC) at the
Hyatt Regency Crystal City
Hotel here.
"The U.S. must continue to
support those who seek
negotiations and peaceful
solutions against those who
promote violence and oppose
peace," he said.
SHULTZ, who noted that
Richard Murphy, Assistant
Secretry of State for Near
Eastern and South Asian
Affairs, is now in the Middle
East to explore "practical steps"
toward peace, declared, "But
whatever opportunities may
emerge, no one in the region or
throughout the world can have
the slightest doubt about
American policy: Israel's vital
interests will never be com-
promised; Israel's survival and
security will never be put at
risk."
Shultz, stressing that the U.S.
remains committed to President
Reagan's September 1, 1982
Middle East peace initiative,
said that anyone can bring any
position to negotiations. He said
there is no shortage of plans in
the Middle East but what was
needed was direct, face-to-face
negotiations. "It's not the going
in position, its the coming-out
position that matters," he said.
Shultz stressed that the U.S.
supports a negotiated settlement
which will give the Palestinian
people their "legitimate rights"
but does not support the
establishment of an independent
Palestinian state in the West
Bank and Gaza Strip. "Nor will
we support annexation or
permanent control by Israel," he
said.
it* S!0^ ** cocktail party held
* Pha" IV art (bach Uftto right):
**>*l K. and P,ari MilUr; and co-
chairman Selma and Al Puntky; Front row lleft
to right): Chairman Lto and Sonia Wtusman;
and co-chairman David and Hekn Lublinar.
*M
Gil?y' .very p*"'
""United
r'tio
\t?
in
Jewish
Jewish
Sunrise
was a
of this
Weissman
SSL^ wyi uvtai
open to thoaewho
* commitment of
,>inv
l* the
Federation-UJA
campaign.
"People said it
privilege' to be part
prestigious affair.'1 V
added.
Sparking the evening was a
talk given by Dr. Gideon Peleg.
Peleg discussed his experiences
in a concentration camp at the
age of eight.
"The comraderie shown
tonight was truly amazing,"
stated Samuel K. Miller,
Federation vice president and
advisor to the new campaign. "It
was a pleasure to see so many
concerned Jews in one room,"
added Irving Spector, the other
advisor to the new campaign.
Weissman stated that he looks
forward to the entire com-
munity's partfcipation in the
next UJA campaign.
I Mission Schedule I
: jg
Below is a list of the upcoming Missions to Israel sponsored &
; by the Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale. If you
: would like any information about any Mission, please contact
: Mission coordinator Sandy Jackowitz, at 748-8400
Summer Family Mission July 4-17 (Rabbi Elliot and Julie
; Skiddell, leaders) Includes opening ceremonies of Maccabiah
| games.
Singles Mission July 2131
Pre-Miassoa to Paris July 17-21 (First Timers).
Pre-lliesieB to Prague July 17-21 (Repeaters).
Campaign Leadership Miasioa Oct. 9-20. Poland and
! Israel.
:-:-:v:*x-:^^:*W^^




Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale / Friday, May 10. 1986
The Great American Jewish Experience'
W By MAX E. BUCK
Inverrary UJ A Chairman
When the evening sun goes
down on May 16 in Inverrary, a
covey of young and attractive
men and women set off on a
search for their religious destiny.
Twice before they have done
this.
They gather in the home of
one of their peers. And under the
cover of sociability, they actually
meet to search out the mysteries
of Jewish life.
This is a highly educated
group. Their ages fall between 25
and 45. They reside in Inverrary
and provide a sharp contrast in a
community which is primarily
composed of retired people with
their life-styles set.
Not so with this group. They
are flexible. They are inquisitive,
and they are zealously seeking
their roots and plotting the
religious roads they and their
children should follow in the
years ahead.
They are concerned about
forsaking sacred values. As a
third generation of Americans,
they look back to their grand-
parents, generally born abroad,
who came to America tied
tightly to strict Orthodoxy.
They saw their parents try to
shake off those bonds to ancient
Judaism and create fresh
lifestyles.
Now these young people are
wondering about re-embracing
hallowed precepts as they ex-
plore the Great American Jewish
Experience.
Recognizing their own needs
and assuming other young
people felt as they did. the
original group was formed by:
Huzzy and Meryl Tabatchnick,
Linda and Howard Gaines, Mike
and Joyce Yarmuth, and Burton
and Judith Levinson.
Among those who have
participated are:
Nick and Trudy Palin. Steve
and Diana Atlas, Steve and
Ellen Okrent, Austin and
Harriet Sonsky. Steven and
Meryl Keren. David and Karen
Waxman. Robert and Debbie
Porman, Mark and Lisa Gendal,
Alan and Bonnie Shapiro, Lester
Friedman, and Robert Meyer.
The search for understanding
is led by the staff from the
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale. Kenneth Kent,
who supervises Inverrary for the
Federation, teams with Bruce
Yudewitz to spark the meetings.
Discussion leaders have been
Abe Gittelson. assistant director
and Gene Greenzweig. director of
the Central Agency for Jewish
Education.
They have looked into 'Jews
125 Years Ago through the
American Jewish experience."
At the May 16 gathering, they
will explore a look at Israel
today through ''Israel Images."
Guidance will come from Jack
Levine, a volunteer who is
national vice-chairman and
volunteer for leadership
development for young adults.
Levine is a builder by profession
and resides in Miami.
These couples are the future
leadership of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale.
Young Jewish couples residing
in or near the Inverrary area are
invited. For further information,
call Kenneth Kent at the
Federation. 748-8400.
Abe Gittelson (facing group) leads the discussion
The original group who recently formed the
Young Leadership Division includes: (left to
right) Joyce and Mike Yarmuth, Buzzy and
Meryl Tabatchnick, Howard and Linda Gaines,
Burton Levinson (Judith Levinson not\
was out of town) and Max E. Buck,
Inverrary Chairman.
Awards presented at JX
Continued from Page 1
regular commitment to the
Education Diagnostic
Services program. She is
also on the Board of the
Women's Division of
Federation.
Alan Levy presently
serves as a Vice President
of the Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale
and 1985 UJA General
Campaign Co-chairman.
Levy heads the "Save
the Market'* program, a
new concept aimed at
bettering the circumstances
of Broward County and
State farmers. He serves on
the Board of Directors of
Landmark Bank, on the
Performing Arts Council of
Broward County in ad-
dition to being actively
involved in the Israel
Bonds campaign under the
leadership of Anita
Perlman. He, too, has
served as JCC Board
Member.
Following is the slate to
be elected during the
Installation ceremonies
June 2.
1985-86 BOARD OF
DIRECTORS PROPOSED
SLATE
OFFICERS.
President, Alvin Capp;
First Vice President, David
Schulman; Vice
Presidents: Joel Arm-
strong, Lydia Golden.
Allen Morris, Jeff
Streitfeld; Treasurer, Dr.
James Phillips; Assistant
Treasurer, Elliot Starman;
Secretary, Marsha Levy;
Assistant Secretary,
Florence Straus.
ONE YEAR
REMAINING OF A TWO-
YEARTERM:
Arthur Birken, Dr.
Wayne Bizer, Sol Brenner,
Elaine Cohn, Louise Feller,
Carey Fischer. Larry
Freilich, Henry Hyman, Hy
Kaplan, Hildreth Levin,
Ivy Levine, Sue Segaul,
Abram SOverman, Helene
Soref.
NOMINATED FOR A
TWO-YEAR TERM:
Alvera A. Gold, Jan
Atlas, Paul Bloomgarden,
Elizabeth Breier, Daniel
Cantor, Dr. Diana Coran,
Dr. Leon Fellman, Maria
Diplomatic Ik
Do Not Erase
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Meir Rosenne, Israel's
Ambassador to the United
States. declared here that
although Israel and Germany
have "normal relations" and
diplomatic ties, the Jewish
people have not forgotten the
horrors of the Holocaust.
