The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 3, no. 7 (Apr. 5, 1974)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 9, 1976 called v.4, no. 27 but constitutes v.5, no. 1; issue for July 7, 1989 called v.18, no. 11 but constitutes v.18, no. 13.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44570954
lccn - sn 00229545
ocm44570954
System ID:
AA00014312:00250

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Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward


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Full Text
OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE
Volume
12 Number 31
Fort Lauderdale, Florida Friday, September 23,1963
CfmlSJtothi
Price 35 Cents
ampaign Cabinet plans 1984 UJA drive
With almost everyone of their
8-member Campaign Cabinet
nt for the first meeting of
t 1984 United Jewish Appeal
npaign year, Joel Reinstein,
Executive vice president of the
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale, and general
(jgirman of Federation's 1984
jjA Regular Campaign and
project Renewal, and the general
Ico-chairman Brian Sherr hailed
|the session as a "wholehearted
ositive step toward launching
[he campaign officially."
They noted that this year's
hational UJA theme is "Share
fte Vision" for a hoped-for year
M peace for Israel. Their opening
Statement also noted that during
[he past 35 years, the people of
Israel have made tremendous
Sacrifices in lives lost, in
financial resources to secure
kheir borders and provide a future
lor their children.
We must," they stated, call
\>n the entire Jewish community
continue the tradition of in-
creased economic support for
Israel. We must encourage our
younger generation, the future
tiers of our communities, to
entify with Israel and to
SHARE THE VISION of a
etter future for Israel's young
ople and for our own children
nd young adults living here,
four total cooperation through
ur Jewish community will help
ike Israel's and our future
brighter."
The, Campaign .Cabinet,
ting in the board room of
Federation's new facility at 8368
Oakland Park Blvd., con-
curred on a series of events that
For a brighter future
will precede the big opening fund-
raising event to be held Dec. 3
with admission limited to those
making commitments of $10,000
or more to the 1984 campaign.
Included in the series of events
will be leadership training
sessions, the Oct. 9-16 Leader-
ship Mision to Israel, personal
solicitations among top
leadership, and regional meeting
Share the Vision
Rep. Shaw talks
here Sept 26
on Oct. 30 for the Campaign
Cabinet with Jewish communal
leaders from other cities and
national UJA leaders.
Reinstein, Sherr, and
Federation President Edmund
Entin will develop plans for the
regional meeting to which, in
addition to the Campaign
Cabinet members, communal
summer's Family Mission to
Israel. It was reported that eight
families have already made
leaders from throughout North prelin^^ arrangements to take
Broward will im^mdmdg !****"***?
participate *** for Parems and chfldren to
*^ enjoy the exciting adventure of
Reinstein, noting that the 1983 experiencing Israel together.
UJA campaign which produced
slightly over 14 million, in ad-
dition to more than S 150,000 for
Project Renewal, said that of the
30,000 contributions received,
almost 10,000 of those were for
amounts under $26.
For this reason, he added, the
Federation had approved the
creation of the Condominium
Cabinet, chaired by Campaign
Cabinet member Samuel K.
Miller of Deerfield Beach, which
will provide assistance, training,
and leadership development for
areas where there have been a
number of "underachievers" in
support of Israel's humanitarian
needs and of the great variety of
programs and services provided
by the Federation here in the
Greater Fort Lauderdale area and
elsewhere.
The Campaign Cabinet leader-
ship duo of Reinstein and Sherr,
both young Fort Lauderdale
lawyers, expressed their pleasure
at the inter-action of the Cabinet
members and the cooperation
expressed during the meeting to
reach out to every area of the
Jewish community in the nor-
thern and western cities of
Broward County. They noted a
good cross-section of the com-
munity represented" on the
Cabinet.
The Cabinet was informed that
plans are underway to encourage
more families to join in next
Cabinet members, in addition
to President Entin, Vice Presi-
dents Reinstein, Sherr, Samuel
Leber of Tamarac, Ethel
Waldman of Fort Lauderdale,
and Samuel K. Miller of Deerfield
Continued on Page 2-
E. Clay Shaw
Alvin Grass
Shamir gets coalition backing
Broward County's U.S. Representative E. Clay Shaw,
who met with Israel's Likud bloc candidate for Prime
Minister, Yitzhak Shamir, oa last month's visit to Israel,
will report on his visit to the Jewish community.
The meeting, open to all by Um Jewish Federation
of Greater Fort I all, wfll be held at 11:30 am.
Monday Sept. 26 on the first floor of the Federation
building, 8358 W. Oakland Park Blvd.
spsaued
An agreement to form a new Israeli
overnment, led by Foreign Minister
Htzhak Shamir, cleared the way for
ime Minister Menachem Begin to
sent his formal resignation to
ssident Chaim Herzog.
Secluded for eight days in his home,
fegin, last Thursday Sept. 15, had a
nessenger deliver his resignation to
resident Herzog.
Israeli Law concerning the transition of power
Kjuires, when a formal resignation is received by
[he president, he is obliged to consult with
tnesset faction heads to determine who can
arner the backing of a majority of the 120-
ember parliament. President Herzog, faced with
> agreement signed last week by six partners in
the government's ruling Likud coalition to
ontinue the 64-member majority, Herzog is
upected to ask Shamir to form Israel's next
^ministration.
Shamir intends to invite the Labor Party with
56 opposition votes to join a national unity
Congressman Shaw, his wife and children, were a
on their fact finding trip by Federation Past President Ah/in
Gross of Fort Lauderdale and bis wife, Evelyn. Gross said that
Shaw had a ens hear meeting with Israel's Foreign Minister
Shamir. He said their discussion touched all aspects of U.S.-
Israeri relations, the problems in Israel aad these that have been
encountered in Labsaon in Israel's effort* to maintain the
security of its borders.
Directly after the meeting, Shaw wfll return to Washington
for the continuing sessions of Congress.
Yitthak Shamir
government.
If Labor refuses
all government ministers
presently serving in Begins cabinet would be
retained.
Shamir, the designated candidate for the prime
minister's post, will have 21 days to form a
government.
The Knesset is curently in recess and will not
reconvene until October. If no party is able to
form a government. President Herzog turns to
the Knesset, which, by majority vote, passes an
election law. The earliest that elections can be
called, in the unlikely assumption that Shamir
fails to get the majority vote, is the spring of
1964. At the very latest, elections with a new
government must be established by June of 1965.
Deputy Prime Minister David Levy, who lost
out to Shamir, in Herat Party's nomination of the
prime minister candidate, headed Likud's
negotiating team which produced the coalition
favoring Shamir. Levy said the Likud's six
partners would enter the new government under
the terms of existing coalition agreement that
forms the basis for administration that had bean
put together by Begin who has headed the
government since 1977.
Condominium Cabinet delegates named
Scores of condominium
iplexes in various cities in
northern tier of Broward
aunty will be represented by
legates on the newly-created
ondominium Cabinet of the
K4 United Jewish Appeal
Project Renewal campaign
m the Jewish Federation of
"eater Port Lauderdale.
This was announced by Federation
rd member and Campaign Cabinet
nber, Samuel K. Milkr of Century
vi%e. Deerfield Beach, chairman of
" Condominium Cabinet. He said
[the delegates who have been named to
the Corjdommium Cabinet are among
tin leaders in their communities.
They, he said, will bs working with
the Fsdsrstkm-UJA coinmittms m
the comdommium compkutss in their
respsctive dtiss "in this innovative
andeaciting sJn>roach to>'#
broader participation" wfthta the
jwiah community in the f*w drive
to rsiss funds for Jsws in Israel in the
total North Broward Jswish com
munity and throughout the world.
The early appc4ntinante to the
Condominium Cabinet induds:
From SUNRISE: JamBimfcwi.
Nat Pearhaaa. Eaten. OOm^jh*
Sunrise Lakss pka.es; IrHaj
Specter. Water Bridge; Irving
, Aragon.
From TAMARAC: City Coun-
cilman David Krauts, citywide; MB-
Isle, of Tamarac; Fred
Sabal Palm, Gardens of
David Fever. Lime Bay;
Joke Shekel, Concord Vi
Carolyn Feffar. Sands Point;
,Crob.
Tsnkvmk. S
Sabal Pabn.
From LAUDERDALE LAKE*
Ledao Staag, Kart Elmhogin, Jerry
IIi liana Hawaiian Gardens; Mr.
aad Mm. Dave Tyler, Sidney Sne-
aman. Jack Onneeem, Betty Reft
Cypress Chases phases; Jeans
Helms. Somerset; La* Sliver,
LsndsrdsisOaks.
From MARGATE: William
Seel
GUIer. Sam LsseO. Jules Lnstig,
Harry Ghmover. citywide
From PLANTATION: Sidney
Goldstein, Lauderdale West; Jerry
Kaye, Omega. Sidney
I^ryseeian Gardens; Cam
Terl Marder. Pins Island Ridge.
Prom CORAL SPRINGS: Sidney
Bernstein, Rambtowood Emt.
From LAUDERHILL: Bolia.se
Cohen, Castle Gardens; Irving
Feldman, Cypress Tree, Majestic
Gardens, Newport, Laudsrhill Esst.
From NORTH LAUDERDALE:
City Councilman Sam MMtor, Oak
brook Village.


Page 2
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
1984 UJA drive
Continued from Page 1
Beach, include:
From LAUDERHILL: Alvera
Ackerberg, Lee Dreiling. Past
President Victor Gruman,
Deborah Fuller Hahn, Joseph
Kaplan.
From PALM AIRE, Pompano
***** September *, ,^
Beach: Mike Ackerman,
Seymour Gerson, Irving
Libowsky.
From PLANTATION: Alan
Becker, David Jackowitz, Martin
Lipnack, Alan Levy, Norman
Ostrau, Sheldon Polish, Dr. Fred
Reitman.
F'om TAMARAC (including
Woodlands and Woodmont):
Walter Bernstein, Louis Colker,
Past President Leo Goodman.
Daniel Klein. Manny Lax,
Samuel Leber, Charles Locke,
Leon Messing, David Miller.
David Rush. Sol Schulman, Past
President Jean Shapiro. Felice
Sincoff. Sidney Spewak, David
Sommer.
From FORT LAUDERDALE:
Past President Jacob Brodzki,
Murray Cherman, Milton
Edelstein, Past President Ah/in
Gross, Past President Milton
Keiner, Mark Levy, Anita
Perlman, Samuel M. Soref, John
Strong.
From BONAVENTURE:
Phillip Conn.
From CORAL SPRINGS:
Rabbi Donald R. Berger.
From LAUDERnn,
LAKES: Rabbi Jefftv ,&M
fflSfeM"u,'fi3;'*3
assa. Supw ^5
What it takes tobea Riverside.
i
It takes years.
Nearly 70 years of building a name
people trust.
It takes a special kind of leadership that
originated with Charles Rosenthal, Riverside's
founder.
And which continues today, in the hands
of Carl Grossberg, Alfred Golden, Leo Hack,
Andrew Fier and a new generation of Jewish
management
It is this leadership which, in coopera-
~4*
tion with Orthodox, Conservative and Reform
Rabbis, actually helped set the standards f or
Jewish funeral services.!
. And it is this leadership that has-
dedicated Riverside to maintaining the high
standards demanded by Jewish tradition.
That's why, at Riverside, people
continue to find the dedication and the
resources which are necessary to provide
service that is truly Jewish.
And that's why today, Riverside is the
most respected name in Jewish funeral servki
in the world.
Carl Grossberg, President
Alfred Golden, Executive Vice President
Leo Hack, Vice President, Religious Advfeor
Andrew Fier, Vice President
RIVERSIDE
The most respected name in Jewish Iunerai
service in the world. tf*fl('
SpOMortBc TU GUARDIAN PLAN* PnuruH FtM**"r,rt"


^September23. 1983
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort.
Page.
Organization members urged to make early registration
for the Oct. 19 conference on Effective Leadership
Because of the initial response Lauderdale, is $15, including
The hundreds of invitations lunch, if received by Oct. 7 at the
nt out to registration leaders of Federation office, 8358 W. Oak-
" ish organizations throughout land Park Blvd. After that date,
early
those
Irth Broward County,
pstration is urged for
inning to attend the unique
19 conference devoted to
veloping "Strategies of Ef-
Ujve Leadership."
(Registration for the all-day
sion, arranged by a committee
Hied by Miriam Kalett of the
lomen's Division of the Jewish
deration of Greater Fort
the registration fee will be $18.
Dr. A. Hugh Adams, president
of Broward Community College,
will be the keynote speaker at the
luncheon session the middle
point of the scheduled morning
and afternoon workshops co-
sponsored by the North Broward
Midrasha, the Central Agency for
Jewish Education and the Jewish
Federation.
Mrs. Kalett said: "Now more
than ever, women make the dif-
ference, and here is the op-
portunity to build for the future
by learning organizational and
personal strategies managing
today's volunteer organizations."
She has been assisted in the
planning of the conference to be
held Wednesday Oct. 19 from
9:30 to 3:30 p.m. at Temple
Emanu-El, 3245 W. Oakland
Park Blvd., by Felice Sincoff,
president of Federation's
Women's Division; Jan Salit, di-
rector of the Women'8 Division;
Abraham J. Gittebon, Feder-
ation's director of education, and
Helen Weisberg, administrator of
Midrasha, the institute of the
Central Agency for Jewish
Education.
Edmund Entin, Federation
president, will greet the parti-
cipants at the start of the
morning workshops which in-
clude sessions on "Stress
Management for Presidents,"
"Time Management," "Delega-
tion and You," "The Need for
National campus agenda to be planned
by college students at Hillel confab
| Some 300
ders from
college student
across the United
\es and Canada are expected
convene in Washington Oct. 5
.gh 9 to meet with American
id Israeli political leaders and
holars and plan a campus
nda for 1983-84.
The meeting, called "Wash-
2", the National Jewish
udent Conference on Public
olicy Issues, is sponsored by the
nai B'rith Hillel Foundations
association with the Inter-
tional Council of B'nai B'rith
d B'nai B'rith Women.
Rabbi Stanley Ringler, inter-
national director of community
affairs and development for B'nai
B'rith Hillel, said, "The goal of
the conference is to bring to-
gether a genuinely representative
group of Jewish leaders."
Ringer also said that major is-
sues will be considered by the
conference such as Israel, Soviet
Jewry, nuclear disarmament,
Ethipian Jewry, and other Ame-
rican domestic and foreign policy
concerns.
The students will attend brief-
ings and meetings at the White
House, the State Department,
the Capitol, and the Israeli
Embassy.
Serving as chairmen for
"Washington 2" will be the out-
going members of the National
B'nai B'rith Hillel Student Secre-
tariat. They are Jeffrey Men-
delsohn of Harvard University,
Robert Levenson of Boston
University, Barbara Bamberger
of the University of Wisconsin-
Madison, Sari Karson of the
Beth Orr seeks volunteers for school play
based on 'Diary of Anne Frank'
JThe call has been put out by
[emple Beth Orr of Coral Springs
all the aspiring directors,
|roducers, stagehands and
nyone else who is interested in
olu in erring to help with the
i-ligious School's 7th grade
Induction of The Diary of Anne
jmnh.
Rabhi Donald Gerber, nnd di-
Klor of education, Barbara
ji'ilner. led that this major
[n>j i'w curriculum offered to
^udents grades 1 to 7 to enhance
Entertainers wanted
Musicians, mimes, magicians
|nd other entertainers are needed
k> volunteer at St. John's
Nursing and Rehabilitation Cen-
ter located at 3075 NW 35 Ave,
[iiudenlule Lakes.
St. John's is a 180-bed facility
at offers care to people of all
Biths and ages. Rabbi David
Kordon, of Sunrise, is a staff
piaplain.
In addition to volunteers who
lould entertain, there are
Ipenings for clerical and patient
psistance volunteers. Interested
ersons should contact Terry
Ijooney, Coordinator of
rolunteers at St. John's at 739-
88.
their Jewish awareness.
One of the most challenging
areas will be in grade 7, where a
course entitled, "From Shtetl to
Statehood" is being offered. This
course is designed to expose the
students to a period of 100 years
of Jewish history from the time of
the severe anti-Jewish laws of
Czar Alexander III (1881)
through the Russian pogroms of
the early 20th century.
However, in order to put on the
play, enough capable volunteers
must be found. If such indivi-
duals are found, the production of
The Diary of Anne Frank will be
staged either at J.P. Taravella or
Coral Springs High School.
Performance dates are slated for
the time of the Holocaust and
Resistance Day in the Spring of
1984.
Anyone interested in further
information, call Rabbi Gerber at
753-9081 or Barbara Fellner at
753-3232.
Share the Vision
University of Illinois, David
Arfin of the University of Cali-
fornia at Los Angeles, Gregg
Goldstein of the University of
Texas-Austin, Leah Goldberg of
Colorado State University, and
Clare Kohavi-Finkleman of
Hunter College.
R0odri wFrif a)
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
May I remind your readers
that the World Jewish Congress
is still anxious to collect reports
of all incidents of anti-Semitism.
I have been advised again by
Frieda Lewis, chairman of the
North American branch of the
Global Commission on anti-
Semitism of the World Jewish
Congress, that the Commission is
still dedicated to the "battle
against anti-Semitism."
I do want to take this op-
portunity to express my ap-
preciation to so many of your
readers who have sent me reports
in the past.
I have even heard from
Broward County residents who
go North (and West) and who
send me reports of anti-Semitism
in other states. It proves our
Jewish prople are truly concerned
and ever alert. Dear Friends,
please continue your vigilance.
Reports, and documentaries if
possible, can be mailed to me:
ESTHER CANNON
1012 North Ocean Blvd.
Pompaao Beach, FL 39062
Volunteers," "Effective Fund
Raising." Following the luncheon
meeting talk by Dr. Adams, the
afternoon workshops include ses-
sions on "Setting Priorities,"
" Assert iveness Training and
Communications Skills,"
"Feminism and Judaism,"
"Public Relations, Promotions,
Project."
A professional staff of women
highly qualified in their respec-
tive fields has been assembled to
lead the various workshops. The
faculty includes Elaine Azen,
president of Azen and As-
sociates, Fort Lauderdale public
relations and marketing firm;
Barbara Johnson of American
Express, Plantation center;
Shoni Labowitz of Broward Com-
munity College; Barbara
Shulman, president of Pegasus
Productions, TV producing
company; Dorothy Stud wick,
Family Service of Broward Coun-
ty; Sherwin Rosenstein, exe-
cutive director, Jewish Family
Service of Broward County, and
Augusta Zimmerman, ACW,
staffmember of Jewish Family
Service.
ISRAELI FASHIONSDevora
Roten, a 16-year-cld student in
Na'amat Pioneer Women's
Timon High School in Bnei Brak,
Israel, designed these outfits to
be featured in a showing of fash-
ions by students in the Israeli or-
ganization's vocational schools at
the national Pioneer Women-
Na'amat Convention Oct. 16-19
in Baltimore.
IN THE COOL & SCENIC BLUE RIDGE MOUNTAINS
v It DM '-v
1 vlxs cc o /a ^w a he kJti i i
too
pp- pp-s.'" fir
.,::
Can you spare a piccolo?
or a trombone, a clarinet, sax, flu* ****
Hava you a mualcal Inatrumant lying around
homanotbalngplayad?
Donate it to the kids In Kfar Saba and get a
tax deduction on your Income tax return.
Newish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale
twinned with Kfar Saba In the Israel Project
Renewal program Is trying to help the nelgh-
I borhood school put together a band.
CALL THE FEDERATION
748-8400
DELICIOUS JEWtSfttMEttCAN CUISINE
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ENTEITIUNMENT P1ANNED NCTTVrTIES
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Write for Brochure & Rates or Phone Miami Office
(309)5344356
,ort Hotl Lake 0
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ISRAEL _$510.
2 WEEK VACATION ~s510.
5 NlgMa In TEL AVIV 2 NigMa in TIBERIAS 6 Night. In JERUSALEM
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FOR RESERVATIONS A INFORMATION ON THESE TOURS, OR OUR
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^5t5nb5
23.11
<**Jewishfloridfan Look Who's CallmgWfwm Paranoid
FRED K. SHOCHET
Editor and PuMlehar
OF ONEATER FOHT LAUOEKMLE
SUZANNE SMOCMETf
Exacuttve Editor]
PuNlaharJ Weakly MM hplOTtui through MM-May- Bi-WaeMy balano* ot yaar.
Second Ctaaa Peerage Paid at HaMandaJa, Fla. US** 11*430
Faitaia>lii.aiidFanaWtialaiwi la Jaa, Miami, FLM101 |
Advartlalng Suparvlaor Abraham B Malparn
Fort UMdaroala-HollywooO Advaniamo Ollica Am. Sa.lnoe 2500 Bide _.
2000 I MaWandaH Baeoh two.. BuHa 707-0 HiMnHMi. Fla. 88008 Fhana e>. Oan
Flant: 120 NE8th St.. Miami. Fla. J3132 Phone 1-373-4MB
Mambar JTA, Savan Arta, WNS, NEA. AJPA. and FPA
^aaWi Flortdlaji Do Mot Quaramea KaewrutH or Meronandlae AoVartlaad
UaaCfUFTrON RATES: 2 Yaar Minimum 17.80 (Local Araa 83.96 Annual! or by mambarahip
Jaw i ah Fadaratlon ol Qraatar Fort Lauoerdale
Edmund Ennn, Fraaldant Latlla 8 Qottllab. Exacutlva Direclof
Tha Fadaratlon and tha nawa offtca of the Jewlah Florldlan of Qraatar Fort Laudardaia are located at
SttfW. Oakland Part. Blvd.. Fort Laudardaia. FL 33321 Phone (308) 7*884001
* Nawa editor: Max Levlne
Friday, September 23,1983
Volume 12
16 TISHRI 5744
Number 31
After Yom Kippur,
the Joy of the/
Feast of Tabernacles
There is no more profoundly Jewish
religious observance than Yom Kippur,
which brings to fruition the spirit set by the
first of the Holy Days, Rosh Hashanah.
But as Jews break their fast Saturday
night after Neilah, they already set their
sights on Sukkot next Wednesday eve.
This more festive celebration, on the second
day of Shemini Atzeret, the festival
marking the end of the Holy Day season,
has a distinctly upbeat tone in the joy of
bringing to a conclusion the year-long
reading of the Torah. And that begins the
Torah anew immediately thereafter.
Sukkot, in contrast to the awesome
ambiance of Yom Kippur, in which the
Jewish soul hangs in die balance, high-
lights the laws relating to the Festival of
the Tabernacles and the taking of the four
species that are bound up with the
holiday s primary symbols, the etrog and
the lulav.
It is in these tabernacles that the ancient
Israelites lived during their 40-years-long
exodus from slavery in Egypt.
There is a mini-parallel to be conceived in
this year's Sukkot celebration. The exodus
of Israel from Lebanon brings that nation
and Jews throughout the work! to a period
of soul-searching and "cleansing," a
wandering in their own desert of un-
certainty.
Let us hope that the climax of that
period will be as happy in its implications
as Simchat Torah itself, a suitable end to
Israel's modern wandering.
Pride of Israel Bonds
The pride and gratitude all Jews feel as
Israel looks back over 36 years of growth
and development are tempered by ongoing
and justified concern for her economic
security.
Yet it behooves us to take note of the
positive changes that have occurred in the
last few years in Israel's status in the
Middle East.
The peace agreement with Egypt, now
over four years old, has brought an element
of normality to Israel's southern frontier.
And to the north hopes have not yet
flagged for the achievement of a larger
margin of freedom from terror in the wake
of the agreement between Israel and
Lebanon.
No one can predict the course of events in
a region so volatile as the Middle East But
to have reached even this tentative
beginning toward a larger measure of Arab
realism must be viewed as a reflection of
the realization that Israel is here to stay
and must be reckoned into a solution of
that region'8 volatility.
In helping to shape that realization,
State of Israel Bonds has played an
essential role. The sinews of Israel's
economic development its harbors and
airports, railroads and water systems,
roads and factories owe much to the
capital raised by Israel Bonds.
EVER SINCE their downing
of Korean Air Lines Flight 007,
the American media have been
filled with stories about the
Soviets' paranoia. And there is
little to argue about in this diag-
nosis of them. It goes back a long
way, | as the media have been
quick to report.
But at the same time, we have
been treated to stories about the
FBI and its surveillance files on
Albert Einstein. The files include
charges that are breathtaking in
their own psychosis: Einstein,
from a suite in a Los Angeles
hotel, was directing the Com-
munist takeover of Hollywood;
Einstein, through a secret
invention, had achieved the
capacity to control the mind of
man; Einstein, pre-Hitler,
operated a Communist spy center
out of his office in Berlin, where
his quarters served as a drop-off
point for orders fed to him direct-
ly from Moscow.
THE FACT is that these and
many other asinine charges
against Dr. Einstein had not a
scintilla of truth in them, and the
FBI files actually include inform-
ation that proves their absurdity.
Example: a "report,*' complete
with "evidence," that Einstein
was "unpatriotic." But the facts
are these: The FBI did not solicit
this information, nor was it
compiled by an FBI agent. A
German woman, aboard a
German ship making a trans-
atlantic crossing to the United
States, observed Dr. Einstein,
also on board, in fact fleeing the
Nazis, as he refused to stand for
the playing of the German
national anthem. Small wonder.
Still, this "report" and other
charges of equal substance re-
main in the FBI file with a some-
what greater spirit of credence
infused in them by those who
placed them there than do the
documented refutations.
What does this say about J.
Edgar Hoover, the director of the
FBI at that time, who was the
Bureau's godfather? What does
this say about the Bureau itself,
among whose staff there was al-
most no one to say no to him?
WORSE, what does this say
about the United States at that
time in the era of that gutless
wonder, Joseph R. McCarthy,
when too many Americans either
Lee
Maudlin
applauded such outrageous
excesses as the charges against
Dr. Einstein most assuredly are
and in fact far more terrible
ones in other cases. Or else were
afraid to come to the defense of
countless victims of these civil
libertarian outrages and cowered
instead in abject silence.
The FBI sureveillance of this
immortal scientist and
philosopher says nothing good at
all: not about that deplorable
period in our history; not about
Hoover, the man, who conducted
it; not about the FBI, itself,
which like robots followed his di-
rectives; not about the nation as
a whole that permitted, and still
permits, the FBI to exercise such
awesome powers and that, in the
case of Einstein, showed itself to
be somewhat less than grateful to
this man who contributed so
enormously to our triumph over
Nazism.
Nor is the nation's condition
any better today, for the news of
the surveillance, long common
knowledge, came with sudden
and stunning impact upon the
media, always ready for a good
scandal or someone else's blood,
at precisely the same time that
the Korean flight was shot down
by the Soviets. And the nation,
not fully satisfied by our agony in
Beirut or the deaths of 269
persons aboard the flight, grab-
bed at it with gusto.
THE TRUTH is that we are as
paranoid as the Soviets any day
of the week. What is worse, too
often our paranoia is directed
along anti-intellectual lines in a
way that, like the Soviets' own
variety of this psychosis, is
lamentably self-destructive.
Why are we, for example,
smack in the middle of a national
crisis in literacy if not for this
very suspicion in us of intel-
lectualism? Why are we, as
nation, woefully inadequ,,, ;.
our educational system! ?
this very same detect in us";
It would be a weak UKWam I
m his defense, m this land auT
time, if he needs any defend I
all, to pomt to Dr. Einstein W
sition among the scientific
philosophical immortals^
human history from ArisuJ
to Galileo, from Newton u
Freud, from Shakespeare ti
Darwin, from Kepler to Heisr*
berg, from Plutarch and Livy mi
Tacitus to Bach and Mm
From Leibnitz and HuygeniJ
Einstein. The names are preciow'
few. Their bearers have shaped I
the course and career of hunx,
experience on this planet and
paved the way to the stars,
well. How can we.have treated]
him, how can we continue to treat]
him, so shabbily?
Dr. Einstein came to tax1
nation as a refugee, choosing it
his new home over dozens of |
other lands and leaders whose1
governments invited him as they
vied for the honor of his presence j
among them. In contrast, it is a]
mark of the malaise of America
how its bureau of snoopers M
served him, and its own highest
ideals, by cataloging the sick
suspicions of others directed)
against him.
IT IS A mark of the nationil
forgetfulness that its antiinttM
lectualism nearly handed the
atom bomb race to the German
because of its indifference to)
intelligence.
When the Hungarian physicist |
Leo Szilard's warnings to Pre-
sident Roosevelt that the Nanil
were coming close to producing!
successful A-Bomb went un-
heeded, if not in fact unread, it
was Szilard's persistence and
humility that encouraged him to
write Einstein and declare in ef-
fect: Who knows me, and who
cares what I say? But a letter j
from you would make the dif-
ference.
And it did. Out of that Eh-1
stein letter to FDR emerged, ii j
the blink of an eye, tat
Manhattan Project. And later,ml
gratitude, the FBI's surveillance
of him. (And the character as-
sassination of yet another gnu
physicist, J. Robert Op- j
penheimer.)
So who's calling
paranoid anyway?
C
\V
\ -jcktAndjSi...
U


Friday, September 23,1963
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page5
Judaic treasures from Prague
will be exhibited in Miami
HiUel School has record enrollment
The Smithsonian Institution
I Traveling Exhibition Service is
organizing a major exhibition
entitled, "The Precious Legacy:
Judaic Treasures from the
Czechoslovak State Collections."
This is one of the largest col
Beach sometime in early 1964.
Drawn from one of the largest
and most significant collections
of Judaica in the world, these
objects illustrate the vibrancy
and continuity of Jewish life from
the Middle Ages to the 20th cen-
lections of Judaica in the world, tury, and they were preserved by
with objects illustrating the con- an ironic twist of fate. The Holo-
tinuity of Jewish life from the
I Middle Ages to the 20th century.
This exhibition will be shown
I for the first time outside Europe
and will be coming to Miami
caust destroyed 90 percent of Eu-
ropean Jewry's material culture.
However, the Nazis preserved
the cultural artifacts of the
Jewish communities in Bohemia
and Moravia with the intention of'
creating a "museum of the ex-
tinct race" in Prague. The arti-
facts are now in the State Jewish
Museum in Prague.
The title, "The Precious
Legacy," refers then not only to
the rarity of the objects in the
collections and the unique way
they illustrate Jewish history,
but also to the survival of a col-
lection which, by an historical
paradox, was preserved for future
generations.
With a record enrollment of
over 725 students, the Samuel
Scheck Hillel Community Day
School, 19000 NE 25 Ave., North
Miami Beach, has become the
largest Hebrew day school in the
south, according to Marshall
Baltuch, the executive director of
the K-9 school.
Under the direction of Rabbi
Dr. Joshua Tarsis, of Plantation,
the school's principal, the staff
boasts over 60 teachers and
numerous specialists in such
areas as musk, art, reading and1
math labs, and computer science.
Rabbi Tarsis stated, "It is
interesting to note in an era of
declining school enrollment,
expecially at a Middle School
level, that our enrollment con-
tinues to grow. Perhaps it is due
to the superior quality of educa-
tion which is a blend of expert
faculty and a caring administra-
tion."
Hillel is a beneficiary of the
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale.
Lupus Foundation meets Sept. 28
[ssociate chairmen named for Bonds drive
Anita Perlman, general
I campaign chairman for North
Broward State of Israel Bonds,
announced the appointment of
I four associate chairmen to assist
I her in the 1983-84 endeavor.
She said: "Working together
I with my associate chairmen, the
leadership and workers within all
the communities, we look forward
fo another record-breaking
| campaign.
The associate chairmen are
Ulan J. Levy, president of Levy
and Col; Martin I. Lipnack, part-
ner in the law firm of Schnur and
Lipnack; Dr. Justin H. May,
Levy
Lipnack
May
chief of staff of the University
Community Hospital; James P.
Robinson, a partner in the CPA
Robinson
of Gerson,
accounting firm
Preston and Co.
Mrs. Perlman said that Levy
has chaired the Bond program in
the Fruit and Produce Division
erusalem awaits Resistance Fighters ^ft^^r GE^.'
advance gatherings at his firm's
During the days of Oct 2-6, all
eyes will be on Israel when the
World Assembly to Com-
memorate Jewish Resistance and
Combat during World War II
convenes in Jerusalem.
Under the auspices of the
Prime Minister, the Assembly
hopes to draw the attention of the
survivors who have participated
in various forms of resistance
I in ghetto uprisings, the under-
ground, or those who fought
alongside the partisans with
Polish and Soviet armed units in
the mountains and the forests, as
well as those who served in any
allied forces, and second
generation, survivors' children
groups.
A special Medal of Valor has
been struck by the Israeli
Government, to be awarded to all
Assembly participants.
For further information
contact the Israeli counsulate at
330 Biscayne Blvd., Miami,
phone 358-8111.
United Way starts with increases
United Way of Broward
I County, holding its first report
meeting last week, heard en-
couraging reports for its $5
million 1983-84 campaign in
support of more than 50 agencies
I in the county.
General Campaign chairman
I Jack Moss, said early returns for
such campaigns as those among
employes of Fort Lauderdale
\Sews and Sun-Sentinel. The
Miami Herald, and Burdines,
show giving increases with
proposed 19 percent increase over
| the dollars raised last year.
Moss said: "Attaining our goal
is going to be a challenge this
year, however, given the caliber
I of volunteers recruited, I am
confident we have the kind of
commitment necessary to get
there."
offices: Lipnack has chaired the
Bond program at Temple Beth
Israel and conducted High Holy
Days appeals there, and that he
and his wife, Shelly, were the
honored guests at the Temple's
Bond reception.
She noted that May has been
active in the Medical Division,
and he and his wife, Babette, were
guests of honor at the Woodlands
Country Club community's re-
ception for Bonds. The fourth as-
sociate, Robinson she said, has
been active in the Pension-Profit
Sharing area, and has lectured at
Israel Bonds Pension seminars.
FREE GIFT
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The next report meeting will be
held at 8 a.m. Thursday Oct. 6 at
Harris' Imperial House in
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Next to Publix in the Village
Square Shoppes. St. Andrew*
Boulevard (adjacent to Town
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Road in Boca Raton. Hours:
Mon. Sat. 8:30 e.m. 9:00 p.m.
Sunday 9:00 a.m. 6:00 p.m.
Telephone 392-4644________
Dr. Norman Gaylis, rheumato-
logist, will speak about "The
Lupus Patient" at the monthly
meeting of the Lupus Foundation
to be held at 8 p.m. Wednesday
Sept. 28 in the Parkway General
Auditorium located at 160 NW
170St., North Miami Beach.
Rhoda Weinstein. of Plan-
tation, is the publicity chairman
and a victim of Lupus herself.
Lupus is a chronic inflammatory
disease that involves the collagen
or connective tissue. It is a
disorder of the body's immune
system which can affect the skin,
joints, blood, heart, and other
vital organs. So far, there is no
cure.
For further information call
Mrs. Weinstein at 474-2280. s.
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herein You mail a to
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proving sufTi-
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covering c ou-
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Coupon may not be p
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COUPON
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December Jl
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o restricted by law
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* SuevOiemond Growers of California, mi


Page 6


The Jewish Floridian ofGreater Fort Lauderdale
Browsin'
Thru Broward
with Maggie
Max Levine
Following last Sunday'*
"Third Sunday of the month
Brunch" at Ramat Shalom, the
members went to work installing
and decorating a Sukka on the
synagogue's grounds at 11301 W.
Broward Blvd., Plantation
. Sunny and Irving Land
man, both well-known for their
Judaic activity, will be off to Is-
rael next month where Irving will
celebrate his 75th birthday Oct.
10 at the Western Wall in Jeru-
salem And from Jerusalem's
Ramat Shapira World Youth
Center came a gift of an ethrog
(citron) for Peggy and Jacob
Brodzki of Fort Lauderdale. They
presented it to Federation's Rab-
bi Albert B. Schwartz for the
staffs Sukkot service this week.
And it's grandma's galore at
Federation! UJA Campaign As-
sociate Naomi Graham and her
husband Howard welcomed
Randi Lauren, daughter of Cindy
and Larry Feldatein of Chicago,
born Sept. 2. Randi has a 2-year-
old sister Stacy And Feder-
ation's Women's Division Di-
rector Jan Salit and her husband
Irving who returned last week
from a 30-day working session in
the "Volunteers for Israel Pro-
gram" welcomed Justin Allen,
son of Emily and Jonathan Salit
of Lauderhill, born Sept. 12.
Justin has a 5-year-old sister
Rachel.
Coral Springs attorney
Richard J. Kaplan will conduct a
seminar on Wills and Probate at
7 p.m. Thursday Oct. 13 at the
Tamarac Branch Library, 8601
W. McNab Rd. Among the
graduates of Charlie Greene's
course in cardio-pulmonary
reaucitation (CPRI for employees
of Plantation Parks and Recrea-
tion Dept. was Milton Rosen
. Jack J. Row, director of the
Fashion Institute of Fort
Lauderdale, is the new president
of Florida Assn. of Marketing
Educators Retired baker Ben
Siegel of Margate will create an
incredible in-edible birthday cake
just for show next Wednes-
day at the Margate Catharine
Young Branch Library for dis-
play throughout October,
celebrating the library's 20th an-
niversary.
Dedication of Broward Com-
munity Blood Center's new faci-
lity at 1700 N. State Rd. 7,
Lauderhill, at 2 p.m this Sunday
(Sept. 25) when 75-year-old Leo
Polk of Dania donates his 320th
pint of blood for a record 40
gallons donated during a 45-year
period Jeff P. Sckoen of Fort
Lauderdale has been elected
chairman of the board of Refineco
Mfg. Co. which has relocated
from Hialeah to Fort Lauder-
dale "s Broward Business Park
. The new Leadership Broward
class, created by Fort Lauder-
dale-Broward County Chamber of
Commerce, includes Roberta
Weinberg of American Express
Plantation Center.
Sometime after Erev Rosh
Hashana service at Margate's
Temple Beth Am, vandals once
* again desecrated the west wall of
the beautiful synagogue with a
spray-painted swastika and the
abominable name, Hitler
. Lisa P. Doberstyn of Invar-
rary, who has been marketing di-
rector at the Galleria, was
promoted to assistant manager of
the E. Sunrise Blvd. shopping
center Leonard L. Farber,
developer of the Galleria, and
David H. Rush, president of ACR
Electronics, will be among the
Laureate Inductees at the 3rd an-
nual Junior Achievement Busi-
ness "Hall of Fame" dinner
dance Oct. 29 at the Marriott
Hotel.
Phyllis and Irving Mendelaon
of Lauderdale Lakes, feature-
profiled in the Sept. 12 issue of
the Fort Lauderdale News, are
seeking h and i-crafted items to
sell at the Elderly Interest
Fund's booth at November's
Broward County Fair. Proceeds
of the booth sales will supple
ment the work of the Area
Agency on Aging Tamarac's
University Community
Hospital's board elected Dr.
Charles Glaser as chairman; Ben
Marts, head of M.A.P. Builders
in Coral Springs as vice chair-
man; and named City Commis-
sioner James Gordon of Coral
Springs a board member. Gordon
is an active member of Temple
BethOrr.
The newest nuclear-powered
Trident submarine will be named
in honor of the late great U.S.
Sen. Henry (Scoop) Jackson. It
will be launched Oct. 15 at
Groton, Conn. Thomas
Kaplan, senior VP of Azen and
Associates, Fort Lauderdale PR
firm, this week told Florida's
Real Estate Sales Directors at
their meeting in West Palm
Beach how PR and promotions
can lead to profit in real estate
developments Lloyd Silver-
man, project director of the
Elderly Law Unit, administered
by the Legal Aid Service of
Broward County, has been ap-
pointed to the Long-Term Care
Ombudsman Committee in
Broward County.
Dr. John Rosen, formerly with
Broward Community College's
science department, for 10 years,
is now dean of instruction at
Manatee Junior College,
Bradenton The Juried
Exhibition of works of art by
Broward's artists will go on dis-
plsy Oct. 3 at BCC's Fine Arts
Gallery st the Central Camous in
Davie Ain't this somethin !
One-third of Israel's population
_ school-kids 1,300,000 of
Friday, September 2j,, j
them started their neT^
y-r on Sept. 1 La* **
Browser was in Israel on SaT
1. just six yean.ago, what .2
it was to see kids going to scS
thstday-andatthattin^S
total was one million. How
country has grown despite 2
wars and turmoil!
Bonds has $250 certificates
A new $250 State of Israel
Certificate designed to encourage
tourism to Israel and to help the
nation's economic development
has been announced by Brig.
Gen. (Res.) Yehudah Halevy,
president of the international Is-
rael Bond Organization.
Calling it "a continuing op-
portunity for the mass of U.S.
Jewry to be involved in the eco-
nomic strengthening of Israel,"
Halevy said the Cretificates can
be cashed by a visitor to Israel
for $300 in Israeli currency after
30 months, and for $360 after 60
months.
If held to its five-year maturity
and not taken to Israel, the Certi-
ficate can be redeemed at the
original purchase price of $250.
This will have served as an in-
terest-free loan for the develop-
ment of Israel's economy.
Certificates can be transferred
to a spouse, children or grand.
children for the purpose of
cashing in Israel. They may bt
purchased as gifts for any indjvj.
dual. Halevy suggested that
"Bar or Bat Mitzvah gift,, tks
Certificates can be accumulate! j
and be used to visit Israel dung*
high school or college years." j
The Israel Bond Organiutira
is s major source of developmsx
capital for Israel, havia*
provided over $6.2 billion aon
its inception to help build even
aspect of the nation's economy
Israel Bond proceeds, channeled
through Israel's Developmex
Budget, help to finance induttna
and agricultural projects, tec
construction of highways tai
harbors, the expansion of com-
munications and transport, the
building of new towns and the
development of new sources of
energy.
JNF offers discounts
for Israel Ballet
Sponsored by the Greater Fort
Lauderdale Jewish National
Fund (JNF), the Israel Ballet is
coming to town next March and
will be performing at 8 p.m.
Wednesday and Thursday March
28 and 29 at Bailey Hall. Brow-
ard Community College, Central
Campus, in Davie.
Mrs. Helene Goldwin, chair-
man of the ticket committee, and
Mrs. Esther Kaufman, ballet co-
chairman, would like organiza-
tions to know that if they partici-
pate with the JNF. they can re-
ceive tickets at a discount. A 10
percent discount is ottered on
every block of 2r> r more tickets
if they are purchased Mm
Dec. 1. Tickets are pi iced ai WO
and $25.
The event is for the lienefit of
the JNF. Inquiries may lie made
by phoning the -INK office at
561-4812. The office is located at
800 W. Oakland Park Blvd.. Fort
lauderdale.
Take
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Whether you're sixteen or
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Coming back for $5.00 when you buy a n.____
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From now through December 15,19S3, you can take
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And until you've travehed on Amtrak's Silver Palm, you
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ABOARD
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For more details, eel your Travel Agent or Amtrak at
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Sefv.ce financed m part by the Florida Department of Transport*


September 28,1968
The Jewish Floryjian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
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PageB
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Frida
y,
Compiled by Helen Steigman,
Federation 748-8400.
WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 21
EREVSUKKOT
Temple Emanu-El Men's Club
10 a.m. Meeting.
Temple Sha'aray Txedek Sister-
hood: Noon. Meeting.
Temple Beth Torah Sisterhood.
Noon. Meeting.
Temple Beth Orr: 7:45 p.m.
Games.
B'nai B'rith Women-Hope Chap
tor: Noon. Meeting. Deicke Au-
ditorium, 5701 Cypress Rd.,
Plantation.
National Council of Jewish
Women-North Broward Section:
12:30 p.m. Refreshments. Guest:
Ann Ackerman. Book Review
"Drummer Girl." Donation:
S2.50. Call 741-2319 or 484-9388.
Public Safety Bldg., 4300 NW 36
St., Lauderdale Lakes.
Hadassah-Pompano Beach Chai
Chapter: Noon. Meeting. Pom-
pano Beach Recreation Center.
THURSDAY, SEPT. 22
1ST DAY SUKKOT
FRIDAY, SEPT. 23
2ND DAY SUKKOT
Workmen's Circle-Greater Leu-
derdale Branch: 7:30 p.m. Public
Safety Bldg., 4300 NW 36 St.,
Lauderdale Lakes.
SUNDAY, SEPT. 25
Temple Beth Torah: 6:45
Games.
Temple Kol Ami: 7:15
Games.
Temple Sha'aray Tzedek:
p.m. Games.
B'nai Zion South Florida Region:
11 a.m. Installation luncheon,
dance. Donation: $15. Call: 456-
1999. Eden Roc, 4525 Collins
Ave., Miami Beach.
MONDAY, SEPT. 26
B'nai Brith North Broward
Council: 9:30 a.m. Executive
Board Meeting. Regioal office,
800 W. Oakland Park Blvd.
B'NAI B'RITH WOMEN:
Oakland Estates: Noon. Meet-
ing. Oakland Estates Clubhouse.
Deerfield Beach: 12:30 p.m.
Community Calendar
p.m.
p.m.
7:30
Meeting. Guest speaker: Dr.
Ronald Columbus. Subject: "Nu-
trition." Temple Beth Israel,
Deerfield Beach.
Israel Numismatic Society of
Broward: 8 p.m. Meeting. Brow-
ard Federal, Inverness Plaza.
National Council of Jewish
Women Plantation Section: 10
a.m. Meeting. Deicke Auditori-
um. Plantation.
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale-Women's Divi-
I sion: 10 a.m. Board meeting.
[ Federation's Boardroom.
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale-Central Agency
for Jewish Education: 9 a.m. Ad-
vanced Bible Study. Federation's
Conference Room.
TUESDAY, SEPT. 27
Temple Beth Torah Sisterhood:
11:45 a.m. Games. Lunch served
at nominal cost.
West Broward Jewish Congrega-
tion Sisterhood: 8 p.m. Board
meeting.
Ann Storck Center Auxiliary-
Friends of Retarded Children:
Noon. Meeting. Broward Federal,
6737 N. University Dr., Tamarac.
HilW Advisory Board of Brow-
ard and Palm Beach Counties: 9
a.m. Meeting. Broward Federal,
6737 N. University Dr., Tamarac.
National Conference of Chris-
tians and Jews: Noon. Lunch
Forum. Broward County State
Legislators Panel. Donation: $8.
Call 739-6225. Stouffer Anacapri
Restaurant, Fort Lauderdale.
Pioneer Women-Na'amat Debra
Club: Noon. Meeting. Public
Safety Bldg., 4300 NW 36 St..
Lauderdale Lakes.
B'nai B'rith Women-Golda Men-
Chapter: Noon. Meeting and
mini lunch. Nob Hill Recreation
Center, Sunset Strip and 104
Ave., Sunrise.
HAD ASS AH:
Rayus Tamarac Chapter: 1
p.m. Meeting. Guest speaker:
Barbara Studley, WNWS radio
personality. Temple Beth Torah.
Somerset Shoahana Chapter:
Noon. Meeting. Program: "Meet
the Board" by Lil Silbert. Rec-
reation Hall. Somerset Phase I.
Organizationi
El Al offers reduced fares for 6-day trips ~~
Israel Airlines has an-
a six-day five-night
El Al
nounced
package called Sunsation Six
which includes round trip airfare
INew York Tel Aviv New
York), hotel, breakfast every
morning, and a car for five days.
The price is S839 for superior
class and $939 for deluxe.
David Schneider, general
manager of El Al, said:
"Sunsation Six" offers some-
thing for everyone. It's for first
tuners- and for experienced
travelers..'
The package is good from Nov.
15, 1983-Feb. 29, 1984, excluding
the holiday dates of Dec. 15-Jan.
5. "
Maaada Margate Chapter:
Noon. Meeting. Guest speaker:
Abraham Gittelson, Director of
the Central Agency for Jewish
Education of the Jewish Federa-
tion of Greater Fort Lauderdale:
Topic: "The Challenge of Jewish
Heritage." Temple Beth Am,
Margate.
North Lauderdale Chai Chap-
ter: 1 p.m. Meeting. North Lau-
derdale City Hall, 701 SW 71
Ave.
WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 28
EVER SHEMINI ATZERET
American Technion Women's Di-
vision-North Broward Chapter:
11 a.m. Installation and lunch-
eon. Coconut Creek Community
Center, 900 NW 43 Ave.
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale-Interfaith
Council: Noon. Meeting. Federa-
tion's Conference Room.
B'nai B'rith Women-Leorah
Council: 12:30 p.m. Meeting.
Community Storefront Room,
American Savings Bank, 8352 W.
Oakland Park Blvd.
ORT:
Inverrary Chapter: 1:15 p.m.
Meeting. Guest speaker: Law-
rence M. Schuval, CRC Director,
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale. Subject: "The
Radical Right." Inverrary
Country Club.
Woodmont Chapter: 10 a.m.
Meeting. Woodmont Country
Club, Tamarac.
Lauderhill West Chapter: Noon.
Installation. Mini lunch. Deicke
Auditorium, Plantation.
THURSDAY, SEPT. 29
SHEMINI ATZERET
YIZKOR
FRIDAY, SEPT. 30
SIMCHATTORAH
SATURDAY, OCT. 1
Temple Sha'aray Tzedek: 8:30
p.m. Show: "Salute to Israel."
Donation. $4-5. Call 741-0295.
SUNDAY, OCT. 2
Temple Beth Israel, Deerfield
Beach Sisterhood: 10 a.m.
Boutique Bargain Day.
Temple Kol Ami Seniorhood
BZ's: 2 p.m. Meeting.
Temple Beth Torah: 6:45 p.m.
Games.
Temple Sha'aray Txedek: 7:30
p.m. Games.
Temple Kol Ami: 7:15 p.m.
Games.
WOMEN'S LEAGUE
FOR ISRAEL
Phil Sachs discussed "Con-
sumer Rights on Florida's Gener-
ic Drug Laws" at the this week's
meeting of Hatikvah Chapter of
Women's League for Israel at
Broward Federal, 3000 Univer-
sity Dr., Sunrise.
2.
ISRAEL EXPERIENCE
15 DAYS
ISRAEL ENCORE
15 DAYS
S. ISRAEL ENCOUNTERS
12 DAYS
4. ISRAEL BY PRIVATE CAR
9 DAYS
5. ISRAEL AT LEISURE
AS YOU LIKE IT
PLUS
EGYPT EUROPE THE ORIENT
S/jherta/i
9.
vovtmjujvam
6. Third Annual Hadassan
Parents Tour
o.it.im3-^n.2.im Nov"V5S7,9e3
7. Young Leaders Mission 10. Escapades In Israel
ft*. S-Mv. 2.1SS4 \Smjn Onlyl Ho, 3- M. 19S4
8. Family Tours- H-AWte* In Costa Mca
For the who* turn*, 12. Passover Tours
Cut out this ad and returnToT ~
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I am interested in Tour No. i. 0 2. D 3-D
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ISRAEL
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The Women's League for Israel
(WLI) held its first National. Ex-
ecutive Board Meeting of the
season at the WLI headquarters,
516 Park Ave., New York on
Tuesday Sept. 20.
Those from the Florida region
who attended were National vice
presidents Celia Engelmeyer,
Lucille Kimmel, Muriel Lunden,
Faye Rosenstein; secretary Har-
riet Scheiner; directors Barbara
Gurtov, Lillian Kaiser and Freda
Rosen, plus Lorraine Frost, the
Florida regional president, and
Cecile Fine, representative at
large.
The WLI is devoted to the wel-
fare of the young people of Israel.
The league is responsible for
building facilities at the Hebrew
University, as well as establish-
ing a Scholarship Endowment
Fund, and a Book Endowment
Fund. For membership informa-
tion, call the WLI office at 791-
4840.
/Lakes Phase I ,t a,.,,.
Oct. 6. >onl
HADA88AH
Orah Chapter of H,^
hold ita fi"t meSaT
season at 11:30 ThmVl
13. at the Nob hRS
Center. 1000 Sunset fil
rise. An original skit SI
JE-- A minimi
TEMPLE KOL AMI
Temple Kol Ami, Plantation,
will celebrate Simchat Torah at
8:15 p.m. Friday Sept. 30 with
Rabbi Sheldon J. Harr, carrying
the Torah, leading the procession
with the Religious School's Ju-
nior Choir members and encircl-
ing the sanctuary.
One of the students of the
School's sixth Grade will conduct
a morning service Sunday Oct. 2
in the Temple sanctuary for fifth
and sixth graders.
Temple Seniorhood, known as
the BZ s, meets at 2 p.m. Sunday
Oct. 2 for the group's monthly
meeting.
WOMEN'S AMERICAN
ORT
Barbara Studley, radio talk
show host on WNWS, will be the
guest speaker at the first meeting
of the new season of Woodmont
Chapter, ORT, at 10 a.m.
Wednesday Sept. 28 at the
Woodmont Country Club, 7801
NW 80 Ave. Tamarac.
B'NAI B'RITH WOMEN
Coconut Creek
There will be a meeting at noon
Thursday Oct. 6 at Temple Beth
Am, 7205 Royal Palm Blvd..
Margate. A mini-luncheon will be
served.
Sunrise
Singer Toby Simone will enter-
tain at a mini-lunch for the Sun-
rise Chapter of B'nai B'rith at the
Chapter's first meeting of the
new season. The meeting will be
held at the Playhouse of Sunrise
_ SUNRISE
JEWISH CENTEi
Sisterhood
Fran Schor of FW
Diet Club, Inc. will 3
gram entitled EattoLhi
members of the Tempfe sJ
Wednesday Oct. 19 meetiJ
Plans are also being mj
the Sisterhood's New Yewl
Party. Information can hi
tained from Shirley Rubin 1
Brissell or Betty Marcahnt
YIDDISHE GEZE1
The Yiddish* Ga
Yiddish thinking-Yie.
speaking Havora dedicate!
September Farbreng
to the commemoration
Yiddish Soviet writers I
by Stalin.
Their compulsive Yid
in search of moral and iiu,
guidance put fear in the 1
nist regime.
At 2 p.m. Monday Sept.]
literature of these writers 1
recited, as well as a disci.
about their lives and workii
will take place in the 1
Room. 8352 W. Oaklasi.J
Blvd. adjacent to Harrison
more information call Yd
Frager at 748-7632.
TEMPLE BETH
Sisterhood
New merchandise is no* I
accepted for the Annual I
Bazaar scheduled for No
from 10 a.m. to I p.m All<
tions such as discontinued ill
or samples are tax dedu
Contact Janet Levenstonill
4354 or Shirley Berraan u f
7672.
Consecration Services
Consecration will be
p.m. Friday Sept. 30 at
services. Any child, grad
who has never been con
call the Temple office at 75
BRANDEIS
WOMEN'S COMMI
The Fort Lauderdale-I
Chapter of Braadeis Hi
National Women's Cc
will meet at 8 p.m. We
Sept. 28. at the PalmAire!
Center, located on Powe
in Pompano.
Hannah Spitalnik,
Brandeis leader and a 1
the local chapter, will in
Brandeis. its functions
programs.
For further information
tact Minna Slater at 97315
Pearl Harris at 974-8553.
Eat iW7
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i aRp ra
n of Ureater Fort
rdale
Friday, SePU.mb,
<*
Introduction to Judaism course
to be offered at Beth Orr
Rabbi Donald Gerber of Coral
Springs plans to begin his third
annual "Introduction to
Judaism" course at Temple Beth
Orr in Coral Springs.
This course is a local extension
of the Reform Movement's "Out-
reach Program" seeking to assist
non-Jewish individuals to leam
about Judaism with the possibi-
lity of eventually choosing
Judaism as their own religion.
Jews searching for new aware-
ness of their heritage are also
encouraged to attend.
Rabbi Gerber has developed a
very pleasant and effective
method of education and has
students ranging in age from
their early 20's through mid-60's.
Registration for the course
should take place this week by
calling the Rabbi's secretary,
Ilona. at 753-9061.
TEMPLE B'NAl MOSHE
Culminating the traditional
Sukkot Festival, during which
congregants of Temple B'nai
Moshe hold services in the Sukka
at 1434 SE 3rd St., Pompano
Beach, Rabbi Morris Skop will
have Simchat Torah services at
9:30 a.m. Friday Sept. 30. Rabbi
Skop will be presented with new
rabbinical robe, a gift of the
board of directors, honoring the
approaching first anniversary of
the founding of the Temple.
Barry Glaser, Temple president,
will make the presentation and
announce future plans for the
congregants.
LIBERAL JEWISH
TEMPLE
The Liberal Jewish Temple of
Coconut Creek will have com-
bined Erev Shemini Atzeret and
Siinchat Torah service as well as
Yizkor memorial prayers at 8
p.m. Wednesday Sept. 28.
