The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 3, no. 7 (Apr. 5, 1974)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 9, 1976 called v.4, no. 27 but constitutes v.5, no. 1; issue for July 7, 1989 called v.18, no. 11 but constitutes v.18, no. 13.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44570954
lccn - sn 00229545
ocm44570954
System ID:
AA00014312:00242

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Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward


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Full Text
* Jewish ficric/ian
OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE
Jumel2- Number 21
FortLauderdale, Florida Friday, Juna 3,1963
FrMSAOCAM
Price 35 Cents
Entin succeeds
|ean Shapiro as
federation president
Federation acquires new home
mro with sculpture award presented by President Ed Entin.
Iting himself to the "noble service" of Federation's re-
pies of "guaranteeing the continuing vitality of the
Jewish community, and, also, to assure continued
ur the State of Israel and provide visible hope to the
Dmmunities throughout the world," Edmund Entin
be as president of the Jewish Federation of Greater
perdale.
Cmtnmed mi Psj 2

The Jewish Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale completed purchase of a
three-story office building at 8358 W.
Oakland Park Blvd., Sunrise.
The building is next door to where the
Federation's offices are now located.
Federation's offices are expected to be
moved into the second floor sometime
this month.
Closing of the sale on Tuesday morning, May
24, was announced that night by Federation
President Jean Shapiro at Federation's 15th
annual meeting.
Atty. Norman Ostrau, a member of the
Federation's board of directors, handled the
papers for the sale. In attendance at the closing
were Edmund Entin who has succeeded Mrs.
Shapiro as president; John Strong, treasurer;
Irving Libowsky, secretary; Samuel Leber, a
board member who has chaired the committee
that has been seeking adequate quarters for the
Federation; and Leslie S. Gottlieb, executive
director.
With the Federation's offices consolidated on
the second floor, the first floor is being made
available for Jewish charitable organizations and
beneficiary agencies of the Federation.
The third floor will be available for leasing by
the Federation for added income.
The Federation serves the Jewish community
in 22 of Broward County's 29 cities.
e needs to be done to Jill out9Israel-Lebanon agreement
the first time in 35 years, the state of
veen Israel and Lebanon was ended
signing of the agreement in which
1 States played a pivotal role.
anwhile. President Reagan's special
envoy, Philip Habib, is shuttling
the Arab states trying to get
nations to help get Syria to the
[ions table for withdrawal of Syrian
1 forces from Lebanon.
iie he shuttles, the Syrians and PLO's leader
Yasser Arafat continue to denounce the Israel-Lebanon
agreement, with PLO forces still bent on the
destruction of the State of Israel.
Israel notes that the agreement with Lebanon
reflects four essentials on which Israel and Lebanon see
eye to eye, first:
A. Termination of the state of war between Lebanon
and Israel.
B. Respect for each other's sovereignty, in-
dependence, territorial integrity and right to live in
peace, within secure and recognized borders.
C. Withdrawal from Lebanese territory aa a
natural corollary of the previous proposition of all
external forces (PLO terrorists, Syrian and Israeli).
D. Agreement that Lebanon must never again
become a base for hostile activity against Israel and
that measures will be undertaken to prevent such a de-
velopment.
2. A number of further steps will have to be taken,
within the months to come, to "fill out" the agreement
and to make possible its full implementation.
3. Thus, propositions (A) and (B), above, require a
gradual normalization of mutual relations including
Continued on Page 4
fsh Family Service elects Sheldon Polish president
Polish, a partner in the Fort Lauder-
Beach accounting firm of Ernst and
a member of the board of directors of
Federation of Greater Fort Lauder-
chairman of the Federation's Founda-
Bwish Philanthropies baa added to his
6 title of president of the Jewish Family
[Broward County.
elected and installed at the agency's
ting last month. He succeeds Brian J.
was re-elected last weak as vie* preai-
ne Jewish Federation which, with the
federation of South Broward and the
7y of Broward County, provides fund-
uwiah Family Service (JFS). Sherr was
: with the Esther Lowenthal Community
tward for his community dedication
1 two-year term aa JFS president.
officers installed at the masting where
fs State Attorney Michael Satz was the
[speaker were Dr. David Sachs, Norman
[ice presidents; Steven Fayne, treasurer;
Krop, secretary.
t his report on JFS work, Sherr stressed
increasing demand for the profsaeional
Pi the agency, along with the concurrent
hade by JFS to meet these needs. Ha
[that the outreach office established at
"each, one of three JFS offices in the
fully operational with a para-
P*l information and referral worker
|the staff.
H. Rosenstsin, JFS executive director,
[the agency experienced an increase use
Rices by 44 percent over last year's
who are among the families aided by JFS in the Schwartz, Felice Sincoff, Zelda Stepner,
Federation-JFS Refugee Resettlement program Florence Straus, Herb Tolpen, and Jan Zift
were awarded by Zelma Abarbanei representing.
the National Council of Jewish Women. The
scholarships will be applied toward college
tuition.
Elected to the board of directors following
presentation of the slate by Israel Resnikoff,
chairman of the nomination committee, were the
following:
Melvin Bear, Joseph Berkovitz, Leonard
Cordes. Ben Dantzker, Dr. Robert Dolgow, Lee
Dreiling, Dr. Mark Drucker, Libo Fineberg, Dr.
Abraham Flemenbaum, Irving Friedman, Bernice
Goldstein, Dr. Warren Creditor, Rabbi Bennett
Greenspon. Dee Hahn, Natalin Heiden, Steven
Hersh, James Kofman, Robert Kramer, Marshall
Krupnkk, Merle Orlove, Elaine Pittell, Israel
Resnikoff, Reuben Schneider, Rabbi Albert
tholarshipa for Russian-Jewish children Itrati Resnikoff (left) and Sheldon Potith (right) present awards to Brian Sherr.


rage 2

The Jewish Floridian of Greater Port LauderxlaU -;::
\ *
~**^.Jaiieg,Hft
Awards presented at Federation's meeting
Continued from Page 1
Standing before almost 300
persons in Temple Beth Israel,
Sunrise, where the Federation s
15 annual meeting, election and
installation of officers and
directors, presentation of awards
took place May 24, Entin,
succeeding Jean Shapiro,
Federation's first woman presi-
dent, said:
"Over the years, the role of the
Jewish Federation has changed
from much more than a collector
and distributor of monies, but
has become the headquarters of
the community, its central ad-
dress, its rleai ing house, its
coordinator of progress and of
activities, its chief spokesman
and, in great measure, its collec-
tive conscience-''
That progress and activities
ware summarised in Jean
Shapiro's report of the work of
Federation committees and that
of its local beneficiary agencies,
(story elsewhere in this iseeei
supported funds raised through
the annual United Jewish Appeal
campaign, noting that the major
support of the campaign, which
raised slightly over $4 million
dollars in the 1963 UJA cam-
paign, goes for aid to Jews in Is-
rael.
Hailing Mrs. Shapiro's accom-
plishments during the 1982-83
term of her office in presenting
her with s Federation award,
Entin said she guided the nego-
tiations for the new Federation
holding soon to be occupied
(next door to the present loca-
tion); secured Baron Guy de
Rothschild, a leader of the French
counterpart of the UJA, as s
speaker at Federation's winter
gala when children from Federa-
tion's Project Renewal city, Kfar
Saba in Israel, were brought here
as guests on that occasion.
He also cited her leadership in
all phases of Federation's work
with the board of directors at
monthly meetings and the pro-
grama of all the agencies.
Ethel Waldman, who was the
general chairman of Federation's
UJA campaigns for 1982 and
1983, each year topping the
previous year's total, and going
over $4 million in the regular
campaign plus $160,000 for the
Israel Special Fund, and $525,000
for Federation's Kfar Saba Re-
newal Project in Israel, is the re-
cipient of an award for this year's
effort.
Another phase of the campaign
was reported by Felice Sincoff,
president and campaign chair-
man of the Women's Division,
noting that individual contribu-
itons by women in their own right
totalled over $600,000 and that
the Women's Division's newest
project: raising 1100,000 for an
Afternoon Environmental Center
for the Kfar Sana youth in
Federation's "twinned Project
Renewal City had already re-
ceived pledgee totalling $30,000.
Mrs. Sincoff also received an
award.
After formal discharge of of-
ficers completing their teems of
office, and the several directors
completing six years of consecu-
tive service (ess story elsewhere
m this swasl. Mrs. Shapiro called
on Gladys Daren, immediate past
president of the Women's Divi-
sion, and a member of the
nominating committee, to
present that committee's report.
With all elected by acclamation,
Mrs. Shapiro installed Joel Rein-
stein, who has served in various
aasjSasMw in the Federation and
other Jewish communal and civic
organisations, as executive vice
president with the responsibility
of serving as general chairman of
the 1984 UJA campaign, suc-
ceeding Mrs. Waldman; also
Samuel Leber. Samuel K. Miller,
Brian Sherr, and Mrs. Waldman,
as vice-presidents; Irving
Lmowsky as secretary, and John
Strong as treasurer.
In the absence of Congress-
man Larry Smith who had been
scheduled to take part in the pro-
gram, Jacob Brodzki, s past
debate and subsequent vote on
the MX missile funding in the
House of Representatives, cited
Entin's achievements, adding: "I
know you will handle your re-
sponsibilities well. I commend
you and your family for your fine
work on behalf of the Jewish
Federation."
Members of Ed's family, led by
the partrisrch of the family, his
94-year-old father, Sol Entin of
Hollywood, were in attendance at
the meeting.
Among other highlights of the
90-minute meeting were other
president of the Federation, had award presentations, and the em-
the honor of installing Entin as
president. Rep. Smith, in a tele-
gram reporting he had remained
S3 Washington to take pert in the
ALFRED COHEN (far right), president of Margate's Temple Beth
Am, hosted a backyard picnic for all of Oakland Hills volunteers who
took part in the 1983 United Jewish Appeal campaign. Assisting at
the barbecue grill were (from left) Maxwell Adler, chairman of the
UJA committee; Ely Wishnack, co-chairman, and Gus Spindler.
ARMDI Ashhelon year end meeting
Members and non-members are
invited to attend the year-end
meeting of the Aahkelon chapter
of American Red Magen David
for Israel (ARMDI) that will be
held at 7 p.m. Tuesday June 7 in
the Soref Hall on the campus of
the Jewish Community Center,
6601 W. Sunrise Blvd.
ARMDI, which is the sole sup-
port arm in the United States of
Magen David Adorn in Israel, is
dedicated to maintaining life-
saving services to Israel.
At the June 7 meeting. State
Representative Peter Deutsch, a
member of the Aahkelon chapter,
will install the officers and direc-
tors of the newly elected board.
Outgoing president Abe Semel-
macher will present the gavel to
Buddy Neustoin who will be the
president for the 1983-84 year.
phasis on Federation's educa-
tional programs.
Claire and Dr. Brian Steingo,
who have taken an active part in
Federation's program since their
arrival here from South Africa,
were presented with the Young
Leadership Development award.
And the Young Leadership
award for distinguished com-
munity service went to Sheldon
Polish, s board member of several
years, chairman of the Federa-
tion's Foundation of Jewish
Philanthropies, and newly-
elected president of the Jewish
Family Service of Broward Coun-
ty-
A special service award, recog-
nizing "extraordinary effort,''
was presented to newly-elected
Federation vice-president Samuel
Leber for "his utmost devotion
and achievement in reaching
Federation goals, particularly in
support of acquiring Federation's
new home."
In the field of education,
Abraham J. Gittelson, Federa-
tion's director of education and
associate director of the Central
Agency for Jewish Education,
was lauded as was Sharon Horo-
witz, administrator of Federa-
tion-CAJE's Judaica High
School. She introduced one of the
school's student, Ian Berkowitz,
son of Rochelle and Atty.
Maurice Berkowitz, who told how
the students had raked money
among themselves whkh they
now wanted to present to tht
UJA campaign. He handed '"
check of almost 1800 to M
Shapiro. *"
Another teenager was called to
the podium. David Orbach, also*
student at Judaica High and
member of the Akiva FslkrwsJun
son of Janice and Robert Orb**
thanked the Federation,^
mother and father," and especial
ry Lorraine Fine of Palm Air fcr
the grant she made available
from the Bruce Fine Phils*.
thropies. It was this grant that
financed Orbach's seven **
trip to Israel as winner of t
scholarship for the "Israeli.
Educational Experience."
Men end women, who during
the course of the year had chaired
community campaign commit,
tees or other activities, were re-
warded for their volunteer effort*
with a plaque. These outstanding
service awards went to Myron
Ackerman, Welter Bernstein
Michael R. Bloom, Murray Cher'
mack, Louis Colker, Sidney Dorf-
man, Alfred Golden, Deborah
Fuller Hahn Daniel Klein. Irvine
Libowsky, Selig Marko, Julius
Mines, Lee Rauch, Joel Rain-
stein, Joseph Kaplan, Israel
Resnikoff. Charles Ruben, Lucille
Stang, Milton Trupin, Moe Wit-
tenberg.
The meeting opened with the
singing of the Israeli and Ameri-
can national anthems led by
Cantor Maurice Neu of the boat
synagogue, Temple Beth Israel,
and the invocation, including the
shehechayanu blessing, by Beth
Israel's Rabbi Phillip A.
Labowitz who hailed the inspira-
tional leadership of the Jewish
Federation in meeting the com-
pelling challenges during the
year.
Rabbi Albert B. Schwartz,
director of Federation's
Chaplaincy Commission, follow-
ing formal adjournment of the
business meeting, offered the
invocation with a prayer for the
Federation's work of meeting
human needs at home and in Is-
rael to continue unfailingly.
We're 82 years old,
and we never looked younger!
We've come a long way
since we used to send
the horse and buggy
down to the Railroad
Station to pick up our
guests and boasted about
electricity in every room.
From the country place
that became the summer
refuge of those who
II
uuDoId
spent the other 50 weeks
of the year in crowded
city apartments, we've
grown into one of the
most pampering resorts
of the land.
Yet deep down we re-
main the same. A friendly,
welcoming stopping off
place where you can get
away from the tensions
and problems of day-to-
day living and discover
a new world of pleasure.
As we start our 9th
decade, and with a 5th
generation of hosts
warming in the wings,
we say to you just as
we've been saying these
last 82 yean:
Come up to the Nevele.
And enjoy yourself.
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Karquetball Riding Private Lake Entertainment
You have the power to Was the future by
leaving, a legacy to I
I
Your WW can continue iJadaaaaha achievements
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hadassan
f MM. TO HMkASSAM. VMUS 4 BEQUEST* OBPT SO WOT SMl SMM NOT \M. N V MBit CM) ,__
1 M.
l\
-______________________ i i


The Jewish Floridian of GrtaUir Fort UxudydqU
Page 3
fre. Shapiro highlights Federation 's achievements in 1982-83
j Shapiro, retiring as
^ent for the 1982-83
t of activity for the Jew-
Federation of Greater
* Lauderdale, shared
[highlights of the year's
mplishments in a re-
covering Federation
juttees and the local
j-M which receive sup-
| from the funds contri-
j to the annual United
Eh Appeal campaigns.
her message, the
jace to the 16-page
._ report presented to
j in attendance at the
24 annual meeting,
. Shapiro expressed her
jcere thanks to the
leration board of direc-
I, committee chairmen
all the hundreds of
nteers who gave freely
heir time and talents to
er our endeavors."
included in this report is
| funding provided by the
ition for United Jewish
and the other national
| international organizations
encies on the list of bene-
UJA usually receives
165 percent of the allocated
I of the annual campaigns.
Shapiro reported: "We
I renewed our commitment to
financial support to Is-
i well as continuing to fund
I agencies who supply the
i needed humanitarian serv-
ile the ever-increasing local
)h population."
(its of those local serv-
I including capsuled reports
of Federation committees, follow:
B'nal B'rith Yough Organs*
tie. IHBYO) In theFort
Lauderdale area, five Aleph
Zadsk Alaph IAZA) boys and
seven B'nai B'rith Girls (BBG)
chapters have increased their
total membership to 383 for an
important role in BBY's Gold
Coast Council, one of the largest
and strongest Councils in the
BBYO order.
Central Agency for Jewish
Education (CAJE) Judaica
High School, completing its third
year of teaching over 200 teen-
agers in grades T through 12, now
has two campuses with almost
every congregation involved in
the program; North Midrasha
Adult Education Institute
reached over 2,000 attendees dur-
ing the lecture series and pro-
vided Hebrew Ulpan courses at
two locations, besides coordinat-
ing 32 courses for 400 students at
12 synagogues and the Jewish
Community Center; conducted
16 seminars, with workshops, as
the Institute for Jewish Studies
for Teacher Professional Growth,
besides providing a program for
students with learning disabili-
ties, and guidance for day school
curricula.
Chaplaincy Commission For
the first time a program of re-
ligious services and celebrations
is being provided for residents of
the congregate living quarters of
Broward Assn. for Retarded Citi-
zens, and a volunteer "rabbi-in-
residence" has been assigned
from the Chaplaincy Corps to the
Broward Center for the Blind, in
addition to its continuing serv-
ices at 20 hospitals, five deten-
tion facilities in Broward county,
18 nursing homes, and inaugura-
tion of "The Extended Syna-
gogue Family" with synagogues
adopting a nursing home for its
own group of volunteers to pre-
pare services and programs.
Community Relations Com-
mittee CRC, continuing its
activity of helping interpret the
crisis in the Middle East and the
need to aid Soviet Jewry, organ-
ized an Education Task Force to
keep alive the idea of separation
of State and Church. CRC also
was a contributing force with
synagogues and others in com-
munity-wide observances, such
as Yom Hashoa, the Day of Re-
membrance of the Six Million
Martyrs; established a speakers'
bureau and distributed 10.000
brochures calling attention to the
danger of cults and missionary
groups.
Foundation of Jewish Philan-
thropies Now approaching
$1.5 million in assets in the en-
dowment fund created to develop
resources to aid financial security
for the future for the community
and Israel, a newly-published
brochure, "From Generation to
Generation," details the Founda-
tion's objectives and benefits to
contributors.
Hillel Foundations of Florida
The Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale, in com-
pany with 14 other Federations in
Florida, allocates funds for Hillel
services at college campuses
around the state. In particular,
Hillel reaches 600 students here
in North Broward at the Broward
Community College campuses, at
Nova University, Fort Lauder-
dale College of Art and the
Sheridan Vocational School with
Judaism classes, Shabbat serv-
ices, Israel Action and Soviet
Jewry groups.
Hebrew Day School of Greater
Fort Lauderdale Closing its
eighth year, the day School ex-
pands its curriculum to include a
7th grade and in another year will
add an 8th grade to complete
courses from pre-kindergarten
through Middle School. Enroll-
ment in the fully-accredtied
school now totals 183 students
getting an excellent education in
secular and Judaic areas plus
extra-curricular activities availa-
ble in public and private schools.
Jewish Community Center of '
Greater Fort Lauderdale With
a program reaching out to
families from early childhood
through to the frail elderly, JCC
offers something for everyone in
the entire North Broward area
served by the Jewish Federation.
Membership has increased
dramatically in all categories, in-
cluding the special service pro-
vided for the Jewish deaf, with a
number of them enjoying a trip to
Israel led by JCC staff. JCC's
WECARE (With Energy -
Compassion And Responsible
Effort) volunteer program aids in
a variety of programs, including
hot kosher meals five days a week
at the Nutrition Sites and for the
frail elderly at JCC's "The
Gathering Place."
Jewish Family Servke of
Broward County (JFS) Six
major program areas are availa-
ble to the entire community:
counseling, family enrichment
talks and seminars, adoption and
foster care, financial assistance,
refugee resettlement. Medicare
Information Service. During the
1982-83 year, JFS provided serv-
ices in all categories to 6,299
families, and successfully con-
cluded 43 appeals for additional
Medicare aid for families.
Kosher Nutrition Program
This federally funded program
administered through the
County's Area Agency on Aging
provides the hot kosher meals,
currently at two locations, for the
elderly, and in addition, enter-
tainment and social contact for
those enrolled in this humani-
tarian program. It is supervised
by the Federation which ext Bod-
ed its thanks to Candy Recht-
chaffer, executive director of the
Area Agency, and Rick Sch-
wartz, director of the Servke
Agency for Senior Citizens, for
their cooperation in this program.
Public Relation. Committee
In addition to contact with the
general news media in the
county, Public Relations is re-
sponsible for the news content of
"The Jewish Floridian of Greater
Fort Lauderdale," the tabloid-
size newspaper, mailed to more
than 20,000 families as the major
source of information about the
Federation, its role in the com-
munity, and its operation of the
annual fund-raising effort on
behalf of the United Jewish Ap-
peal. The Floridian is published
weekly from early September to
mid-May and bi-weekly during
the summer months.
Young Leadership Develep-
ment During the past eight
months, numerous young couples
have participated in this program
designed to re-kindle a real
Judaica awareness with families
joining in missions to Israel and
in such events as a Florida Re-
gional Young Leadership Con-
ference for a weekend of Judaica
activity.
In concluding her message,
Mrs. Shapiro said: "I am certain
that you will share a great sense
of pride in knowing that you have
helped make these services possi-
ble."
leration honors 10 directors
10 served on board six yean
members of the board of
Ictors of the Jewish
ition of Greater Fort
crdale were honored at the
24 annual meeting for
served six consecutive
on the board.
i Federation's by-laws, pro-
for the rotation of
ship on the board, stipu-
i that a director steps down
|&i consecutive years for a
itical" for at least one year.
for their voluntary
ent and dedication to
i of the Federation during
[ put six years and receiving
wards presented by Presi-
[Jean Shapiro were Louie
Leonard Gluck, Erwin
Joel Levitt, Bernard
Charles Locke, Leon
P">K. Mark Steingard,
Weinberg, Saul
rger.
Kanev, Martin Lipnack, Jack
Nudehnan, Anita Permian, Israel
Rasnikoff. Moe Wittenberg.
They will join the following
directors whose terms of office on
the board continue:
Alvera Ackerberg, Walter
Bernstein, Dr. Ahrin Colin, Philip
Cohen, Gladys Daren, Milton
Edelstein, Leonard Farber,
Irving Friedman, Morris Fur-
man, Alven Ghertner, Joseph
Kaplan, William Katxberg, Alan
Levy, David Miller, Joseph
Novick, Norman Ostrau, Saul
Padek, Sheldon Polish, Herbert
Sadkin, Sol Schulman, Sidney
Spewak. Florence K. Straus.
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The/ewjsh Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale ; ;

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^Jewish Ftoridian
or Graatar Fort Laud*rdaM
* fmsnocw
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Editor and Publisher Ecuiie Edito
Publisnsd Waakly Mj Sapt*mtr ihfouon MkJ May B. W*e*iy muto ol r**'
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8360 W Oakland Par* Blvd Fort Lauderoai* Fl 333?t Phone 13051 748*200
Friday, June 3,1963
Volume 12
22 SIVAN 5743
Number 21
Israel-Lebanon agreement
Continued from Page 1
the peaceful and unhampered movement of goods,
products and persons, communications, etc, some of
these things will require formaliration in bilateral
agreements.
4. Proposition (C) withdrawal of forces, requires first
of all, the withdrawal of those forces that precipitated
the near collapse of Lebanon during the last decade and
a half and created the conditions that made Israel's
Operation Peace for Galilee, in the summer of 1962,
inevitable. It requires, in other words, the withdrawal
of all PLO elements and the simultaneous withdrawal
of Syrian forces from Lebanese soil together with the
Israel Defense Forces now stationed in southern
Lebanon.
5. Proposition (D) security measures will
require carefully worked-out follow-up measures and
arrangements, to ensure that the security region set up
in southern Lebanon under the terms of the agreement
will indeed perform the function it is intended to
perform.
6. The Israeli-Lebanese negotiations were impeded
and complicated all along, not only by the
heterogeneous character of the Lebanese government,
which greatly reduced the scope of the Lebanese dele-
gation's bargaining authority at the talks, but also
mainly by Lebanon's hesitancy in malting any kind
of move without the approval of its eastern neighbor,
Syria, and other Arab countries. In effect, this gave
Syria and behind it, the Soviet Union virtual veto
power over Lebanon's positions and decisions, a stance
strongly influenced and supported by the rest of
the Arab states as well.
7. Israel, fully aware of Lebanon's sensitivities in this
regard, went out of its way to make concessions
designed to smooth the way to an agreement. Thus,
when the Lebanese delegation pleaded its Arab af-
filiation to justify its opposition to Israel's proposal
that the present talks culminate in the signing of a
peace treaty, Israel agreed to forego this most natural
and reasonable of proposals and to content itself with a
pragmatic arrangement of "Good Neighborly Rela-
tions. "
8. There were other Israeli ccoceeaions in the course
of the talks, some of them in the realm of substantive
issues, others in matters of wording. The aim always
remained to seek compromise wbeieei possible in
order to keep open the chances of a successful conclu-
sion of the talks and an agreement, needless to say,
concessions that could neither be offered nor mads on
issues that, Israel felt, touched vital security concerns.
9. In the final analysis, Israel found it possible to
make the concessions it did, because they paved the
way for an agreement that doss "**'" the four essen-
tial propositions mentioned in the first paragraph of
this paper as well as a number of additional clsusss
that lend a measure of substance and mning to these
basic propositions.
10. It is to be hoped that this agreement will serve as
the foundation of a growing understanding between Is-
rael and Lebanon, leading ultimately to the extension of
the peace process, begun at Camp David, to all of Isra-
el's laBaghbors.
At weekend retreat:
Israela light unto the nations
Sue and Ben Reiter and their three
children; Bob and Elise Dohjow; Jeff
and Judy Faine and children, Evelyn and
Mark Silvennan, Federation's coor-
dinator of Young Leadership
Development, and son Andrew, were
among the many young couples who at-
tended the May 1315 Florida Regional
United Jewish Appeal-Council of Jewish
Federations Leadership Development
weekend retreat at Haines City near
Orlando.
The following report has been ex-
cerpted from an article prepared by Sue
Reiter for The Jewish Floridian of
Greater Fort Lauderdale:
As we trooped into the Grenelefe resort center
lobby, we were welcomed by the registration
committee members who handed us our con-
ference kits, a book by Danny Siegel (one of the
two scbolars-in-residence for the week-end), and,
much to the delight of our three little children,
five name badges.
The short drive to our luxurious two-bedroom
condo revealed more marvelous landscaping,
winding bicycle paths, running and fitness trails,
a rolling golf course and a magnificent, sparkling
lake Our six-year-old son, Danny, kept saying:
"Pinch me; I must be dreaming!" His three-and
four-year-old sisters finally took him up on his
offer, and the tears and name-calling that ensured
brought us all back to the reality of the \ eekend.
The reception afforded us the chance to meet
some of the other Florida contingents. We learned
that about 30 couples, 40 singles, and 40 children
were in attendance. We bumped into three other
Fort Lauderdale families whom we knew from our
own Young Leadership group meetings. We also
met a very friendly and personable gentleman,
Scott Barnett, the chairman of the weekend.
The Kabbalat Shabbat and dinner that
followed presented a roomful of "strangers" with
the opportunity of becoming a family gathering.
Somehow when Jews break bread together on the
Sabbath and share those private rituals and
blessings normally done at home on Friday
nights, we become as one large family.
After the meal Scott Bernard directed the
children to an adjoining room while the adults
exited to another for our first seminar. The
speaker was Danny Siegelpoet, author,
talmudic scholar, lecturer, dedicated Uedakah
worker, and mensch.'Danny spoke for two hours,
quoting excerpts from his own publications while
provoking much introspection and laughter from
his audience. We discussed the meanings words
used everyday, and the true meaning of what
tzedakah really is.
The next day started early with Shabbat
services at 8, followed by a lovely buffet breakfast
on the patio and miniature golf and tram ride for
the little ones. Danny Siegel, in his own eclectic
style, presented a "give and take" lecture on
"Judaism's Unique Approach to Being Human.''
After this everyone was given a half-hour break in
order to consolidate their knowledge, gather their
children, and prepare for lunch and our initial
encounter with Mark Talisman.
As Mark Silvennan so aptly pointed out, this
man, Mark Talisman, is "our man in
Washington." (Talisman is the director of the
Washington office of the Council of Jewish
Federations, the "umbrella" organization for all
the Federations affiliated with the United Jewish
Appeal.)
Among Talisman's numerous credits, it mo.
be noted that Mark's background include* 22
years of very active participation in politics on I
The Hill. Listening to this man's polished i
of speaking was truly a treat!
I sat mesmerized as he lectured on "Israel-..
Light unto the Nations." What a complex in-~l
dividual! It was a pleasure to listen to this mini
with sueh deep-rooted convictions regardingc
Homeland and its relation to the United Suti-,
kept wondering as he spoke how he had kept*
this political game for 22 years; surely k mutt,
like hitting one's head against a wall. Yet tan
man, our man in Washington, hung right in tht
If nothing else it is oomf orting to know that]
is still there for us.
The rest of the afternoon was a brief respite
from the thought-provoking talk of the morni
It marked the commencement of family Mac-
cabiah games. Our team had "ruach!" The
ribbons that we earned totally overrode the i_
setback of placing last. If nothing else, we cer-
tainly earned the claim to a refreshing swim inc
hotel pool.
The evening seminar, given once more by
Talisman, was entitled "Why and How a Pol
Involvement for Israel." Once again I sat with
my mouth literally wide open. This same man
who had earlier in the day presented a slide s_
of valuable Jewish artifacts that he and his wil
had spent 15 years trying to free from Com-
munists countriesthis same man was
describing the innermost workings of political
organizations from personal experience.
He stressed the importance of Political Ac
Committees (PAC) and the importance for Jewil
in America of the American Israel Public /
Committee (AIPAC) and the need to become
involved. This seemingly low-key individual
exuded fervor and political conviction and once |
again heightened the political awareness of his
audience.
After the evening's presentation, we were all |
treated to an elaborate dessert of French i
and cherries jubilee. Unfortunately most of the 1
children were unable to join us in this gourmet
feast. most of them had fallen asleep during !
the movie that was part of their evening |
Danny Siegel gave us one final speech Sundiyl
morning about "Tzedakah: Everyday Miracle*"[
in his own inimitable and captivating style. TbisJ
was followed by a panel discussion involving t
scholars who entertained Questions from the
audience. When Chairman Barnett signaled
that it was time to adjourn, I was not quitei
for it to end!
As we prepared for the long ride home I ob-
served two phenomena: Our children were c
out names of the children (whom I had barely
met) and calling "Goodbye" as if they had been |
friends for years. This reminded me of the fact
that my youngsters had also experienced
wonderful, event-packed weekend and alto, mjj
husband and I were bidding fond farewells to
people from our own Young Leadership group
with whom, in the past, we had only shared sp
now we had a common bond.
As we passed through the main gates of
Grenelefe at 1 p.m., all three children were i
fast asleep in the back of our station wagon 1
all had tired smiles on their little faces... my
husband, Ben, held my hand and we thanked
other for sharing such a wonderful few days
together as a family unit. and one thought
crossed my mind: DannySiegel had impressed
upon us a fitting custom for saying "Thank
you "-give tzedakah in memory of a marvelom
weekend!
Isaac Minkoff, NJCRAC's founder, deadat8\
Isaiah M. Minkoff of New
York, who, for more than half a
century was among the handful
of American Jewish leaders who
gave shape and direction to the
American Jewish community,
and of cancer last month at 82
years of sge.
Minkoff, who served for 31
years as the founding executive
vice chairman of the National
Jewish Community Relations
Advisory Council (NJCRAC),
was described bv Jacaueiine K.
Levins, NJCRAC's chsirpersot
as "one of the true giants of tat
Jewish community rsistioiia
field. He had a profound effect on
the nature and substance of the
field and the impact of his
thought and work can be dearly
seen in the structure of the
American Jewish community,
particularly at the local level."
The Community Relations
Committee of the Jewish Federa-
tion of Greater Fort Lauderdale,
one of the 111 local agencies affi-
liated with NJCRAC, sent its
condolences to Minkoffs family.
Prior to his work at NJCRAC,
he was executive director of the
Jewish Labor Committee. He be-
gan organizing Jewish labor
union support, and support of the
general American labor move
ment, on the issue of combating
Nazism. He was the professional
who directed the Jewish and
labor-backed effort to boycott
Nazi goods imported into the
United States.
Minkoff, through NJC
brought the silent suffering J
captive Soviet Jewish P00]*
to the world's attention and'
instrumental in the fern*""]
the American Jewish ConM"
on Soviet Jewry wtuca
housed and staffed by NJi
for nearly a decade. That p
was the precursor to U<
National Conference tor
Jewry.
BBnames Macktezprogram chaii
The program "gS
structurally*^2figk
receittiiwetingoftheAO j
i.h Education. Comffl
Volunteer Servj**J*^
commissions, will. *,
B'rith's chief <2?|l
making the organizatw" r
grInurnioreeffccUv--t^
roots ktvel-
WASHINGTON Lester A.
Macktez of Providence, R.I.,
marked his 40th year as a mem-
ber of B'nai B'rith International
by becoming chairman of the
Program Committee of the
world's largest and oldest Jewish
service organization.
He was appointed to the post
by International President
Gerald Kraft.


June
3,1983
Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 5
'There are Jews in all my Songs'

Shaw urged Reagan to release F-16e
I8ILBEBSTEIN
gBUSALEM At 10
K on 8 Thursday morning,
Edinary workday, I enter a
lT\Vithin half an hour, I
Eft I am in a synagogue. Be-
I of the singing. Because of
flood, brave, sad songs of
h men and women who
our collective history in
rvoices-
.this room, a large, bare
floor. More than 160
jjllv, emotionally or men-
handicapped people are
i it work tables. Six to a
Four. One. All ages. In all
__g. One thing in com-
fc they need help.
_j them, another 6,300 Jews
Icared for throughout Israel in
slwkem, sheltered work-
for rehabilitation of the
^.pped. It costs $14.8 mil-
tnnually for basic main-
B of these programs, in-
^ $6.5 million in subsidies
t the Jewish Agency. These
g do not cover the cost of
construction, purchase of
machinery or training of
Lily qualified technical staff.
i people I see before me are
ay. But with what?
r hand, they are making file
i. Sold to the Government
tel, to the Ministry of De-
Two hundred thousand a
.h, month in and month out.
livery dazzling occupation,
eful.
to walk past the work
. A woman smiles, inviting
Bio her life.
) is this woman?
are," she tells me. An immi-
It from Russia. Her hair is
I, her eyes spark when she
] me for 15 years she was a
I on Russian television. She
I not mention the blue num-
| on her arm, from a concen-
camp. The other details
I out one after the other. In
,40's. Divorced. Three chil-
A daughter in school. Two
in combat in Operation
[forthe Galilee.
i she, Sara. Why is she here
this sheltered workshop,
shakem? High blood pres-
| A heart condition. Battered
a She lacks the physical
ina to put in an eight-hour
[five and a half days a week
k competitive, open market.
|she works from 7:30 in the
J till 1 in the afternoon,
| half an hour break for tea.
weives National Insurance,
n, medical insurance and
.ry of about 80 cents an
[Subsidized, all of it.
' does she not sing on Is-
pvMon?
' is no place for her .
"the one and only channel
has.
I then, will she sing for me
ft me record her voice on my
bKorder?
Sara will sing. In Russian.
Georgian. Uzbeki,
' "here, in a sheltered work-
I w'thout disrupting the
I0'150 others?
|Jeruaalern, anything is pos
we waU, out j^j^
Wwn, to stand in a
' httle alleyway bet*
V* J*e m all my
lik "* And in her
L r P** ot them
K from 2,000 yean ago,
y. crossing the snows of
e severe mountains of
iiiItttl?8toI"M->^"
18ugmg. Surviving.
ill* tTan to *"*
iCT f1" tbat I play my
fed ansL-
t^^tb*ioom.LJks)
K^hayUareKt1U
countries, some wearing the
flowered summer dresses or
striped pajama-like trousers and
shirts of Arab lands from which
they came, some in the heavy
wool pants, sweaters and peaked
workmen's caps of Eastern
Europe.
There is a spontaneous out-
pouring of joy. Two dozen man
and women come to sing with
Sara, to dance and sway and snap
their fingers, even to send out the
high ululating wail of the North
African and Far Eastern Jews.
Their smiles are so real, then-
mouths so brilliantly proud with
gold teeth that I forget where I
am, in a room where every person
is hurting.
Unexpectedly, from behind, a
man taps me on the shoulder. A
short man, about 60, wanting
something very badly.
"Please," he says, "I want to
sing the Kol Nidre for you."
In Jerusalem, anything is pos-
sible. Even this most somber,
this holiest of holy songs can be
sung in the middle of a sheltered
workshop where the work of the
day is making file folders.
Aryeh and I retreat to a
storage room. There are grey
metal shelves ranked along the
walls, boxes stored all along then-
length and height. We stand in
an aisle, facing each other. Aryeh
plants his feet firmly on the bare
floor. He strikes a proud stance
that makes him taller.
"I was a cantor," he tells me.
"In Hungary. Before the war.
Before Auschwitz. I used to love
the land, I waa a gardener, too.
But then I started having trouble
with my kidneys. It was from
lying in the snow, in the rain. My
mother, my father, they didn't
survive. After Auschwitz, only I
was left. When I came to Israel, I
got married. For 26 years we were
together. Then my wife became
paralyzed and six years later, she
died. Since then, away from here,
sometimes I feel I'm left alone,
alone like a fly on the wall."
Without another word, Aryeh
begins to sing the Kol Nidre.
And, through his winging, con-
nects himself to his past, when he
was young and there was Re-
demption. Like Sara, who sang
for me just now in the alleyway,
he becomes a Jew in all his pride
and glory. The singing pours
through the empty storage room
and through me.
And into the workshop. The
dancing fades away. The tape re-
corder is turned off. Sara comes
to the doorway of the storage
room and stands listening.
Behind her, other faces gather.
Still flushed with the joy of
their dancing. But quiet now, re-
flecting the slower cadence of
sorrows past and pride emergent.
Listening. Remembering. Shar-
ing hurt. and healing.
No, Aryeh is not alone like a fly
on the wall. Not here, at
Hameshakem.
Broward's U.S. Rep. E. Clay
Shaw applauded the Adminis-
tration's proposal to lift the ban
on the sale of F-16 aircraft to Is-
rael.
Early last month Congressman
Shaw wrote to President Ronald
Reagan expressing his pride with
the Administration's commit-
ment to secure a lasting peace in
the Middle East. He wrote: "I
am most concerned with the U.S.
decision to withhold the sals of F-
16 aircraft to Israel."
Since that letter was sent, the
Administration has lifted restric-
tions on the sale of 76 of the
sophisticated F-16 fighter planes
and will also permit Israel to
manufacture spare parts for the
aircraft.
In other portions of the letter,
Shaw noted:
"In our efforts to facilitate a
peaceful resolve to the conflict in
Lebanon, we must not lose sight
of our long standing commitment
to Israel, our strongest ally in
this region of the world In recent
weeks reports of a renewed,
massive build-up of Soviet
supplied Syrian troops in eastern
and northern Lebanon have
permeated the media. In fact, the
Soviets have supplied the
Syrians with SAM-5 surface-to-
air missiles with a range that not
only poses a threat to Israel but
to the United States troops
stationed in the Mediterranean.
"I have been a strong support-
er of this Administration's at-
Rep. E. Clay Shaw
tempt to rebuild the United
States defense posture, for I
firmly believe that with strength
comes security. The same
philosophy applies in the Middle
East. I know that you recognize,
ae I do, that a strong Israel with
a qualitative edge over her neigh-
bors, is the best deterrent to war
in the Middle East. With this in
mind, I urge you to reexamine
the withholding of the sale of F-
16 aircraft to our friend and ally,
Israel."
pour on the Santo* Brand
Place on rounded
poon Sato* brtontor
levied Coin* in a tol
lo*olBt Ad toe and serve
iboe hovs a aei yihm summer cooler. Men,
Mfli coffee wicw V/t cbmsr free. And Kasha*;
too. ^HJtpFlSrWIHH&mll&QIQMMUk**
^re*o hews Dried Pi
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knew wsWsw^PfJw ^aw^ejsT
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t> WR ftMW Hmk Cwewew



_________


Page 6
The JewUh Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
^day. June 3,
56 teachers of 10 synagogue schools honored at closing seminar featuring Danny Siegel
Danny Siegel displays his unique tallit bag at teachers' seminar.
Religious school teachers
with five to 15 years of
teaching in the synagogue
schools of North Broward
and Boca Raton were
among the 66 teachers
awarded Professional
Incentive Program (PIP)
grants at the concluding
seminar coordinated by the
Central Agency for Jewish
Education (CAJE) of the
Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale.
Danny Siegel, author, poet.
lecturer and educator, was the
featured speaker at the session
held last month at Temple Beth
Am, Margate. During his often
witty and probing talk, Siegel
quoted from Talmudk and Mid
raahk literature to emphasize the
crucial role of the teacher in
transmitting the Jewish heritage
and the importance of the teacher
as a model for students.
In addition to the PIP grants,
three teachers received certifi-
cates attesting to 15 years of
teaching in religious schools:
Natalie Godin of Sunrise's
Temple Beth Israel, Shirley
Levin of Lauderdale Lakes's
Temple Emanu-El, and Jeanette
Organization heads
plan leadership workshop
Miriam Kalett will chair a very
special meeting set for 10 a.m.
Wednesday June 8 at the Federa-
tion building, 8360 W. Oakland
Park Blvd., where the presidents
of all Jewish women's orga-
nizations have been invited to
meet and plan an October session
on strategies of leadership.
Sponsoring the project are the
Women's Division of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale, the Central Agency
for Jewish Education, and Brow-
ard Community College. The
purpose of the initial meeting will
be for the organizational leader-
ship of the community to provide
input for the October program.
The projected plans will be
presented Oct. 19 at Temple
Emanu-El, 3245 W. Oakland
Park Blvd., at a formal meeting
at which time, in conjunction
with Broward Community Col-
lege, the strategies of leadership
will be the focus of attention.
All women's organizations
presidents are urged to call Iris
Steinberg at the Federation 748-
8200 to confirm attendance at the
June 8 meeting.
LAWMAKERS PROTEST NON-DELIVERY
OF U.S. MAIL TO SOVIET JEWS
WASHINGTON (JTA) A group of Congressmen has
appealed to Postmaster General William Bolger to urge "that
our U.S. delegation bring up the problem of the non-delivery of
United States mail to Soviet Jews and others with the Soviet
postal authorities" at the forthcoming Universal Postal Union
meeting in Bern, Switzerland.
f*
10*
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Fishman of Plantation's Kol
Ami.
Ten year certificates were
presented to Esther Cohen,
Miriam Klein, Sarahleo
Magriaso, Temple Beth Israel;
Marlene Pinsker, Fern Harr, both
of Temple Kol Ami; Dorothy
Kutchera of Temple Beth El,
Boca Raton.
Among those recognized for
five years of teaching were
Rosalyn Troy of Beth Israel;
Helen Starr, Eleanor Levy, Robin
Rosen, Susan Goldstein, Lee
Corburn, Sandy Goldstein, all of
Temple Emanu-El; Laurie
Kurdziel of Kol Ami; Roz Rice
and Sally Wolfson of Tamarac's
Temple Beth Torah; Barbara
FeUner of Temple Beth Orr, Coral
Springs; Lori Garlin and Barbara
Mushlin. both of Plantation's
Ramat Shalom, and Harriett*
Sherman of Boca's Temple Beth
El.
The 56 teachers receiving PIP
grants represented the greatest
number awarded grants since the
program was established by the
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale. It is an indica-
tion of community support for
those teachers who continue to
develop their professional compe-
tencies. The grants are awarded
to teachers in 10 different He-
brew schools in the area. Teach-
ers were required to attend a
minimum of four in-service work-
shops and seminars to qualify for
the award.
Abraham J. Gittelson, CAJE
director of education for Fort
Lauderdale's Federation, noted
that "each year the number of
teachers participating in the
professional growth programs
has grown. The teachers of the
community are dedicated to
enhancing the quality of Jewish
education in their classrooms,
and to transmitting our Jewish
heritage in a spirit of commit-
ment and knowledge."
The closing sessions, in ad-
dition to Danny Siegel's talk, in-
cluded discussions on "Ending a
School Year and Beginning a
New One," led by Robin
Eisenberg. education director of
Boca's Temple Beth El Do
Hern^n, religious whool.
of Miami a Temple Beth
Stephanie King, educate? 1
consultant m Miami.
Among the workshons
seminars conducted durin.'
1982-83 school year wereS
conducted in conjunction
Union of American He
Congregations, United
gogue of America World
Organization, American
Youth Foundation, Jewish"'
logical Seminary.
The sessions ranged
studying the use of compuu
conducted by Irving Rossab,-
of the Institute for Computenl
Jewish Education; to teac
about Soviet Jewry, led
Marilyn Tallman of Chicago
the teaching of Hebrew
Magda Winter of the Je
Theological Seminary as
tutor; to Hebrew literature, va,
approaches in teaching about ]
reel, and special sessions
including the holidays in
tirriculum of the school.
2DQNQNI
The delicious, nutritious Noah's Ark
of pasta-shaped animals kids love!
Moms and kids go (or Zooroni two by two! Kids think Zoororn
looks as great as it tastes And since Zooroni is vitamin-
enriched pasta simmered in lots of yummy tomato sauce and
tangy cheese. Moms love to pair up with it, too1
"Finally, a
Catskiii resort
that lets you
stop eating
long enough
to have
some fun.."
$350.nd$365
Per week, pet person (dbl.occ.)
Every Room with Private Bath,
Air Conditioning and Color TV
For reservations and
information phone
1-80W5M85a
Hotel Brickmen
South Faisburg, MY I2779
Master Card, visa, Amex
Overlooking a great
18 hole golf course.
When you escape the Florida heat
this Summer, escape to something
more than non-stop overeating.
Escape to the Brickmen.
We know that you go on vacation to
do more than live from one meal to the
next. That's why we're on the Modified
American Plan, serving two sumptuous
meals dairy. Breakfast (until 11:30 am).
and Dinner (from 6:30 to 8:30 pm).
Midday snacks? Magnificent Pool-
side Coffee Shop.
There will be no announcement at
I pm calling you back to the Dining
Room which you just left, no need to
rush off the gorf course or tennis courts.
Linger at the pool all day if you choose.
We have one outdoor and indoor (con-
taining hearth club and jet whirlpool
spa). Play duplicate bridge, take art
classes, go folk dancing, jog. or work
out on our Universal min^gym. In short,
enjoy a fuH day of outdoor activities and
sunshine, and all the other fabulous
things we have to offer, including enter-
tainment that's second to none.
So come to the Brickman. Where the
meals are fun.. .not something that
gets in the way of fun!
The Posner Family


Friday, June*, 1983
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page7
Psalmist s words taken to heart during Jerusalem Day event
Beth Torah's President Sol Schulman greets Jerusalem
Day participants. Among those at head table from far left
Gene Greenzweig, Howard Feinberg, Rena Genn
Abraham J. Gittelson.
"If I forget thee, 0 Jerusalem, may my
right hand lose its strength; may my tongue
cleave to my palate if I do not remember thee;
if I do not place Jerusalem above my chiefest
joy" Psalm 137
And more than 360 persons remembered the 16th
anniversary of the reunification of the City of
Jerusalem the reunification that took place in the
aftermath of the 1967 Six-Day War of Israel against its
Arab neighbors of Jordan, Syria and Egypt.
The remembrance took place on May 11, Yom
Yerushalyim (Jerusalem Day), corresponding to the
28th day of the month of Iyar, at Tamarac's Temple
Beth Torah where the audience thrilled to the
Jerusalem displays, studied, sang, applauded and
pledged their dedication to the undivided city of
Jerusalem.
A turn-away crowd enjoyed the dramatic readings by
the Israeli Shlichim (emissaries) of South Florida,
joined in songs of Jerusalem led by Ami Gilad, and
listened attentively to Dr. Bernard Schechterman,
professor of University of Miami's Department of
Political Science, describe the international tensions
currently surrounding Jerusalem and the State of
Israel.
Jerusalem Day, organized by Helen Weiaberg, ad-
ministrator of North Breward Midrasha of the Central
Agency for Jewish Education (CAJE) of the Jewish
t the Midrasha adult education committee of the
sponsoring institutions of the Midrasha, opened with a
welcome by Temple Beth Torah's president, Sol
bcnulman. He read a proclamation issued by Tamarac'e
Mayor Walter Falck recognizing the centrality of
Jerusalem to world Jewry and marking the
reunification day.
The eternal nature of the city through the centuries
to the present was highlighted in film and in dramatic
readings presented by Rena Genn and Yoni Weil, Israel
schhehim; Howard Feinberg of the Jewish Fedention
of Greater Miami, directed by Yossi Shohat, CAJE
shhach.
Gene Greenzweig, CAJE's executive director; Danny
Siegel, author and poet; Abraham J. Gittelson, CAJE's
director of education for Fort Lauderdale's Jewish
Fedention; Rabbi Morton Malavsky of Hollywood's
Temple Beth Shalom, and Efret Afek of Jerusalem's
Yad Ben Zvi Institute were among the facilitators at
the workshops that followed the formal morning
program.
A candje lighting ceremony, led by Midrasha
Administrator Weiaberg, honored the members of the
North Broward Midrasha Adult Education committee,
who were instrumental in planning and implementing
this program and others during the year.
Latecomers lined the wall after 360 participants were
seated for Jerusalem Day program.
Poet ate, pictures and displays donated by Temple
Beth Am of Margate, Temple Beth Am of South
Miami, the South Dade Hebrew Academy, the Jewish
Community Center of Greater Fort Lauderdale, El-Al
Airlines, the Jewish National Fund and the Israel
Program Office added color and variety to the walls and
tables in the Temple's social hall.
Especially outstanding were a depiction of the
Western Wall made by students of Temple Beth Torah
under the direction of Joan Bergman, and model of
physical features of Jerusalem constructed by students
of Temple Beth Am's Hebrew school fourth graders,
taught by Joyce Sprotzer.
Beth Torah Sisterhood members, under the direction
of Ruth Mantell, served lunch which preceded the
several workshops where participants took part in the
dialogue with the workshop leaders before getting
together one more time for Dr. Schechterman's talk and
Gittelson's concluding summary, closing with the
ancient quotation from Psalms that Jerusalem should
never be forgotten.
North Midrasha Adult Education Committee
members honored at the randUHjh^g ceremony were
Helen Goldwin, Anna Harden, Henry Karp, