The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 3, no. 7 (Apr. 5, 1974)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 9, 1976 called v.4, no. 27 but constitutes v.5, no. 1; issue for July 7, 1989 called v.18, no. 11 but constitutes v.18, no. 13.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44570954
lccn - sn 00229545
ocm44570954
System ID:
AA00014312:00291

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Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward


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Full Text
WOMEN'S DIVISION
ACTIVITIES
UPCOMING
UJA EVENTS
Pg 3
ie Jewish FL<
AIPAC'S DINE
INTERVIEWED
Page 6

* :
HAN
OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE
.14- Number 16
Fort Lauderdale, Florida Friday, Apr! 12,1986
I'rki1 t"> Cents
Yom Hashoa observance April 17 at Beth Am
accordance with the
ig of the Israeli
(set. the Israel
nent, the 27th day of
lonthof Nisan, which
this year comes out on Holocaust.
Thursday, April 18, is
annually commemorated as
Yom Hashoa, the day of
remembering the
IISSING:
lOUR PLEDGE
is the time for some 6,328 former contributors
Dm more than 28,791 others who have made a
tment to the 1985 United Jewish Appeal
of the Jewish Federation of Greater Fort
rdale.
ough the hard work and dedication of the
fnds of volunteers and staff members of the
ration, the campaign is approaching the $6.5
on mark.
Dt more money is needed to meet the allocations
d to the United Jewish Appeal, Operation
the Joint Distribution Committee and
ous Jewish philanthropic and service agencies
land abroad, and to the many programs provided
[the Jewish Federation and its beneficiary
cies.
response of the outstanding former con-
ptors is needed to bring in the additional funds.
k additional dollars that come from those
ping" former contributors can help. And
jwgh the 1985 campaign is in reach of its goal,
pore is needed.
6you one of the outstanding contributors? Have
[pledged yet? Call the Federation today at 748-
Become a partner for life.'
In Greater Fort
Lauderdale, the official
Yom Hashoa service of
commemoration will take
place at Temple Beth Am,
7205 Royal Palm Blvd.,
Margate, on Wednesday
evening, April 17 at 7 pjn.
The service, co-sponsored
by the Holocaust Survivors
of South Florida, the
Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale,
Temple Beth Am, and
B'nai B'rith has become an
annual event in the com-
munity. This year's
program will include a
procession of children
bearing candles, a candle-
lighting ceremony at which
six lights in com-
memoration of the six
million will be lit. Each
candle will be lit by a
survivor who was liberated
from a concentration camp.
A member of the second
generation and the third
generation of survivors wilf
accompany the survivor
and the candles will be lit in
Continued on Page 4
John Loftus
Federation/UJA campaign
approaches $5.5 million mark
The 1985 Jewish
Federation-United Jewish
Appeal campaign is ap-
proaching the $5.5 million
mark, according to Brian
Sherr, 1985 UJA general
campaign chairman.
"The community has
responded very generously
thus far, but we must ready
ourselves for one final push
towards our goal," he said.
With only a few func-
tions left on the campaign
calender, the majority of
outstanding money will try
to be cleaned op by
volunteers who will be
coming to the Federation to
make phone calls, Sherr
said.
"We hope that everyone
who is called, will respond
generously," stated Alan
Levy, campaign co-
chairman. "So many
Jewish people need our help
and our support," he ad-
ded.
The remaining functions
are as follows: Sunrise
Governor Graham sparks AIPAC workshop
*'Bob Graham
F ^e American
Public Affairs
Nee (AIPAC!
J held Sunday,
L31 the Marriott
["Keynote speaker,
Ed u- Graha*
7* h's recent
[ "rael and how
^community of
mda must become
m lhe political
-77 process
an? the TOle 3
Gri Poetics,"
,Ud,eo;<* about S
f Jsrael to the
lO., Graham
'f^el s strength
,* <** in K
^erican Israel
^Committee is
.; American
1 "Mistered to
** on behalf of
1 c,se U.S.-
Israel relationship. In
addition to strengthening
U.S.-Israel relations,
AIPAC works to prevent
sales of sophisticated
American weaponry to
hostile regimes in the
region which refuse to
participate in the peace
process.
The day-long workshop
was comprised of three
sessions: "Nuts and Bolts
of Political Campaigns:
How to get Involved,"
"The Campaign to
Discredit Israel: How to
Respond," and "Com-
munity Action: How to
Lobby."
Following the workshops
Senator Paula Hawkins (R-
FL); Thomas Dine,
Executive Director
AIPAC; and Represen-
tative Lawrence Smith (D-
FL) addressed the group.
Serving as Chairman was
Herbert Katz, Regional
Chairman, AIPAC and as
Prom-am Chairs; Martin
Lipnack and Elaine Pittell. 444 North Capitol Street,
N.W., Suite 412,
For additional in- Washington, D.C. 20001,
formation write to AIPAC. <202> 638-2256.
Lakes Phase IV will hold a
Special Gifts cocktail party
at 8 p.m. Sunday April 28
in the home of Mr. and Mrs.
Abraham A. Levin. Guest
speaker will be Dr. Gideon
Peleg. Chairman is Leo
Weiss man. A minimum
commitment of $250 is
required for attendance.
Stephen and Julie LeVine
will host a cocktail party in
their Harbour Beach home
at 5 p.m. Sunday April 21.
Dr. Peleg will speak here
also. Steven Lew in serves
as event chairman. Dr.
Roger and Linda Stewart
will host a UJA cocktail
party on Sunday April 28 in
their Sunrise Key home.
John Streng serves as
Ocean chairman, over-
seeing both functions.
Pictured (above) addressing the recent AIPAC Workshop, is Florida
Governor Bob Graham, as program chairman Martin Lipnack looks
on Lipnack is Chairman of the Jewish Federation's Government
rifairx Committee.


Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale / Friday, April 12, 1986
CRC, Holocaust Survivors urge U.S.-Israel FT A Accord headed
action be taken against Mengele tQward Congressional approval
chard Entin. chairman of the IN.C.I. Sen Charles Mathias ~ wa|
Richard Entin, chairman of the
Community Relations Committee
of the Jewish Federation, and the
Holocaust Survivors of South
Florida, have joined together to
urge the public to write letters to
the Senators who serve on the
Foreign Relations Committee,
regarding Resolution 14, which
was introduced in Congress on
Feb. 19.
The resolution states that the
government of Paraguay should
carry out an investigation to
locate and arrest Josef Mengele
and extradite him to Germany,
the United States should send
representatives to Paraguay to
assist in the investigation, and
finally, the U.S. should take all
possible actions to ensure that
Josef Mengele is brought to
justice.
The members of the Senate
Foreign Relations Committee
are:
REPUBLICANS
Sen. Richard Lugar (Ind.
(chairman), Sen. Jesse Helms
iN.C.i. Sen. Charles Mathias
iMd.i. Sen. Nancy Kassebaum
(Kans), Sen. Rudy Boschwitz
(Minn). Sen. Larry Pressler
(S.D.), Sen. Frank Murkowski
(Alaska). Sen. Paul Trible (V
Sen. Daniel Evans (Wash.)
DEMOCRATS
Sen. Claiborne Pell (R.I.I. Sen.
Joseph Biden (Del). Sen. Paul
Sarbanes (Md.l. Sen. Edward
Zorinsky (Nebr.l, Sen. Alan
Cranston (Calif.). Sen.
Christopher Dodd (Conn.). Sen.
Thomas Eagleton (Mo). Sen.
John Kerry (Mass.)
Each senator should be written
to separately. The address it:
United States Senate
Washington. DC. 20610. The
telephone number of the United
Suites Congress is: (202) 224-
3121.
"It is your duty and obligation
to contact the Senators listed
above in order to make this
possible and have it passed by
Congress as soon as possible,"
stated Sam Desperak, president
of the Holocaust Survivors.
JERUSALEM (JTA) A bill that would make denial of the
Holocaust a criminal offense punishable by up to three year's
imprisonment, has passed its first reading in the Knesset and is
expected to become law without difficulty. It has been approved
by the Justice Ministry. The measure was introduced by MK
Elazar Granot of Mapam.
WASHINGTON (JTA) The
recently concluded U.S.-Israel
Free Trade Area (FTA)
agreement appeared to be headed
toward its expected swift
congressional approval, as the
Senate Finance Committee
rejected proposed amendments to
the pact.
Having turned down three
minor technical modifications,
the Committee voted to begin
.consultations with the House and
Administration on preparing
legislation in support of the pact
initialled by Israel and the U.S.
earlier last month.
The FTA provides for the
gradual elimination by both the
U.S. and Israel of tariffs on goods
traded between them. According
to the pact, duties on items
regarded as sensitive to import
competition will be phased out
more slowly than others, with all
tariffs and other trade barriers to
be eliminated within 10 years.
Although Congress has
already given its approval to
conclude the agreement in
principle, through its passage of
the Tariff and Trade Act of 1984.
the pact itself must be approved
by both Houses of Congress once
final legislation is formerly in-
troduced by the President.
The 1984 legislation also
stipulates that the agreement
would be considered for approval
Second Annual Israel Festival,
May 18-June 14
JERUSALEM Last spring,
Jerusalem dared to inaugurate
one of the world's biggest per-
forming arts festivals on a
limited budget with minimal
advance planning in an uncertain
economy and broke even.
And now. enthusiastic
audiences from Israel and abroad
ere eagerly marking their
calendars for the second annual
Israel Festival in Jerusalem. May
18 to June 14.
For four weeks last spring, the
ancient city was transformed into
vast arts park. The festival
itself sponsored 200 per-
formances of 100 programs
staged by 50 groups in 14 dif-
ferent locations. In addition, the
Jerusalem Film Center hosted a
film festival and the Israel
Museum held a special sculpture
exhibit. Parks and streets and
the Old City walls became
theaters, with flags and banners
flying from every lamp post and
tower.
More than half the festival's
$1.25 million cost was covered by
ticket sales, an unusual ac-
complishment for a young
festival. Government and
municipal allocations, as well as
private sponsorship of specific
performers, covered the rest.
Nearly two-thirds of the tickets
went to visitors from out of town
and abroad who purchased
subscriptions In advance. The
demand was so .great
especially by late-arriving foreign
tourists that 20 performances
were added after the festival
began.
Why was it such an out-
standing success? The main
attraction was the quality of such
performers as the Sankai Juku
dance company from Japan, the
Lindsay Kemp theater company
from London. Yugoslavian
pianist Igo Pogorelich. Teatre
Alia Scala of Milan. Jean-Pierre
, Rampal. the Amadeus Trio. Odin
I Teatret from Denmark. Less
~ conventional tastes were also
g indulged, as was the thirst for
controversy.
Ticket prices were low under
$5. Voracious cultural appetites
were satisfied by a schedule that
made it possible to attend at least
three performances a day.
Organizational snafus were
minimal, despite the short lead
time, the clamor for tickets and
the extra performances.
It is no coincidence that the
opening day of the Israel Festival
is Jerusalem Day. the com-
memoration of the reunification
of Jerusalem after the 1967 Six
Day War; according to
Mossinsohn. the date was picked
so that the Festival might start
with a special homage to the city.
Details of the event are secret,
however, just as they were for
last year's opening.
With the program for 1985
ready and rave notices for last
year s festival. Mossinsohn
expects many more tourists for
the festival in 1985.
i
*
i
How Much Salt
Are You Drinking ?
It's hard to escape salt. You'll find it in almost
everything you eat and drink.
But you won't find it in Mountain Valley Water. It's
so negligible, Mountain valley can be used in a salt-free
diet.
Known for natural hardness and
delicious taste, Mountain Valley's spring
is nestled in virgin timberland at Hot
Springs, Arkansas. Geologists report the
water takes 3500 years from rain back to
the spring. It's protected still more, in
glass bottles to you.
Have Mountain Valley Water Delivered
to your home and office. It's good, all the
ttme.
Da* Broward
696-1333 563-6114
c^ountaiq^ey^ter
FROM MOT SPRINGS, ARK
by Congress on a expedited basis.
It was this pledge to "fast track"
the President's bill through
Congress that provided the
justification for the Committee's
refusal to introduce amendments
suggested including one by
Committee chairman Robert
Pack wood (R. Ore. I
I'ackwood's amendment would
have authorized the President to
phase out tariffs on all goods
within 10 years in accordance
with the agreement. The
President's version excludes
certain import sensitive items
leaving them to subsequent
approval by Congress. The
House Ways and Means Com-
mittee has already adopted a
similar amendment to the one
proposed by Pack wood.
The dear indication given by
the majortiy of Committee
members, that they would reject
any change that might delay the
final drafting and approval of the
bill, caused some resentment on
tr* part of tho*. -j
agreement that !. i
Particular, and "*
"goutimJ
Israels phasing
export goods.
.rr!inieUnderStand"l.
&-<-
sultation proces, 0f I
mittee is annulled it',,.-
t a farce." But Peri.
deeded the swift 2
of U* pact, saying jtZ
with the CongSoi"
to fast-track the bill.
Although some coo*
expected on the eucu
thebilltobefonnillYb
by the President, i irf!
of the Senate Financed
said the agreement wuw.
guaranteed swift Conn
approval.
Israel's, World's top
consumers of solar ene
JERUSALEM Some of the
brightest spots on Israeli
horizons are reflections coming
from rooftop solar energy
collectors. According to Israel's
Ministry of Energy, about
700,000 of these efficient,
pollution-free water heaters are
spread around the country,
providing 65 percent of the
population's domestic hot water
need, on a per-capita basis, that
makes Israelis the world's
number one user of solar energy.
Unsatisfied with first place,
Israelis refuse to rest on their
solar collectors. Instead, they're
busy at work refining and ex-
panding the use of solar energy
and, by the turn of the century,
fully intend to make sunshine a
cornerstone of the country's total
energy budget.
Developments in solar
collectors also occur continually.
Some 130 Israeli manufacturers
lot
backed by on-goof
nment-sponsored ud
research organization^
universities are
turning out devices whkl
and more efficient,
cost-effective. Todai
Jerusalemite can nab
investment on i
collector which will
family with free
through the city's (
often snowy winter
years to come. The newc
are compact, der"
maximum energy
and can now superheat'
scorching 260 degreei a
(482 degrees Fl
While hot water mIs
are the most visible i
of the sun's energy i
they can be seen on i
every city, village and I
there are other
solar energy with
implications for the I
't
S
S
o
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and Well Give Your Granddw*1
Winter Weekend Afcblutely W*
When you join the Pw^JunwCf!iW's.C^to'7 ,
$50 deposit which is credited towards your ay.r" ,,
cwandcnW- can come and enjoy a free wrt***-
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This special ewer m only good until May 1st.
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mrise Lakes Phase IV
,cial Gifts cocktail party
April 28
Friday, April 12,1986 / The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Pace 3
Gov. Graham to speak at Senior Conference
May 6 at Tamarac Jewish Center
keissman. chairman of
y.formed United Jewish
paign committee at
Fjkes Phase IV, has
that the Phase will
,y special gifts cocktail
I p.m. Sunday April 28
of Mr and Mrs.
Ja. Levin.
(speaker for the event
V. Gideon Peleg, media
I on Middle Eastern
[minimum commitment
[required for attendance
itigious party.
L u co-chairmen for this
: Abraham A. Levin,
ivin, David Lubliner
fPensky.
Serving as associate chairmen
are: Irving Braitman, Joe Graus,
Murray Kaminsky, Abe
Kleinberg, Murray Seiden, Osksr
Spiegel and Henry WeU, with
John Goldbeck, president of Inc.
I and Burton Berk, president of
Inc. II.
Serving on the campaign
committee are: Charlotte
Appleman, Eugene Beater,
Simon Cooperman, Sidney
Jampole, Norman Katz, Harriet
Kaminsky, Eileen Krause,
Nathan Pensky, Joe Schneider,
Maurice Shaw, Bill Spector,
Ellyn Spector, and Jacob
Wecker. Samuel K. Miller and
Irving Spector are acting as
campaign advisors.
At a recent meeting of the
Southeastern Region of United
Synagogue of America, it was
announced that on May 6, at
Temple Beth Torah, Tamarac
they will sponsor a conference
titled "A Precious Resource A
Special Responsibility, Seniors in
Synagogue Life." The keynote
address will be made by
Governor Bob Graham, who will
speak on, "The Responsibilities
of Government and Communities
Towards Senior Citizens." The
program will be geared towards
the participation and servicing of
senior citizens in all phases of
synagogue life. It will include
presentations on meeting the
immediate needs of seniors, social
service agencies and the senior
citizen along with a special
program for the role of the
professional in meeting the needs
of seniors.
Co-sponsoring this event wili
be the Central Agency for Jewish
Education of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale and Southeastern
Region Rabbinical Assembly.
Alfred Golden will be chairman
for the United Synagogue of
America. Lou Meltzer is
president of Southeastern Region
United Synagogue, Harold
Wishna, Director Southeastern
Region of the United Synagogue
of America.
Rabbi Ted Feldman is
president of the Rabbinical
Assembly Southeastern Region.
Abraham J. Gittelson is the
educational director of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale. Helen Weisberg will
act as consultant for the Central
Agency for Jewish Education.
The committee planning this
event includes: Harold Wishna,
Lynn Pollack, Helen Weisberg,
Dorothy Rubin, Sol Schulman,
Rabbi Ted Feldman, Rabbi Kurt
F. Stone, Rabbi Paul Plotkin,
Rabbi Donald Crain, Abraham J.
Gittelson and Norman Pollack.
For further information call
United Synagogue of America
474-4606 or 947-6097.
'L'Chaim-Reunification of Jerusalem' celebration May 19
kmming is nearly
[and brochures are in the
Yom Yerushalayim,
[Cdebratingl8 Years of
bifcation of Jerusalem.
I annual event will take
| Sunday. May 19. at 1
Temple Beth Israel,
The brochures are
I at all institutions which
! in the North Broward
To register for Yom
lyim dip the reser-
and return it as
Ion the brochure. The
fee is $2 per person
be included with the
(Registration includes
enta prior to the
All reservations must
be made by May 19, due to a
limited amount of space.
Excitement is building for the
poster contest for children
depicting Yom Yerushalayim
1986. Prizes will be awarded for
the moat appropriate posters for
each age group.
Two sets of simultaneous
workshops will be held as part of
the day's events. The workshops
will include Heroes of Jerusalem,
The Prophets Speak of
Jerusalem, Ancient Israel aa
Revealed in Archeology (in
Hebrew), University of
Jerusalem Politics of Success.
Judaism, Christianity and Islam,
Views of Jerusalem. Mystical
thanks Greater Margate Area
lunfeers at April 18 breakfast
of volunteers
made the Greater
Area-United Jewish
Iwch a resounding
I be treated for break -
I a.m. Thursday April
[Jewish Federation and
"uad City UJA
committee. Guest
f the breakfast will be
Miller, a Federation
at.
I thanks go to Temple
pi-Margate Jewish
Nregatioii Beth Hillel
of Margate, and all their board
members and officers for their
cooperation throughout the UJA
year," stated Margate Area UJA
chairman William Katzberg.
Serving aa Margate Area UJA
co-chairman is Harry Glugover
with advisor Israel Resnikoff.
Coordinating the breakfast are
David E. Brill. Sol DoUack,
Morris Kirschbaum, Esther
Lerman, Sam Lazeil, Jules
Lustig. Sara Shnonowitz and
Flora Wetter.
Harbour Beach to hold
JA cocktail party April 21
['JStephtn and Julie
raff*"". Fort
J .first event, on
"^Federation-
APPI campaign
B!iiTha *Ka
15? ? '"A of
-S^"1 Unction
Wf ? Bnnl*
Bamett," stated Steven Lewin.
chairman of the event.
Scheduled to speak is Dr.
Gideon Peleg, media consultant
on Middle East affairs.
Serving as Oceanfroot Area
UJA chairman is John Strong.
For further information contact
Steven Perry at the Federation
Gait office at 668-6202.
*F*r
MMDWIUWm
aaiswia
miALDAY &108
MYS/4NfGHTS ,3K~
2FUUIKAUOMLV
11 mi AiA-(MAaaoa a Houoavat
** aouT setcuu. mm row loismi
OUT V DAM COUNTY CALL COUJCT
305-538-5721
i
Jerusalem. Musical Echoes of
Jerusalem. Religious Life in
Jerusalem (in Yiddish). A
Walking Tour of Jerusalem.
Legends of Jerusalem. Airlift to
Jerusalem the Ethiopian
Story, and Jerusalem la Poetry.
Please note that there have
been some changes since the
brochure was issued. The
workshop which was titled
Jerusalem in Life and Thought of
Rabbi Kook has been changed to
The Three Jeruaalema; Judaism.
Christianity and Islam. The
workshop entitled Religious Life
in Jerusalem will be conducted in
Yiddish. When mailing reser-
vation forms please address the
envelope:
Helen Weisberg, CAJE, Box
26810, Tamarac, FL 3332O6810.
This event will be Yom
Yerushalayim happening. For it
has been said, "He who has not
seen Jerusalem in all its glory.
has not seen beauty in his life."
Since this event has always been
very popular it is important to
get reservations in early.
Yom Yerushalayim is spon-
sored by the North Broward
Midrasha of the Central Agency
for Jewish Education of the
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale, and its con-
stituent organizations. Temples
Beth Am, Beth Israel, Beth
Israel of Deerheld Beach, Beth
Orr, Beth Torah, Emanu-el.
Sha'ary Tzedek, Sholom, Ramat
Shalom Synagogue, Hebrew
Congregation of Lauderhill,
Liberal Jewish Temple of
Coconut Creek, Southeastern
Region United Synagogue of
America, JCC and Omega
Condominium, in cooperation
with the Department of
Education and Culture of the
World Zionist Organization,
American Section. For further
information call Helen Weisberg
at 748-8400.
Our Dear Friends,
Your kind expressions of concern for Ed have not
gone unnoticed. We appreciate all your good wishes,
it means a lot to us both.
Warmly,
ED And ROZ ENTIN
Nobody treats your
parents better than
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Monthly rental includes:
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One and two bedroom apartments, kitchen.
balcony view
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Page4 The Jewish FloridiMi of GreaUr Fort Lauderdale/Friday, April 12, 1986
_________________________________________^__-t^t
Togetherness Day' unites Jewish women's organizations
The Tamarac Jewish Center
was the setting for one of the
most important events on the
Women's Division calender this
year. It was the day when 200
women, representing eight
Jewish women's organizations
and six Temple Sisterhoods,
united to discuss the many
aspects and roles of women in the
North Broward Jewish Com-
munity.
Claire Socransky, Community
Relations vice president for the
Women's Division of the Jewish
Federation and chairman of the
day, welcomed those in at-
tendance and thanked them for
attending. "I am very pleased to
see that so many women have
realized our important role in the
community." she said.
The day-long event began with
an address by Harriette
Shulman, president of the Leorah
Council of B'nai B'rith Women,
followed by concurrent
workshops, which discussed the
"dynamics of leadership" and the
"status of services and demands
on the growing community."
After a break for lunch. Gene
Greenzweig. executive director of
the Central Agency for Jewish
Education (CAJE), presented the
keynote address. discussing
"Jewish Roots," which was
received enthusiastically.
Women's Division president
Roz Entin said. "I'm very
pleased that the women in our
community have responded to
this event."
Charlotte Padek, vice
president of education for the
Women's Division, stated, "This
is only the beginning, we hope to
continue programs like these for
many more years to come."
Florence K. Straus, co-
chairman of the day, was
overwhelmed with the response.
"We regretted that we had to
turn some women away, due to
the shortage of space. However,
next year we will be sure to
accomodate every woman who is
interested in attending."
Straus added that Jan. 29.
1986 has been selected as the day
for next year's gathering of
Jewish womens' organizations.
Sponsored by the Women's
Division of the Jewish Federation
of Greater Fort Lauderdale. the
following groups participated in
the event:
B'Nai B'rith Women
Brandeis University National
Women's Committee,
Hadassah.Jewish War Veterans,
Ladies Auxiliary. National
Council of Jewish Women. OUT,
Pioneer Women Na'amat,
Women's League for Israel,
Temple Sholom. Pompano Beach,
Sisterhood. Temple Beth Orr.
Coral Springs. Sisterhood;
Temple Beth Israel. Sunrise
Sisterhood: Temple Kol Ami,
Plantation. Sisterhood: Temple
Emanu-El. Fort Lauderdale.
Sisterhood: Hebrew
Congregation of Lauderhill
Sisterhood.
Mission Schedule
Below is a list of the upcoming Missions sponsored by the
Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale. If you would like
any information about any Mission, please contact Mission
coordinator Sandy Jackowitz. at 748-8400.
Summer Family Mission July 4-17 (Rabbi Elliot and Julie
Skiddell. leaders)
Singles Mission July 21-31
Pre-Mission to Paris July 17-31 (First Timers)
Pre-Mission to Prague July 17-31 (Repeaters)
Campaign Leadership Mission Oct. 9-20 Pre-Mission to
Eastern Europe
Yom
Continued from Page 1
memory of the" different
camps, including the camp
from which that particular
person was liberated.
The highlight of the
service and the program
will be an address by Mr.
John Loftus. the author of
the "Belarus Connection."
In his years with the
Justice Department, he
uncovered many secrets
that point a finger at the
American government's
complicity in protecting
Nazi sympathizers,
collaborators, and the
Nazis themselves during
those early years of the cold
war.
"It is hoped that his
address, by showing us the
Hashoa
complicity, even of the
United States, will be a
reminder to us to maintain
a constant vigil because the
scurge that was Nazism is
capable of being reproduced
in almost any country at
any given time," stated
Rabbi Paul Plotkin of
Temple Beth Am. The
program will be concluded
with the memorial prayer
and the mourner's kad-
dish."
Many local dignitaries
will be in attendance,
proclamations from the
county and state will be
read, and it is hoped that
many of the local non-
Jewish clergy will attend.
For information contact
the Jewish Federation at
748-8400.
A i
Members of the Planning Committee for
'' Togetherness Day," are pictured at the Tamarac
Jewish Center. They are: Harriette Shulman,
Charlotte Padek, Claire Socransky, Florence K.
Straus, Shirlsy Viscott, Priscilla Ltviu,
Kirschner, Edythe Morgano, Justine Wn
Julia Sussman, Esther Seslouk,
Grossman, Rose Alpert and Shirley Waum.
'^fif***.
Pictured at "Togetherness Day" were (left to
right): Florence K. Straus; Harriette Shulman,
Larry Schuval, Esther Schwartz, Charlotte Padek
and Alvera A. Gold. All acted as fac&h
the day's event.
Women's Division 'Community Day'
luncheon draws 250 plus
Guest speaker Lea Rabin
Over 250 women attended the
Women's Division $72 'Yom
Kehillah (Community Day)
luncheon held at the Plantation-
Holiday Inn. where Lea Rabin.
wife of Israel's Minister of
Defense and former Prime
Minister Yitzhak Rabin, spoke to
the capacity crowd.
Barbara Wiener, Women's
Division Campaign Chairperson,
was pleased with the turnout for
the luncheon and expressed her
thanks to Dorothy Wildman for
her hard work and dedication.
Roz Entin. president of Women's
Division, thanked all the hard
workers who made the day such a
success.
Serving with Dorothy
Wildman on the luncheon
committee were Karen Boorstein,
Barbara Levine. Carole Skolnik,
Madeline Wall and Esther
Wolfer. According to Wiener,
"This luncheon enabled the
Women's Division to take a giant
>tep towards our one million
dollar goal. It was tnih/ a
community affair."
Luncheon chairptrto*
Wildman.
<*Jewish Flcrldl&n
OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE USPS 899420
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m anould Da Uiwiiia jama* Fadoration or Oraalar Fort Laudardala P O Choirper"
Friday, April 12, 1986
Volume 14
21NISAN5746
Number 16
'rson, luncheon committee member Carole
Skolnik, Barbara Wiener, Women', Division
campaign chairperson; Lea Rabin, guest speaker;
and Ether Lerner, incoming f""*^
president. (Rear, left to right!: Lu^Z
nut tee members Barbara Levmt, *'>
and Esther Wolfer.


- r\ **V I

___ Friday' AV*K *2.1986/ The Jewiah Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 5
Scenes of Jewish lifeat itie JCC
aft ^FJk% ^
The programs pictured are all
available to the members of the
Jewish Community Center of
Greater Fort Lauderdale, 6501
W. Sunrise Blvd. For information
contact the Center at 792-6700.
>i
STEPHANIE SASTER,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jeff
Saster, performs a solo song at
the Kindergarten Consecration at
The Hebrew Day School of Fort
Lauderdale.
Pictured are Suzuki violin students who performed
recently during the JCCs Purim-fest. Classes are
offered regularly for elementary age students.
! at the JCCs Purim-fest an members of
J Scorcas' class dressed up and ready to
ku the Purim holiday at a special presentation
tJCC Prt-School Department.
Tourists love to take pictures. And what better place is there
than at an absorption center for Ethiopian Jews. The ever-
smiling youngsters are a joy to behold. And so, on this afternoon
a group of American tourists were cocking shutters, flashing
bulbs and having a time photographing the Ethiopian
youngsters and each other photographing the youngsters. One
of the Ethiopian children turned to his counselor and asked, in
all innocence: "Are Americans born with cameras?"
Kiamesha Lake. New York 12751
Telephone: (9141 74-tt00
Direct NYC. Phone 12121924 Klh.'
>.
\Mollye Maryn, Polly Levy and Ida Hertz strike a pose during
, Senior Adult program, "The Total Look for Today's Mature
i" held recently at the Center.
Chairlady of the JCC lunch
program Shirley Weinberger, is
assisted by Harold Borrus, who
prepares and sets up the lun-
cheon buffet, which is available
between noon and 1 p.m. every
Tuesday and Thursday. The
buffet consists of salads, dairy
dishes, fruits, pastries and
beverages.
Hotel
GIBBER
Surrounded by our 400 private acres,
in the beautiful Catskills.
3 Meals DailyStrictly KosherAII Diets Catered to
Rabbi and Masgiach on Premisses* Two Health
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You'll Love Us. The Gibber Family


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Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale / Friday, April 12, 1986
Reagan Stands by
Dachau Decision
WASHINGTON -
(JTA> President Reagan
has reaffirmed that he will
not visit a concentration
camp site when he goes to
West Germany in May
because he believes the
40th anniversary of the end
of World War II should be
trated as a celebration and
not used for "reawakening
the memories'" of the war.
Reagan, in answering a
question at a nationally-televised
press conference, also said that
the German people have a guilt
feeling that s been imposed upon
them and I just think it's un-
necessary.
JEWISH ORGANIZATIONS.
and particularly groups of
Holocaust survivors, have urged
Reagan to visit a death camp site
after it became known that he has
ruled out a trip to Dachau during
his participation in V-K Dav
ceremonies following the Western
economic summit in Bonn.
When Reagan was asked why
he would not visit the camp site.
he replied:
"1 feel very strongly that this
time in commemorating the end
of that great war that, instead of
reawakening the memories and so
forth and passions of the time,
that maybe we should observe
this day as the day when 40 years
ago peace began and friendship
because we now find ourselves
allied and friends of the countries
that we once fought against."
REAGAN SAID the an-
niversary should "be almost a
celebration of the end of an era
and the coming into what has
now been some 40 years of peace
for us, and I felt since the Ger-
man people and few are alive
that can remember even the war
and certainly none of them who
were adults and participating in
any way and they do, they
have a feeling and a guilt feeling
that's been imposed upon them
and I just think it's unnecessary
"I think they should be
recognized for the democracy
that they've created and the
democratic principles they now
espouse."
Reagan denied that West
German Chancellor Helmut Kohl
has asked him to take such a
position The West Germans had
reportedly suggested the Dachau
visit. In talking just informally
some time ago with Chancellor
Kohl and others, we all felt the
same way. Reagan added, "that
if we could observe this as the
beginning of peace and friendship
between us."
IN NEW YORK, the Rab
binical Assembly criticized
Reagan's remarks. Rabbi
Alexander Shapiro, Assembly
president, said that while the
President "has done much to
[>erpetuate the memory of the
Holocaust." he nevertheless
"created the impression that we
can forget the past because
today's generation of German
citizens and leaders were not
responsible for the actions of the
Nazis."
Shapiro added. "The entire
world must never be permitted to
forget the dreaded actions of the
Hitler era that destroyed many
millions of people, including six
million Jews ... the Holocaust
must never be eliminated from
the pages of German history .
The world must make certain
that such acts are never
repeated."
AIPAC Chief Warns 'Em
Qf Good Feelings' May Enc
U.S.-Israel relations are
in an "era of good feelings,"
but this era could undergo a
strained period in the
future, according to
Thomas Dine, executive
director of the American
Israel Public Affairs
Committee.
Dine, in an interview with The
Jewish Floridian, warned that if
the United States asserts too
much pressure on Israel to make
certain changes in its economic
policies and budgets in exchange
for foriegn aid. it could have a
"deleterious" effect on the
present national unity gover-
nment in Israel.
IN HIS SPEECH before some
300 Florida Jewish leaders at-
tending a regional political action
workshop Sunday in Fort
Lauderdale. Dine said he feels
confident that the foreign aid
package a total of S3 billion in
grants will be passed by
Congress.
Dine also praised President
Reagan, who in recent months
has told three Arab leaders that
direct negotiations" between
the Arab world and Israel is a
prerequisite for peace.
"Peace in the Middle East will
only be achieved through direct
negotiations between Israel and
its neighbors," Dine said, adding
that while President Reagan is
not the first president to endorse
direct negotiations, he is the first
to bluntly tell three Arab leaders
this is needed in front of the
national and international press.
The Arab leaders were Egyptian
President Hoani Mubarak, King
Fahd of Saudi Arabia and the
foreign minister of Jordan.
"IN LIGHT of the continued
lord
Jm^i
'marsri
JORDAN MARSH
WISHES YOU A HAPPY
PASSOVER 1985
FLORIQA
CELEBRATE WITH
BARTON'S CHOCOLATES
...SWEET PASSOVER TREATS
When only the finest sweets will do. choose
Barton's to celebrate the Passover holiday
From our selection:
Passover Miniature Nuts. 8 02.. $6
Passover Seder mints, 8 or, $8
Fruit flavored slices. 12 02.. $5
Kosher for passover and attractively boxed
Candy, all Jordan Marsh stores except
.Miami International Mall. Broward Mall.
Pompano. Boca Raton
Arab refusal to recognize Israel,
this is the only way to force
movement on the Arab side,"
Dine said. "The United States
must never encourage the Arabs
to believe they can avoid Israel
and reach an agreement with
Washington that will be imposed
on Jerusalem."
At the same time Dine praised
President Reagan, he also ex-
pressed concern that in recent
days the administration has
fueled Arab expectations. During
the Mar. 21 presidential press
conference, President Reagan
said the United States would be
willing to meet with a combined
delegation of Jordanians and
non-PLO Palestinians in talks
not tied to direct negotiations
with Israel.
"1 think if we draw away from
S** neP>tiationa it .4
U possibility that 5a'
be able to come tow-
be received <
"hW Arafat is^
"id will enable Art*,
agarn exercise veto Z
(Jordan! King Huar
"""ARAFAT fed, b
something hm ,.
States without HuZ
a^jft-pp-tii
Dine said if this pr^
the next logical step wj
recognition of the PLO '
this process is stoppid
tracks, it will caw
relations between ta>
States and Israel, ud
weaken the national
government in Israel uj
doom the peace process."
Additional thanks to the Arnold Shor Chapter of ARMDI
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Friday, April 12, l&ft / The Jewish Floridian of Greater Port Lauderoale -Page 7
tin receives
Achievement Award
L'YORK. NY-George M.
fofScarsdale.NewYork.a
, lawver and pnUan-
/^iveo the HI AS
nent Award at the
.tions 105th Annual
on March 18 m New
Ety
IJaffin. who is the second
of the HIAS
'mt Award (Walter H.
was the first, in 1983),
nted with the citation
|AS President Emeritus
Shapiro. The HIAS
Achievement Award was created
in order to pay special tribute to
individuals who have made
outstanding humanitarian
contributions.
In presenting the Award. Mr.
Shapiro noted that George
Jaffin's lifelong interest and
respect for the work of HIAS has
influenced many of the attorney's
clients and colleagues. In fact, he
said, it was Mr. Jaffin who had
guided Elliot and Louis Liskin's
decision to earmark funds from
the estate of their late mother,
Ida Liskin, to underwrite a
history of Jewish migration,
which highlights the work of
HIAS.
The inscription on the 1985
IAS Achievement Award
reads: "The Hebrew Immigrant
ui Ao'ety Proudly Presents the
HIAS Achievement Award to
George M. Jaffin. In grateful
recognition of the selfess efforts
he has devoted to improving the
lives of others. His commitment
and his generosity of spirit are
inspiration to all those who aspire
to Judaism's highest traditions."
South Lebanon Christians and Moslems
to cooperate with Israel
JaVIV (JTA) Christian
Koalem residents of south
i near the Israeli border
nised to cooperate with
I to maintain peace and
lin the security belt just
I of the border after the
I Defense Force completes
rawal.
|they may well have to deal
jstinian terrorists who
i that they are returning
i areas of south Lebanon
Lhich they were ousted by
the IDF in 1982, to continue their
war against Israel.
About 100 Christian, Shiite
and Sunni Moslem dignitaries
from border villages met with
Brig. Gen. Shlomo Ilya, the
IDF's chief liaison officer with
the population in the south of
Lebanon. Ilya promised that the
"good fence" the arrangement
by which Lebanese could freely
enter and leave Israel for com-
mercial or personal purposes
before June, 1982 would be re-
instated after the IDF leaves
Lebanese soil.
The village headmen promised
in turn that they would support
local civil militias to maintain
order in the region and would
encourage young men to enlist in
them. Ilya, who met with them in
the Shiite village of J'bail, a few
kilometers inside Lebanon, said
the civil militias, along with the
Israel-backed South Lebanon
Army (SLA) would have a
central role in maintaining peace.
Fruit slices, a traditional Passover favorite, can be used in a
variety of creative ways.
Fruit Slices Return
to Ft. Lauderdale
Jellied fruit slices long a Passover tradition make a
return appearance to supermarkets in Fort Lauderdale this
season.
The H.W. Powers Company of Boston, Mass., maker of these
original fruit pieces since the 1940's, has introduced a new line of
Polly Orchard Fruit Slices.
The fruit slices available in raspberry, orange, lemon and
bine are made with natural fruit flavors under full rabbinical
supervision.
Fruit slices are first cooked in customized steam kettles, then
poured into molds, cured and cut by hand. A drying period of up
to 10 days follows. They are then hand-powdered with
granulated sugar and carefully packed for delivery.
In addition to traditionally being a favorite Passover con-
fection, fruit slices may also be used in a variety of creative ways
as decorations for cookies and cupcakes on pies and cakes
- and as attractive garnishes for a host of foods and drinks.
HIAS announces scholarship award winners
(York, NY Eight former
>s have received
w gauge Jewish
rceptions off
^emitism
plvl.Mass Stii
Aington, DC. and .
' Brandeis 1'niversity
licy analyst suggest that
w in the United States
[rtev have experienced
of anti-Semitism in
foion. says Gary Tobin.
\ Professor of Jewish
y research and plan-
Brandei- ( enter for
JBh Studies, "the
' the person, the more
ia to say that he has
W anti-Semitism within
| months."
ch on anti-Semitism
l^nsored by the Center
^"Jewish Studies at
the only advanced
*nt*r devoted ex-
A.lhe S,Udy f
tTeys contained
*??* t0 e8tWh
^lts perceptions of
**"* with anti-
l.*W salient piece of
i.S!Lthe studie
C*5 of Jews claim
"n. said Tobin.
UtltSlUd,es did not
IrS1"* why the
Ly^nts tended to
r recent experiences
y&t'ibut- *
^ c,al contacts
1 I the !?caalwd to
r^Jews. defined for
El?'6 -fading
Art n- Pre8tiQ
UraroneckU New
scholarship awards from HIAS,
the Hebrew Immigrant Aid
Society. The award winners were
announced at the organization's
105th annual meeting, on
Monday, March 18 at the UJA-
Federation's new conference
facilities in New York.
iooa took place .M the
of the HIASZbard.
which, for the first tin*,- was
open to HIAS' genera] mem-
bership. Chairman of the Board
Meeting. HIAS President.
Robert L. Israeloff, explained
that each of the HIAS
Scholarship Awards carries a
$500 stipend and is given to
HIAS-assisted refugees who
have settled here since 1976 and
made special progress in their
adjustment to life in the United
States.
, HIAS: Prudent- Emerttus.-
Edwin Shapiro, presented two
awards from the Richard Alan
Shapiro Award Fund, established
in memory of Mr. Shapiro's son.
Honorary Executive Vice
President and newly elected
member of the HIAS Board,
Gaynor I. Jacobson, announced
two awards from the Judge
Murray I. Gurftin Memorial
Fund, The late Eva Gurfein
established this fund in memory
of her husband, who was HIAS
president from 1966-57 and from
1960-67.
Judge Betty W. EDerin, HIAS
Board member and President of
the organization's Women's
Division, announced two
scholarship awards from the Ann
S. Petluck Memorial Fund. This
fund was established by Meyer
Poses, of New York, in memory
of his wife, who served as
Director of HIAS U.S.
Operations for more than two
decades. Ms. Petluck s efforts
profoundly influenced the
practice of migration casework
and helped reshape U.S. im-
migration law.


Pge8 The Jewah FloridiMiotGretr FortUudwdah/Fridiy, April 12,1986
Space-age tools unlock
secrets off Israel's past
h
JERUSALEM Prehistory is
fast becoming a space-age science
in the land of the Bible. Israeli
archeologista are no longer just
pick and brush men. Today, they
use tractors to clear the land,
nuclear reactors to identify
pottery and the computer has
replaced the file cabinet. In the
near future, satellites will map
sites to help determine where to
excavate.
"It's what we call ar-
cheometry," says Yigal Shiloh.
chairman of the Archeology
department of the Hebrew
University in Jerusalem,
"... the application to ar-
cheology, of disciplines developed
for other things. It's part of a
whole new approach, which seeks
to recreate ancient civilizations
instead of just looking for palaces
and treasures."
"We are asking questions
archeologists never dealt with
before," says Hebrew University
Professor Amnon Tor, who heads
the Jezreel Valley regional ex-
cavation. "So we bring in
paleobotanists to analyze the
pollen. This tells us what people
ate and gives us an idea of the
climate in the various periods
Paleozoologists study animal
bones to determine what animals
people ate and sacrificed. More
important, they can tell us when
the ox and the donkey were
domesticated. That meant the
beginning of trade, improved
crops through harnessing
animals to the plow and
therefore, increased carrying
capacity of the land. Today we
are trying to get at the essence of
ancient man and we use every
tool possible to squeeze the finds,
like a lemon, to gather every drop
of evidence that can help com-
plete the picture."
ORT DAYS: Mayor Leonard Weisonger of
Margate, presents a proclamation declaring ORT
days now through June 30. Pictured with the
LVJf
mayor are Ehrna Preiser, president of the I
West Chapter; Leonie Merles; Pearl Wu
Betty Stitzel, president of the Margate Ck
Research Scientists Gets New Funds
NEW YORK (JTA) An
unprecedented collaboration
between two of the world's
foremost research institutions,
the Rockefeller University and
the Weizmann Institute of
Science, will be made possible
through a contribution by the
Rapid-American Corporation, it
was announced by Mona
Ackerman. R- AC president.
A new foundation, the
Foundation for the Rockefeller
University and the American
Committee for the Weizmann
Institute of Science. Inc.. will be
funded by the Rapid-American
Corporation through a con-
tribution of 85 million which is
expected to generate 8500,000 per
year from investment.
It is anticipated that the
beneficiaries of the new foun-
dation will ultimately share in an
aggregate of at least 814 million.
"THE MAGNITUDE of the
research efforts undertaken by
these two institutions is enor-
mous and they have already
contributed significantly toward
finding solutions to the world's
most pressing problems,"
Ackerman said. "Our ardent
hope is tha the award will enable
the Rockefeller-Weizmann
scientific teams to work together
even more intensively and
fruitfully to eradicate disease.
According to Dr. Joshua
Lederberg. president of the
Rockefeller University, the
establishment of the new
foundation will bring the two
institutions closer together in
ways that would not otherwise
have been possible.
"We expect that the foun-
dation will support work in many
fields, but many of its initial
efforts are likely to be in
biomedical research areas like
cancer biology. the
neurosciences, molecular
genetics, immunology, plant
genetics and parasitic diseases,
as well as other fundamental
science," Lederberg said.
"Research in these fields would
impact on a wide range of human
problems."
PROF. MICHAEL Sela.
president of the Weizmann
Institute of Science, said that
this new formal link with the
On ih. occasion of his
850t, Birthday
(1135 1985)
St FARAD TOURS
INTERN A TIONAL
presents
The
MainoiidesYear
In Spain, Egypt. Israel and
Morocco
DELUXE TOURS BI-WEEKLY DEPARTURES________
SEFARAD (Two weeks)..................SI.: 15 plus air farr
SEFARAD AND ISRAEL (Two weeks) ..........SMIS plus air fare
SEFARAD AND MOROCCO (18 Days)..........iI 429 plus i> fare
SEFARAD. ISRAEL AND EGYPT (18 Days) ......SI S 19 plus air fare
SPECIAL DEPARTURES ESCORTED 1Y
Or Moshe Laxar. (Uiuvenaty of Southern California I ... May 13* July 22
Dt ZiowZevit. (University of Judaism I........May 6. June 10 ft Jury I
Dr. Norasas Roth. (University of Wfacoaaas).........May 20* June 10
SPECIAL RATES APPLY
FOR BROCHURES. INFORMATION AND RESERVATIONS
Contact your Travel Agent or call (TOLL-FRr.K):
I (800) 421 -4105 Continental U.S.A. except California
Sefarad Tours International
* ***** cau*0MM nuasi stmas t.
6399 Wilshire Boulevard. Suite 110
Los Angeles. California 90048
Telephone (213)658-6226
Land Operator Politur. Madrid
50 West 57th Street, Suite 1200
New York, NY. 10019
Telephone: (212) 582-8552
Rockefeller University will serve
as the catalyst for Weizmann and
Rockefeller scientific teams, both
in New York and in Israel, to
deepen their range of potentially
life-saving research. "The for-
malization of the Weizmann
Institute's link with the
Rockefeller University adds a
bold new dimension to the
relationship between the two
institutions we are most
grateful to the Rapid-American
Foundation and the Riklis
family," he said.
Additionally, the subjects and
findings of the research sup-
ported through the new foun-
dation will form the basis of
international symposia involving
leading scientists from in-
stitutions throughout the world.
$
Best Wishes For A
Happy Passover!
Congressman and Mrs. Lawrence J. Smith
Grant and Lauren
Join the Summer fun
at cool, cool Stevensville!
j.
f.YtT:.u.::> a #t:
Come join the Onrmrnmn and FrtohMrto farnities
tor everything that malm tha Of ****** the
finest reeort in the Car*****at super discount
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sumptuous meals daily (dietary laws observed,
and careful attention given to special diets) And
you'll love the dancing, music. cootdaR parties.
and (op-name peribrmeri wtto'H enf*rt*in you **
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OUTDOOR I HEATED INDOOR POOLS
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limousine information awulable ,
Stevensville



Friday, April 12,1986 / The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 9
Meet some JCC WECARE volunteers
Meyer, Sylvia
[md Julius Gersten all
in common. They
J^ for the JCCa
(With Energy,
And Responsible
.^nun. Under the
[ Rhonda Puttennan.
RE program operates
^m of volunteer
Maurice Meyer
CAREs' Hospital
[program. Meyer has
[ hospitals, bringing
dden, for more than
,. Sylvia Goldstein
time regularly to the
V shop. "Le Browse,"
[4314 N. State Rd. 7.
i acts as "sunshine"
Meyer
Goldstein
lady, sending cards to volunteers
who are ill. Julius Gersten, for
the paat nine years, has made the
Chanukah and Passover festivals
meaningful for needy families in
Broward County. He collects and
distributes holiday food baskets.
If you would like to join these
dedicated individuals and donate
some time, contact Rhonda
Putterman at 792-6700.
JCC to host Senior Maccabeah
Games beginning April 21
J time, the Jewish
Center of Greater
jle will sponsor a
j Maccabeah Games
filter this month.
a, which will begin on
[pril 21, are open to
i 55 and over. The
J area of competition
| on Sunday. April 28
: part of the JCC's
of Israel's
t Day. There will be
- track and field
. ball throw plus 11
events including
100 yard dash,
p, shuffleboard, table
! throw, 5 K run,
oldstein. chairman of
ah Committee, said
> of the games is
r adults a chance to
several athletic ac-
ous levels of ability
! fun while doing so.
that he hopes the
become an annual
forms for the
[available at the JCC,
1 Sunrise Blvd., Ft.
lor can be obtained or
piling Nili Kimelman
pochman at the JCC,
I Registration forms
pl5 must be returned
[by April 12. The fee
^nts to register for
M as they wish to.
~t will receive a
hments, and each
th Wounded
,jj* (JTA) -
J V Israeli soldiers
Arab youth during a
"I mcident at the
1,3* ^P ^e
[!* of Jerusalem.
^aasMaravSalah
''"udent a the
'tonal school.
Heading
J"" -.(JTA) a
0 ke denial of the
" oimuial offense
ruP to three years
I**""* law without
bounded
iBank Jew
IB- *entif*.
T!.of Hndasha.
lof^'^Weat
V.v Blreh last
K^ Usrroriat
- Uberatbn 0f
C ^Ponsibility
^ er"'oute to
second and third place winner
will receive an award.
The Committee members
planning the games are Harold
Goldstein, Chairperson, Sylvia
Goldstein, Murray Stoll, Dorothy
Spivack, Leo Spivack, all of
Plantation; Robert Levy and
Joseph Cohen of Sunrise; Joseph
Fuhman and Irene Fishman of
Davie; and William Leichter and
Judith Leichter of Lauderhill.
Everything's Kosher
With Kesher Kosher Tours
NEW YORK Kesher Kosher Tours has released its new
1985 brochure detailing ita special packages to Europe and the
the U.S.A.
Highlights of the European packages include Continental
Europe, trips to Scandinavia, Spain and Portugal. The U.S.A.
tours feature the National Parks, Las Vegas and California.
Kesher Kosher Tours highlights sites of both general and
Jewish interest in fun-filled packages that are sensitive to the
needs of the observant Jewish traveler. Now it is possible to
enjoy a classical touring program with observance of Shabbat
and Kashrut.
Some of this year's offerings are, "Europe on a Budget,"
(Italy, Switzerland, France, Holland and England), 12-22 days,
$629-* 1199 land; "Scandinavian Holiday,'' 16 days, 81099 land;
"Iberian Fiesta," 14 days, $747 land; and "Europe through
Young Eyes" (ages 17-31) 24 days, $1199 land. (Airfare is not
included.)
Kesher's programs around the U.S.A. include California and
Las Vegas, 11 days $1219; and National Parks and West Coast,
15 days $1669. (Prices for land only.) All prices per person
double occupancy.
Information on meals, hotels, detailed itineraries and
departure dates are provided in the new Kesher brochure which
is available by contacting the operator at 1501 Broadway, NYC,
NY. 10036; 212-921-7740 or out-of-state 800-847-0700. Or call
your travel agent.
where shopping is a pleasure 7days a week
PubMx Bakeries open at 8:00 A.M.
AaUbli at PubMx Stof wttrt
Frwh Daniah*ariaa Only.
Mouth Watering
Chocolate Chip
Cookies
!1"
Avaftabk* at PubMx Storaa with
Fraah Dan lah Bakariaa Only.
Shadberry
Tarts
.69
AvattaMa at PubMx Store* with
Fraah Daniah Bakariaa Only.
Plain or
Bagels
699
: ^
AvaJtafafa at AN
and Daniah Bakariaa
Storaa
Available at PubMx Storaa with Fraah
Daniah Bakariaa Only.
each
$148
Banana Peanut Butter
Streusel Coffee Cake.
Toppad wtth kMdout maringua
Lemon Meringue Pie.... -cnM49
Coconut Donuts...........Ex*"!29
Chocolate
Ripple Cake
7*f$2w
Prices Effective
April 11th thru 17th. 1985.
Quantity
Rights Reserved


Page 10 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale / Friday, April 12,1986
Swift Approval
Predicted for New
Free Trade Area
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) The recently-
concluded U.S.-Israel Free
Trade Area agreement
appears to be headed
toward its expected swift
congressional approval, as
the Senate Finance
Committee rejected
proposed amendments to
the pact.
Having turned down three
minor technical modifications,
the Committee voted to begin
consultations with the House and
Administration on preparing
legislation in support of the pact
initialled by Israel and the U.S.
earlier this month.
THE FTA provides for the
gradual elimination by both the
U.S. and Israel of tariffs on goods
traded between them. According
to the pact, duties on items
regarded as sensitive to import
competition will be phased out
more slowly than others, with all
tariffs and other trade barriers to
be eliminated within 10 years.
Although Congress has
already given its approval to
conclude the agreement in
principle, through its passage of
the Tariff and Trade Act of 1984,
the pact itself must be approved
by both Houses of Congress once
final legislation is formally in-
troduced by the President.
The 1984 legislation also
stipulates that the agreement
would be considered for approval
by Congress on an expedited
basis. It was this pledge to "fast
track" the President's bill
through Congress that provided
the justification for the Com-
mittee's refusal to introduce
amendments suggested, in-
cluding one by Committee
chairman Robert Pack wood (R.
On.).
PACKWOOD'S amendment
would have authorized the
President to phase out tariffs on
all goods within 10 years in
accordance with the agreement.
The President's version ex-
cludes certain import-sensitive
items leaving them to subsequent
approval by Congress. The
House Ways and Means Com
mittee has already adopted a
similar amendment to the one
proposed by Pack wood.
The clear indication given by
the majority of Committee
members, that they would reject
any change that might delay the
final drafting and approval of the
bill, caused some resentment on
the part of those seeking more
extensive debate of the
agreement that might address
concern about the American
textile and footwear industries in
particular, and the timing for
Israel's phasing out of subsidies
on export goods.
IF THE understanding is that
no amendment can be made,
George Mitchell (D., Me.l. who
introduced one of the amend-
ments, told the Committee, "then
the consultation process of this
committee is annulled, it's
charade, it's a farce." But Pack-
wood also defended the swift
consideration of the pact, saying
it was in keeping with the
Congressional promise to fast-
track the bill.
*
The following photograph
appeared in the March 29th
edition of the Floridian with some
names incorrectly listed, the
names below are correctly hated.
Pictured above: seated (left to
right) Jenny Eisenstein, Regina
Eisenstein, Rose Recknic, Jadzia
Szychter and Marysia Borden.
Standing (left to right) art Bmct
YudewiU, Federation Campaign
Director, Leo Rechnic, Karl
Szychter, David Sommer, Danitl
Cantor, Operation Mosts
Chairman, Norman Gitltr,
Bernard Eisenstein, Rose Gitler,
Max Borden and Jack Eisen-
stein. Not shown: Henry and
Rose KoploviU.
Although some compromise is
expected on the exact wording of
the bill to be formally introduced
by the President, a staff member
of the Senate Finance Committee
said the agreement was virtually
guaranteed swift Congressional
approval.
Ann Storck Center holds April 22 gala
Fatal Shooting
Causes Curfew
By JTA Service
JERUSALEM A curfew
remained in effect in the center of
Ramallah and the adjacent town
of El Bireh on the West Bank
Monday following the fatal
shooting of a Jewish settler
Avraham Nahulpik. in the
Ramallah market place -Sunday
The army said the curfew would
remain in force at least until
Wednesday afternoon.
Nabulnik. a resident of
Hadasha a Jewish settlement
just north of Jerusalem, was the
second Israeli to be murdered in
the Ramallah market place since
IDEAS
inXS,Kff f 'if Jewh Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
mvites their readers to submit any new and creative ideas thev
may have for improving the content or design of the papeT ^
t^SSs^ to: "-*?p **10
u/F'D LIKE YOU TO MEET
Discover state of the art
pamper.ng by our devoted
Zd owing sia With massage,
whirlpool, sauna, solarium
Have fun staying fit w.th tennis
golf.yogaandexeTC.se classes
6et the gourmet way Relax in
luxurious accommodations
Enioy I've entertainment
All this and more are
.ncluded in your Safety Harbor
Soa Vacation Package In a
private, tranquil Florida setting
on Tampa Bay. )ust 15 minutes
from Tampa International
Airport
For reservations write
Salu Devnam. Safety Harbor
Soa Safety Harbor. Florida
3572 Or call 1800 237 0155 ,
toll free Or call collect
(813)726-1161
U*m*Ch+
The Ann Storck Center is a
non-profit organization providing
a range of services for the benefit
of mentally retarded, physically
handicapped and autistic
children throughout the State of
Florida.
The Center's mission is to
preserve and strengthen these
forgotten children with special
services, Occupational Therapy,
Physical Therapy. Speech
Therapy and Psychology. |
They are sponsoring!
Benefit Performuw
Parker Playhouse on,
8 p.m. to raise
for the children.
mission is 810. Pal..
a choice seat for the j
and a special cockuil |
Green Room at Parker!
at 6:30 p.m.
_ For information call!
Feb. 4 when a soldier was gunned
down in almost the same spot,
near the central bus station.
Jewish settlers throughout the
territory reacted with fury.
One response by the Council of
Jewish Settlements was to
establish an unauthorized -t and
therefore illegal hew' set-
tlement close to Ramallah.
Tractors began leveling' the
ground while Volunteers ham-
mered poles into the ground.
There was no immediate in-
tervention by the Israel Defense
Force.
^l
J TORRID FLORIDA or COOL CATSKIL.
SPEND A VACATION, NOT A FORTUNE
SPRING LAKE INN
, PARKSVILLE, N.Y.
. -faaail, IrinitMf, Informal hotel, nestled In beautiful
Me. Day and Night aettvHiea. Dancerdn, Danes u
Tennis golf nearby. Outdoor putting green. LARGE)
lovely Lake.
SHOWTIME 2 Delicious Meals Daily
Discount Rates Accommodations for Sin
DIRECTORS: JOAN ft BERNIE KIRSNER
77S0 CYPRESS CRESCENT SOCA RATON. FL3J4M
(305)392-6781
Travel the world the Jewish wc
WITH
Kesher Kosher Tours ,
fc\3*'
oi*
T**
*S?
?*
*#i
^4
%
*IZ4
*S
\-nK I OH Ol H *IKIM, v SI MMI l< HKO FOP MORE INFORMATION CALL
LAGENT
KESHER KOSHER TOURS


Friday, April 12,1986 / The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale Page 11
<
Publix
Joyous
Passover Wishes
fromRiblix.
May the spring festival of Passover
bring a bounty of happiness
to your Seder table.


Page 12 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale / Friday, April 12,1986
i j r <
| Mai
Community Calendar
.^^[WJQWflM^
Compiled by Lori Ginsberg,
Federation 748-8400.
SATURDAY APRIL 13
Bermuda Club Entertainment
Committee: 8:30 p.m. Normand
La Chance's revue,
"Masquerade." featuring Jene
Chandler. Bermuda Clubhouse.
721-6645.
Sunrise Lakes Condo Association
Phase I: 7:30 p.m. Three-act
show featuring Emil Cohen.
Dancing. Donation $4.
Playhouse. 8100 Sunrise Lakes
Dr. N. 742-5150
SUNDAY APRIL 14
Ramat Shalom Synagogue: 10
a.m. Potential members brunch.
At Temple. 11301 W. Broward
Blvd.. Plantation. 472-3600.
Brandeis University NWC: 3
p.m. Gala Art Auction. Donation
$1. Jewish Community Center.
6501 W. Sunrise Blvd. 474-2056.
Temple Kol Ami-B.Z. s: 1 p.m.
Kosher deli luncheon, followed by
entertainment. Cost $4.50
members. $5 non-members. At
Temple. 8200 Peters Rd..
Plantation. 472-1988.
B'nai B'rith-Sands Point Lodge:
10 a.m. Installation of officers.
Singer Bernie Knee will en-
tertain. Tamarac Jewish Center.
9101 NW 57 St., Tamarac. 721-
2722.
MONDAY APRIL 15
Hadaasah-Scopus Chapter:
Donor luncheon. Crystal Lake.
428-3435 or 428-7663.
B'nai B'rith Plantation Lodge:
7:30 p.m. Installation of officers.
Deicke Aud., 5701 Cypress Rd.,
Plantation.
B'nai B'rith Women-Cypress
Chase Chapter Noon.
Installation of officers. Mr. Rays
Restaurant, Lakes Mall.
Foster Grandparent Program:
8:30 a.m. Meeting. Salvation
Army Fellowship Hall, 100 SW 9
Ave.
Hadassah liana Hawaiian
Gardens Chapter: Chinese
luncheon and card party. Wans
Mandarin House, University Dr
484-3693.
WLIHatikva Chapter. Noon
Meeting and mini-lunch.
Broward Savings, 3000 W.
University Dr.
TUESDAY APRIL 16
B'nai B'rith Kol Haverim Lodge:
8 p.m. Meeting. Rabbi Samuel
April of Temple Sholom will
discuss. "No Easy Questions."
First Congregation Church. 2501
NE 30 St.. Fort Lauderdale.
Deborah-Sunrise Chapter: Card
party. 742-5071 or 741-1275.
Yiddish Culture Club. 10 a.m.
Joseph Goldhar will present
lecture dealing with Warsaw
Ghetto Uprising. Satellite No. 15.
742-8709.
NCJW-N. Broward Section:
Noon. Meeting. Silent auction
plus mini-lunch. Temple Emanu-
F.l. 3245 W. Oakland Pk. Blvd.
Hadassah-Oriole Scopus
Chapter: Noon. Meeting.
Congregation Beth Hillel. 7638
Margate Blvd.
B'nai B'rith Lauderdale Lakes
Lodge: 7:30 p.m. Meeting.
Hawaiian Gardens Phase 8
Clubhouse. 4700 NW 35 St.
THURSDAY APRIL 18
Holocaust Survivors Friendship
Club: 2 p.m. Remembrance of
Holocaust. Abraham J. Git-
telson. Federation director of
education, will speak Century
Village East Clubhouse Theater.
Hadasssh-Rayus Tamarac
Chapter: Noon. IMA Mother of
Israel" luncheon honoring
president Eunice Gross. Tamarac
Jewish Center. 9101 NW 57 St.
722-1783 or 722-4250.
Hadasssh-Blyms Msrgate
Chapter: Noon. Passover third
Seder. "A Haggadah for our
Times,"' will be presented.
Congregation Beth Hillel of
Margate.
Hadassah-Ilana Chapter of
Hawaiian Gardens: 12:30 p.m.
Meeting. Clubhouse Phase 7.
B'nai B'rith Women Tamarac
Chapter: Installation of officers.
Country Club of Coral Springs,
10800 W. Sample Rd.
Temple Beth Israel. Deerfield
Beach-Sisterhood: Noon.
Meeting. Celebration of Israel's
37th anniversary. At Temple, 200
S. Century Blvd.
Intro to Judaism course
April 18 at Kol Ami
On Monday Evening, April 18,
at 7 p.m.. The North Broward
Board of Rabbis, in cooperation
with Temple Kol Ami and Ramat
Shalom, will be sponsoring an
introduction to Judaism"
Course.
This course will be taught by
Rabbi Sheldon J. Harr of Temple
Kol Ami and by Rabbi Elliot
Skiddell of Ramat Shalom. It will
continue for a period of 10 weeks.
The first five weeks will be held
at Temple Kol Ami. 8200 Peters
Road (between University and
Pine Island Road), in Plantation
This course in Basic Judaism
will cover some history, theology,
customs, ceremonies, festivals
holidays and beliefs. It is an
overview of Judaism and Jewish
Temple Sholom
to host dual event
Life.
This course is primarily offered
to those persons who are in-
terested in converting to
Judaism. Please contact Rabbi
Sheldon Harr. 472-1988, for
further information and
registration procedures.
Teenage Holocaust Com-
memoration: Call Sharon, 748-
8400.
Pioneer Women Na'amat-Ayanot
Club: Open meeting for new
members. 979-3311.
Pioneer Women Na'amat
Tamara Chapter: Noon. Meeting.
Water Bridge Rec. Center. 1050
Del Lago Circle.
B'nai B'rith Women-Ocean
Chapter: Noon. Installation of
officers and paid-up membership
luncheon. Price S7.50 members.
$9.50 guests. Entertainment.
Gait Ocean Mile Hotel. 3200 Gait
Ocean Dr.. Fort Lauderdale. 565-
5891.
Temple Sholom: 1 p.m.
Remembrance of the Holocaust
(Yom Hashoa) and celebration of
Israel Independence Day. Lee
Gorenstein and Esther Cannon
will narrate. Mini-lunch at noon
At Temple, 132 SE 11 Ave..
Pompano.
Hadassah-L'Chayim Plantation
Chapter: Noon. Meeting and
mini-lunch. Deicke Aud.. 5701
Cypress Rd.. Plantation. 473-
5981.
Jewish Book Review Series: 1 to
2:30 p.m. interrupted Life." by
Etty Hillesum. Taramac Branch.
748-8400.
WEDNESDAY APRIL 17
Yom Hashoa Observance: 7 p.m.
Remembrance of the Holocaust.
Temple Beth Am, 7205 Royal
Palm Blvd.. Margate.
Sunrise Jewish Center-
Sisterhood: Noon. Meeting.
Cosmetic demonstration by
Anita Knight. At Temple. 4099
Pine Island Rd., Sunrise.
Temple Ohel B'nai Raphael-
Sisterhood: Noon. Meeting. Max
Rubin will discuss. "Saga of a
Nation At Temple. 4351 W.
Oakland Pk. Blvd.. Lauderdale
Luke.s
Both Yom Hashoa. Holocaust
Remembrance Day, and Israel
Independence Day. are being
observed this month, by a
presentation by the Temple
Sholom Sisterhood.
The program will take place on
Tuesday April 16, starting at 1
p.m. at the Temple, 132 SE 11
Ave.. Pompano.
Lee Gorenstein, education vice
president, and Esther Cannon.
Israel Affairs chairman, will be
the narrators, and cantor-
guitarist Bella Bogart will
augment chapters of Jewish
history with canto rial and Israeli
music.
A mini-lunch will be served at
noon. The public is invited. Call
942-6410.
A Diversified
Jewish Quiz
By RABBI
DAVID W GORDON
1- In which direction do
worshippers face?
2- Can you name the only
living creature not included on
the passenger list of Noah's Ark?
3- What is the popular name
by which the Talmud, consisting
of 63 Tractates, is known?
4- What law of Moses shows a
repugnance to usury?
5- Who was the first Jew ever
to be appointed to the Supeme
Court?
6- Who was known as the
Barnum of Basketball?
7- When and by whom was the
first Siddur (Prayer Book) in-
troduced?
8- Who coined the phrase.
"Handwriting on the Wall"?
9- Are there any Biblical Books
that are named after a women?
10- In confessing our sins on
Yom Kippur and throughout the
year why do we gently beat our
breasts?
See Pafe 14. fOP
answer*
theGolds:
w 1
THE 800 ETHIOPIAN CHILDREN enrolled in JV.
Women day cart center, are learning Hebrew a[
customedto Israeli life. (Above) liana, 3. who cam, Ji
Georgia, Russia, teaches the fine art of finger paintinil,
2H, a recent immigrant from Ethiopia. '""""UsJ
All About Medical
Q: My neighbor and I were
talking about Medicare one
night. We got into an argument
about what happens to a person
who cheats on his Medicare
claims. I said that if someone
gets caught, he may go to jail for
fraud. My neighbor insisted that
the person may be fined a great
deal of money. Pleas* tell us who
is right: my neighbor or It
A: Actually, you are both
right. According to a particular
Social Security Act provision,
persons, committing certain
fraudulent acts, can be punished
by means of both monetary fines
and imprisonment. In relation to
Medicare, government
distinguishes between criminal
and civil penalties. Criminal
penalties are usually imposed on
a person who "knowingly and
willfully" misrepresents in-
formation on a claim, makes false
statements, conceals any in-
formation in order to secure
Medicare reimbursement, or
retains Medicare payment after
he applied for the benefit ol
another person. If such an in-
dividual commits fraudulent acts
directly, he is guilty of a felony
and. if convicted, may be fined up
to $25,000 or imprisoned for up to
five years. If someone else (other
than a person submitting a claim)
is involved, that person is guilty
of a misdemeanor and. if con-
victed, may be fined up to
$10,000 or imprisoned for up to
one year. If a doctor misleads
Medicare or violates an
agreement with _
may be faced with 1
penalties. A good _
case of physicum
charge patients in'
temporary physics* ,
In July 1984 Medics*)
month freeze
allowances for
vices. During this
fective through!
doctors must notch
anymore than they 1
1964. Those who
agreement may boa
civil penalty of up to I
Q: Does Medicart onj
use of heat lamps!
A: Medicare will
patient for the use of I
only if such medical I
has a therapeutic
patient. Medical stiff 1
by Medicare conadm]
individual claim and
whether or not the aaj
lamps is covered.
Jewish Family Sir
recipient agency of
Federation of South
Jewish Federation ol I
Fort Lauderdale andtkt\
Way of Broward
have a Medicare as
problem: CALL
Information Service
County at 966-t
Hollywood. 735-3394
Lauderdale, and I
Deerfield Beach.
eswvVe-r\wilur. XV
MOVING &
^ STORAGE
Local A Long Distance Licensed a In*"**|
Hollywood
923-3300
Ft. Lauderdale/
Pompano
563-5680
Pass it around when there's
fish on the table!
The fresh, zlngy. fish flavor
upper makes the taste buds
tingle with delight!
Remember the Golds when
you re doing the holiday
shopping.
Golds
HORSERADISH my,rdaln

RIDGE
CAMP and RESORT FOR ROYS A GIRLS 6-lij
YOOH MOUNTAIN OP PUN Where SprW
Comes A Spends the Summer
ONLY 2 HOURS NORTH OF ATLANTA
MOUNTAIN CITY oa
All Water Sports in Our Own Twin Spring Fed u*"
e White Water Canoeing e ML Trail Hikes n*.
Arts ft Crafts e Sailing e Skiing Gymnastics*"
Dance e Go Carls e Computers e Roller Skating
e Rock Climbing e Basketball e Soccer Som*
e Hockey e Zoological ft Science Pro0ram__M
Dietary Laws Observed e Shabbat Services
Medical Staff Available at All Times1
Accredited Member American Camping Assoc
VoorC
C0ACN J
Directors
ttft
*rit
Miami Beach Phone 305-538-3434 or
P.O. Box 2888. Miami Beach. Fla 33i
UM
,no
fJttOUAtfNT



.....
Friday, April 12,1986 / The Jewiah Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
18
NORTON
TIRE CO.
pv*J
GOOD/YEAR
CUSTOM POLfSTEEL^WHITEWALLS
_az_
P155 80-13
Piasao-n
P1B5 75-14
P195 75-14
PRICE
34.95
42,95,
-46,95
46.95
SIZE
P2Q& 7S-1S
P215 75 15
P225 75-15
P23575-15
FREE14P0INT
SAFETY CHECK
TIRES-BALANCE
BRAKES-HOSES
BELTS-BATTERY
5H0CKS& MORE
| NEW CAR CHANGEOVERS |
Micftelin
TWWTEKKALiS
BRAND NEW
20575-14 XZ4
55$
RIGHT PLACE
FORM
RIGHT TIRE
PRICE
53,5
55,95
56.95
59.95
BECAUSE SO MUCH IS RIDING ON YOUR TIRES
I THE MEW XH IS HERE! xh' whitewaus
femp^tottoitanaartMldwIinXWWRadtal
6ie ft RaaW tire batons: DtecKiM-
89rimtnc9M fefecad rotting resistance lor
increaaodlwel economy Special Irud com
pound etpeciaPy (tenoned to deliver high mileage
XZXorMXL
(atpndlnf on yiMttHty)
TUBELESS BLACK P-METRIC
'X'WMITEWALLS
SIZE
PRICE
185/80-13 XH 54.95
185/75-14 XH
195.75-14 XH
205/75-14 XH
15S 12
145-13
155-13
165-13
165-14
175-14
ies-M
165-15
16570-13
175 70 13
16470-13
33.95
34 95
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46.96
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ae PMC6
P185/75-14 55.95
P195/75-14 58.95
P215/75-14 67.95
P205/75-15 63.95
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59.95
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ALL SEASON RADIAL
a met
P175/80R13 1.96
P185/75P.14 64 M
P19S/75P.M 66.96
P2O5/70P.14 76J6
P205/75P.15 75.95
P215/70R15 77.96
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P235/7SP.15 7.95
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P155/80R13 32.95
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P175/75R14 39.96
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P195/75R14 44.95
P205 75R14 46.95
P21575R14 47.95
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P23575R15 57.95
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SIZE PRICE
P166V80R13 29.50
P185/80R13 3i sr\
P185/75R14 36.42
P195/75R14 34.25
P205/75R14 36.11
P215/75R14 4O04
P205/75R15 39J2
P215/75R15 39X91
P225/75R15 41.19 1
P235/75R15 | 42.78 1
FBLTCLASSBaiH) I
SIZE nmr r 1 rrncel
P19SV75B14 25.16 1
P20S75B14 26.01 I
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P21&75B15 j 28.11 1
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P2357SB15 I 31.82 1
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SIZE PRICE 1
P166V80D13 21.89 1
P175/80013 2449 1
P18S75D14 28.14 1
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Most of our mechanics have been TESTED and CERTIFIED
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0
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New filter Comp. lube
For most U.S. passen-
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40 MONTH
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89J6
63.95
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P77BLACKWALLS
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155SR12
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186SR13
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3746
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41.98*
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* New P44 available in these
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Y865 STEEL BELT RADIAL
155SR12
145SR13
155SR13
165SR13
175SR14
185SR14
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175/70SR13
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18S70SR14
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B7o io(P17575-13
B7tM3P165 80-13
D78-14JP185 75-14
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F 76-14 P19575-14 KU
F78^14iP205 70-14 2S*5
Lktmmquantities Not all items
waMeiotetSub|ecnopnofniee
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DAVIE......... st Rd 64 knlMtl of Univ. Dr. 473-4700
pCERFJELD BEACH .......2265 W. Httlaboro Blvd. 427-9900
"LAUOEROALE ...........1740E.SunrlaaBlvd 493-7589
^fAH/PALMS^RpNOSMILE ......"7549ttiS1 822-2500
HOMESTEAD...............30100 S-Faderal Hwy. 247- 1622
NEt^LDR7M,QATESQUARE 13072 5W.9ath St. 397-0129
HfS**"-0*-.......9^ 99* SLai*1071hAve. 595-1545
^AIRPORT......Ntt2591. AMHamDal^rW 593-1191
BREACH...................1464 Alton Road672-5363
r^.f.i|1,|JrllelL'li.yJ4kM

NORTH MIAMI.................13300 N.W. 7th Ave. 681-8541
N MIAMI BEACH ...............1700 N.E 163rd St. 945-7454
PEMBROKE PtNES HltywdBrvd, wamtof Unrv.Dr.435-1383
PLANTATION ...................381N. State Rd 7 587-2186
POMPANOBEACH ...........3151N.Factor*!Hwy.943-4200
SOUTH DADE ..................9001S. Dixie Hwy. 667-7575
TAMARAC ...............NUnhr.Dr.9McNabRd.721-4700
TAMARAC .............4414 W. Commercial Blvd. 735-2772
W.H0LLYW0OD................497 S.StateRd. 7 987-0450
WEST MIAMI................Bird 8 Galloway Rda 552-8656
W-TAMtAMtTRAM................12520 S-With St. 551-1141
rmaanni
AlSOSIORfSH*
oarraa9CM
mna
ROYM.MLM9UCH
THWEtn
TITWWUi
999661*01
waimmmtot


Page 14 The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale / Friday. April 12,1986
ISRAEL BONDS NEWS: The North Broward
Israel Bonds Campaign recently honored Dr.
Sherwin and Arlene Mendeli and Bernard and
Beverly Weston for their leadership and chair-
manship of the successful Bonds breakfast held
recently at Temple Beth Israel Pictured (left to
right) are Martin I. Lipnack, North Broward
General Campaign Chairman of Israel Bonds; the
Mendells; Libo Fineberg, vice president of ad-
ministration of Temple Beth Israel; and the
Westons.
CONSECRATION FOR THE KINDERGARTEN CLA Hebrew Day School u exciting, creative and mta
dergarten teachers, Mrs. Cheryl Best and Mrs Maxint^k
lighting the Shabbat candies), assisted Mrs Aharon 3
conducting the Consecration ceremony. Stacy Singer daJZ
and Mrs. Jack Singer, recites the blessing over the candkt.,
SpeiUer, son of M,.and Mrs. Jeffrey Speiller gets raajy |TT
prayer over the wine.
AJCongress: 'Louisiana's 'Creation Science' Law veiled effort to teach religion'
The American Jewish
Congress says a Louisana law
requiring public schools to teach
the biblical theory of creation as a
science is a thinly-disguised
attempt to convert the schools
into "instruments of religious
instruction."
The organization wants the
U.S. Court of Appeals for the
Fifth Circuit to uphold a lower
court ruling that the Louisiana
law, known aa the "Balanced
Treatment Act," is un-
constitutional because it violates
the prohibition against gover-
nment sponsorship of religion.
An amicus, or friend-of-the-
court. brief, announced by
Marvin E. Frankel, co-chair of
AJCongress* Commission on
Law and Social Action, declares
that the state's legislature "may
not require the teaching of
religious dogma in the guise of
creationiam by passing it off as
science."
The brief says that the real
issue in the case, known as
Aguillard v. Edwards, is not
whether theologians or scientists
are ultimately correct about
evolution, but whether "creation
science" is a scientific theory or a
religious one. If it is a science,
Louisiana may include it in the
Smith fasts for Soviet Jewry
Congressman Larry Smith (D-
Floridal joined many of his
colleagues, religious leaders, and
human rights activists from
around the country in a prayer
and fast vigil to show support for
the Soviet Jewish emigration
movement.
"We are fasting to draw at-
tention to the human rights
violations of Soviet Jews who
wish to emigrate and are not
allowed to do so," said Smith.
"The Soviets need to realize that
Soviet Jewish emigration is a
priority and commitment of the
United States."
"The Soviet Union continues
to test the Western world in the
hope that we will remain silent,"
warned Smith. "Actions such aa
today's fast show that we cannot
and will not be silent. We must
continue to rivet the eyes of the
world on the Soviet Government
that has increased their attacks
against Jews and Jewish
heritage."
Smith also reiterated his
proposal to make the issue of
Soviet Jewish emigration, snd all
human rights violations, an
essential component of any U.S.-
Soviet trade, economics, or arms
negotiations. "The problem
should be elevated above the
realm of humanitarian appeals to
an integral non-dismiasabke part
of any negotiations," stated
Smith.
This is the third annual
Congressional Prayer and Fast
Vigil for Soviet Jewry. This year,
several hundred participants
attended the ceremony on the
West Front of the Capitol. Smith
fasted in the name of his adopted
Soviet refusenik, Dr. Yuri
Tamopolsky of Kharkov. Tar-
nopolsky ia serving a three-year
prison sentence for wanting to
emigrate to Israel.
Senate Unit adopts requirement
on sale of AWACS to Saudi Arabia
WASHINGTON (JTA1 The
Senate Foreign Relations
Committee unanimously ap-
proved a requirement that before
any AWACS are delivered to
Saudi Arabia. President Reagan
certifies to Congress that the
Saudis have contributed to the
peace process in the Middle East.
The requirement was proposed
by Sen. Alan Cranston (D. Calif.)
as an amendment to the Foreign
Aid Bill which was adopted by
the Committee. When the Senate
approved the sale of the AWACS
B'nai B'not Mitzvah
TEMPLE BETH ORR
Jarad Backer, son of William
I
Candlelighting Times
April 66:21 p.m.
April 6 7:30 p.m
April 11 6:24p.m.
April 12 6:24 p.m.
April 19 6:26 p.m.
April 26 6:31p.m.
and Bella Bucker, will celebrate
his Bar Mitzvah at the Saturday
morning April 13 service at
Temple Beth Orr, Coral Springs.
DaaJei Baryehko. son of Ma.
Sherie Baryehko. will become a
Bar Mitzvah celebrant at the
Saturday April 13 service at Bath
On-.
TEMPLE EMANU EL
David Moatial, son of Carol
and Francisco Montiel. will be
called to the Torah in honor of his
Bar Mitzvah at the Saturday
moming April 13 service at
Tsmple Emanu El, Port
TEMPLE KOL AMI
DeaJels Grbig. Amrmhttw
of Laura, snd Warren Greenness;.
will cakbrau har Bat Mitzvah at
the Friday night April 12 service
at Temple KolAmi. Plantation.
At the Saturday morning April
13 service, the Bar Mitzvah of
?as) Flakslstaa, son of Lynda
and Myron Finkelstein. will be
celebrated.
b 1981, Reagan sent a letter to
then Majority Leader Howard
Baker (R Tenn.) saying that
before delivery he would certify
that the Saudis had been helpful
in the peace process as well as
several technical requirements
protect the security of the
technology in the AWACS.
The first five AWACS are
scheduled to be delivered in
January. The Cranston amen-
dment would now make Reagan's
promise s requirement under law
if adopted by the full Senate and
the House. Rep. Michael Barnes
(D. Md.) is introducing a similar
amendment in the House.
Diversified Quiz
1 East.
2-Pish.
3- "Shea" an abbreviation of
"Shiehah Sadarim Six Orders.
the
4-The law forbidding
taking of interest on bane
to another Jew.
6- Louis Dambitx Brand***
- Abe Saperstein and bis
team. "The Harlem Globe
Trotters."
7 In the
Amnun Gaon
year 866 by Rabbi
8- Bible. Daniel Chapter 6.
10 This custom is based on a
passage in the Talmud that the
heart and the eyes are the two
agents of sin (eye ess and heart
desires). The hand, the in-
strument of action beats the
heart aa if to say: "You caused
me to do this wrong*"
curriculum, the brief points out,
but if it b not "consistent with
the teachings and methods of the
branch of human
knowledge we call
cannot be included.
CONSERVATIVE
TAMARAC JEWISH CRNTRR Service* Sunday through Friday 8:S a.m.. 8 p.m. UU Friday ar
pm Saturday 8:46 a.m.. 6 p.m. RaSM Kail S. SteM. AwHWfl
Nathan Zotendeh. Cairter R. HtUel raaiwar.
TRMRLR StTM AM (ST4-SSBS). TSM Royal Palm Blvd. Hup*
Services: Monday through Friday SO a.m.. 6 p m ^l,f
p.m ; Saturday 9 a.m.. B pm.; Sunday 8 am 5 pm Ssmrml
Rabbi Emeritus. Dr. SolomonQatd. Cantor IrvingOrotaman.
TEMPLE RITH ISRARL (74*4010). 7100 W. Oakland Part Bhi.I
BUS Service*: Monday UiroufhThuraday8a.m.B:9p.m.;MA*l
B p.m..8p.m.; Saturday 8:46 a.m.; Sunday ( am .5 JO p.m .***"
; Lasiwin. Cantor Me*rlc* Mae.
TEMPLE RRTN ISRARL OR DHRRFIBLD SISCH (4S.-I
Century Blvd.. Deortleld Beach 88441 Servke*: Sunday tnrwerni
a.m.. 6 p.m. Friday late aervice 8p.m Saturday I m..im(
lighting time "* "** Lanener. Canter Skaatal Ackerm**.
a
, TEMPLE R'NAI MOSHE (43-6B*0>. 1484 SE terd St., Pomp*I
3SO80. Service*: Friday (p.m. Beta* MerrIt A. She*
TEMPLE SHA'ARAY TZRDRK <741-03*6). 40M Pine IleMM,l
88831. Service*: Sunday through Friday 8 am op m Latirnta*
p.m.. Saturday 8:46 a.m.. 6:80p.m. BteaM Reward 8. "
*R*B*f
TRMPLR SMOLOM 1*4304101. 183 IE 11 Av*.. ^l"fB0J?*L
vices: Monday through Friday 8:46 a.m. evening* *""**** .
aday at 6 pm.. Friday evening at 8. Saturday and Sunday I *
SO*Moi April. canter Sanaa*) Renter.
CON OWE OAT ION BRTH HILLRL OR MARRATE Blvd.. Margate 8*008 Service*: Sunday ttirouittFriday = *lS
Late Friday aervloa p.m. Saturday :* a.m.. 6: JO pm. "
Manner Canter Jo*) Cohen.
HEBREW COMOREOATION OR LAUORRMILL <7"f>:*'2
AW. LauderhUl 88818. service*: Sunday through Friday -
pm.; Saturday 8 46am. R*a*l lireel Haiporn
NOBTSI LAUDEJLDAIX BURRSW CX)NORXOATI0N: (*[*
37B> Servteee at Banyan Lake* Condo Caa)hom*.
Tanuu-ac Friday atBp.m Saturday *am Char la* B. Fyler.
ORTHODOX
TRMPLR OMRL R'NAI RARMARL (TJS-IBBI). \52^,vi
Lauderdaie Lakes 88818 SorvieoB: Sunday through Tnuraaey
Friday 8 a.m. .6 p.m.. Saturday 8:46 a.m.. 6p.m.
SVNAOOOUi OF INVtRRARV CMARAO 1748-1777^"^,^
coin Park Weat. Sunrtee 88831. Service*: Saaday thf"**" r/Jfl tf
p.m.. Saturday a.m.. S X p.m. Study ^^J*TL.
ervicoo; W*mew, T**asayt 6 p.m. ReaM Area usaarwav
YOUHO ISRARL OR DRRRRIRLO BEACH (431 1NJ)"*?,
Blvd.. Deerfleld Beach 8M41. Service*: Sunday Ui>*te*TTi^.l
aundown. Saturday 0:06 a.m. and sundown Ofcater Raw**
YOUIeVisRAR L SYMARORUR OR HOLLYWOOO'OBTLW^
(008 7ST7). 83*1 Stirling Rat. Fort Lauetardata 8*113 a*^ (
through Friday T:SS a.m.. and aundown. BABHday.
8 a m auk>WB Ra*M T '
CON*MROATK>N MIROAL DAVID (
TUmarac lorvleao: Dally 8 a.m.;
Ftatechar. RRCONSTRUCTIONin
R. *#*
?"*]
ttie?S-
RAMAT
I
Friday 8:16pm;
>>.
TBMPLR BBTH ORR (
6: Friday pm.
.re BirO^nM-,7,
SMI Rrraraia. Dr^*BJ
rlBaVS.R*Biiori0al"k
1*0.8*.
RRRORM
).
TRMRLR R'NAI SHALOM ORPR mmrimU>*j^2d !***."""'
TRMFLR HOL AMI (*T
Friday 8 18 p.m
LIRRRAL JRWIBH TRMRLR OR COe*)WT c""l^S*aT<*^
Frtday nagOK aarvteaa twtee wiamly M CaWj3>r
Pmrtiway
-zp*rrs
WRST aaOWARD JRWISH COHRRRRATHJOI[[rm^t0$r,t
PlantaUoa Servtcat: Friday 8: IS pm
cetehraUoaa. a*M SOaart L.
SSi


v ., hf '< '' T9ljrfO k. .'jR'^ron rfrrT WfT
Friday, April 12, 1985 / The Jewiah Floridian of Greater FortjUuderdale
Page 16
Children and the Holocaust
I Story. Clara Heller
L as told to Joan Adea
I. Jewish Publication
Mi 119 pages. Agaa
195
on Bird Street. Uri
slated from the
by Hillel Halkin.
Mifflin Company.
pages. Ages 10-14.
IbySntBarancik
I here, Mindy." I said to
i-year-old daughter.
read you the first
[this new book, Clara's
i the true story of what
| to one woman during
ust when she was a
Pom," Mindy protested,
are too scary. I'd
I try," I continued,
veryou want."
in my reading aloud
Isaacman's personal
[ Clara's Story. One
1 to two, and two to
I two hours later, my
a, we finished the
it was sad; yes, we
But the reading ex-
|j '00 percent wor-
of all, because
the opportunity to
become emotionally involved in
the life of one young girl and her
family and, second, to learn a
great deal about Hitler and the
destruction of European Jewry.
Clara and her family,
Romanian citizens, were living
comfortably in Antwerp,
Belgium, when whispers of
Hitler's excursions into
European countries were heard.
"It couldn't happen here," they
blithely told each other, of
course, inch by inch, it certainly
did!
Clara's family's attempts to
escape to France and England
were futile. When their pleasant
Jewiah street was "liberated"
(cleaned out by SS troops with
their heavy boots and loud
trucks), the Heller family waa
saved by their Romanian
citizenship. With the assistance
of the growing Resistance
movement, the Heller family was
moved from place to place
bakeriea, basements, barrooms,
mansions, and minute, miserable
rooms. The mother's wits (the
father was an early victim) in.
sensing when to move on and the
closeness of the family made their
tedious, but tense, life bearable.
Mrs. Isaacman's keen ob-
servations throughout the story.
II Jewish best-seller list
JiNGTON-Basedona
IwJewish bookstores in
^ the United States.
B'rith International
PWWy has selected on
Iwue the following as
\*** of Jewish
/wy are listed
*y oy title.
OVER
tot the Jews.
*yman Pantheon.
LS
response to the
& Color'' l8rael
Jwibleday. $19.95. The
F Jewish experience.
Safrp^,Chaini pk>k.
The child of a
s drawn to
Son- Blia Wiesel.
Summit. SI 5.95. Will a Holocaust
victim's son pursue his father's
persecutor?
Soeaadey the Rabbi Wii Come.
Harry Kemelman. Morrow.
SI 5.95. Murder mystery.
PAPERBACK
The Canlnei fca the Garden.
Moacyr Scliar. Ballantine. S6.96.
Romantic fable set in Brazil.
Changing Israel. Peter Grose.
Vintage. 14.96. Socioeconomic
study of modern Israel.
Jewiah Trivia and Information
Book. Ian Shapolsky.
Steimatzky. $5.95. Q & A in
categories including Bible,
current events, personalities.
Tongues of Pire. Peter
Abrams. Pocket. $3.96. Mystery
set in the Middle East.
>A Transmitter talks begin
t\LEM IJTA) _
*h^,nCan diPnts
*' ,began
bus 1 rad, tr*n-
S^WU 10 erect in
bin? f Ameri<*
b*lnd the Iron
^ concerned the
H wo "**
hhhS, co.unt".
hUfZ* sPk \i" Sh**. an
^ "' n the
[5^ delegation
En "ron. deput
Am^can teaS;
ted by Robert Flatten, the Charge
d'Affairs at the U.S. Embassy in
Tel Aviv, and Walter Roberts,
executive director of the Board of
International Broadcasting. ,
Israel agreed recently, after
considerable pressure from the
Reagan Administration, to
permit a VOA transmitter P
Israeli soil. The purpose is to
beam VOA programs to the
. Soviet Union and 'Communist-
bloc countries from a location
where the Soviets will find it
difficult to jam the signals. It
waa pointed out that Israel is
geographically closer to the
Soviet Union's Central Asian
provinces than Western Europe.
Some Israelis had objected to
the transmitter on grounds that
it would involve Israel in the
"flupupunni1 pupagalHll'
reflecting on the situations they
encountered and placing them in
a larger perspective, added to its
value. This is a wonderful book
for young readers. Just ask
Mindy!
The Hellers spent the war
years as a family in hiding.
Young Alex in Uri Ortev's novel
The Island on Bird Street spent
those very same years in a Jewish
ghetto in Poland, hiding alone in
a bombed out building. His
mother had gone to visit a friend
in another Ghetto; she never
returned. His father, who tutored
Alex in the realistic ways of life
and war, was abruptly taken in a
"Selection."
Alex lived by his deter-
mination and intelligence,
procuring food and other needed
supplies from apartments in
which the owners had been
forcibly removed. He found
himself the most secure hiding
place in the building and devised
ways to survive physically and
mentally. He eventually made
brief forays to the Polish area on
the other side of the wall.
His life was perhaps riskier
than Clara's; it definitely
required more responsibility than
here did.
Orlev's story reflects his own
life. He spent the war years in
hiding with his mother and
brother in the Warsaw Ghetto.
After their capture, he was sent
to Bergen-Belsen. When the war
waa over, he emigrated to Israel
where he still lives. This novel, so
beautifully and simply written
that a youngster of 11 or 12 can
understand it, has garnered
several Israeli literary prizes.
Both books are superb ad-
ditions to our Holocaust
collection for young people,
presenting diverse characters
facing insurmountable and
unbelievable odds.
When we encourage our
children to become aware of what
happened to our people, we are
teaching them that it is our
responsibility to see that such a
horrible tragedy never happens
again. We open up the doors to
understanding by allowing our
youngsters to become
emotionally involved with young
heroes and heroines, whether
they are "real" people, such as
Clara, or fictional characters lik
Alex.
Sue Barancih is the Librarian
for Temple Adath B'nai Israel in
Evansville, Indiana. She is also a
fret-lane* storyteller traveling
'from community to community,
nursery school to nursing home.
Marc Chagall dead at 97
Marc Chagall, perhaps the greatest Jewish artist of all time,
has died at the age of 97. Chagall was the last living member of
the generation of artists whose world began early in this century
and shaped our concept of modern art.
Marc Chagall was born in Vitebsk, Russia, in 1887 of a
Haas id ic Jewish family. White be waa to spend most of his life in
Prance, Jewish traditions and symbols, Russian ikons and folk
art, and memories of traditional village life filled his imagination
and set him apart from the modern European artists he met in
Paris. He organized his paintings poetically, blending layers of
reality and illusion. As the artist wrote: "For the Cubists a
painting was a surface covered with forms in a certain order. For
me a picture is a surface covered with representations of things
(objects, animals, human beings) in s certain order in which
logic and illustration have no importance. The visual effect of
the composition is what is paramount."
Association of the Jewish Blind
The Association of Jewish
Blind is a non-profit agency,
supported entirely by private
contributions. The facility on
Chicago's north side provides
room and kosher meab for
visually impaired adults, as well
as counseling, recreational ac-
tivities and religious services and
holiday celebrations. Quite
unique, the Association operates
the only sheltered care home for
the Jewish blind in the middle
west and one of only two
nationwide.
"The founding members were
dedicated to the purpose of
providing a quality long-term
sheltered care residence," said
Fred I. Oskin, executive director.
"In addition to upholding their
original principles, we have
added occupational and physical
therapy; social work and
psychological counseling: plus
educational and vocational
guidance."
"Today the Home is a
rehabilitation center as well as a
residential center because most
newly-blinded individuals need
special training for adapting to
life,'' Oskin continued. "Our
residents are cared for in the best
of Jewish tradition as well as
with the best in nursing and
related areas of care."
The Home is sn approved
placement site for blind veterans
in the Residential Care Program
of Veterans Administration, and
a field placement site fbr social
SPECIALIZED CARE"
FORTHEHOMEBOUND
24 hr nursing service since 1972
Serving All Dade A Broward Counties
R.N.'s, L.P.N.'s, Nurses Aides, Homemakers
Specialize in Live-Ins & Post Hospital Care
Insurance Assignments
ALL DADE HOME CARE
I Miami 5764)383, Hwd. M3-1417 Ft Laud. 566-6503 j
,iH students from several area
universities.
The Home also has various
programs and services available
to members of the blind com-
munity, free of charge. These
include monthly Activity Days;
dances with a live band; a self-
help support group; and other
projects. The Home is also a
source of aids and appliances for
the visually impaired. Oskin
coordinates outreach programs
designed to alert people to the
causes and prevention of blin-
dness and to educate the com-
munity about the needs of blind
individuate.
For a brochure about the
Association, or for further in-
formation, contact: Fred Oskin,
executive director, Association of
Jewish Blind of Chicago, 3625 W.
Foster, Chicago, 111 60625, or
phone 312-478-7040.
^HOTLINE^
TO JERUSALEM
la lime ai illness, wrgery sr
crisis special prayer* will be
recited at the Western Wall and
at eur Yeshiva in Jerusalem
CALL 24 HOURS
(718)871-4111
A FREE PUBLIC SERVICE OF
The American Rabbi Meir
Baal Haness Charity
KOLEL AMERICA
112 Nstias SI N T N Y 10031
WWW A- A J a j A
KADDI$H.
Mishnayotrt Vnkor & Yurbeit
observes witn a minyon in our
Yeshiva He:chal Rjooi M i
Baal Haness in Jerusalem
CALL________
Remember Kolei Amend
Rabbi Met' Baal Haness In
Your Will
T T ? T T ?
Oritr Our rasas* Sfb ftr **
B-ha. Mssslaati ksi Seems"


Page 16 The Jewish Fkmdian of Greater Fort Uuderdale/Friday, April 12,1986
LIGHTS IOCS: 10 mg. V, 0.8 mg. racmm. WNft 17 mg. 'wm. 13 mg. new*, *. g* ogifitw by FTC mtthod
You ve got what It takes.
Share the spirit
Share the refreshment
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