Rabbi Bruce S. Warshal and
Cantor Benjamin Hansel will
conduct the services at the Tem-
ple's meeting place in Calvary
Presbyterian Church, across the
boulevard from Wynmoor Village
in Coconut Creek.
TEMPLE BETH AM
Shemini Atzeret services will
begin at 9 a.m. Thursday Sept. 29
at Temple Beth Am, Margate
with Yizkor memorial prayers
about 11 a.m.
That evening, Erev Simchat
Torah, the day of rejoicing of the
Torah, service begins at 6:46. At
6 p.m. also on Thursday Sept. 29,
prior to service, the Rabbi Solo-
mon Geld Hebrew School will cel-
ebrate the holiday by holding its
own Family Dinner in the Social
Hall.
At the evening service, and
again the following morning, be-
ginning at 9 o'clock, everyone
present, children and adults, will
have the honor of carrying the
Torah in the joyous Hakofet, the
seven processions circling the
sanctuary, marked by singing
and dancing before the Holy
Scrolls.
The Congregation takes pride
in the work of Florence and Mor-
ris Posner who, once again, have
erected a miniature Sukka dis-
played for the remainder of this
month at Margate's Catherine
Young Library.
B'nai-B'not
Mitzvah
BETH ISRAEL
The Bar Mitzvah service of
Seth Levine, son of Linda and
Kenneth Levine of Plantation,
will be held during the Saturday
Sept. 24 worship service at Tem-
ple Beth Israel in Sunrise.
TEMPLE BETH AM
Caren Joseffer. daughter of
Barbara and Howard Joseffer of
Coral Springs, will celebrate her
Bat Mitzvah service Saturday
morning Sept. 24 at Temple Beth
Am in Margate.
TEMPLE BETH ORR
Melinda Siegel, daughter of
Gilda and Burton Siegel of Coral
Springs, was called to the Torah
as a Bat Mitzvah at Temple Beth
Orr in Coral Springs Saturday
Sept. 3.
Laura Michelle Morris, daugh-
ter of Carol and Stuart Morris of
Coral Springs, and Ossie Beni-
tah, daughter of Lise and Moshe
Benitah of Coral Springs cele-
brated their B'not Mitzvah Sat-
urday Sept. 10 at Beth Orr.
TEMPLE KOL AMI
The B'nai Mitzvah service of
Pamela Boreth, daughter of
Phyllis and Harry Boreth of
Plantation, and Adam Kogan,
son of Marlene and Steve Kogan
of Lauderhill, will be held at
Temple Kol Ami in Plantation on
Saturday morning Oct. 1.
Kol Ami has adult studies program
fee. Non-members
Temple Kol Ami has an Adult
Education Studies program that
begins Wednesday evening Oct. 5
and continues for six more weeks.
Classes will be held every
Wednesday in October, then two
more Wednesdays in November
with final sessions on Thursday
Nov. 17.
The Adult Jewish Studies pro-
gram for the fall semester is open
to all Temple members for no
extra fee. Non-members may
register for the program at a cost
of $25 per course, per person.
The first hour includes study of
Hebrew, and open discussion ses-
sions, with the second hour
devoted a study of a variety of
Jewish festivals.
The Adult Education Com-
mittee, headed by Jeffrey Homer,
is making plans for the winter
semester of courses.
NCCJ meets to discuss Fla.
legislative impact on Broward
Representative
State Representative Fred
Lippman, chairman of the
Broward Legislative Delegation,
will be the keynote speaker at the
National Conference of Chris-
tians and Jews (NCCJ) to be held
at noon Tuesday Sept. 27 at the
Stouffer's Anacapri Inn, 1901
North Federal Highway, Fort
Lauderdale.
Lippman will present an
overview of the 1983 Florida
Legislative session and its im-
pact on Broward County. Each of
the Broward legislators have
been invited to appear on the
panel. After the presentation,
there will be a question and
answer period.
The NCCJ is a non-profit
human relations and civic
organization which, for the past
55 years, has been engaged in an
educational program to eliminate
prejudice and discrimination
against all groups and to build
more positive relations between
all people. Contact Alice
Solomon, 739-6225, for more
information.
Broward Symphony subscription drive
for 1983-84 series ends this month
scheduled a musical rendition
featuring Guillermo Cruz, the
Broward Symphony Orchestra's
new concertmaster.
Violinist James Buswell will
appear in December. Pianist
Grant Johannesen will perform
the Rachmaninoff Piano Con-
certo No.2 in February. Doc
Severinsen will join the Orchestra
in March for the special "Pops"
concert. Classical guitarist, Pepe
Romero will perform in April.
The season concludes with the
compete for $l,ooo pr^
The Concerto CorXSj
made possible by the SF
Symphony Orchestra u
Inc., and also by a m^,
American Express. ^nt|
Special group discount* J
available to organi^JP
individuals purchasij
minimum of 50 subscript,!
the five-concert series F
ditional information all
6726.
Jimmy Woodle
The Broward Symphony
Orchestra completes its final
subscription drive this month for
the 1983-84 series of concerts. It
is the Symphony's 17th season.
A five-concert subscription will
be available at special subscrip-
tion rates of $36, $45, and $54.
Also featured this season is a
special "Pops" concert featuring
Doc Severinson, the music di-
rector of the NBC Tonight Show.
This event is available in a six-
concert series ranging from $44-
$66. All concerts are held in
Bailey Concert Hall on the
Broward Community College
Central Campus, 3501 SW Davie
Rd., Davie.
Music director, Jimmy
Woodle, has slated Steven
DeGroote, pianist, grand prize
winner of the Fifth Van Cliburn
Competition, as the first guest
artist of the season late in
October. The orchestra has also
Symphony season
begins Oct. 4
The Fort Lauderdale Sym-
phony Orchestra, under the
direction of Emerson Buckley,
opens its 1983-84 season on Oct. 4
featuring pianist Earl Wild.
Concerts are held at the newly
renovated War Memorial Audi-
torium in Fort Lauderdale on
Tuesday and Wednesday
evenings.
Other artists featured for the
season include, Kathleen
Winkler, violinist; Leonard Rose,
cellist; Gil Morgenstern,
violinist; and Olga Rostropovich,
cellist.
Tickets are available at a sub-
scription price or at individual
prices. Contact 561-2997 for
further information.
Holocaust series
on TV 2
The ten-part mini-series,
Holocaust, will air on WPBT-
Channel 2 during the week of
Sept. 25. The first two parts will
be presented from 9 to 11 p.m.
Sunday Sept. 25, 8 to 11 p.m.
Monday Sept. 26, 9 to 11 p.m.
Tuesday Sept. 27.
The drama focuses on the
triumph and tragedy of the Weiss
family in Nazi Germany from
1935, just before the enactment
of the anti-Semitic Nuremberg
laws, to the liberation of Ausch-
witz in 1945.
The show portrays factual ac-
counts of history by the use of
fictional characters. The cast
includes Meryl Streep, Joseph
Bottoms, Fritz Weaver, Michael
Moriarty, Rosemary Harris,
Tovah Feldshuh, Sam
Wanamaker, and James Woods.
CaadtaUgkttafTlB,
First eve of Sukkot
Wednesday, Sept. 21.7^j
Second eve of Sukkot
Thursday, Sept. 22
-After Dark
Friy.Sept.23-&tt
I
OBTHODOX
TEMPLE OHEL B'NAI BAPHAEL (7M-TCM). 4*61 W. Oakland P* EM I
Ludrdl UkNWU. hnto.: Sunday through THuredayB ,7Z
rrlday I a.m.. 7 p.m.; Saturday 8:48a.m., 7p.m. ^
SYNAGOGUE Of INVEBBABY CHASAD (74MTT7). 7TT0 NW 440,J
Lincoln Park W.it. Sunrta* 83821 ferric: Sunday through FrkhyliZl
7:80 p.m.; Saturday 9 a.m. 7:80 p.m. Study troupe: Man, 8umtayil
aarvlcaa; Woman, TueedayiBp.m liWAmf
YOUNG I8BAEL OT DEEBTTEU) BEACH (4SMM7), 1JB0 W f
Blvd.. Deerfl.ld Batch SS441 Servtoee: Sunday through Thurtdw I
8:80 p.m.; rrlday 8 a.m., 8 p.m ; Saturday 8:48 a.m., 8:80 o m "-"'
a***. Preeidlum: Marto. r^gaaa, SU-y hduaator. A*atalh!r
YOUNG BBAEL SYNAGOGUE OF HOLLYWOODPOBT LAODEBUul
(8-7877). 8301 Stirling Rd., Tort LaudardaJa 88813 SerrloM: Hotel
through rrlday 7:80 a.m., and aundown; Saturday. 9 am., lundown Suafcfl
8 a.m.. lundown BafcM Edward Da via.
CONBEBVATIVE
TEMPLE BETH AM (974-84*0). 7306 Royal Palm Blvd., M
Sarvtoaa: Monday through Friday 8:80 a.m., S p.m. rrlday late lerrtnl
p.m.; Saturday 8 a.m.. 8 p.m.; Sunday 8 a.m., 6 p.m.
Rabbi Emerltua, Dr. Ultima GaU. faatoi b-vkeg <
TEMPLE BETH ISBAEL (70-4040), T100 W. Oakland Part Blvd. Suutl
88818. Service.: Monday through Thuraday 8 a.m. 8p.m.; FrKkySiaJ
m2Lm .* Pm- Saturday 8:40 a.m., aunaot; Sunday 8 am.. 9 p.m. MM
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Cantury Blvd.. Daarflald Baach 8*441. Sarvtoaa: Sunday through rrthrIII
a.m B p.m. rrlday lau eervtee I p.m.; Saturday 8:48 a.m., and at hH
lighting Urn, BafeM Jp. Laagwa,. Oaaiar ShaMaJ Aek.
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Sarvtoaa: Sunday through Friday 8:80 a.m.. B p.m. Lata rrlday mnkJ
p m Saturday 8 48 a m 8 p m BabM Bart T. Mm. raateilllil) llkin I
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The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 11
ens urges reassessment of Lebanon
ByHUGHORGEL
|l AVIV (JTA) -
,e Minister Moshe
was reported Mon-
u) have ordered a re-
tment of Israel's at-
toward the warring
[ns in Lebanon.
Lrding to Israel Radio's
] correspondent, Arena
_, that Israel will not con-
|to rely entirely upon the
lan Phalangists, the party
Ibanese President Amin
lei, but would seek to open
[aintain relations with the
se Druze who are con-
J to have a stronger moti-
Jthan the Christians. Israel
llarge Druze population of
which is becoming in-
Jy restive as their Leb-
brethren battle the Chris-
3RDING TO the corree-
li. the U.S. is displeased
Ins' switch. But the argu-
s-e is that Israel must give
ority to its own security.
lattitude of Israel's Arab
community is also
or concern. Israeli Chris-
ader Ibrahim Sama'an,
ky an Israel Radio reporter
why his people have not spoken
out more firmly against the kill-
ing of Christians in Lebanon, re-
plied that Israeli Christians were
in a "difficult and special situa-
tion." He explained that inside
Lebanon "the Christians are
fighting against our fellow Pales-
tinians."
He added that it would be
wrong to introduce elements of
the Lebanon war into Israel. He
criticized Israeli Druze for an-
nouncing their wish to fight
alongside the Druze in Lebanon.
Sama'an said that many Arab
Christians in Israel feel that Is-
rael, which went to war in Leb-
anon to support Lebanese Chris-
tians, now is doing little to help
them. "There is a feeling among
some Israeli Christians that Is-
rael cannot be trusted," he said.
The Israeli operation in Lebanon
may still be a subject of debate.
JERUSALEM (JTA)
A bitter public quarrel
has erupted between former
Defense Minister Ariel
Sharon and his successor,
Moshe Arens, over respon-
sibility for the current
bloody warfare between
Druze and Christians in the
Defense Minister Arens
Shouf mountains of central
Lebanon from which Israeli
forces withdrew only a
week ago.
An angry exchange of barbed
comments between the two men
at Sunday's Cabinet meeting was
apparently sparked by Arens' re-
ported decision to reassess rela-
tions with Israel's Christian
I'halangist allies in Lebanon and
to seek closer relations with the
Lebanese Druze.
IJULJ
Jewish Books
t in Review
a senne of Ihr /W0 le-wiih Book Council
IS (jvi 2bth Sf. **w York. N.V 10010
JONA 0BERSK1
iood. By Jona Oberski; translated by Ralph
leim. Doubleday & Co., New York. 1983.
[$11.96.
w Tomorrow. By Arnold and Ellen
in. North Coast Publishing, Shaker
Is. OH 44120. 1982. 176 pp. $6.95.
nary of Dawid Rubinowicz. By Dawid
pwicz; translated by Derek Bowman,
ire Options, P.O.B. 601, Edmonds, WA
11982. XVI, 87 pp. $10.96.
!/ Do Remember: Fragments from the
fist. By Gerda Haas. Cumberland Press,
\tt, ME 04032.1982. XXII, 287 pp. $16.95.
I by Mark Friedman
enormity of the Holocaust makes its
difficult for most to grasp. We can only
i understand the human dimension of this
(y through the stories of individuals. These
oks tell individual and very personal
ks of the Holocaust. Three were written by
who experienced the Holocaust as
In; the fourth is an ambitious effort to
V several personal accounts into a survey
Holocaust.
Mood is a brief memoir written by Jona
pi in 1977. It teua the unusual story of his
ccupied Holland and his bizarre childhood
nee in Bergen-Belsen. Oberski was two
old when the Nazis marched into Holland
ven at the liberation. The book is written in
pie style so as to enable us to see the
?ust through the eyes of a child. This device
I well and results in a most moving book.
P'ght, however, have liked to see a post-
I by the adult Oberski. Childhood was
% written in Dutch and has already
1 in seven languages.
88 effective device is used by Arnold and
IReisman in Welcome Tomorrow. As the
Ppens the authors art on a train to Poland,
Suddenly the vista c*#ng into a vision of
in 1939, when Arnold celebrated his fifth
y The memoirs follow Arnold and bis
, {rm occupied Poland to the Ukraine to
' **. drawing a very warm picture of tha
and a very cold one of the Poles.
> adventures, crisscrossing half the
of Russia by himself at the age of eight,
tanes reminiscent of Koeineki's The
Bird. But this prjvately published book
m having too much historical hindsight
onto a child's story. The author's
etive shifts awkwardly from then to now
*> lack of an editor's touch is visible in the
' treatment of foreign terms and names.
>etafsl2
Rubinowicz was twelve when he began
'in occupied Poland. His diary has a
that no memoir written after Auschwiti
E! toUs the tory of otneone trying to
flth ufe under the Nazis, not knowing what
P*finn
TrmliteJlyRalpslbaeeui
:..m**t*i*M!*todM*mmm*amMNHm tmm,
ft** MiMrix art fa* fawn .OtertB *m **4 ***
,:** im*f i Urn km* ***** ...* Say-"*"_a|m,
..... ----------1----- '" ~
tomorrow would bring. One can see Dawid
changing with the passage of time, maturing
rapidly, yet weakening under the brutal tension
and insecurity. The diary ends with Dawid s
deportation in the summer of 1942. As Dawid's
fate is unknown, the editors chose to close the
book with a selection of photographs on the
Holocaust.
These I Do Remember by Gerda Haas is a
largely successful attempt to present a com-
prehensive survey of the Holocaust through
selections from several memoirs and diaries.
These personal accounts are well supplemented
with background material on the Holocaust and
on world events, and with maps, glossary and
bibliography. The only material presented is
Haas' own story of her life as a young woman in
Nazi Germany and in Thereaienetadt. and her
ultimate rescue on the famous Musy train to
Switzerland. These I Do Remember is a very
personal book for Mrs. Haas, following her up to
the present and even including current
photographs of her family. It is an excellent first
book for someone to reed on the Holocaust but is
leas satisfying for someone acquainted with the
literature.
All four books are about the Holocaust ex-
periences of young people and show how their
authors grew up quickly, and perhaps grew old,
under those conditions. They all became very
independent, often becoming the providers or
caretakers for their parents while still children.
These stories of individuals, simple people in
complex times, and of their families, open up the
Holocaust to the reader as other types of books
cannot. ____ .
Afore Friedman is director of programming for
the World Jewish Congress, New York.
wnal tales of the Holocaust recounted
Regional Libraries showing films
based on famous authors' stories
In conjunction with Nova Uni-
versity's subscription Famous
Authors Lecture Series, the
Broward County Library System
is presenting, free of charge, a
collection of films featuring the
lives and works of the four au-
thors at the two regional librar-
ies. Among them are the follow-
ing:
At West Regional Library,
8601 W. Broward Blvd., Planta-
tion. Kurt Vonnegut's science
fiction story Slaughterhouse Five
will be shown at 7 p.m. Wednes-
day Oct. 12. Edward Albee's
Delicate Balance will be shown at
7 p.m. Wednesday Nov. 9. Also
Albee's Who's Afraid of Virginia
Wolfe will be shown at 7 p.m.
Wednesday Nov. 16. Isaac Baah-
evis Singers two stories, Night-
mare & Mrs. Pupko's Beard and
Zlateh the Goat will be shown at
7 p.m. Wednesday Dec. 7.
At East Regional Library,
1300 E. Sunrise Blvd., Fort Lau-
derdale, James Baldwin's My
Childhood will be shown at 2 p.m.
and 7:30 p.m. Tuesday Sept. 27.
Vonnegut's Slaughterhouse Five
will be shown at 2 p.m. and 7 p.m.
Tuesday Oct. 11. Albee's Delicate
Balance will be shown at 2 p.m.
and 7:30 p.m. Tuesday Nov. 8,
and Who's Afraid of Virginia
Wolfe will be shown at 2 p.m. and
7 p.m. Tuesday Nov. 15. Singer's
Nightmare A Mrs. Pupko's
Beard and Zlateh the Goat will be
shown at 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m.
Tuesday Dec. 6.
MEDICAL CARE -
WITHOUT AN
APPOINTMENT
We're MD Emergency Center. And
we're here to help you in any minor
emergency or non-life-threatening
medical situation.
At MD Emergency Center you
never need an appointment. And a
qualified licensed physician is always
on hand, from 8 a.m. to midnight,
365 days a year.
From cuts, bruises, fractures and
sprains; to physical examinations,
tests and X-rays; to coughs, fevers,
high blood pressure or yjust not
feeling well," we're here to help you
in any way we can.
We care. And we can help. \bu can
depend on it.
Ml
1658-1660 E. Oakland Park Blvd.
Telephone: 564-4300
A non-life-threatening emergency medical center.
)


12
' "
The Jewish Floridian ofGrtaUrFort Lauderdal*
VANTAGE
THE TASH OF SU
>
t

1

r

GreatTkste
with Ultra LowTar.
That's Success!
Warning: The Surgeon General Has Determined
That Cigarette Smoking Is Dangerous to Your Health.
5-f.-W.Bi.
brFTC


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