"Accepting reparations (from
troopers are buried,
representative of laid1
don't expect me to talk a
issue." he told the wdiexd
But the Israeli envoy]
prompt in warning
resurgence of neo-Nansn|
anti-Semitism around thei
He charged the Arabi
United Nations and the
Union official, policy with I
Steven Feller
Frankel, Dorothy Har-
wood, Ruth Horowitz,
Rochelle Krakower, Ben
Marcus, Dr. Philip Mir-
melli, Dr. Harold
Rabin ovitz, Dr. Sheldon
Ross, Martin Sadkin, Jeri
Schnessel, Ted Sobo,
Nancy Weiser.
Germany) and establishing Union official policy in
diplomatic ties does not mean the l)nm(' instl??U)rs.0I
rehabilitation," Rosenne, a
Holocaust survivor, told more
than 400 people who gathered at
Alice Tully Hall at Lincoln
Center for a Holocaust memorial
evening. "We have a long
memory and we will alwa]
remember the Holocaust,"
said.
c
Rosenne. who appeared in the
Dialogue Forum Series, was
interviewed by Rabbi William
Herkowitz, founder and
moderator of the program.
Rosenne refused to answer any
questions regarding President
Reagan's planned visit to the
Bitburg cemetery in West
Germany where SS Nazi
Jewish Labor Committee
shocked by cemetery visit
OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE USPS 899420
FNCOK SHOCHCT
fSKwandPuMMw,
l'NM
Mqt#tdiMMHiiaiii.rta.
aUZANNf SHOCHCT
fMCMttWldNor
FtrwHaw.
POSTMASTER: Send i J
pojo. oiiira, mS*,n*. mioi
Ftione 74S-S400
F1M tNffi St.. Miami. Fla. 33112. Phon* 1-37I4SM
- ... f^^ A*.WNaA.AJPA.aidf PA
J-mf* FiertdWrt Dm MM QmiwIii Keetov* at TliiiriliiM ..m,i.
SUBSCS.FTrON SATES 2 ,Mir*P S0 Jei$h Federation of Greater Fort I aiiimUmH
jHwian Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale. Joel Be.nele.n, freelde.ll Joel TeHaa E.ar..i,M
O.reclor Gan Aber.. d.lor. Lor, G.naberg Aaa.aUM Editor MNWOaMaM MBM
&?* 5 2^' u"t? '** l*-"" ~ *ti55. a*fnTrnJ^rWan'S
Friday, May 10.1985
'lrneU
19 IYAR 5746
Number 19
The Jewish Labor Committee
statement: we are d-.piy
S2S*J9L* *ncsd in-
tention of President Reagmn to
visit a World War II dSrmw
ojdiars cemetsry following his
"fuaal to visit bschau durins;
his cental trip to GsnnanjT.
Such actions are Dot condudvs
to reconciliation, the President's
nnouncsd reason for these
dadaions. but instead will result
ai increased frustration and
nger among other groups:
Holocaust aurvrvora, victims of
* post heinous crime in
mankind history; Jews of all
nationa; other nationalities
ods and democratk ideologies'
who were also among the
millions of non-Jewish victims of
the concentration camps and gas
cfcfmbars; and the American and
Wi veterans of World War II
who fought and died in an effort
to Put an end to the Nazi terror.
Adniinistration'a decision is
faaensitive and inspt.
We urge ths Preskient to
"^" nia previously announced
wwons. We urge him to visit
Dachau ao that Jewish and other
victims of Nazism, are ap-
propriately rnamoriaHierl Ws
urge him not to visit a World
w*' II German military
cemetery. Reconciliation should
be with present day Germany,
not through the memorialiution
ot German soldiers who died in
upport of a regime, that, if it
bad won, would have dominated
a world of unimaginable horror.
anti-Semitism HenoteJl
Soviet Union was the
country in the world.
1964. which demanded I
UN pass a resolution
demninn Zionism.
Bfnai B'ril
opposes]
cemeter
visit
B'nai B'rith betev-|
reconciliation *'.
Germans is vahd. Buttft
take place in Dew
SS troops are buna
Scheduling
to a concentratioo camp'
tomutecTitkimofU><,
visit is an attempt to
moral balancmf act"
B'nai BTkh bsl*
to the
wrong
fought against
and to the tot
mffr
Jowaandnoo-JwL
,ad death at th wa
and his SS.
Itfaaleoirroi*t'>L
to, SS troop* ,
justing tham
babies they ourder*.
If the pr-^r
bolfc gestur-
the apint of
between our wo
would "Tar.*
pproprw"
available.


^y,MylQ,l^/Th^^ p>gt5
H*T6WD^^ celebratesttmhtezikaron and Yom Hatzmout

T:
On Friday, April 26, the
| Hebrew Day School of Fort
Lauderdale celebrated Israeli
Independence Day in a unique
way. The children from Kin-
dergarten through eighth grade
I took part in a special program
which commemorated Yom
Hazikaron and celebrated Yom
Hatzmout.
Yom Hazikaron, Memorial
Day, remembers the six wars in
which the Israelis fought. Time
is set aside to remember and
honor the dead and injured. The
children of the Day School
observed a minute's silence, as
does the entire nation in Israel,
for their Memorial Day ob-
servance. The children also had a
candle lighting service.
After the moving; Yom
Hazikaron service, the children
had a festive celebration of Yom
Hatzmout. This day marks the
37th anniversary of the birth of
the State of Israel. On this day,
the entire nation of Israel
celebrates its independence. The
children of the Hebrew Day
School performed songs, skits,
and dances. In addition, the
children performed a skit whose
theme was the gathering
together of all the Jews
dispersed throughout the world.
The children dressed up as
Yemenites, Russian immigrants,
Hassidic Jews, Israeli soldiers,
Sabras, and Kibbutzanics.
The Hebrew Day School is a
beneficiary agency of the Jewish
Federation ,of Greater Fort
Lauderdale.
w
l>
mating the celebration at the Hebrew Day
/, was the release of 250 balloons by the 260
'tnts who attend the school These blue and
white baloons were released in honor of Israel's
37th birthday.
fnai B'rith Raps Soviet Appearance At Ghetto Memorial
YUM!
IBUENOS AIRES -
TA) B'nai B'rith
lernational deplored the
arance in Buenos Aires
the notorious Soviet
n. David Dragunsky to
nmemorate the 1943
aw Ghetto uprising.
a statement issued here,
nuil Kaplan, president of
i B'rith Argentina, declared
: the visit by Dragunsky "la
|obscene move by his Kremlin
to discredit the
I Jewish aspiration for a
i in Israel, expressed
i Zionism."
AGUNSKY is a Soviet
"ith an undisputable
>ry record. However,
^ Mid, -He has always
"? to serve his Kremlin
KGB masters by
wing Jews and Zionism."
, [B'nai B'rith leader not* |
l^ragunsky associated with
^nt anti-Semites Uo
rcngKWs hatred r^rly
Pm attacks on Israel/"
**ic line, he added, is to
t0 link Zionism with
IA Diversified
|Jewish Quiz
ruu& RABB
JAVID W.GORDON
]Lm?cara ka^
' tunes?
in
*"* a famous Yiddish
* an/rv0 bec'me
k^&wcu* in the
^Wben
Hhit
Tem?? |?wh 'Wiple destroyed?
NUki the name of the
fc^ncan chew player
WM Delmoro Sch-
^ BibhcaJ Book i.
!5^s,ivaknto,u*
'Mi *" the meaning of
*
Eliier ben
^^ recent time.?
F,W liter
Nazism, "the enemy of all Jews
and humanity."
Kaplan traced Dragunaky's
anti-Jewish moves back to the
Stalin era, pointing out that just
before the Soviet leader died in
March, 1963, Dragunsky put his
name on a petition to pressure
Jews into leaving Russia and the
Ukraine for the isolation and
harsh climate of Siberia, All
other prominent Jews contacted
in the Soviet Union rejected this
effort, Kaplan said.
"DRAGUNSKYS appearance
in Argentina is a bold attack on
Israel and the Jewish people, the
vast majority of whom proudly
support the Jewish State," said
Kaplan. "It is a crude attempt to
drive a wedge between the only
democracy in the Middle Eeast
and one of the newest
democracies in the Western
Hemisphere, Argentina."
B'nai B'rith's Argentina
office, headed by Alfredo
Neuberger, director for South
America, serves as a key
regional center in Latin America.
PAC-MAN is a big macher with all the kids! So they II realty gobble up
PAC-MAN shaped pasta in spaghetti sauce with cheese flavor
It's delicious and it's packed with goodness From Chef Boy-ar-deel*
t nmuni iw iwM,iMM,Wf c >
Ws tough to make
the Supreme Court.
Raisin Bran
Every aspiring attorney needs a boost cl.mb.ng the ladder of success
Oneway you can help yours reach the top is by making sure he has
Post" Raisin Bran cereal each morning
As^abalancedbreakfastF^t-Rais^Branc^nr^ycKir
enhre temily get the kind of start that will help them thrcog^the busest
ST2 fnumfcous. satisfying combjnatKX. of wt^tesome
XeWheat and wheat bran flakes and detenus, chewy ra.s.ns
J*s*wsogood everyone will took forward toennymgrt.
course, hearsay evidence may net convince you
Ms? try a rjo of Peer* F^n Bran and judge f^^ ^ ^
%)
i msotffM HXMcoo*noN
Where keeping Kosher is a delicious tradition.


Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale / Friday, May 10,1986
Israel Independence Day Fun for Everyone
An estimated crowd of 5000
came to celebrate the 37th
anniversary of Yom Ha'atzmaut,
Israel Independence Day,
Sunday. April 28, on the JCC
campus!
A family festival for every age
group, JCC'8 16-acre campus on
Sunrise Blvd. was transformed
into a giant carnival holding
indoor and outdoor activities
such as Maccabeah games,
musical entertainment, carnival
games and rides, speakers, an
Israeli shopping "Shuk", Israeli
films, food and drink!
A highlight of the day was the
appearance of Israeli Consul
General Dorit Shavit, who has
been stationed in Miami since
1963. Mrs. Shavit spoke before a
"packed" house in the Center's
Soref Hall describing the
challenges of a multi-ethnic
society and how the Israeli
government welcomes the large
numbers of Ethiopian Jews who
have come to make themselves
"at home" in Israel. Now, Mrs.
Shavit said, after learning from
past experience in the earlier
years, the absorption process is
easier for everyone. After in-
doctrination in special ab-
sorption centers, Ethiopian Jews
today may settle anywhere they
choose to in their new country.
Although they come from a far
different culture, they show a
high expectancy of themselves
and should assimilate in good
time, Mrs. Shavit reported.
Also speaking to large groups
during the day were Rabbi
Josiah Darby, who discussed the
politics of Israel, and Efram
Shafrir, who told about the
differences between living in a
kibbutz and a Moahav.
CAJE of Greater Fort
Lauderdale's Jewish Federation,
cooperated with JCC Special
Events Committees to arrange
for the days' speakers and the
showing of Israeli films. Mrs.
Helen Weisberg, the
Administrator of CAJE's North
Broward Midraaha said, "I
found the "ruach" (the spirit) of
Israeli Independence Day very
exciting."
It seems that close to 5000
other celebrants agreed.
1*1 -*
JsKaci


Volunteers for Israel
i^j**^^ Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 7
[pinkee. the regional
r, stated that more
college students and
lop to the age of 66 have
I for volunteers for the
Lpam. He stated that
[of i new life experience
Iprking in the Israeli
IForces has finally been
I to the men and women
t the country.
also provides
|M"rried families the
L bring their children
the ages of 12 to 16 to
summer camp in Israel,
[parents spend a month
i volunteers. Children
i now work along with
llunteers live in army
! eat with the Israeli
I their mess hall, go on
tours and spend time on the
Sabbath with an Israeli family, a
kibbutz, a moahav (at no cost) or
a hotel (at their own expense), or
remain in camp.
An applicants only prequisite
is that they be in good health to
perform physical manual labor.
Volunteers must understand
that the program is strictly a
work program; that living
conditions are not similar to that
of a five star hotel. It is a
program to help the State of
Israel in its hour of need.
For information write to
Volunteers for Israel, 6601 W
Sunrise Blvd. Fort Lauderdale
FL. 33313 or call 305-792-6700
Monday, Tuesday, Thursday or
Friday between the hours for 1
and 4 pjn. All other times call
305-974-1984.
UJA creates Business
(Professional Women's Council
as New National Division
3RK, NY. As a
onse to community
|ir increased services
nition of the growing
I of Jewish working
the United Jewish
created a new
Ivision, the Business
Sessional Women's
named Robyn D.
of Denver its first
Alexander Grass,
Rational Chairman,
hment of the new
. irtment was the
J keg-range planning
pain UJA's Young
lUedership Cabinet,
' always included
men in its con-
[Gnus pointed out.
wt has long been
[tor the development
pMss and professional
|groups across the
i said, "as more and
munities have at-
P"doutand involve
I numbers of these
1" uncomfortable
in more traditional women's
groups.
"Today, most large and in-
termediate communities have B
and P groups," he continued,
"but m we prepare to move into
a decade in which the majority of
all Jewish women will be
working, these local groups will
increasingly require service and
consultation from a national
cadre of trained and experienced
lay leaders who can serve as role
models.
"The Business and
Professional Women's Council,
which will interface with and
serve this unique and expanding
community, is our recognition of
and response to those needs, and
in Robyn Berenstein, with her
wealth of experience, the Council
will have an excellent and ef-
fective first chairman."
Further information on the
UJA Business and Professional
Women's Council is available
from its Director. Vicki Agron,
at the UJA national office. (212)
757-1600, Ext. 283.
*
^CIPATE TRIP TO ISRAEL: Michael Krohn
Nbe*.it"UU8t *" of ** 10 Fort Lauderdale
?tfi-Si?te ""chavtr l> ch-v*{riimd
^Center tT,SmTh! P"*"** PO-ored by the
3**1 bv SL i ^, A*~* for J#wi-h Education,
i!1" Israel LfWU,h **' of Greater Fort
LNect Jl'* tesMprs will spend two weeka in
r *B1 beT*"1 C,tr th F"t Lauderdale Jewish
Ithe slKh,w'(a?*nied ^ Im* teens of their own
Aug fnis of 1"1 The trip departs to Israel on
"""fth,. !,'nl?,LA?cncy for Jewih Education are
federation.
Jewish Agency Update
JERUSALEM Unem-
ployment has become a major
short- and long-term problem in
Israel, but the Jewish Agency is
working hard to solve it.
The Jewish Agency is helping
limit unemployment by job
training and placement
programs for new immigrants
Youth Aliyah teenagers and
residents in distressed neigh-
borhoods. It aids moshavim in
economic difficulty and deser-
ving university students.
Now the agency's settlement
study center has developed a
tenyear plan that will help
Israel restructure its economy
and create jobs needed into the
-Hst century. The plan would
provide comprehensive economic
and social development focusing
on 13 development towns, but
radiating regionally to include
272 nearby kibbutzim and
moshavim. Development towns
include 10 percent of Israel's
population, but 40 percent of its
jobless.
Of the 13 towns, all have
Project Renewal neighborhoods,
including eight twinned to U.S.
Jewish communities. They are
Beth Shean (Los Angeles),
Kiryat Gat (Baltimore), Maalot
(Pennsylvania Cluster), Kiryat
Malachi (San Diego), Safad
(New Jersey cluster and
Oakland), Kiryat Shmona (San
Francisco and Richmond)
Shderot (Buffalo. Rochester and
Niagara Falls, New York) and
Beth Shemesh (Indiana).
The plan would cost $860
million over ten years with
Israel's national and local
governments bearing most of the
cost, including to finance in-
dustrial development. The
Jewish Agency would provide
$10 million each year, to provide
for vocational training, com-
munity and public facilities, and
water, gas, electricity and
transportation systems.
The project has been initiated
at Beth Shemes, 30 miles south-
west of here, but so far it has
been funded only by the local
regional council. The Israeli
government is reducing ex-
penditures this year to limit debt
growth and currency reserves
declines.
But American Jews can
support employment programs,
long-term development programs
such as the center's and critical
research such as at the center by
contributing now to the United
Jewish Appeal-Federation
Campaign.
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(914) 434-5151 ma/or credit cards honond


Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale / Friday, May 10,1986
Organizations
Community Calendar
Compiled by Lori Ginsberg,
Federation 7484400.
FRIDAY MAY 10
City of Hope-Plantation
Chapter: 11:46 a.m. Meeting.
Plantation Community Center,
6555 Palm Tree Rd. 792-8009.
Temple Kol And: 8:15 p.m.
Services to honor teachers and
aids of Religious School.
SATURDAY MAY 11
Children's Theatre of Lenderhill:
1 p.m. Production of
"Oklahoma." Castle Gardens
Condo. 4850 NW 22 Ct.. Also
May 12. Free of charge. 739-
3124.
Sunrise Lakes Condo Aaaoc.
Phase I: 7:30 p.m. Show
featuring Shenanigans, Dark)
Cassina and Gillian Grey.
Donation $4. 8100 Sunrise Lakes
Dr. N. 742-5150.
SUNDAY MAY 12
Temple Beth Israel, Deerfield
Beach-Sisterhood: 6 p.m. Gala
dinner dance for Mother's Day.
421-7060.
MONDAY MAY IS
Women's Division: 10:30 a.m.
Board meeting. Federation, 8358
W. Oakland Pk. Blvd. 748-8400.
Hadassah Bat Ami Tamarac
Chapter: Noon. Installation of
officers. Tribute to chapter's 5th
anniversary. Play: "Hadaasash
with an International Flavor."
Mini-lunch. Tamarac Jewish
Center. 9101 NW 57 St.
B'nai Brith Women-Cypress
Chase Chapter: Noon. May
festival and dosing meeting.
Lauderdale Lakes City Hall.
Women's Club of Castle: Noon.
Mother's Day program. A group
from Nova Univ. will entertain.
Castle Rec. Center.
B'nai Brith Pompaao Lodge: 3
p.m. Board of directors meeting.
Pompano Beach City Hall.
TUESDAY MAY 14
Deborah-Sunriee Chapter: 11
a.m. Mini-lunch and meeting.
Sunrise Lakes Phase One
Playhouse, 8100 Sunrise Lakes
Dr. N.
Pioneer Women Na'amat-
Tamara Chapter: Noon. Water
Bridge Rec., 1050 Del Lago Cir..
Sunrise.
B'nai B'rith Women-Ocean
Chapter: Noon. Meeting and
card party. Gait Ocean Mile
Hotel, 3200 Gait Ocean Dr., Fort
Lauderdale. 942-6009.
WEDNESDAY MAY 16
Hadaaaah-Pompano Golda Meir
Chapter: 12:30 p.m. Installation
meeting. Palm-Aire Social
Center. 974-6714.
Sunrise Jewish Center-
Sisterhood: Noon. Meeting.
Cartoonist Jerry Shaw of the
Miami Herald, will present
program. At Temple.
Temple Emanu-D Sisterhood
and Brotherhood: 6 p.m. Joint
installation of officers. Colony
West Country Club. 484-6562.
B'nai Brith Lauderdale Lakes
Lodge: 7:30 p.m. Meeting.
Slides of Israel to be shown.
Lauderdale Lakes City Hall.
4300 NW 36 St.
Temple O'hei B'nai Raphael-
Sisterhood: Noon. Meeting.
Harmonitones will entertain.
Broward Bank.
Hadassah-Oriole Scopns
Chapter: Noon. Meeting. Max
Rubin will present Jewish
history in prose. Cong. Beth
Hillel, 7638 Margate Blvd.
ORTTamariae Chapter: 6:30
p.m. Dinner and fashion show.
Inverrary Country Club. 973-
0909.
THURSDAY MAY 16
B'nai B'rith Women-Tamarac
Chapter: 11:30 a.m. Meeting.
Deputy Dan Levy will discuss
home security. Tamarac Jewish
Center, 9101 NW 57 St.
Hadaaaah liana Chapter: 12:30
p.m. Meeting. City Hall.
Temple Beth Israel-Siaterhood:
Noon. Installation of officers.
Samuel K. Miller will install
officers. Cantor Shabtai
Ackerman and Claire Kay will
entertain. Temple aanCtuary.
SATURDAY MAY 18
Children's Theater of Lauderhill:
11 a.m. Also May 26. Production
of "Oklahoma." Lauderhill
Community Center. 1176 NW 42
Way. 739-2037.
SUNDAY MAY 19
Temple Beth Am-Men's Club: 8
p.m. Show featuring Batalaika
Company. Donation 65, 16. 721-
2710 or 721-3609.
Temple Kol Ami: 9 a.m.-l p.m.
Registration for Religious
School. At Temple. 8200 Peters
Rd., Plantation.
Temple Kol Ami-Brotherhood:
8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Annual
blood drive. Free breakfast for
donors. Also at Temple.
Sunrise Jewish Singles (21-36): 2
p.m. Beach party at Quiet
Waters Psrk. 485-0217 or 741-
0295.
TUESDAY MAY 21
B'nai B'rith Women Lauderhill
Chapter: Noon. Meeting.
Fashion show. Castle Rec.
Center, 4780 NW 22 Ct.
Knights of Pythias-Margate
Lodge: 7:30 p.m. Meeting.
Catharine Young Margate
Library. 974-3854.
Hadaaaah N. Lauderdale Chai
Chapter: Noon. Sam Miller will
install new officers. N.
Lauderdale City Hall. 701 SW 71
Ave.
Hadaaaah -L'Chayim Plantation
Chapter: Noon. Installation of
officers and meeting. Dekke
Aud., 5701 Cypress Rd.,
Plantation. 473-6981.
Odd FeQows and Rebehaha
Social Club: 1 p.m. Meeting.
I00F Hall, 1461 N. Dixie Hwy.
564-5184.
WEDNESDAY MAY 22
Dade Broward Lupus Foun
datlon: 8 pm. Meeting. Parkway
Regional Medical Center, 160
NW 170 St., NMB.
ORT-Lauderdale West Chapter:
Noon. Meeting featuring
nutritionist Dr. Saul Shoobe.
Mini-lunch. Dekke Aud.. 6701
Cypress Rd.. Plantation. 473-
6338.
Women's Division-Young
Leadershp Development
Committee: 9:46 a.m. Morning
lecture and discussion featuring
Federation'8 director of planning
and community relations, Larry
Schuval. Home of Marcia
Steinfeld. 748-8400.
ORT-Woodmont Chapter: 10
a.m. Meeting. Installation of
officers and luncheon. Wood-
mont Country Club.
Jewish Family Service: Annual
meeting.
THURSDAY MAY 23
B'nai B'rith Pompano Lodge: 8
p.m. Meeting. Palm-Aire
Country Club, 561 S. Pompano
Pkwy.
Pioneer Women Na'amat-
Broward Council: 9:30 a.m.
Meeting. 1303 N. State Rd. 7.
979-3311.
B'nai B'rith Women-Bermuda
Club Chapter: 11:30 am Paid-
up membership luncheon.
Fashion show. Clubhouse.
Jewish Family Service
annual meeting May 22
Jewish Family Service of
Broward County will bold its
23rd Annual Meeting on
Wednesday, May 22. 1986 at 8
p.m. at the Jewish Federation of
South Broward, 2719 Hollywood
Blvd.. Hollywood.
Jewish Family Service
provides counseling for in-
dividuals, groups, families,
single parents, adolescents, and
a variety of offerings for senior
citizens. The agency also
sponsors a Medicare Information
Service, Family Life Education
programs. Information and
Referral, and a Resettlement
Program. Jewish Family Service
is a licensed adoption and foster
care agency. Offices are main-
tained at 4517 Hollywood
Boulevard, Hollywood, 3500
North State Road 7, Ft.
Lauderdale, and 180 West
Hillsboro Boulevard, Deerfield
Beach.
The Nominating Committee
will place the following names in
nomination for election to the
Board of Directors: Gladys
Daren, Judy Feldman, Jean
Rosenberg, Dr. George Lipton.
Howard Wacks. Debbie Hir
schorn, David Sommer, Rabbi
Elliott Skiddell. Dr. Linda
Benlolo. Peter Deutsch,
Charlotte Padek. Bobbie
Simonds, Jerome Gevirman,
Rabbi Richard Margohs, and
Philip Weisberg. The following
are board members whose terms
of office will continue: Joseph
Berkovits, Steven Hersh, Lino
Fineberg, Florence Straus, Israel
Resnikoff, Herb Tolpen. Rabbi
Bennett Greenspon, Reuben
Schneider, Ben Dantzker, Dr.
Robert Dolgow, Lee Dreiling,
Felice Prensky, Lynda Levin,
Merle Orlove, Bernice Goldstein,
and Dr. Steven Schacter. The
following have been proposed for
election as Officers: Dr. David
Sachs, President: Norman
Ostrau, 1st Vice President;
Steven Fayne, 2nd Vice
President, Elaine Pittell.
Treasurer: and Dee Hahn,
Secretary. Additional
nominations for membership on
the Board may be made by
submitting a petition to be filled
with the Chairman of the
Nominating Committee. Elaine
Pittell. Jewish Family Service,
4617 Hollywood Boulevard.
Hollywood. 33021, one week
prior to the Annual Meeting.
The Annual Meeting is open to
the general community.
Jewish Family Service of
Broward County is a financial
recipient of United Way of
Broward County. Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale, and the Jewish
Federation of South Broward.
HAD ASS AH
Pompaao Golda Meir Chapter
The following will be installed
as officers at the May 16
meeting at Palm-Aire Social
Center. Lee Rich will perform the
installation ceremony. Newly-
elected officers are: Leah Rose
and Evelyn Kaplan, presidium;
Zelda Isaacs, Anne Gilbert,
Mina Mervis and Marion
Render, vice presidents; Rhoda
Harnick, Lillian Alpert and
Sylvia Rosa, secretaries and
Doris Domnitz, treasurer.
HADASSAH
Blyma Margate Chapter
Esther Cannon, Hadassah
regional past-president, will
install the new officers at the
May 16 meeting to be held at
Congregation Beth Hillel of
Margate. The new slate is as
follows: Mildred Tell, president;
Flora Behelfer. Rae Radow,
Helen Niedelman, and Sylvia
Ziperson, vice presidents; Jean
Haren, Frieda Cohen and Lee
Lifshutz, secretaries, and Evelyn
Ingber, treasurer. Oscar
Goldstein will entertain at
meetintr.
mnSSaJMOK km*
TB5WSL
BOMOWAUHOm
AU Hooma wete"*" "rf^
Color TV aArfrfoereto/
Fulrf A* Conditioned
Strict* Dietary Uaaj
Music errfecteWmant
Social rroorama Oelae
poo,. Fr CrtaraM
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RabWnlcal Sopanrlalort
B^loarrtatsaholarh
, served e^Boelsa*!
$108
per person
dote occ
Conipmnerrtary Ice cream
MEMORIAL DAY
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2 FULL MEALS OAH.V
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HADA88AJ,
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Molly Lewis
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Hadassah, wiii
following officer, ,
the Lauderdale
dominium Auditor*
Oakland Park Blvd |
Jto^Katz ard Gain Ql
Presidents, Ann 21
Levne. Joseph^'
Anne Herman; Trem
J- Cohen; Serial
Slawsky, Fannie "
Anna Berg.
B'NAI BTUtJ
BonavntBv
Laura and Mitun
visiting in the UniJ
from Israel, will speakl
Are Product* of
Americans On A
Bonaventure's Mo
Breakfast, Sunday,
a.m. in the Boi
Center. 200 Boa
Boulevard, Fort Laud
The B'nai Brith
Bonaventure will
breakfast and honor |
tending mothers.
Chermak is president.
Kiamesha Lake. New York 12751
Telephone: 19141794-6900
Direct N.Y.C. Phone 12121924*1*.'
Hotel
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Surrounded by our 400 private acres,
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All Rooms AirConditionedTVsCapacity450(
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Proposed Jail term for Holocaust deniers
Friday, May 10,1986 / The Jewiah Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 9 j
i IJTA) Interior
. Karl Blecha proposed
-ent of up to one year in
for anyone who per-
or disseminates the
ritt lie" the claim that
caust never occurred.
L at a press conference
L. Austrian penal code
"E amended accordingly
t the same punishment
Ifcd to anyone who ap-
praises, minimizes or
the crimes committed
the Nazi regime in
waa the more effective.
He said that for many months,
teachers and school principals
have complained to police that
neo-Nazi propaganda was being
distributed outside of schools in
Vienna, Linz, Klagenfurt and
other cities. Although political
propaganda is prohibited on
school premises, the distribution
of leaflets outside the schools is
allowed under the law. He said
the propaganda is so cleverly
worded that the letter of the law
is not violated.
Chancellor Fred Sinowatz, may
soon come up with a draft bill.
But Justice minister Harold
Ofner, a member of the Freedom
Party, a coalition partner,
cannot be relied upon for sup-
port. According to the book.
The Extreme Right in
Austria," Ofner is listed among
those Austrians who have been
supportive of neo-Nazis.
Blecha said neo-Nazi activists
constitute a very small group in
Austria, numbering no more
ould also close loopholes
iaws which prevent
\m from bringing legal
against anti-Semitic
i said he raised the issue
ih community center
memorial gathering
j it will mark the
of a nationwide fight
rising neo-Nazi
in Austria.
ng to the minister, the
be waged on two
I- by the police and
education. He thought
i the long run. the latter
Because the police and the
courts are unable to act in such
cases, the penal code required
amendment. Blecha said. He
noted that the penal code
prohibits incitement against
churches, religions and
foreigners. But those Austrian
Jews who are not religious are
excluded from this protection. It
is one of the loopholes he wants
closed.
Blecha stressed that as
Interior Minister he can only
make proposals. The initiation of
legislation must be either by the
Minister of Justice or a
parliamentary faction. He said
the Socialist faction, headed by
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than 180-200. But he could not
estimate the number of sym-
pathizers or the amount of
financial and logistical support
they receive from abroad. He
said the West Germany
authorities are cooperating
closely with the Austrian
authorities in that area.
Blecha listed some of the
action his ministry has taken
against neo- Nazism in Austria in
recent years. He said that since
May, 1983, when the present
coalition government replaced
former Chancellor Bruno
Kreisky's Socialist regime, four
neo-Nazi organizations have
been dissolved, 10 neo-Nazi
meetings were banned, 18 non-
Austrian neo-Nazis have been
declared personae non gratae in
Austria and 175 were reported to
district attorneys.
Blecha also referred to the
large neo-Nazi trial last year
which ended with prison sen-
tences for all of the accused,
although several of the sentences
were suspended.
Give Your Recipes
The Gulden's Taste
CIEAM OF UU LI FLOW E R
1 head cauliflower, broken
into florets
V* cup butter or margarine.
melted
V* cup chopped celery
'/> cup chopped onion
V* cup flour
1 quart vegetable broth
SOUP
'/ cup shredded Chedder
Cheese
H teaspoon ground black
pepper
'/teaspoon ground
nutmeg
3 tablespoons Guldens
Spicy Brown Mustard
1 cup heavy cream
Steam cauliflower, set aside a tew florets as a garnish
Puree cauliflower in rood processor, blender or tood mill
Saute celery and onion in butter Stir in Hour Over medium
heat add broth, cheese, pepper and nutmeg Stirring con-
stantly, bring to a boil Stir in pureed cauliflower Remove
from heat, stir in mustard If a smoother consistency is
desired, reprocess Add cream, stir to warm over low
heat Garnish before serving
Makes 6-8 servings
NUTTY CAB1ACE SALAD
V/i cups mayonnaise
'/cup 1 tablespoon Gulden's
Spicy Brown Mustard
2 tablespoons lemon |uice
2 apples, cored and chopped
2 small heads shredded red
cabbage
Vi cup chopped walnuts
'/! cup chopped celery
Combine mayonnaise
and mustard set aside
Mix together lemon
luce and apples
Six in remaining
ingredients
including
the mustard
nurture
Makes 6-8
servings
-GULDENS
widens mu^;;
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Page 10 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Friday, May 10,1986
Frank and Edythe Morgano
Jewish War Veterans
Ladies Auxiliary
A testimonial luncheon was held recently at Justins, by the
Wm. Kretchman Auxiliary Jewish War Veterans, who honored
Past President Edythe Morgano, of the Broward-Palm Beach
County Council. Edythe is member of No. 730 for the past 10
years, and was elected as President of the County to serve the
term of 1984-85. Members of the Department of Florida JWV
and County Officers were on hand to offer congratulations.
There were also members of the National Ladies Auxiliary there
to give Edythe congratulations. She was attended by her
husband Prank and her grandson Bradley Berk, who was
visiting them from Michigan.
Peres favors
Israel's
participation in
'Star Wars'
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Premier Shimon Peres said that
he personally was
"unequivocally in favor" of a
positive response to the Reagan
Administration's invitation to
Israel to participate in research
for the Strategic Defense
Initiative 1SDI). popularly
known as "Star Wars."
Peres told the Knesset's
Foreign Affairs and Security
Committee that the SDI
program signified a scientific
revolution and it was clearly in
Israel's interest to be involved in
the technology from the outset.
Peres' remarks to the Knesset
committee did not constitute a
formal reply to the invitation
U.S. Defense Secretary Casper
Weinberger extended to Defense
Minister Yitzhak Rabin in
Washington last month. The
formal response is still being
drafted by Israeli experts and
must be approved by the
Cabinet before it is conveyed to
Washington
But given the enthusiasm of
Pi'res and Rabin for the project,
there seems little doubt that
Israel will accept the invitation.
It was also extended to
America's NATO allies, Japan
and Australia.
B'nai B'not Mitzvah
THE ISRAELI FRIENDSHIP CARAVAN.
composed of 10 young, talented Israelis,
presented a program of lively song, dance and
folklore recently at the Jewish Community
t 'enter. The members of the Caravan act as good
will ambassador's entertaining around the U.S.
prior to their tour of duty in the Israeli army.
Broward Cantors attend
annual convention
Cantors Shabtai Ackerman of
Temple Beth Israel, Deerfield
Beach, Chairman of the
Southeast Region; Maurice Neu
of Temple Beth Israel. Fort
Lauderdale, Treasurer; Irving
Grossman of Temple Beth Am,
Margate; Henry Belasco of
Sunrise and Morris Levinson of
Deerfield participated in the 38th
annual convention of the Cantors
Assembly, of which they are
members. The four-day meeting
took place from Sunday. May 5
to Thursday, May 9 at
Grossinger's, New York.
Some 800 cantors and leaders
of Conservative synagogues took
part in the five-day meeting.
With a membership of more
than 400 cantors who hold full-
time pulpits in the United States
and Canada, the Cantors
Assembly is the world's largest
association of *Hazzanim.
Canton chant the liturgy that
1947.
has
stan-
forms me heart of Jewish
congregational worship and work
closely with young persons in
the temple's pastoral and
educational activities.
Since its formation in
the Cantors Assembly
sought to maintain high .
dards for cantors and to preserve
and enhance the heritage of
Jewish liturgical music through
its numerous publications and
library of cantonal selections.
The Assembly publishes "The
Journal of Synagogue Musk."
Music permeated the con-
vention, which featured a variety
of innovative uses of music,
language, drama and other
means of communication to
heighten spirituality, in-
trospection and mediation. The
convention also addressed itself
to the welfare of cantors, the role
of their spouses and other issues
of concern to hozzanim.
a 6
Candlelighting Times
May 10 -7:39 p.m.
May 17 -7:42 p.m.
May 24 7:46 p.m.
May 31-7:60 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH TORAH
The Bar Mitzvah of Michael
Mordis, son of Irene and Edward
Mordis, will be celebrated at the
Saturday May 11 service at
Temple Beth Torah, Tamarac.
The B'nai Mitzvah of Teron
Cohen, son of Pat and Yeheil
Cohen, and Neal Gilbert, son of
Lauren Gilbert, will be
celebrated at the Saturday May
18 service at Beth Torah.
On Thursday May 23, Seth
Co well, son of Janice Cowell, will
celebrate his Bar Mitzvah.
TEMPLE EMANU EL
Greg Wohrle, son of Barbara
and Gary Wohrle, will be called
to the Torah in honor of his Bar
Mitzvah at the Saturday May 25
service at Temple Emanu-El,
Fort Lauderdale.
Robert Friedman, son of
Barbara and Stanley R.
Friedman, will celebrate his Bar
Mitzvah at the Saturday May 18
service at Emanu-El.
TEMPLE BETH ORR
Rebecca Bishop, daughter of
J. Thomas Bishop, will celebrate
her Bat Mitzvah at the Saturday
morning May 11 service at
Temple Beth Orr, Coral Springs.
The B'nai Mitzvah of Jocelyn
Meisels, daughter of Teresa
Meiaels. and W,
schbaum. son of Mi
feW the ^uZ
May 18 service at b3
TEMPLE KOL
Adam Feber, *.
and Stuart FeineT
**""*' daughter
Borger. will celebs
Mitzvah at the
morning May n
Temple Kol Ami.
Stephanie Gwdoa,
Beth and Michael (
celebrate her Bat Mitx
Friday night May 17
Temple Kol Ami.
At the follows
service, Sum
daughter of Helene
Silverman, and Jeta
of Tina and Irwio
celebrate their Bnii_
TEMPLE BETH
Debra Rodlrin,
Ricki and Larry n
become a Bat Mitnnk
at the Friday nigh
service at Temple
Margate,
The Bar Mitnah
Feather, son of
Lawrence Feather, i
place at the Saturday
service at Beth Am.
and
COMSIRVATIVE
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER (721 -76*31. 8101 NW 57th St,
Scrvleei Sunday through Friday 8 SO a.m., S p.m. Late Frtdsji
p.m Saturday 8:46 am. 5 p.m. Rabbi Kurt F. SIM*. AwUVfl
Nathan Zoiondek. Canter P. Hlllel Brtimmor.
TEMPLE BETH AM (974 MOO). 7306 Royal Falm Blvd.
Services: Monday through Friday 8: JO am 5 p.m.. Friday Mi
p.m.. Saturday 9 a.m.. 5 p.m.; Sunday 8 a.m.. 5 pm. Babki Pa
Rabbi C mtrltua, Or. Solomon Oeld. Cantor Irv lug Grossman
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL (743-4010), 7100 W Oakland Part Bird
33313 Sorvlcoa: Monday through Thuraday 8 am 5:0pm Frl*|l
5 p.m. 8 p.m.. Saturday 8:48 a.m.; Sunday 9 am 5:30 pmtaUlP
Labowift, Cantor Maurice Nan.
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL OP DEERFIELD BEACH iIB-MI,
Century Blvd.. Daertloid Baach 88441 Services: Sundaythrough!
a.m ,5 pm. Friday late eervtce 8 p m Saturday 1:45 am. aats|
lighting time Rabbi Jeaee* Langnar, Cantor Shabtai Ackenaae.
TEMPLE B'NAI MOSME (942-6380., 1434 SE Strd. St. Pomps|
33080 Service*: Friday 8 p.m. Rabbi Morris A. Skep.
I TEMPLE SHA'ARAY TZBDBK (741-03961. 40M Pins uiandM.
SS321 Services: Sunday through Friday 8am ,5p.m.: Lai*Frldsjt
p.m Saturday 8 46 a.m.. 6:80 p.m. Rabbi Howard 8. Eaattal
MarckML
TEMPLE SHOLOM (94244101. 183 SE 11 Ave ^mlno***J
vice*: Monday through Friday 8:45 am evenings Monday in
eday at 6 p.m., Friday evening at 8. Saturday and Sunday N
Samuel April Cantor Samuel Renter.
CONGREGATION BETH HILLBL OP MARGATE. |6M{*"_
Blvd., Margate 38063 Services: Sunday UwhFrtd,jVi ,a*ll
Late Friday eervtce 8 p.m. Saturday 8:46 am.
Matinor. Cantor Joel Cohen
HEBREW CONGREGATION OF LAUDERHILL '"*"':?,!
Av., LauderhUl 88813. Services: Sunday through Fridays-
pm Saturday 8:46am Rabbi Israel Halpern
NORTH I.At DERDALE HEBREW CONGREGATION: iTJJ
2722) Service*; at Banyon Lake* Condo clul*"f-, j
Tamarac. Friday atSp.m Saturdays 46a m O
ORTHODOX
TEMPLE OHEL B'NAI RAPHAEL (738-76841. 4351 W. ^f
Lauderdale Lake* 88818. SarvK:**: Sunday through Thursday
Friday 8 am. 5pm .Saturday 8.46am, 5 pm
SYNAGOGUE OP INVBRRARY CHABAD 'J*"?',?,,J
coin Part Weat. Sunrtae 88821 Sorvieta: Sunday mrouf" r ,
pm.. Saturday a.m.. S:J8 p.m. Study groups JJ*; *""
serv.ee., Woman. Tuesdays 6 pm Rabbi Aron L.ebermae
YOONO ISRAEL OP DEERFIELD BEACH .421 ^'^*|,
Blvd.. Deerfield Beach 88441. Service*: Sunday UirougBr
sundown Saturday 8:46 a.m. and eundown Caater I
v1>"*SPRABL SYNAGOGUE OF HOLLVW0OI>-F0TJJMjJ
(68 7877). 82*1 SUrllng Rd.. Fort Lauderdak su ^^1
through Friday 7 30 a.m.. and sundown; Saturday.
8am .eundown Rabbi Edward Davit.
CONGREGATION MIODAL OAVID (7J6-86MI. 8878 tf
Tamarac Services: Daily 8 a.m.; mlncha 6 Pm \~r0Zttt:
[5:16 pm Rabbi Chains Schneider CanoreeaW** P
Fleischer RECONSTRUCTIONS
RAMAT SHALOM (473-3600), 11801 W. BrowaraJJIj*
Barvlooa: Friday 8:16 p.m.; Saturday. lOa.m
"^ **. REFORM
TEMPLE BETH ORR (768-8382). 3161 River** Dr. *. Lift]
Sawvteaa: Friday 6 p.m.; Saturday 10 am. "
Nancy Hastamaa. isja-iaTJ1-1
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Friday, May 10,1985/ The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Pae 1 i
says Jewish identity survives freedom as well as adversity
\. Mass The
gnce in America
Jewish identity
freedom as well as
wys Brandos
historian whose
Lblished book traces
Europe and
i of Jacob, Hands of
American Life
Stephen J.
vs how the Jewish
identities have
leaving a clear
nce that ought to
doubts about the
American Jewish
j renew itself,
cal orientation of
sts a people that
identity, even as
is transformed in
can experience,"
| in an interview.
I no longer like our
Bt we still differ from
a collection of 14
Whitfield, traces and
, Jewish experience
in America and
in Europe and
"lays out a hopeful case for the
capacity of the Jewish people to
survive freedom as well as
adversity," Whitfield said.
"Jews have proved their
capacity, in spite of horrible
tragedies, to survive per-
secution," he said, but doubts
have been raised about the
ability of Jewish identity to
survive assimilation in a
hospitable society.
"Despite the Jewish ascent
into the more comfortable
classes, Jews are the only ethnic-
religious group that votes in
ways that don't correlate with
economic status," Whitfield
said.
"It's axiomatic that the higher
the economic status, the more
likely the person will vote
Republican. But Jews have a
predisposition for liberalism,
which seems to have something
to do with historical memory
a sense of somehow feeling
vulnerable and beleaguered and
identifying with others who are
oppressed."
Another example used by
Whitfield is humor. Jews are less
than three percent of the
inounces program to assist
Ethiopian Jews in Israel
i National Fund of
assist in the ab-
Ethinpian Jews in
nounced Charlotte
sident of the JNF,
responsible for af-
nd land reclamation
reported that the
provide a major
employment for
in JNF parks,
road building
oughout Israel. In
| playgrounds and
recreational
be constructed in
where Ethiopians
Ion her return from
f she met with Moshe
I chairman of Keren
Lelsrael. Mrs.
i announced that a
"ill be established
to this inspiring
m community."
Payment plan will
bpian Jews, most of
killed, their first
ne self-supporting
[country. It will also
transition from a
ly of life to a
i society. Working
foresters and
|y fill be trained
PUtta equipment
used in JNF's
[Woresution, rural
,ti00' and forest
[Programs.
"** that the
P'" offering
newcomers an economic foothold
in Israel resembles one of the
proudest chapters in JNF's 84-
year history. In the years im-
mediately following Israel's
independence, when nearly a
million Jews driven out of Arab
countries were absorbed by
Israel, JNF became the coun-
try's primary employer.
The JNF undertaking to
construct parks and playgrounds
is designed to meet the special
needs of the Ethiopians, who
have large families and are used
to spending much of their time
outdoors. These facilities will be
concentrated in two development
areas, at Hupper near Acre, and
at Mitspe Hoe hay a in the
Galilee, where many Ethiopian
Jews have settled. The
redesigned environment will
enable the immigrants to settle
into more comfortable
surroundings than those offered
at other absorption towns.
In the coming months,
Jacobson reported, a site will be
selected near Jerusalem for a
forest of 10,000 trees to be
planted in tribute to the
Ethiopian Jewish community.
"Their fortitude and spirit,
through almost 3,000 years of
isolation from the mainstream of
Jewish life," declared Mrs.
Jacobson, "is an inspiration to
us all." "What better way to
express our admiration and our
hopes for their future in the
homeland to which they have
been restored than to dedicate a
forest in their honor."
?'
American population, but they
provide more than 80 percent of
the nation's professional
comedians, he said, and part of
his book analyzes the role of
comedy in Jewish life.
"Humor is perhaps the key
way in which Jews seek to
confront and absorb the in-
congruities of being both a hated
people and a chosen people,"
said Whitfield.
Other parts of the book show
how fully at ease Jews now are
in America, and one section, on
Southern Jews, "is an effort to
show how fully acculturated
Jews have become in a region
that one would have thought
historically would not be
hospitable to a non-Protestant
minority," Whitfield said.
"The South is the most
thoroughly Protestant part of
the Western Hemisphere and
also, historically, the most
racially and religiously in-
tolerant. Yet Southern Jews
have become very accepted and
have found the South highly
congenial."
This section of the book is
presented as a case study of the
degree to which Jews have taken
on the identity of Esau, who in
Jewish tradition represents the
ancestor of Gentiles. Jacob is
one of the patriarchs of the
Jewish people, and as the title
suggests, he represents the
enduring Jewish identity in
Whitfield s presentation.
The book, said Whitfield,
minimizes the importance of
anti-Semitism in contemporary
America.
"It studies Jewish life within
rather than forms of intolerance
that take place without. Jewish
life is based on an internal
dynamic; it's not simply a shield
to ward off intolerance."
libraries offer free programs
At West Regional Branch, 8601
W. Broward Blvd., Plantation.
"Communicating with
Grandchildren and their
Parents," a lecture by Dorothy
Strudwick, of the Family Service
Agency, will be presented at 2
p.m. Wednesdays May 15, 22
and 29.
At Sunrise Branch, 6600 Sunset
Strip, Sunrise.
"The Golden Age of
Operetta," a concert of recorded
musics, will be presented by
Murray Ferguson at 2 p.m.
Friday May 17.
At Margate Catherine Young
Branch, 5810 Park Dr., Margate.
"Defeating Strokes," a lecture
by Elliott Shernoff, will be
presented at 1 p.m. Wednesday
May 15.
A calligraphy demonstration
will be presented by Pat Jarvis
at 1:30 p.m. Tuesday May 14.
Diversified Quiz
Answers
1- Yes. Book of II Kings 9:30
records that "Jezebel painted her
eyes.
2- Maurice Schwartz.
3- The year 70 CE by the
Romans.
4- Samuel Reshevsky.
5- Critic, Poet and short story
Writer.
6- The Book of Ruth.
7- Magen David Adorn (Red).
8- Mifleget Poale Eretz Yisrael
(Israel Worker's Party) The
present Labor Party in Israel.
9- A dedicated Hebraist who
revived Hebrew as a living
language. Robert St. John's
"Tongue of the Prophets" is a
stirring biography about him.
10- Mike Jacobs.
Senate Deadlocked Over
Genocide Pact 'Conditions'
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) The Senate
Foreign Relations Com-
mittee remains deadlocked
over a "package of con-
ditions" demanded by
conservatives for
ratification of the in-
ternational convention
against genocide which the
United States signed 36
years ago.
Supporters of ratification of
the document as it stands made
it clear that they would vote
against it on the Senate floor if
the conditions, which they feel
water down the spirit and
concept of the anti-genocide
pact, are adopted.
CONSERVATIVES, who
express concern that the treaty
would compromise U.S.
sovereignty, indicated that
without the conditions, there
would be stronger opposition to
ratification than there was when
the convention failed on the
Senate floor last fall.
The condition most vigorously
demanded by conservatives,
notably Sen. Jesse Helms (R.,
N.C.), would make jurisdiction of
the World Court in cases of
alleged or attepted genocide
contingent on U.S. consent when
the U.S. is a party to the
dispute.
Another condition would bar
submission of cases involving
the U.S. to a "Penal Tribunal,"
which is mentioned in the
convention but which does not
now exist, unless a separate
treaty is concluded for that
purpose.
THE REAGAN
Administration has endorsed
ratification in principle, with
certain changes of language. The
package of conditions was
strongly supported by Sen.
Richard Lugar (R., Ind.l, the
committee chairman, who
warned that the "concerns" of
conservatives "have bean suf-
ficient to block ratification of the
convention for 36 years" and "if
thev are not addressed they will
be sufficient to block ratification
during this Congress as well."
But Sen. Charles Mathias (R.,
Md.l said he would not go along
with the limitation of the
jurisdiction of the World Court
even if it meant a filibuster on
the Senate floor. He said he
would oppose the conditions "on
principle. '
Sen. Christopher Dodd (D.,
Conn.) said he would try to find
a compromise to end the
deadlock. But it became clear
from the deliberations that there
could be no compromise on the
World Court issue that would
satisfy both Dodd and Helms.
HELMS REPEATED a
suggestion he made at previous
hearings that Israel could be
victimized by exploitation of the
World Court under the treaty.
Addressing himself "to our
Jewish friends" who have
lobbied strongly for ratification,
Helms suggested "that one of
the first nations to be hauled
before the international court is
going to be the State of Israel."
dje tl"E THEME at the April 16 matting of Sunrise
,0 y went ooch to the good old days by attending
"yfora *"" adm*" The "Candy Butchers"
* CknJrnny and ** cream for 10 cent: The feature
a Fe'\?nd/ac** Coan "Th* Kid," wkich
H\ ki Cat cartoon. From left to right are:
k*>WU.r,,Pu*' Lou Kttniek. Nat Goldman, Nat
* Worry Wade and Irving Weisinger.
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In time oi illness surgery or
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Page 12 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale / Friday, May 10,1986
Consumer Tips
If you just assume it's silk
and put it back on the rack, look
gain- And, this time read the
label. These days, that "silk"
blouse may not be silk at all.
Believe it or not it could be
polyester.
Silky polyesters are building a
loyal following among working
women who adore the look and
feel of a soft, sensuous blouse or
dress, but who want fabrics
practical enough to wear every
day, announced the Broward
County Cooperative Extension
Agency.
The new silk-like polyesters
combine the rich appearance and
luxurious feeling of pure silk
with many practical "plusses."
They can be rinsed out, hung to
dry overnight, and worn with
little or no ironing eliminating
sky-high dry-cleaning bills. And.
there's no problem with
wrinkling, water-spotting, or
damaging from anu-perspirant.
Best of all, a well-made garment
of silky polyester can cost half as
much as a silk blouse of equal
workmanship.
Many leading designers
known for their use of quality
fabrics have introduced lines of
separatee and drssein in silky
polyester crepe de chine, a good
year-round fabric that is suitable
for office or evening wear. You'll
find the new silky polyesters in
sleepwear. shirts, blouses, active
sportswear, and loungewear.
You'll also find comfort in these
items because the new polyester
has cotton-like properties. It
"breathes" and absorbs moisture
as do natural fibers, while of-
fering the easy care of man-made
fibers.
The secret behind the new
polyesters' super-silrinsss is
advanced technology. The
manufacturers of polyester fibers
have found a way to produce
yams of ultra-fine alaSss
similar to the sin of silk
fibments and to engineer the
yarns so they reflect light with
the rich, subtle luster for which
silk has always been prized.
M>bi cites Jewish law on self-defense on Goetz' behalf
SAN FRANCISCO (JTA) -
An Orthodox rabbi has con-
tended that the subway shooting
by Bernard Goetz of four young
black youths was justified by
halacha on the principle of self-
defe
The result pleases both the
hand and the eye, even when a
silk blouse is compared aide by
side to a polyester one. In many
cases, the only way to tell which
garment is silk or polyester is to
read the fiber content label.
Ever wonder why some gelatin
salads and desserts say, "Hold
the fresh pineapple?" According
to Broward County Cooperative
Extension Agency, it's all
because of the enzyme,
bromelain, which breaks down
protein in a manner to our own
digestive process.
Likewise, because of
bromelain, cottage cheese, sour
cream and other dairy products
should be mixed with fresh
pineapple just before serving to
keep their consistency stable.
And. if you're stirring up meat
and poultry salads, bold the
fresh pineapple untill about 30
minutes before serving to keep
the meat from becoming mush.
However, the enzyme's ability to
break down protein makes it
useful as a marinade to help
tenderize less tender cuts of
meat.
If you buy a fresh pineapple at
the Supermarket, store it at
home the way you found it in the
store. Pineapples develop dark
spots from changes in tem-
perature. So if yours was chilled
when you got it at the grocery
store, keep it chilled at home,
concludes the Home Economist.
GOVERNMENT HOMES
from SI (U repair). Also
delinquent tax property.
Call 1-805-687-6000 Ext.
GH-4349 for information.
Rabbi Pinchas Lipner,
executive director of the Hebrew
Academy, presented that
argument during a seminar on
the Torah's interpretation of self-
defense which turned into a
heated debate over the
justification of the shootings by
Goetz, according to the Northern
California Jewish Bulletin. The
seminar was sponsored by the
Academy's Institute for Jewish
Law.
Lipner summarized a story
from Jewish sacred lore in-
volving the rape of Jacob's
daughter. In summary, he told
the seminar, if a Jew feels en-
dangered, he has the right to
defend himself by any means.
Goetz has been indicted by a
New York grand jury on charges
of attempted murder of the four
youths who had approached him
with a request that he give them
some money. He was described
in the report as a "half-Jew."
The fact that Goetz was white
and the four youths black
became a crucial element in the
discussion. Lipner claimed at one
point that because of the poverty
and degradation at the core of
life for blacks in America, they
do not value their lives as much
as do whites. He contended that
he would therefore, had he been
in Goetz' position, feel more
threatened by blacks than by
whites.
Lipner presented Maimonides'
interpretation of the rape of
Jacob's daughter. When that
happened, the father of the
rapist tried to make a pact with
Jacob.
However, Lipner indicated
that Jacob's sons, wanting
justice, killed not only the rapist
but everyone in the rapist's
village. Lipner said Maimonides
held this was justified because
not only was the rapist guilty
but also all who saw the crime
and did nothing to prevent it
were guilty. Lipner used that
argument to declare that
sometimes "a Jew must think of
survival first."
Richard Jaeger, a seminar
participant, asked Lipner
whether Jewish Law would allow
for such "extreme" self-defense
if the men who approached
Goetz had been white and well-
dressed.
The rabbi relied, absolutely."
but he admitted he would have
been more frightened if he had
been approached by blacks. He
stressed "I am not a racist. I
want to make that clear. I accept
the Falashas. I don't believe in
racism."
Lipner aaid the present
lawlessness in America rested on
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