The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 3, no. 7 (Apr. 5, 1974)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 9, 1976 called v.4, no. 27 but constitutes v.5, no. 1; issue for July 7, 1989 called v.18, no. 11 but constitutes v.18, no. 13.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44570954
lccn - sn 00229545
ocm44570954
System ID:
AA00014312:00251

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Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward


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Full Text
vJeitisf) floridian
12 Number 33
OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE
Fort Laudsrdale, Florida Friday. October 7.1983
C fndShochti
Price 35 Cents
\ep. Shaw sees 'better days ahead' for Israel
-
W4
._!
f A? crowd pictured as Congressman Shaw
on his Israel visit with Prime Minister-
Yizthak Shamir. Shaw had his wife,
ite
{Raymond
Ion Staff Writer
[duced as "Israel's greatest friend in
Lgton," Broward County's U.S. Rep-
^ive E. Clay Shaw of Fort Lauderdale,
lis friendship for Israel during a talk to
|an 100 persons Sept. 26 at the Jewish
>n of Greater Fort Lauderdale.
report on his recent fact-finding tour
Shaw's introduction was offered by
>ss, a past president of the Federation,
his wife, Evelyn, accompanied the
in, his wife, Emily, and their
> the trip.
bng, taking place just a couple of hours after
Reagan had addressed the United Nations
Jsembry and called on the Soviet Union to be
)le in arms negotiation, included Shaw's
>n the President s UN talk, and also on the
base-fire announced on the eve of his report to
' on meeting.
sed cautious optimism' about the cease-fire
tiated by Saudi Arabia's crown prince
i Syrian officials.
|d: "The Saudis finally got involved. Maybe
ement may bring peace. I see better days
ael under Yitzhak Shamir."
Emily, join him in talking about the trip. Shaw
(second from left) is pictured with Alvin Gross,
Federation President Ed Entin and Federation
GROSS, who was introduced at the meeting's outset by
Federation President Edmund Entin, told how the Fort
Lauderdale group had an hour-long meeting with then-
Minister of Foreign Affairs Shamir who is now the prime
minister-designate scheduled to succeed Prime Minister
Menachem Begin who has resigned. Shamir has formed a
coalition much like that which had enabled Begin to ad-
minister the government. Shamir now needs the Knesset
majority vote to become prime minister officially.
Shaw said the selection of Shamir to succeed Begin "is a
positive step toward stabilizing the country and it is his
belief that under Shamir's leadership, "U.S.-Israel
relationships will be stronger than ever."
Comparing this visit to his trip to Israel three years ago
when he was mayor of Fort Lauderdale and attended the
Conference of Mayors meetings in Jerusalem, Shaw said
the spirit of the Israeli people, whom he met during the
trip, had diminished somewhat, "but, understandably so,
due to the high inflation afflicting Israel's economy, and
the weariness of war the people are feeling*"
MRS SHAW, called to the microphone by her husband,
joined him in proclaiming the trip to be "an uplifting
experience, one that our children will never forget, it was
so rewarding."
Shaw expressed his concern for the Marines in Lebanon,
noting that he was returning to Washington that af-
ternoon and that debate was expected to continue on the
possibility of having Reagan keep the Marines in Lebanon
through the War Powers Act
executive vice president Joel Reinstein. Below:
TV, radio and newspaper reporters interview
Shaw.
fHe also said ."Israel is an anchor in the Middle East. It
is imperative to the security of the U.S. that Israel remain
strong."
That was another of his remarks that drew a burst of
applause from the crowd which included television
newscasters from TV 4 and TV 10, as well as reporters for
Radio Station WINZ and area newspapers.
This report was supplemented with information from
Federation's public relations director, Max Levine.
continues to oppose
1-Lebanon unity w
the Lebanon Cabinet members
resignations to President Am in
[as part of the cease-fire agreement
in Syria last week, the Syrian
pit, led by President Assad, continued
ugn against any sort of relation be-
lel and Lebanon.
and Israel, earlier this year, had concluded a
tment as part of the arrangement for Israel to
pts forces from the country. Israel has re-
forces in the southern part of Lebanon below
liver.
)f the cease-fire agreement, the warring factions
ly. the Lebanese army, Christian militias, and
have been supported by Syria ware
[to begin a dialogue, hoping to reach a peace
i meeting set for Sept. 27 was postponed.
Damascus radio broadcast warned that "any ties
^1 will not solve any problem and will bring
i to Lebanon."
pmmentary continued : "Anyone who likes
id is keen on mht^frfa^ Hu wristf"** should
lie start of the national dialogue which coo-
I first step towards resolving all Lebanese crises,
nd difficulties."
[us radio, the official voice of Syrian govern-
prated Syria's anger over the presence of U.S.
the Lebanese shore without naming them. (The
US8 New Jersey was recently added to the
in the Mediterranean near Lebanon.) "The
imentator said: "The warships, destroyers,
Israeli troops will leave Lebanon and nothing
"Lebanon except to depend on Syria."
kudu and U.S. envoy Robert McFariam have
Uted with helping to bring about the cease-firs
\ been welcomed in a number of Arab states.
Honors accorded blood donor
CHAMPION BLOOD DONOR Leo Polk
(left) of Dania, who gave hit 320th pint of
blood at the newly-dedicated Broward
Community Blood Center hut week, receives
a plaque commemorating the event The
presentation was mad* by Bd Carr of
Orlando, president of the American Assn. of
Blood Centers, headquartered in
Washington, D.C.
Polk, 75-year-old son of Russian im-
migrants, former business agent for the
Amalgamated Clothing Workers Union in
Detroit, has gained international recognition
as the nation's top volunteer blood donor.
At the ceremonies, dedicating the newly-
built Broward Community Blood Center at
1700 N. State Rd 7, Lauderkill, Polk said.
"After all these years of giving blood and
getting hundreds of others to donate blood
for life saving purposes, it's still a wonderful
feeling to give another pint." That pint
added up to a total of 40 gallons of blood
given by Polk.
Among those present at the event was
Congressmen E. Clay Shaw wko delivered a
personal letter from President Ronald
Reagan after telling the audience that
Reagan expressed his appreciation to Polk.
Congressman Larry Smith inserted into the
Congressional Record his commendation for
Polks achievement which was also recorded
by national TV network and radio newscasts.


Page 2
The Jewish Fhridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
PridV.Octobw?
Rep. Smith deplores USSR'i
disregard for human rights
As a member of the House
Foreign Affairs Committee,
l-arry Smith, U.S. Congressman
from Florida's 16th District,
which includes several cities in
Broward County, has expressed
deep concern for the USSR's
disregard for human rights and
the serious decline in Soviet
Jewish emigration.
Smith has adoped the case of
Soviet refusenik. Dr. Yuri Tamo-
polsky, and his family of
Kharkov, Ukrainian SSR. Tarno-
polsky has been sentenced to
three years in a labor camp for
slandering the Soviet State.
Smith believes that his only
crime was maintaining his Jewish
identity and applying to
emigrate. Along with 88
Members of Congress. Smith has
sent a statement to Soviet
General Secretary Yuri
Andropov asking that clemency
be granted to Tarnopolsky.
Smith feels that only through
constant pressure, will the USSR
change its treatment of Soviet
Jews. "All people deserve the
right to decide their own fate,"
Smith says.
Smith supported "Solidarity
Sunday," which was a conscious-
ness-raising bipartisan, and non-
sectarian gathering, which meets
annually to reaffirm the com-
mitment to the right of Soviet
Jews to emigrate.
In a meeting with Charles
Wick, Director of the U.S.
Information Agency. Smith
discussed increasing Voice of
ST" JOHN'S NURSING and Rehabilitation Center celebrated its 3rd
Anniversary with a reunion for its patients. Amid balloons and
streamers, about 75 patients celebrated. Among them (left to right/
are Rabbi David W. Gordon, chaplain; Sol Friedman; Gerald
Levison; and Father Trevor Smith, director of Chaplain Services.
Survivors' clubs
hold gathering Oct. 23
A gathering of survivors of the
Nazi Holocaust living in South
I'kjrida. will take place on Sun-
day evening Oct. 23 at the
Konover Hotel on Miami Beach.
The "Gathering" the first of its
kind to take place locally, was
* inspired by the American gather
g ing held in Washington D.C. in
Z April. At that time, 15,000
8 survivors stood together and
proclaimed "We are here" a
symbol of their resistance to the
murderous actions of Nazism.
The event is being coordinated
by the Southeastern Florida
n Holocaust Memorial Center.
L located on the Florida Inter-
] national University Bay Vista
5 Campus, in North Miami.
The survivors are gathering
toother in full support of the
)">.u.- ui the (enter "A living
Mefriorlal Through Education"
where testimonies are now
being taktn of survivors, to
create a permanent memorial.
These testimonies are already
being used in many public and
private schools.
The testimonies are given so
that people will become educated
on the subject, and to ensure that
an event like this, may be pre-
vented from ever happening
again.
Sponsoring the gathering are:
Children of Holocaust Survivors,
Czenstochov and Vicinity Social
Club of Greater Miami. David
Ben Gurion Cultural Club.
Holocaust Survivors of South
Florida. New American Jewish
Club. Radomer Relief Club of
Greater Miami, Yiddish Cultural
Circle of Point Fast.
For information call the
Holocaust Memorial Center 940
5690
William Katzberg chaired a
meeting of the Greater Margate
United Jewish Appeal cam-
paign's executive committee to
make plans for the 1984 UJA
drive of the Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale.
Joined by Israel Resnikoff.
advisor to the Greater Margate
Area, and Federation's campaign
associate. Paul Levine, Katzberg
and others recognized the con-
tinuing urgency for aid to Israel,
noting that humanitarian needs
were suffering because of the
necessity to maintain a huge
armed force to protect the
security of its borders.
Although Margate was among
the foremost in the Federation's
UJA campaign during the 1963
campaign, the goal has been set
higher for 1984 to meet the in-
creased needs for aid to the Jews
in Israel, in North Broward and
throughout the world.
1 he l ommiite- leaders in the
William Katzberg
-U some condominium and
residential areas are being invited
to a meeting to be held at 10 a.m.
Wednesday Nov. 9 at Temple
Beth Am. Margate. The primary
objective of this session, Katz-
berg said, will be to have the
community leaders seek ad-
ditional volunteers to form
cadres to reach resident, 5
have not previously mT
commitment* to UJA
paigns. n **
Rep. Larry Smith
America broadcasts for Soviet
Jews.
Smith urges citizens to send
constant and consistent
messages to Soviet officials, to
let them know that human beings
who want to emigrate, are being
denied their fundamental rights
that most of us enjoy. Smith will
continue to speak out in the
behalf of Soviet Jewry until the
problem is solved.
Shultz Blames Syria For War in Leban
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) The Reagan
Administration fired off its
sharpest criticism to date of
Syria's role in the current
Lebanese crisis which
Secretary of State George
Shultz charged was block-
ing efforts for a national
reconciliation in that coun-
try.
Shultz. appearing before the
House Foreign Affairs Com-
mittee and later before the Senate
Foreign Relations Committee,
accused Syria of failure to honor
its commitment to pull its troops
out of Lebanon, of permitting
armed Palestinian groups to
enter the regions recently
evacuated by the Israeli army
and thereby of responsibility for
the continued presence of Israeli
troops on Lebanese soil.
SYRIA, the Secretary of State
aeclared, is using its influence in
Lebanon to obstruct national
reconciliation and "indeed .
has instigated political op-
position within Lebanon and
armed several factions engaged
in military actions against the
legitimate government."
Shultz appeared before the
Congressional foreign policy
panels to support a resolution
that would allow U.S. Marines to
remain in Lebanon for another 18
months. This is a compromise be-
tween the Administration which
wants a free hand in Lebanon
with no time limit and many
members of Congress who have
insisted that the President in-
voke the 1973 War Powers Act
which would give Congress
authority to order the Marines
out of Lebanon in 60-90 days.
The Secretary defined the U.S.
role in Lebanon as helping to
create "a kind of equilibrium"
that would encourage a ceasefire
leading to political accom-
modation and the ultimate with-
drawal of all foreign forces from
Lebanon. He warned that to pull
out the Marines now would
jeopardize those objectives.
SHULTZ ANGRILY criticized
French Foreign Minister Claude
Cheysson for saying several days
aKo that France, a participant in
on
the multinational force in tht
Beirut area, dissociated itaf'
from the U.S. decision to allot
the Marines to call for air and
naval support if they were en-
dangered by gunfire from and-!
government forces.
"The French Foreign Minista
made what I would consider i
very flamboyant statement,
Shultz said. He contended that
Cheysson seemed "to position
himself between what he
described as the U S.-Israeli
forces and the Soviet-Syrian
forces. I don't think it was i
particularly helpful statement,
very frankly."
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We are proud to honor Dr. Giselle Peri,
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A history thet reflects the story
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American Committee for
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Cordially invite* you to
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Tribute To
DR. GISELLA PERL
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Tuesday, November 1st, 1983
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day. October 7,1983
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 3
ICC president will keynote 'Strategies for Effective Leadership'
Dr A. Hugh Adams, president
Broward Community College,
address the luncheon session
if the Strategies of Effective
dership conference to be held
etween 9:30 and 3:30 p-m.
lednesday Oct. 19, at Temple
fi?.Ei; 3243 W. Oakknd
park Blvd., Lauderdale Lakes.
Dr Adams, a native of Punta
fcorda. Fla., received his BS
Jegree in mathematics and social
liudies education from Florida
Ttale University, where he was a
[ember of Omicron DelU Kappa
aternity. He was a football
aptain, elected most valuable
Llayer, and was awarded an
jcademic graduate fellowship.
Adams served as a varsity
ssistant football coach at FSU,
pd received his master's and
dor's degree at FSU in
ducational administration and
supervision.
He became Charlotte County's
first appointed superintendent of
public instruction and then he
was vice-chairman and co-
ordinator of the Governor's Com-
mission for Quality Education
with report to a special session of
Florida Legislature. He became
president of BCC in 1988.
Married, with three children,
Adams received his Doctor of
Humane Letters from Florida
Atlantic University in 1972. He is
listed in Who's Who in America,
Who's Who in the World, and is
the boards of various agencies
including Century National
Bank, Southeastern Florida
Holocaust Memorial Center, Inc.,
and Southern Scholarship
Foundation.
Adams has received numerous
awards including: Phi Beta
Kappa, Gold Key Honorary,
Liberty Bell Award, Sports Hall
of Fame at FSU, and the L'Ordre
International Constantinien.
Dr. Adams will speak about
"The Role of the Volunteer in the
Context of Today's Community."
The Conference, open to Jew-
ish organizations, is sponsored
by the Women's Division of the
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale with Miriam
Kalett, chairman of the con-
ference. Co-sponsors are the
North Broward Midraaha of the
Central Agency for Jewish
Education of the Jewish Federa-
tion of Greater Fort Lauderdale;
Paul Frieser, chairman of
Dr. Hugh Adams
400 Century Village UJA volunteers
invited to Oct. 12 Recognition Day
| Mori' than 400 volunteers who
ok part in the 1983 United
kish Appeal campaign of the
rwish Federation of Greater
orl Lauderdale at Century
tillage in Deerfield Beach have
en invited to the annual
|Ecognition Day and reception
i be held at 1 p.m. Wednesday
|ct. 12 in the Party Room of the
ntury Village Clubhouse.
| The Federation is honoring the
kip, headed by Meyer (Mike)
ddleinan, for the outstanding
suits achieved during the 1983
npaign. Of the group, 131, who
part in their first campaign
UJA during the vear, will
*ve their names added to the
1A plaque which hangs in the
nmunity's clubhouse lobby.
Mikt FiddUman
Century Village UJA general
chairman Fiddleman, who has
accepted chairmanship for the
1984 UJA campaign, will be
joined by Federation officials at
the reception. Joel Telles, assist-
ant executive director of the
Federation, will give the
volunteers an update on the
Middle East situation
Each year the Century Village
community has increased its
commitment to the annual
campaigns kt support of the
humanitarian needs of Jews in
Israel, in North Broward and
elsewhere in the world. The
contributions for the 1983
campaign totalled over $200,000.
Cypress Chase
amarac UJA volunteers has B'nai B'rith
to get awards Oct. 13
[Tamarac City Councilman Da-
1 Krantz will present awards to
blunteers who took part in the
Immunity's 1983 United Jewish
[ppeal campaign of the Jewish
' ration of Greater Fort Lau-
krdale. The presentations, which
p being made to those vohin-
ers who were unable to attend
>t springs' Federation Volun-
er Recognition Day, will take
i at 10 a.m. Thursday Oct. 13
| Temple Beth Torah, Tamarac.
[During the course of lauding
dedicated volunteers, Krantz
also discuss with the city
lie Tamarac UJA committee
for the 1984 UJA cam-
He'll be calling on them to
' the word throughout the
\y to residents to "Share the
Give to Life," the
' f the campaign, and help
the commitments to aid
in Israel and to provide
for the services and pro-
provided by the Federa-
David Krantz
tion for the Jewiah community
throughout North Broward.
day Oct. 24
The Cypress Chase Chapter of
B'nai B'rith of Lauderdale Lakes,
will celebrate the 140th Anni-
versary of B'nai B'rith Interna-
tional at its 7:30 p.m. meeting on
Monday Oct. 24 at the City Hall
in Lauderlake Lakes.
Mayor Al Gereffi, of Lauder-
dale Lakes, has issued a
proclamation designating Oct. 24
as "B'nai B'rith Day" in the city,
and will attend the gathering
together with members of the
City Council as honored guests.
Sheriff George Brescher will be
the guest speaker, and will be
welcomed by the Lodge's
president, Louis L. Yahm, and
presented by Councilman, Sam
Goldstein, Rabbi Iaadore
Rosenfeld, and Milton Schein-
garten.
Federation's Committee of
Education; Abraham Gittelson,
Federation's director of
education; and Helen Weisberg,
administrator of Federation's
North Broward Midraaha, in
conjunction with Central Agency
for Jewish Education.
Also participating in the pro-
gram will be Edmund Entin,
Federation president, and Git-
telson.
Reservations, including lunch,
cost 115 if made on or before Oct.
7. Space is limited to 200 people.
Call the Federation at 748-8400
for a brochure or further in-
formation.
Palm Aire honoring
100 volunteers Oct. 27
Irving Libowsky
Irving Libowsky, general
chairman of the Pahn-Aire
United Jewish Appeal campaign
of the Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale, and co-
chairman Mike Ackerman, will
present "thank you" awards to
more than 100 residents of the
Pompano Beach community who
volunteered their services during
the 1983 campaign.
The presentations will
place at 3 p.m .Thursday Oct. 27
in the East Room of the Palm
Aire Main Clubhouse.
Libowsky and Ackerman, who
had met with Federation officials,
have begun making plans for the
1984 UJA campaign and Project
Renewal. To launch the drive,
Mike Ackerman
they have planned for a
Pacesetters luncheon to be held
Monday Dec. 19 at the Palm Aire
Spa Hotel.
Men and women leaders in the
Palm Aire community will be
invited to the Pacesetters lun-
cheon. A minimum commitment
to the 1984 campaign of $1,000
will be required from those in
attendance.
Libowsky, who will be
returning from the Federation's
Leadership Mission to Israel a
week before the Oct. 27
recognition day for volunteers,
will provide those in attendance
with an update on the Middle
East situation.
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V.V.VV


^

5
e Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday. October 7
Let's All Pitch in To Save Our Statue of Liberty
The Statue of Liberty is uppermost in
our minds these days for two reasons. One
is the status of disrepair into which Our
Lady of Freedom has fallen over the years.
A South Floridian, Nicholas Morley, has
been named by President Reagan to lead a
campaign throughout our state to help
raise the funds necessary to restore the
Statue of Liberty to help preserve her as
the great symbol of our nation's freedom to
oppressed peoples everywhere and to
Americans as well, who live and enjoy the
benefits of freedom in their daily lives.
A second reason for our concern is that,
for nigh onto a century, the Statue has been
the welcoming site for many immigrants
throughout the world who came to our
nation's shores. From almost the earliest
days of American history, the Statue of
Liberty has cast its shadow across Ellis
Island in the Hudson River, where today a
museum celebrates their voyages here and
the magic moment of their entry into the
excitement of becoming an American.
It was the Statue they first saw, where,
on her foot, was emblazoned a poem in-
scribed in 1903, "The New Colossus,"
calling to the tired and hungry, yearning to
be free, to come to her open arms.
That poem, composed in 1883, was the
work of the American Jewish poetess,
Emma Lazarus, to help raise funds for the
Bart holdi Pedestal Fund the building
fund for the Statue's then-new pedestal.
November, 1983 will be the centennial
anniversary of Emma Lazarus' com-
position.
In recalling this centennial event, we
must not forget the Lady herself. Through
her poem, Emma Lazarus helped raise
funds for the new pedestal. Today, we must
help raise funds to "Save Our Statue." Let
us all pitch in behind Nicholas Morley and
put Florida on the map of this SOS cam-
paign.
Reagan Must Speak Out
Anatoly Sharansky, the Soviet Jewish
Prisoner of Conscience who has become the
symbol of the struggle of Soviet Jewry,
marked the midpoint of his 13-year sen-
tence on Sept. 15. He continues to languish
inside the notorious Chistipol Prison,
subjected to inhuman conditions, deprived
of fundamental rights such as visitation
privileges and correspondence with family
members, all on the trumped-up charges of
treason against the Soviet Union.
The silence at this point from the Soviet
Union is expected. To let Sharansky out of
prison, or even out of the Soviet Union,
would mark a grave peril to their closed
society, exposing the harsh cruelties to
which it has subjected not only Sharansky,
but many other Jews during the past years.
President Reagan has stated repeatedly
that the Administration has raised the
issue of Soviet human rights when senior
Administration officials have conferred
with Soviet officials.
Publicly, the Administration appears to
be acting on empty words. Since it has
come to office, the Reagan
Administration's policy of quiet diplomacy
Jewish FlonJian
in the field of human rights has left many
Americans feeling that little has been
accomplished.
The current level of Soviet Jewish
emigration is at an all-time low, and any
indication of an increase in emigration from
the Soviet Union, in light of the Korean
airline downing, appears limited. But the
Administration must continue to play a
significant role to help the Sharanskys and
it could start with public revelations of its
specific efforts for Soviet Jewry.
Robert Segal
The Recent March cm Washington
Of OftCATIR 0*T LAU06HOALE
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Adwiiaino. Suparvtaor Abraham Haiparn
Fort Laudanlala-Hollywood Advarttalna Of flea Am. Savinoa 2900 Bloa
aoot-..........Minn a-.yMa>OT.om........r*.mo.m*tm4m
Want: 120 NC h Si Miami, Fla. M1J2. Phona 1-3734606
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JawSa* WartdMw Doaa Met Qya/antaa Kaahrvtn e Maronandlaa Aflwyllaad
SUBSCRIPTION HATIS. 2 Yaar kNnlmum 67.90 (Local Araa 63 66 Annual) or by mamoarahlp
Jawran Fadar Mlon of Qraatar Fort Laudardata
Edmund Emm Praatdant
Tha Federation and the newa office of the Jewieft Floridian of Qraatar Forl LauaerdalaVra'iocatad'a'
6396 W Oakland Park Bivd Fort Lauderdale. FL 33321 Phone (309) 74*6400.
Newa editor Ma. Lenne
Friday, October 7. 1983
Volume 12
Have we witnessed
progress or just change?,
one may reasonably inquire
in sifting through the dif-
ferences of the March for
Jobs and Freedom in 1963
and the March for Jobs,
Peace, and Freedom in
1983.
Criticism there was in abund-
ance for the effort by the New
Coalition of Conscience to make
more of Martin Luther Kings
historic dream of 20 years ago by
means of staging a commemora-
tive, new March on Washington.
On that electrifying march in
1963, the focus was sharp, the
goals vital but limited, and the
spirit of unity notable. Above all,
there was a modern Moses to
infuse the assembly with elo-
quence, magic, courage, love, and
irrefutable logic.
THIS TIME around, the
agenda was diffuse and multi-
farious. Not just the expansion of
equal opportunities for jobs and
dear access to places of public
accommodation were the goals,
as in 1963, but the promotion of
the causes of environmentalists
and gays, and advocacy of
women's rights and nuclear
freeze were rolled into one huge
bundle.
In 1963, the statesmanship and
genius of such giants as A. Philip
Randolph, Roy Wilkins. Whitney
Young, Bayard Rustin. and Dr.
King himself energized the
march. This time, much of the
organizing burden fell on the cap
bje shoulders of Correta King
valiant and admired. But death
had cut the ranks of the other
greats.
with the question raised earlier:
has there been change since 1963
or real progress? And let us add
that, if we are able to record true
advancement, what is the outlook
for the still unrealized sectors of
Dr. King's dream?
Progress? The 1963 march
gave great impetus to civil rights
gains: 1964 saw passage of laws
barring discrimination in jobs
and in places of public accom-
modation: the Voting Rights Act
followed in 1965; Fair Housing
Legislation was placed on the
books in 1968. Reluctantly, some
sectors of industry and some
labor unions made concessions.
Many of the walls of segregation
fell in the field of education.
Progress: Dick Gregory put it
succinctly when he said in Wash-
ington: "Twenty years ago, we
came here and asked other folks
to take care of business; today,
we can take care of business on
our own."
But again, it was in the 1960s
that
factors fuel the fires of anger ud
doubt and discontent. Millions
who champion the prime cause of
ending the arms race threaterung
planetary destruction an
branded as soft on Communism
and insulted by a President was
refers sarcastically to "the it-
called peace movement" and ac-
cuses nuclear freeze proponents
of indulging in theatrics.
Change without progrea?
When we turn to employmal
figures, we find some nine tola
million Americans jobless eve
when we count those in military
service as employed. Finally, b*
slowly, the public, and even tk
White House, begin to reato
that there is such a blight a
hunger in America. Hunger and
poverty. When the 1963 Mard
on Washington took place, H
percent of this nation'6 black
families were under the poverty
line, while only 13 percent of
white families were. Today, black
families on the poverty b*
number 35 percent while U
setbacks were registered.
The nation was torn by the tor- figure for white families is jaat
ment in Vietnam Assassinations about where it was 20 years ago.
SOU tv!lir,hit*oPf?B8 Loar Civil righte? Yes. huge gsina.
history books: President Ken- n ? ;hi...r.ai
nedy in 1963; Bobby Kennedy in Bui h1uner' jobJSE
1964; and Dr. King himself in BEf**' ^P** **??TX
1968. Riot, and^ber ES 5 ? i^jSKSE
violence ripped through the King- the ^J E!^SS
spun fabric of nonviolence. P^ ^Khow*
IN MORE recent yean. Dew insuMijaSfriraffSa
Neo-Nazi Teacher Finds Walls
Adorned With War Crimes Posters
BONN (JTA) A neo-Nazi teacher walked W
the dLentof 1^? bu Lh =LfSSXiffVZ *iwith Patera chronEling Nazi war crimes andjj
h could not ha^btm^ *?* "htwin8 activities within the neo-Nazi NittjJ
ptetely unaware of the flirtations Dncratic Party (NPD). The headmaster of the school!]
rSLT? der8r^y two of the ^e federal 8tate of Baden-Wuerttemberg had approv*
oSlouSJSSr E e exhiDit Mld bck*nd nmk of anti-fascist soot*
** i~~Dor V6^?^ Conference. aadSS J ? TEACHER, Guenter Deckert, 43, is a tarfg
piiqL Jwkson, spark plug of "der of the NPD's young guard arhich has attacked10
=Vnd3.ate1nar KS&r "VaiUble W 8 leade""P for being "too moderate." He has Wj
30TISHRI5744 rk CwJ^ts h.vinB W' "successfully, for the office of NPD natM**
Number 33 been delineated, let us try to deal


Friday, October 7,1963


The Jewish Fhridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Pae5
Mondale Urges Strategic Agreement to Bar Soviets
By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK- (JTA)-
Former Vice President
Walter Mondale urged that
the United States forge an
"effective strategic agree-
ment with Israel to restrain
the Soviets and their prox-
ies" in Lebanon. _
Addressing a meeting of the
Conference of Presidents of Ma-
jor American Jewish Organiza-
tions here, Mondale, a candidate
for the Democratic Presidential
nomination in 1984, blasted the
Reagan Administration's Middle
East stance and. charged that the
gdministratioo has no policy in
Lebanon. He claimed the Admin-
istration harbored
the region.
"illualons"b
He listed these as the belief
that Saudi Arabia is a moderat-
ing force; that King Hussein of
Jordan will enter negotiations
with Israel; and that I Israel's
withdrawal from Lebanon would
be followed by Syria's withdraw-
al from that country.
"WE HAVE troops in Leba-
non but no policy there," Mon-
dale declared, stating what he
believed American goals there
should be. The U.S. should not
accept Syrian domination of that
country, he said. It should not
tolerate wanton attacks on the
Marines. It should work for a
Walter Mondale
New Book
Sees Soviet as a Minority at Home
By ARNOLD AGB8
Part II of a Twp-Part Series
Edward Luttwak does
not agree with Andrew
Cockburn. Luttwak is the
brilliant defense analyst
and one-time Israeli re-
sident who wrote what has
been called one of the major
books in political science,
"The Coup d'Etat." He is
probably the only political
scientist to have a word,
Luttwakian, coined after
his name. The term is syno-
nymous with brilliant
analysis.
Now working as a consultant
to the United States Department
of Defense (and a lecturer before
various university and academic
constituencies), Luttwak has
authored a study of the Soviet
Union which is diametrically op-
posed to the conclusions reached
by Cockburn. Luttwak's book,
"The Grand Strategy of the
Soviet Union" (St. Martin's
Press), is a frightening look at
the imperial designs of the
Russian colossus.
IT IS significant that Lutt-
wak, who wrote a doctoral dis-
sertation on the Roman empire,
considers the Soviet Union today
to be a modern incarnation of the
ancient empire. He seas uncanny
similarities, particularly between
the expansionist patterns which
ancient Rome undertook and
current Soviet practices. In fact,
Luttwak sees Soviet expan-
sionism as almost inevitable.
Whatever weaknesses may
have existed in the Soviet armed
forces (and Luttwak recognises
that they did and do exist), they
re now under control. Luttwak
believes that in the hut tan years
the Soviets have effected enor-
mous improvements both in their
military hardware and in their
battle planning.
According to Luttwak, the
Soviets not only have impressive
military equipment of immense
destructive power, they also have
armaments for which no
equivalent as yet exists in the
West.
THESE INCLUDE automatic
trench-diggers and ribbon-
oridges; the latter were put to ef-
fertive work in the Egyptian
crossing of the Suez Canal in
1973 during the Yom Kippur
War. Luttwak says that while the
Russians were at one time behind
Americans in helicopters, the
^vta are now on a par with this
Drand of weaponry.
On the issue of the raminca-
bons of the various Arab-Israeli
"** Uttwak does not share the
*me conclusions as Cockburn
* Luttwak denies that Soviet
"They tell us more about Is-
raeli skills than about the quality
of Soviet equipment." Western
armies, says Luttwak, would not
have found it so easy to develop
the projectiles and strategy
which destroyed so many
Russian tanks.
IN HI8 analysis of Soviet
military production, Luttwak
suggests that the West not be
fooled by allegations about
Russian inefficiency. The Ameri-
cans might have a slight lead in
ordnance, says Luttwak, but that
is more than offset by the faster
Soviet production cycles.
Luttwak is concerned that the
experience of Soviet armies in
Hungary and Czechoslovakia not
be used as s paradigm of future
Soviet strategy. He agrees with
Cockburn that the Russians per-
formed very poorly in both
theaters and that had either the
Hungarians or the Czechs fought
back, the Soviets would have lost
many men.
The example of Afghanistan,
according to Luttwak, shows that
the Russians have improved
tremendously since their actions
in 1966 and 1968 in Hungary and
Czechoslovakia. In fact, the inva-
sion Of Afghanistan demon-
strated a Soviet capacity for
boldness in planning and execu-
tion that were uncharacteristic of
traditional Russian partterns of
military thinking. This means
that Russian military men have
opted for a new kind of flexibility
in their grand strategies.
LUTTWAK'S MOST im-
portant insights derive from his
perception that the Soviet
Union's expansionist future is a
function of its volatile political
and ethnic make-up. Using the
example of ancient Rome,
Luttwak paints a scenario which
sees the Russians eventually
gobbling up those countries ad-
jacent to it in order to protect its
own vital life lines.
This problem is compounded
by the fact that within 20 years,
if demographic trends continue,
the Russians will be a minority in
their own country. The Asian
populations will have become the
dominant group in Soviet so-
ciety. This change in the ethnic
strands of Soviet society will
contribute to the disequilibrium
of the country.
compromise between the various
factions to broaden the govern-
ment of President Amin Gemayel
and then forge an "effective stra-
tegic agreement with Israel to re-
strain the Soviets and their
proxies."
Mondale charged that in the
past year the Reagan Adminis-
tration has pressured Israel alone
on the issue of Lebanon and
"took the heat off Syria." The
result, he said, is that Syrian
troops are still in Lebanon and
PLO Chief Yasir Arafat is back
there as well.
Mondale was the second Dem-
ocratic Presidential aspirant to
appear before the Presidents
Conference, and his remarks were
nighty favorable to Israel He
said he believed the U.S. should
move its Embassy from Tel Aviv
to Jerusalem because Jerusalem
is Israel's "undivided capital."
HE SAID he did not believe
Jewish settlements on the West
Bank are illegal, asserting that
the fate of the settlements will be
determined only when negotia-
tions are resumed within the
Camp David framework.
Mondale also expressed oppo-
sition to the sale of sophisticated
weapons by the U.S. to Arab
countries because the introduc-
tion of I such weapons will only ac-
celerate the arms race in the Mid-
dle East. If the Arabs are sold
sophisticated weapons, the U.S.
1 has to provide Israel with arms to
defend itself against them, he
said. Mondale called for good re-
lations between the U.S. and the
Arab countries, "but not at the
expense of Israel," which he
caued a strategic asset to the
U.S.
i Asked if he supported a state-
ment by Sen. John Glenn (D.,
Ohio), a rival for the Democratic
'Presidential nomination, who
'said in New York that the
U.S. should end its even-
handed policy in the Middle East
and tilt openly in Israel's favor,
Mondale replied, "I have never
had to redefine my attitude." He
stressed that as a Senator from
Minnesota and later as Vice
President in the Carter Adminis-
tration, he was always a staunch
supporter of Israel.
Family Mission '84
For a unique, once-in-a-lifetime experience,
families are invited to join the Jewish Federation's
"Summer '84 Family Mission to Israel."
Children, who have completed Bar or Bat Mitzvah
courses at their respective synagogues, will have the
opportunity to take part in services atop the historic
Masada mountain or at the Western WaH in
Jerusalem.
Now is the time, Mark Sflverman suggests, for
families to make their plans for next summer. Call
him at the Jewish Federation 748-8400 for details.
' GARDEN RAVIOLI
The Jewish Homemaker's Guide to Delicious Italian Cooking
Calls for Chef Boy-ar-dee Cheese Ravioli.
2 packages (10 oz. each) frozen
chopped broccoli
2 tablespoons grated Parmesan
cheese
V, cup finely chopped onion
1 medium dove garlic, crushed
V, cup chopped red or green peppers
1 tablespoon butter or margarine
2 cans (15 ox. each) Chef Boy-ar-dee
Cheese RavK* in Sauce
Cookbroccoliiaccorthngtor^luge Parmesan cheese and mix well. Saute onion, garlic and peppers tn
butter until lightly browned; combine with broccoli. Place Ravioli
in saucepan over low heat; stir occasionally until thoroughly
heated. Add half of the broccoli mixture to Ravioli; save half for
garnish. Arrange in shallow or 1V4 quart serving dish. Garnish
edge with remaining broccoli. Serves 4 to 6.
8U,aat
loidW
found wanting in
with
TAKE
AMTRAK'S
Silver Palm
Now, And
Weil Bring
You Back
For*5.
than taking a trip oti
Amtrak's Savor Pasm?
CeasJag back for only $5.00
when you buy a round-trip ticket.
Whether you're stetson or sixty-ftvo,
you can tako advantage of our special
$5 00 return faro from now through
DscsasharlS,lfa^Trasjlnaatbecow>-
than January IS, lsU. Other rostric-
Service financed m part by Florida Otpt ol Transportation


The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, Qctob^J
Browsin'
Thru Broward
with Maggie
Max Levine
Dan Araoa, director of the In-
ternational Department of
Magen David Adorn in Israel, re-
ported arrival of the ambulance
donated by members and friends
of Temple Beth Israel at Deer-
field'a Century Village
Rabbi Samuel April and his
wife, Judy, -.-ill lead 40 of Pom
pano's Temple Sholom congre-
gants on a 15-day tour of Israel.
The group leaves Oct.
19 Breward's State Attor-
ney Michael SaU and Broward
School Board member Donald
Samuels were the speakers at this
week's meeting of Plantation
Democratic Club Ana Ac-
kerman reviews the book, Ellis
Island, at the Oct. 31 meeting of
Plantation Yachad Hadassah
chapter at Plantation's Deicke
Auditorium.
The book, Max and Helen, was
reviewed at this week's meeting
of Hadassah s Armon-Castle
Garden Chapter Hatikva
chapter of Pioneer Women
Na'amat this week honored Edith
Goldhar and her husband, Joseph
Goldhar, of Sunrise, at a Whiting
Hall luncheon, on the occasion of
their 50th wedding anniversary.
Joseph is a widely-known Yid-
dish lecturer Lee and Milt
Goldsmith (484-3446) are the
Broward contacts for B'nai Zion
Hishon Chapter's Mexican tour
Dec. 7-14.
Aileen Cooper, director of na-
tional B'nai B'rith Women's pro-
gram services, has a film, Cults:
Choice or Coercion, available for
organizations to show at
meetings. She's at BBW's Wash-
ington office (202) 857-
6628 Sharon Nembhard
(485-6373) has information about
trips planned by the Elderly In-
terest Fund of the Area Agency
on Aging Neil Simon's
semi-autobiographical superb
play, Brighton Beach Memoirs, is
coming to Fort Lauderdale with a
national touring company for Zev
Bufman's 1983-84 series at
Parker Playhouse.
The Precious Legacy, the sen-
sational Judaica exhibit of arti-
facts that were recovered from
Nazis, is coming to the Bass Mu-
seum in Miami and is expected to
be open to the public during Jan-
uary and February Beth
Hatefutaoth, the Museum of the
Diaspora on the Tel Aviv Univer-
sity campus, has issued a world-
wide appeal for pictures and films
related to survivors of the Holo-
caust. The Museum a "must
see' when you're in Israel is
preparing for an exhibit in 1985
to mark the 40th anniversary of
liberation from the Nazis.
Incidentally, about the
Brighton Beach Memoirs, a non-
Jew, Matthew Broderick, won
this year's Tony Award as the
best actor of the year on Broad-
way Evelyn Hanker
becomes the seventh president of
Brandeis University at the uni-
versity's 35th anniversary at Oct.
9 ceremonies in Boston's Sym-
phony Hall And not so in-
cidentally -Israel has never failed
to make payment to the U.S. on
its loans. From 1973 through
1982, Israel repaid the U.S. $5.07
billion-tbat's BILLIONS of dol-
lars The Condominium
Cabinet delegate from the Lau-
derhill area encompassing Cy-
press Tree, Majestic Gardens and
other conods is Victor not Ir-
ving Feldamaa. Sorry about
that mistake. Victor.
U" TO M JCWISH
k* Tap OS*
J M|..t 1I13C
Hmm Mnd S0( pottM* and handkng
lo your l.rtt oramt
NoSocchorin
No Sorettol. No So*
No Additives
OJMftTTRSTf
SO*T0 AMORS
8 lbs. Just $7.?S M
*S postoos 6 tandsno
L Check or MO to
DHUJKX CANDY
Box 50 Short HMts
law I*
%. lust t7.ff M
toga 6 horxftng
d. or MO to
iUKNOMDV
59 Short HMfe I
ierssv0707 J
East Harry Levin
of Bermuda Club commu-
nity in Tamarac, a poster-painter
who has assisted the Jewish Fed-
eration many times in the past,
contributed the sign identifying
Federation-supported Kosher
Nutritiomsite in the Lauderhill
Mall on State Rd. 7.
Because the effectiveness of
the computerized book recording
of financial data by the Jewish
Federation's bookkeeping has
earned commendations in many
quarters, the department, headed
by MarByan Levine, was visited
by Carol Larson, controller, and
Pat Loch, consultant, of the
Jewish Federation of Greater
East Bay in Oakland,
Calif. Leonard Rabin of
Tenafly. N.J., chairman of JWB
Scholarship Committee, an-
nounced distribution of scholar-
ships totalling $60,550 to 22 stu-
dents enrolled in graduate
schools of social work, health and
physical education and Jewish
communal service.
Edith Lederberg, community
coordinator-advocate for Area
Agency on Aging, announced
Broward s Senior Citizen Day is
scheduled Tuesday Nov. 22 at
Broward County Fair, Gulf-
stream Park, Hallandale. Area
residents, 55 and older, will be
admitted through Fairgrounds'
South Gate that day from 1 to 4
p.m. for 50 cents All proceeds go
to the Elderly Interest Fund
Ian Koblkk. founder
and president of Fort Lauder-
dale's Marine Resources Devel-
opment Foundation, is having an
underwater "live-in" habitat,
complete with laboratory equip-
ment, brought from Maryland to
Florida for use in underwater
research.
Austria's Federal Chancellor
Blood drive Oct. 11
at Bermuda Club
B'nai B'rith lodge and B'nai
B'rith Women's chapter at
Tamarac s Bermuda Club condo-
minium complex have combined
forces once again to sponsor
blood donation drive with the
South Florida Blood Service. The
drive, open to the community,
will take place in the Bermuda
Club clubhouse, 6299 NW 57th
St., Tamarac, from 8:30 a.m. to3
p.m. Appointments may be made
by calling 722-6174 or 722-3223.
f REE G'Pl
M Fun To at MmmH oW no* m
My lo com* "fciy-t For WM flrfl and
>r Fred Sinowatz attended Yom
Kippur services at the main syn-
I agogue in Vienna, site of a Pales-
tinian terrorist attack two years
ago Vandals struck at the
I Sukka that had been built for the
1 congregants of Temple Emanu-EI
in Lauderdale Lakes Lillian
Dubb, president of ORT's Wyn-
moor Chapter, Coconut Creek,
will represent the chapter at the
biennial convention Oct. 16-20 in
Los Angeles. Allan Schwartz
speaks at the chapter's Oct. 10
meeting in Coconut Creek Rec-
reation Center on "Wills and
Living Trusts.' Sylvia and
Baa Drnkes of Coconut Creek
who worked 30 days in Israel as
"Volunteers for Israel" related
their experiences at this week's
meeting of Hadassahs Wynmoor
Chapter.
Alzheimer unit
changes name,
meets Oct. 12
Broward County's chapter of
the National Alzheimer Associa-
tion is meeting at 1 p.m Wednes-
day Oct. 12 at the North Ridge
General Hospital, 5757 N. Dixie
Highway, Oakland Park.
Dr. Jules S. Tomkin, director
of public relations for the group,
said the meeting will ratify the
"name and aims change" to Alz-
heimer Disease and Related Dis-
orders Association of Greater
Fort Lauderdale, and making it
into an acronym FLA-ARDA.
He will also report that the As-
sociation of Volunteers of the
Florida Medical Center has
awarded FLA-ARDA a donation
of $500 honoring its twice-
weekly support service for those
who provide care to persons suf-
fering with the Alzheimer
diseases. This support service for
family members, mostly spouses,
is under the supervision of Dr.
Marvin Fredman, a clinical
psychologist.
Dr. Tomkin said that "Alz-
heimer" is "not a necessary ac-
companiment of the aging pro-
cesses, not is it senility per se. It
is senility dementia, a devastat-
ing, progressive and irreversible
disease derived from an organic
brain damage. Younger people
are not immune, as it can afflict
people in the 40-50-year-age
group."
REV: HESBURGH HONORED The president of Nob,
Dame University and co-chairman of the Citizen's Committl
for Immigration Reform, Father Theodore hi. Hesburgh CSC
last month received the HI AS Liberty Award at the HebZ
Immigrant Aid Society (HIAS) Awards dinner. Edwin Sha!!m
(left), president of the Worldwide Jewish migration amST
made the presentation. At right is Ben Zion Leuchter o/lS
land, N.J., dinner chairman and a HIAS vice president HIA&
receives funding from the Jewish Federation of Greater Port
Lauderdale UJA campaigns.
IRVING
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North Broward Midrasha
Institute of Jewish Studies
A community program of adult education
ftponsomd by: Temptoa Beth Am. Beth Israel. Bern Israel of OeerfteM Beach, Beth Orr.
i2l?J2?ZE,'Si A!!!i2?,',*y T"d-k- fhotom, Ramat Shalom Synagogue.
m'CZY2Z%l2n'0i Lobrt>M, U^* ^^Tso^'of Coconut CnSr^tortda
!i!!3L,/^rti!h#a!lrn "^lon Unlttd msfoaMS of America. Jewish Com
SSSSSf1 AM CLA*8e >E0,N TNI WK OF OCTOBER 17. COURSES HUH
PON 7 WEEKS.
Temple Beth Torah
JJJW MB*B)aai AeettSetMHivoh
Tarn. 7:JO*J0pm -
Thws. 7:1b) Bimmmia
Thw. ax-stop*. VMSM.
Temple Shaaray Tiedek
There. 1*0111*0 Qtmi
at
Temple Sholom
Wed. rooroop*, Baste)
wed. soot is or* Seven Basle OesetieM
Ramat Shalom Synagogue
Men. 7:SM:S0em Bents*
Temple Both Am
"N: P* To So A Jm
Them.
LV *"^Henn7
Msmrss-fciapM up*,
Temple Beth Israel
Thss. 10*0-1140 am Sweep ef Mister*
Tims. 1100-12*0 Noon taalenttHw et Mamaa
Tees. r*B*SSem
Jewish Community Center
Men. S-JS-loaOsm WMNwOetOI
Mm. ie*Sii Mom JovtoMUtar*
Teas. SSSeeoam Ssmesef Mattery
Teas. **0**0am choral
Teaa.0B0 0.SOem Mraeil
COursl0^2S^!f rtttUt^:M^~or" TOR JEWI^^S!??S^S"2* CHECKS PAYABLE TO CENTRAL AGENCY
TICIpiTSS7N1SSSC^m^- HP* *THER INFORMATION CALL FAR
TltlPATINO INSTITUTION OR JEWISH FEDERATION 74S-S400.
M
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Page 8
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The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale

Fridy.OctobtJ
< c
Community Calendar
Compiled by Helen Steigmsn, Federation 748-8400.
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 5
Temple Beth Israel, Sunrise: 7
p.m. Games.
Temple Beth Orr: 7:45 p.m.
Games.
Central Agency for Jewish Edu-
cation of the Jewish Federation
of Greater Fort Lauderdale:
12:3o p.m. Adult Education
Committee. Boardroom. Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort Lau-
derdale, 8358 W. Oakland Park
Blvd.
Brandeis UniversHyFort Lau-
derdale Pompano Beach Chapter:
1 p.m. Study group showcase,
registration. Palm Aire Social
Center.
CHy College of New York
Ahamni Broward Chapter: 1 p.m.
Election of officers, Broward
Federal, 5518 W. Oakland Park
Blvd.
National ALS Foundation-Flor-
ida Chapter: 7:30 p.m. Dr. David
Roes, ALS Clinic, University of
Miami School of Medicine. Re-
search update. David Park Pavil-
ion, 5803 Park Dr., Margate.
THURSDAY. OCT.
Temple Beth Israel Sisterhood,
Deerfield Beach: 9 a.m. Board
meeting.
Temple Beth Israel, Sunrise:
Noon. Games.
ORT-North Broward Region:
9:30 a.m. Executive Committee
meeting. Shaker Village Club-
house.
B'NAI B'RITH WOMEN:
Sunrise Chapter: Noon.
Meeting. Sunrise Lakes Phase I
Playhouse.
Coconut Creek Chapter: Noon.
Meeting. Temple Beth Am.
SATURDAY, OCT. 8
Temple Emanu-EI Couples Club:
6:30 p.m. Dinner. Call 731-2310.
SUNDAY, OCT. 9
Temple Beth Torab: 6:45
p.m.
Koi And: 7:15 p.m.
7:30
11
Games.
Temple
Games.
Temple Sha'aray Tasdek
p.m. Games.
Temple Emanu-EI Sisterhood
a.m.-6 p.m. Rummage sale.
Brandeis University-Fort Lau-
derdale Pompano Beach Chapter:
2 p.m. and 8 p.m. Performances:
Plata Suit: Cost: $6. Call 979-
3099 or 973-1567. AmeriFirst
Bank, Loehmann's Plaza. Pom-
pano Beach.
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale: Oct. 9-17.
Leadership Mission to Israel.
Association of Parents of Ameri-
can Israelis-Broward Chapter:
1:30 p.m. Meeting. Jewish Fed
eration Building, 8358 W. Oak
land Park Blvd. Call 584-0598 for
APAI information.
MONDAY, OCT. 10
American Mizrachi Women-
Golda Meir Chapter: Noon.
Meeting. Temple Beth Israel,
Deerfield Beach.
B'nai B'rith Women-Cypress
Chase Chapter: 12:30 p.m. Meet
ing. Public Safety Bldg 4300
NW 36 St., Lauderdale Lakes.
Hadaaaah Plantation YACHAD
Chapter: Noon. Meeting. Deicke
Auditorium.
ORT:
Pine Island Chapter: Noon.
Meeting. Nob Hill Recreation
Center, 1040 Sunset Strip, Sun-
rise.
Wynmoor Chapter: 11:30 a.m.
Meeting. Coconut Creek Recrea-
tion Center, 900 NW 43 Ave.
TUESDAY.OCT.il
Temple Beth Torah Sisterhood:
11:45 s.m. Games. Lunch served
at nominal cost.
Hillel Advisory Board sf Brow-
aid and Palm Beach Cesmty: 9
a.m. Executive Board meeting
Broward Federal, 6736 N. Uni-
versity Dr., Tamarac.
Deborah Hospital
Sunrise Chapter: 11 a.m.
Meeting. Sunrise Lakes Phase I
Playhouse.
B'sal B'rith Women Ocean
Chapter: Noon. Meeting. Gait
Ocean Mile Hotel. 3200 Gait
Ocean Dr.
B'nai B'rith Men and Women-
Bermuda Club: 8:30 a.m.-3 p.m.
Blood Drive. Call 727-6174 or
722-3223. Bermuda Clubhouse.
Pioneer Women-Na'amat. Tarn-
an Chapter: Noon. Water Bridge
Recreation Center, 1050 Del Lago
Circle, Sunrise.
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 12
ORT Coral Springs: 8 p.m. Mul-
lins Park Center, 10000 NW 29th
St.
Temple Beth Israel, Sunrise: 7
p.m. Games.
Temple Beth Orr: 7:45 p.m.
Games.
Brandeis University-West Brow
ard Chapter: Noon. Meeting.
Guest sneaker: Abraham J. GhV
teison, Director of Education of
the Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale. Donation: tl.
Call 486-3432. Deicke Auditori-
um, 6701 Cypress Rd., Plants
tion.
THURSDAY, OCT. IS
Tempos Sholom Sisterhood:
12:30 p.m. "Cafe Rochelle" skit
at meetng.
Temple Beth Israel Sisterhood,
Deerfield Beach: Noon. Member-
ship meeting.
Temple Beth Orr B & B Social
Club: 8:30 p.m. Meeting.
Temple Beth Israel, Sunrise:
Noon. Games.
Hadassah-Sunrise Shalom Chap-
ter: 11:30 a.m. Meeting. Sunrise
Lakes Phase I Playhouse. 8100
Sunrise Lakes Dr. N.
Broward delegates
to attend ORT convention
Delegates from the North
Broward Region of Women's
American ORT will attend the
organization's 27th Biennial
National Convention to be held in
Los Angeles. Oct. 16 through 19.
This will be the first time that the
convention is being held on the
West Coast.
The 45 North Broward
delegates, who will represent
5,000 members in 28 local chap-
ters, will join some 1,200 of their
colleagues, representing 145,000
members from coast to coast, as
well as, guests from this country
and overseas.
Joseph Harmetz, director-
general of the World ORT Union,
as well as ORT directors from
France, Latin America, and Is-
rael will attend. Also attending
will be Serge and Beate Klarsfeld,
the Nazi hunters who tracked
down Klaus Barbie and helped
return him to France for trial.
Mrs. Clare Klugman, president
of the North Broward Region,
said that Women's American
ORT convention comes at a time
when America, at last, has be-
come aware of the grave crisis
which the nation faces in its
public education system. "Our
organization," she said, "has
been concerned about the decline
in American education for over a
decade."
Adult education
classes begin
Oct. 10 at CenViU
Temple Beth Israel of Deerfield
Beach and the North Broward
MMrasha .. ih.< Central Agency
f* Jewish Education of the Jew-
ish Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdaiv, announces the
beginning of the Fall Semester of
classes, beginning Oct. 10.
The dasavh run lor 10 weeks
and the fee is 15 per course,
maximum uf 630. Smne of the
courses being offered include: the
"whys" of Judaism, beginning,
intermediate, and advanced
Hebrew, and a guide to Jewish
living.
A minimum of 10 students is
needed to sustain a course. Make
checks payable to Temple Beth
Israel of Deerfield Beach. Classes
will be held at the Temple, and
instructed by faculty members
including Beth Israels Rabbi
Joseph Langner, Max Rolnick
Samuel Valberg. and Gilbert
Vaupen.
Organizations
ORT:
North Broward Region: 10
a.m. Board meeting. Council
Chambers, 4300 NW 36 St., Lau-
derdale Lakes.
Sunrise Village Chapter: 12:30
p.m. Meeting. Broward Federal,
3000 University Dr., Sunrise.
Coral West Chapter: 11:30
a.m. Guest speaker Shirley K.
Miller, executive director, Brow-
ard'a Jewish National Fund.
Congregation Beth H illel of Mar-
gate, 7634 Margate Blvd.
B'nai B'rith Women-Golda Meir
Chapter-Noon. Discussion about
B'nai B'rith's Anti-Defamation
League. Nob Hill Recreation
Center, Sunset Strip and 104th
Ave., Sunrise.
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale: 10 a.m. Awards
meeting for City of Tamarac.
Chairman: David Krantz.
Temple Beth Torah.
SATURDAY, OCT. 16
Temple Emanu-EI: 6:30 p.m.
New Member Party. Donation:
$9. Call 731-2310.
SUNDAY, OCT. If
Temple Beth Israel Brotherhood.
Deerfield Beach: 10 a.m. Break-
fast. Guest speaker: Dr. Sam
Brown.
Temple Sha'aray Tzedek Men's
Club: 9 a.m. Meeting.
Temple Beth Torah: 6:45 p.m.
Games.
Temple Sha'aray Tzedek: 7:30
p.m. Games.
American Red Magen David-Col.
David Marcus Chapter: 7:30
p.m. Annual show. Call 742-4272
or 742-8801.
TEMPLE SHOLOM
Sisterhood
An entertainment skit by the
personnel of "Cafe Rochelle" will
highlight the 12:30 p.m. Thurs-
day Oct. 13 meeting of the Tem-
ple Sholom Sisterhood in the
Temple Social Hall, Pompano
Beach.
Lillian Shore, Sisterhood's
Judaica Gift Shop chairman, and
vice chairman Goldie Entel, have
re-opened the newly remodeled
Judaica Gift Shop in the Temple
Lobby. The shop, open from 10 to
3 p.m. Mondays through Fri-
days, has been stocked with a
large selection of items imported
from Israel. Blanche Alloy,
Sisterhood boutique chairman,
will also have items on display.
Call 974-4066 for additional
information.
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL
Super Sunday April 1
P21OUr,Fei!!!ti?n8: "? Jewiah Federation of Greater
fifti I^ecdaleLoand ""^ of ^th Broward
(Hollywood), South County (Boca Raton) and Palm Beach
County, have joined forces to conduct a Super Sundav
phon-a-thon on Sunday, April 1. -y
Leaders of these Federations are completing plans to
coordinate their public relations efforts to make tbTjaw-
ish communities of the two counties aware of ths nscessitv
of making commitments for ths 1964 United Je*rienA*>
peal campaigns and their Project ***,. ^
The April 1 data, a change from the National UJA
fiT? SPESunday "" Natk>Ml WASh.bbatto
be^weTn^pfrim *SXV*1 ** "** <***
3?? T 52 Pa*fch* w" d***1 "cla**up*
effort to reach those who may have missed makin/a
The Men's Club of Temple
Beth Israel, Sunrise, Breakfast
will be held at 10 am Sunday
Oct. 16. Must be a paid member
to attend.
HADAS8AH
Sunrise Shalom
A Thanksgiving Tour of
Naples and the West Coast of
Florida by Sunrise Shalom
Hadassah is planned far Nov. 24
through 27. The price is S199 per
person. For reservations call
Betty Wincott at 741-2756, or
Jean Aurebach at 741-7890.
WLI MARGATE
Margate Chapter of the
Women's League for Israel holds
a luncheon-card-party Thursday
Oct. 27 at Duff's Smorgasbord,
6501 W. Commercial Blvd.,
Tamarac. Contribution is $5.
The WLI chapter will have a
Thanksgiving Weekend cele-
bration Nov. 24-26 at the
Sheraton Bal Harbour Hotel.
Also planned is a five-day
cruise Dec. 18-23 on the SS
Britania, stopping at three ports.
Miriam Wohl 971-2509 and Bea
Winkler 974-0811 have informa-
tion on all events.
BBW DEERFIELD BEACH
The B'nai B'rith Women's
Deerfield' Beach Chapter is plan-
ning a Nov. 5-12 Fun ship
Festivale cruise: Thanksgiving
Nov. 24-25 trip to Key West, and
a New Year's three-day trip to
Cypress Gardens and Busch Gar-
dens. Anne at 426-1629 has full
details on trip informal ion
WOMEN'S AMERICAN ORT
Sunrise Village
The Sunrise Village Chapter of
Women's American ORT will
hold a general meeting at 12:30
p.m. Thursday Oct. 13, at Brow-
ard Community Room at Brow-
ard Bank, 3000 North University
Dr., Sunrise.
The program will consist of a
movie. "Nothing But Th, 1
, Refreshments will be
ConUct Sylvia Shonj n 71
for details.
WOMEN'S AMERICA,,
"ynnoorCh^'
^.Sjperal meeting win
atllj30a.m.Mond.y7
the Coconut CraK
Center, 900 NW 43 Av.
Creek.
Wills and Living Tru*/
Refre8ament will hi ad
For further information oH
MEN'S aUB- .
SHA'ARAYTaSn]
The Men's Club will u
a.m. Sunday Oct. 16
Sha'aray Tsedek
Dr. Elizabeth Ban j
praetor, will be the guest,
Members as well as pre*
members are invited to 1
Breakfast will be served
WOMEN'S CENTO I
A meeting will be held 1
to 8 p.m. Monday Oct ](
BCC Central Campus U
19, the Faculty Dining I
Stephanie A. Reailly 1
count executive wits I
Lynch, and Barbara R. I
CPA with Fox and Co., 1
about money ~iinipasM
women.
Bring a brown bagc
reservations contact C,
wiu, of the Central Ne
Professional Women, 475<
B'NAI B'RITH WON
Hope Chapter
A meeting of Boo
Women's Hope Chaplain
uled for noon Thursday f
the Deicke Auditoriua,
Cypress Rd.. Plantation I
bers and prospective ad
are welcome to atlas]
"Bagel Break."
"Adrianna" wiliest
a musk program. For
formation call Esther
at 792-6448.
BRANDEIS West Brows*]
The West Broward I
Brandeis University
Women's Committee will
noon Wednesday Oct
Deicke Auditorium, 5701 (
Rd., Plantation.
Abraham J. Gittdsoftj
ciate director of the
Agency of Jewish Edu
South Florida and
education of the Jewish I
tion of Greater Fort Lib
will discuss highlights
Hadassah study group hil
leading this fair
'Contemporary Issuei
of Our Jewish Heritage
Call 485-3432 for
formation.
Ramat Hasharon facility!
hosts Israel tennis classk
The fourth annual $88,000 Is-
rael Tennis Center Classk, which
runs from Oct. 10 through 15, will
be held at the Israel Tennis Cen-
ter's Ramat Hasharon facility,
located just north of Tel Aviv.
Israel's top tennis player,
Shlomo Glickstein, will be among
the 32 entrants in this Volvo
Grand Prix event, along with
Shahar Perkis, the country's
number two player. Also playing
as a "wild card'r entry is 17-year-
old Amos Manadorf, who first
picked up a racket when the 17-
court facility, Ramat Hasharon,
opened in 1976.
Since the opening of the first
Israel Tennis Center in Ramat
Hasharon eight years ago, sight
additional Centers have been
built ks Kiry.t Shmonah,
And, Haifa, Jaffa, Aahksbn.
Jerusalem, Faroes Hann*]
Migdal Ha'emeq.
The purpose of th <
to provide normal reer
the children of IaraA
usually a tension-filae
The facilities, itn*tM
ment. and clothing are I*'
children who peu^aopee*-
program To da*. J*
50.000 youngsters hi"
ipsted to the program
The Center* w*
supported by don*"* <
tennis enthusiast* m
the world.
Coinciding with the >^
eluding the ftesW*"
Chism Hanof


w
.October 7,1983
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lander dale
I-age 9
yfOzick novel- Taut and brilliant
I Cannibal Galaxy. By Cyn-
Sik Alfred A. Knopf, 201
Eh Street. New York. NY
fe 1983 171 pages. 111.96.
i by Diane Cole
tout a doubt. Cynthia
\ is one of the finest writers
tnerica today. In Cannibal
TrV her flawed but fascinat-
new novel, she gives us a
erlv portrait of Principal
ph' Brill, a middle-aged,
Vof-the-road intellect who
des over a Midwestern
to' middle school "belea-
U by middling parents and
{middling offspring."
Incipal Brill is so limited
he cannot even see the
ir of the Holocaust, which he
V
Jewjsh Books
JUUB in Review
n a iwvk* o/ fWf lewtili toot CouncK
IS Im lUh it Nn. roik. N1 10010
survived by hiding first in a
Parisian cellar and then in a rural
hayloft. Nor can Brill, the former
astronomer, any longer raise his
eyes heavenward, to the heights
to which he once aspired. Prin
cipal Brill tries to inspire his
students with his motto, Ad
astro ("to the stars") but he
himself casts his gaze to the
ground.
As a teacher, Principal Brill is
in the business of identifying
talent, praising achievement,
)rnerstone Laid
Jewish Chapel Gets
Going at West Point
IEST POINT, N.Y. -
fA) The cornerstone
.ie first Jewish chapel at
United States Military
(demy was laid here at
femonies attended by
it 400 persons. A mes-
te from President
jan hailed "the contri-
lon of citizens of the
rish faith who have
ved with distinction in
battle for freedom we
ericans have fought"
pre-Revolutionary
bs to the present.
ne message was read by
ert Ames, president of the
Point Jewish Chapel Fund
i raised $4.5 million of the 16
on needed to build the chapel
^h will be completed next
The funds were donated
ely by Jewish and non-
sh individuals and organize-
through the Chapel Fund
|h is a non-profit organiza-
IEN COMPLETED, the
chapel will be a center for reli-
gious worship, Judaica studies
and holiday observances for the
Academy's Jewish cadets, ins-
tructors, post personnel and their
families. It will be open to
visitors as well and will serve to
familiarize non-Jewish cadets
with Jewish customs, traditions
and religious ritual.
Ames noted that until now,
"Jewish cadets who have at-
tended the Academy since its
first class was graduated in 1802
have been using the chemistry
lab, auditorium or non-
denominational chapel at the
post cemetery for worship ser-
vices. When the chapel is com-
pleted next year it will serve the
religious and cultural needs of
some 250 Jewish cadets, faculty
and other military personnel sta-
tioned at the Academy and their
dependents."
Groundbreaking ceremonies
were held in December, 1982. The
Jewish chapel will stand on a
bluff overlooking the parade
grounds, midway between the
Protestant and Catholic chapels.
encouraging slow minds to grow
bold. But when he meets philo-
sopher Hester Lilt, the brilliant
mother of one of his least
1 promising students, he is forced
to reconsider the dry choices of
his life. "You stopped too soon,'"
Hester admonishes him **
stopped too soon as an astro-
nomer, as a would-be husband
and father, and as an educator.
For Brill has long since given
up on Hester's daughter Beulah
a sullen, silent student with
dull green eyes. But Beulah, the
late blossomer, will undergo a
magical transformation, a trans-
formation which Brill might have
foreseen had he not refused to
see. Beulah, it turns out, posses-
ses eyes which will shine more
brightly than anyone's and
they will shine brightest as they
mock Principal Brill to remind
him of his failure.
The Cannibal Galaxy is a taut
and brilliant tale told with
elegance and wit. But while its
opening chapters, dramatizing
Brill's childhood and adolescence,
are beautifully written, they are
also somewhat over-written and
perhaps extraneous as well. The
novel does not entirely capture
our interest until Joseph Brill
becomes Principal Brill and
meets his nemesis, Hester Lilt.
At that point. The Cannibal
Galaxy becomes an engaging,
thought-provoking, and finally
disturbing novel whose scope
extends far beyond the failed
aspirations of a small-minded
principal.
Like Ozick's justly acclaimed
story collections The Pagan
Rabbi, Bloodshed and Three
Novellas, and Ltvitation: Five
Fictions, The Cannibal Galaxy
belongs to a different universe
than most of the middling work
that today passes for fiction.
When Cynthia Ozick raises her
eyes to the stars, she sees what
no one else dares see and shows
us her visions with the genius
and wonder of the artist.
Diane Cole is a New York-based
writer whose book reviews have
appeared in The New York
Times, The Washington Post,
and USA Today.
'Medium' reviews films
about Jewish Problems
Ills of society which formerly
had little impact on Jewish life
but which are now significant
problems, are the subject of 16
films described in the current
issue of Medium, just published
by JWB's Jewish Media Service.
The theme of the issue is,
"COPING: Jewish Concerns."
Problems and rights of single
parents. troubled teenagers,
alcoholism, intermarriage,
disorders which affect Jews, and
Jews with handicaps, are dealt
with sensitively within the
context of Jewish ethics and
values.
One film of interest is entitled,
Shabbat In Sign Language.
This shows young deaf people
sharing in the beauty of a
Shabbat meal. The physically
handicapped strive to lead
normal lives but go about doing
things in different ways.
Some of the films include:
Yours Truly, Andrea G. Stern,
and The Empty Chair, which deal i
with the problem of single
parenthood; Teenage Suicide,
and Childhood's End, to help
combat teenage suicide; and
Lisa's Dilemma, which discusses
the effects of intermarriage on a
child.
The films reviewed in the
current issue of medium are
available from a variety of dis-
tributors across North America.
The Jewish Media Service-
JWB is a central clearinghouse
for audio-visual resources for the
North American Jewish com-
munity. It is jointly sponsored by
the Council of Jewish Federa-
tions, JWB, and the National
This is a scene from Yours Truly,
Andrea G. Stern, a film about a
single parent and her 10-year-old
daughter. The film is one of K
reviewed in current issue M
Medium. T
United Jewish Appeal, and is
housed at and administered by
JWB, 15 East 26th St., New
York, N.Y. 10010. Associate
sponsors are the American
Zionist Youth Foundation, Jew-
ish Education Service of North
America, and Union of American
Hebrew Congregations.
Joseph Kruger, South Orange,
N.J., is chairman of the Media
Service. Dr. Eric A. Goldman is
director.
*
SURROGATE MOTHERS-
Jewish couples unable to have children willing to pay a
fee and expenses to single woman to carry their child.
Conception to be by artificial insemination. Contact
Alan S. Kessler, Esq., 2301 Collins Ave., M-8, Miami
Beach, FL 33139 (305) 538-4421. All inquiries confiden-
tial.
ISRAELI DIMS
Brought Back by Popular Demand!
Sunday, October 9- 10t30 A.H.
Miami trial lawyer Stanley Rosenblatt cross examines
outstanding personalities on location inJjn*
, Quests In this WPBT Miami production' ^^jj^"
Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin, former President Yitzhak ftavon,
former Defense Minister Ariel Sharon
and Labour Party leader Shimon Peres.
Don't miss the inside storyl
Irs Easy to Feel Like a HBon
Without Sparing a Dine
j**2
H first glance. Its just a Ivlng room
Mod wh fumitun. Or rnaybs its
a garage tilted with tods. Oractoeet
Wed with ctolnes.
It might not be worth much to you,
but to us is worth rrtstons. Ms worth
Home and Hospital tor the Aged.
Everything you donato to the
Douglas Gardens Thrill Shops is
taxKtoo^lbtoCTcoijrmwewibe
glad to ptok up your m*chanc*aeat
your convenience. A loenesd
appraiser is uualehla upon request.
Call the Douglas GardensThrift
Shops- when you re-decorate your
home, clean out your garage and
straighten up your closets.
Its that easy. And youl tee! sKe a
rnHfidn without efjenrjng a oTme.
15713 N.W. 27th /We.
500N.E.79thSt.
3149 Haltendsto Beach Brvd.
Irving Cypen. Chairman of tha Board
Harold Beck. President
Aaron Kravte, Chairman. ThrW Shop
Commrttas
r^DHW.E*cutk* Director


-r-r


aKr iu
WeJewishFlotiSanofGnater Fort Lauderdale
Fridy.Octob1
-/
*>
10th Bar Mitzvah twinning at Temple Sholom
The 10th twinning since April
1982 of a congregant son's Bar
Mitzvah with a Soviet Jewish
boy whose family has been denied
permission to leave the Soviet
Union will take place Saturday
morning Oct. 15 at Temple
Sholom, Pompano Beach.
David Abraham SBversteia,
son of Mr. and Mrs. Howard Sil-
verstein, will share his reading of
the Haftorah with his Soviet
twin, 13-year-old Albert Zava-
lunov, son of Zaav and Semion
Zavukinov of the city of Kuba in
Azerbaijan, the Soviet Socialist
Republic on the Caspian Sea.
r, listed in ,.
formation supplied the National
Conference on Soviet Jewry and
the Soviet Jewry Research
Bureau to the Jewish Federa-
tion's Community Relations
Committee as a "driver'' in a city
where Jews were mostly agricul-
tural workers or worked in oil
fields, was denied an exit visa in
September 1979 fori "secrecy"
reasons. Samion has relatives in
Kiryat Nordau, Netanya, Israel.
David Abraham Sftverateki
will mail to his twin a certificate
of Bar Mitzvah to indicate that,
though the rite of Bar Mitzvah is
denied to him in the Union of
Soviet Socialist Republics, he
was present by proxy on Oct. 15.
LIBERAL JEWISH TEMPLE
Coconut Creek
Rabbi Joseph Noble will
conduct Shabbat services at 8
p.m. Friday Oct. 7.
Rabbi Bruce Warshal, who
normally conducts services twice
a month, will be joined by Cantor
Benjamin Hansel, to conduct
services at 8 p.m. Friday Oct. 21.
Both services will be held at Cal-
vary Presbyterian Church, 3950
Coconut Creek Pkwy., Coconut
Creek, (opposite Wynmoor Vil-
lage). An Oneg will follow the
services.
B'nai-B'itot Mitzvah
TEMPLE KOL AMI
Andrew Fein berg, son of Helen
and Ron Feinberg of Plantation,
and Jordan Mayers, son of Bar-
bara and Leslie Greenbaum, will
celebrate their B'nai Mitzvah at
Saturday morning Oct. 8 services
at Temple Kol Ami, Plantation.
Next Friday night Oct. 14,
Stephanie Grose, daughter of
Beverly and Allan Gross of Plan-
tation, will become a Bar Mitz-
vah at the Temple. The following
morning, Daniel Thaler, son of
Cindy and Larry Thaler, and
Daniel Miakin, son of Marsha
and Barron Mink in, all of Planta-
tion, will celebrate their B'nai
Mitzvah at the Temple.
RAMAT SHALOM
Jeana* Raskin, son of Paula and
Dr. Howard M. Husk in of Plan
tation, will be called to the Haf-
torah reading as a Bar Mitzvah
at the 10 a.m. Saturday Oct. 15
service at Ramat Shalom Syna-
gogue, Plantation.
TEMPLE
8HAARAY TZEDEK

c S
rs
-?f
Michael Breelaw, son of Beryl
and Allen Breslaw of Sunrise,
becomes first Bar Mitzvah cele-
brant at the Saturday morning
Oct. 15 service in the newly-com-
Just
Great?
Great fbod.
Great Drinks.
Great Gathering. ,
fe
a re&autant
n&
SadaSoioodSfma k Such
FtUudmafc
1745 E Surra* Mvd 524-3)00
4 Oawhobee BVd (S 704). 1-95 Ew 69M
68*2097
TMtfftf Dmmg Sp*U-$tM. from 6 064 06
pleted Temple Sha'aray Tzedek,
4099 Pine Island Rd Sunrise.
TEMPLE BETH AM
Kevin Green, son of Billie and
Harris Green of Coral Springs,
will become a Bar Mitzvah at
Saturday morning Oct. 8 services
at Temple Beth Am, Margate.
TEMPLE BETH TOR A H
Saturday morning Oct. 15
services at Temple Beth Torah,
Tamarac, will be marked with the
Bar Mitzvah of Andrew Ksaskr.
son of Barbara and Leonard Kes-
sler of North Lauderdale.
The B'nai Mitzvah celebration
for Jeffrey BaraU, son of Maxine
and Michael BaraU of Sunrise,
and Eric Prexantz, son of Jacque-
line and Herbert Prezantz of
Coral Springs, took place during
the Oct. 1 services at Beth Torah.
Archaeologists In New Dig
HAIFA (JTA) An ar-
chaeological team sponsored
jointly by Haifa University and
the University of Marburg in
West Germany has unearthed the
remains of a Canaanite settle-
ment dating from approximately
3100-2900 BCE at Tel Acco, near
Acre north of Haifa bay.
According to Prof. Moshe
Dothan, head of Haifa Univer-
sity's archaeological department,
who directed the dig, the various
clay vessels found indicate the
settlement pre-dates earlier
estimates by about 1,000 years.
He noted that "this early settle-
ment was not fortified and was
probably agricultural in nature."
The skeleton of a horse was
found in a layer of rubble dating
from the middle Canaanite pe-
riod. Dothan called that dis-
covery "one of the moat remark-
able finds ever made in Israel"
Graves from the late Bronze Age
were also uncovered at the site.
several containing clay vessels
including very rare pieces
decorated in two tones. A jar in a
style known as "chocolate and
white" is only the second piece of
its kind to be found in Israel,
Dothan said.
One grave yielded scarabs,
some of them combined with gold
rings. In another, day vessels
were found similar to those of Sy-
rian or Turkish origin. In other
areas of the hill, relics were found
dating from the Iron Age and late
Canaanite period, including clay
vessels the archaeologists as-
sociate with the Shardan people,
sea-faring mercenaries who
settled the coastal area at about
1200 BCE.
Among the rare pieces found
were an ivory cosmetic container
in the shape of a duck and a
bronze image of the ancient deity.
Baal, which are believed to date
from the 13th century BCE.
Statement of Ownership, Management
and Circulation (required by M UBC
MM): 1 Titto of publlcstlon Jewish
Flortdlan of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Publication No. 8SM30 S Date of
nuns: sept. SO, IMS. S Frequency of
toeuo: Weekly mid-Sept through mid-
May, Bt Weakly balance of year. A -
No of tesuM published annually: M B
- Annual Mbscrtptlon price: O S3 4 -
location of known office of publication
M0 E. Hailandale Beach Blvd.. Suite
707 C. Hallandate, Fla SM0* Loca-
tion of headquarter! of publisher* 120
N.E. Street. Miami, Fla Ml33 I -
Publisher, editor, managing editor:
Fred K. Shochet, 130 N.E. Street,
Miami. Fla. MU2 7 Owner. Fred K.
Shochet. 130 N.E. Street. Miami. Fla.
IU. I Known bondholders, mort-
gagees and other security holders hold
uig or owning 1 percent or more of total
amount of bonds, mortgages or other
securities If any. None. for comple
tton by non-profit organisation: Nona. 10
- Extent and nature of circulation.
given In this order, average no coplei
each Issue during preceding 12 months
followed by actual no. copies single Is-
sue published nearest to filing date: A)
total no. copies printed (net press run):
l336, 20.000; B) paid circulation: 1 -
sales through dealers and carriers,
street vendors and counter sales. 0.0; 2
- mall subscriptions: 18,762. 1B.2S7; C)
total paid circulation: lS.Tss, 1.2S7; D)
free distribution by mall, carrier, or
other means, samples complimentary
and other free copies, M. 80 E) total
distribution. 18,816, l,S37 F) copies not
distributed: 1) office use. left over, un-
accounted for, spoiled after printing,
S20, SM. 2) returns from news agents: 0.
0. O) Total: 1MM. 20,000 I certify that
statements made by me above are cor-
rect and complete.
Fred K Shochet, publisher
- t-
Can you spare a
oratrornbontvacijn^
Haw you a musical Instrument lying around
home not being played?
Donate it to the kids in Kfar Saba and get a
| tax deduction on your income tax return.
Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale
twinned with Kfar Saba in the Israel Project
Renewal program Is trying to help the neigh-<
borhood school put together a band.
CALL THE FEDERATION
748-8400
Share'the Vision
CaadleUgkUagTIssi
Friday, Oct. 7-6:44
Friday, OcM4-ft37
(Tas-MM). mx w. OaklealPtal
TEMPLE OREL AVNAI I
' *--'-'-' -*ttTTTit ilim tisisaj ratlin Thaieflaj i
Frtdayla m., 7pm; Saturday i Warn,7pm M|
XJJEf^wS, nr"""iT "M* <*wwt>. rmm mi
7:*0p.m; Saturday tarn., 7:Mp.m Study groups Man i
services; Women. Tuesdays p.m. Bakae Area Usearsnaa
(sn-latT). 1W
*F Owwejh Thvreft
:eam...:Mp.av<
TOUNO
Bred.. Daerneld Beaeti sMai.
:M p.m.; Friday g a.m., I p.m.;
YOCNO
I SSI-7177).
through Friday 7:at a.m., sad)
am
AM (Ms-MSS).
r through Friday Mam.. p.m Friday law ertel
P m ; Saturday am, lp.m.; Sunday I am.. I j
SBPSeaaaiibkael (tea saw. nst w. ne steal Fan wtn., L_
Mis. Servtcs.: Monday through Thursday am, f p.m.; FrUBylial
jMji.m.. t p.m Saturday *a.m.. eaaeet; Sunday am., I s.n.r
Csntury Blvd, Deerfleld Beach Steal Barrtaas: Sunday through rrkmj 1:1
a.m.. 6 p.m. Friday late service p.m.; Saturday l:Uam. aadst earn
lighting time -fcn 'sii I aagnai. fa ate i BSii
TEMPLE BETH TOBAH <7*l-7a0>. MM NW trth tt Temerec m
Servteee: Sunday through Friday ( M a.m.. f p.m. Late Frtdsy nrrtel
-. a.t..^.r...-. -tt MaSMBTtr Ttttt TIsIii mijIiIiiii
TEMPLE B'NAI MOSHE (M3AMO>,lM BE Srd St Pompano Bead MS
eervtoeo: Friday p.m. BaaM Mearrta A. Bheav.
TEMPLE SHA'ABAY TZEDEK (741-OBSSI. SMI Pine lass* M.
sunrise Mm. Services: Sunday through Friday am. pm ; !**
^Maeeaaed. tuWtoy ,:- *-m- *'* |BM*1 iUNrt "' fm>-am
!PIX "OLOM Servteee: Monday through Friday I M a m. Friday evening st I Nr-
2"8*18*1""!" mUMM. m MABOATE (tTe-MSO). TMIMwaa
iT[rsV!5?t*to_?,- *""' Buinaj atewsMliFilaiyt:lla.,l:BM;
Late Friday s>rtespm. ssaMdeTdTSaS.. gTlsp.m. aahN **
mam\^awmm. lAesass' elea4 Oaakaa*.
aAa.alsaUIM(Fornaertlwwj
I M am, IN p.m.; ssturevl
OONOBEOATMN BTN Al
).
Daets,
' OONQBEaATtOM OT
Ave leiifterlilU MU I
P m ; Saturday I u am
BaAMiaraelBI
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2722). Isrvteesall
pn>:eturdayam.Al|
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(7MM40). )*>
ssdl Friday I 10 ML, W
ky study class In PIT* **
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1 WEAJIU EX (711-Mie). MW.C
I''"' rrtaajr : s,m.;
Frk toST" ^E!2^",)' ^ars-.
?7td*>' 1 P.m.. Saturday M.Ma.m. BashM ate
ftaJaylr*
***** night esrvlco. twice
ACTwafe*nV*a twU*.???*fcy.a Caieary Fieekytertee Q***J
reex. *****
*k*


October 7,1983
The Jewish Fbridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 11
I"
NORTON
SINCE 1924-
I
SAFETY
SERVICE
CENTER
~*5S2tiMCO,i. LIMITED WARRANTY
SMisFACTWIH GUARMITEED
OR YOUR MOMEY REHirn
S5525Sa&?Sr
clu4*o"
STORE NO. 31 IN GREENACRES
3838 JOG ROAD PHONE 968-1014
THESE SPECIALS AT ALL STORES
QUALITY VALUE PERFORMANCE
XZXTUBELESS
BLACKWALL
P-METRIC TUBELESS
X WHITEWALL
SIZE
PRICE
P155/80R13
41.46
P165/80R13 46.54
P185/80R13J58.16
P185/75R14J 62.01
P195/75R14
P205/75R14
P215/75R14
P205/75R15 71.95
65.11
70.73
73.66
P215/75R15
P225/75R15
P235/75R15
74.98
77.48
86.45
F.E.T.
1.50
1.64
1.90
SIZE
145x13
155x13
165x13
175x14
185x14
165x15
165/70-13
185/70-14
MXL
PRICE
36.26
41.39
46.45
53.18
57.35
51.36
44.76
185/70-13 55.24
58.94
F.E.T.
163
1.42
1.55
2.08
2.15
1.55
ma
2 IMPORT
TRUCK
XCT
185x14
6 PLY
1.78
1.99
2 27.
FET
ASK FOR OUR
PRICES ON
TUBELESS
BLACKWALL
f. 195/70-14 205/7C-14 j xcXtwm
81.85 87.33 TRUCKES
F.E T 2.27 F.E.T 2 40
2.13
234
249
244
259
2.74
296
HFGoodrich
P-METRIC, POLYESTER
CORD, FIBERGLASS BELT
WHITEWALLS
THE NEW GENERATION RADIAL
CHELINT
BLACKWALL
SIZE
165/70-365
180/65-390
220/55-390
WHITE
PRICE F.E.T.
77.08
90.:
1.72
1.94
107.49237
IllRELLI
40,000 MILE LIMITED WARRANTY
DOss* WIDIE
W~ ^\ STANOING VALUE "^ "J"
W RAOJA. RADIALS
PRICE
155SR12 39.50
145SR13 34.85
|l55SR13j41.24
1165SR13; 44.73
175SR14
185SR14
165SR15
51.12
54.02
1.19
1.15
1.24
1.53
1.81
2.11
um
SIZE PRICE F.E.T
P155/80B12 31.49 1.50
P155/80B13 31.97 1.52
P165/80B13 33.81 1.58
P175/80B13 35.75 1.70
P185/80B13 37.93 1.79
P175/75B14 38.79 1.70
P185/75B14 39.88 1.86
P195/75B14 41.82 2.00
P205/75B14 42.92 2.11
P215/75B14 44.25 2.24
P225/75B14 46.57 2.45
P155/80B15 35.75 1.67
P165/80B15 37.44 1.83
P205/75B15 |44.14 2.13
P215/75B15 45.60 2.37
P225/75B15 47.78 2.52
P235/75B15 50.10 2 72
LIFESAVB XLM
STEEL BELTED RADIAL WHITE |
SIZE
P165/80R13
P175/80R13
P185/80R13
HIGH
TECH'
RADIALS
50, 60 4 70 SERIES and COMPT/A
PREMIUM 4 PLY
POLYESTER CORD WHITEWALLS
fflftt
_LLL
A78x13
25.26
C78x13 28.20
C78x14
28.83
E78x14
30.03
F78x14
31.48
G78x14 ; 33.18
h78x14
G78x15
H78x15
1.71
P3/70
BEST SELLING RADIAL
DUAL STEEL BELTS
JSL
165/70SR13
43.87
175/70SR13
185/70SR13
185/70SR14
195/70SR14
OT
49.49
53.99
57.93
62.99
r-f-f REVOLUTIONARY
K //ALL SEASON RADIAL
HIGH PERFORMANCE
SPEED RATED
THE ONLY DUAL TREAD
DESIGN. DUAL COM-
POUND TIRE
STEEL BELT IN SIDEWALL
FOR AOOED STRENGTH
PWCt M.T.
1.26
1.32
1.57
165
1 88
a
195/70HR14
2O5/70HR14
86.19
96.79
2.06
2.19
OTHER WZM AVAILABLE
WE ALSO CARRY
L78x15
34.74
33.26
34.98
36.94
1 60
1.77
1 89
205
2 16
228
248
P195/70R13
P205/70R14
P175/75R14
P185/75R14
P195/75R14
P205/75R14
8ALEPMCC
43.46
45.02
46.28
47.11
52.76
46.39
48.57
52.76
55.06
F.E.T.
1.64
1.83
1.90
1.95
2.24
1.87
2.00
2.13
P215/75R14 56.10
P225/75R14
P195/75R15
P205/75R15
P215/75R15
P225/75R15
P235/75R15
59.97
55.37
57.25
59.45
61.63
66.13
2.34
2.49
2.67
2.21
2.44
2.59
2.74
2.96
YOKOHAMA
40,000 MILE LIMITED
WARRANTY
YB65 STEELBELTED
RADIALS
FOR MOST FOREIGN 1 DOMESTIC
SMALL INTERMEDIATE CARS
SIZE
238
255
260
Available in 2 Ply only
MAXITRAC
HIGHWAY RADIAL
WHfTgWALLt
3E
P165/80R13
P175/80R13
P185/80R13
P185/75R14
P195/75R14
P205/75R14
P215/75R14
P215/75R15
P225/7SR15
35.62
38.39
40.09
41.25
42.62
43.90
45 JO
46.28
48.77
P235/7SFU
trCWTURga
1.67
184
1.78
155SR12
145SR13
155SR13
165SR13
175SR14
185SR14
165SR15
PRICE
31.18
31.94
33JZ
36.13
41.98
F.E.T.
1.36
1.23
1.48
1.60
1.84
1.98
1.79
SMALL TRUCK
SPECIAL
Y45 WHITEWALL
41
800x14
6 PLY
193 6PLY ^ I a 08
"H.l'.'IJ:lU
12.08 F.E.T
Y88SSt*HttttNR*al
SIZE PRICE F.E.T
175/70SR13 41.47 1.64
185/70SR13 44.62 1.78
185/70SR14 47.25 1.91
195/70SR14 50.45 2.09
205/70SR14 57.14 2.40
231
270
EXPERIENCE
& INTEGRITY
THAT SAVE
2 801

>PEN7:30AM ^^gggo.
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I Since 1924 Norton Tire Co. has
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I managers, certified mechanics.
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^


Page 12
The Jewish Floridian of OrwaUr Fort Lauderdale
Friday,)
Warning: The Surgeon General Has Determined
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9mg
5mg
SOn PACK 100$ FILTER. MENTHOL 2 mj. "tat". 0.2 mg. meow*
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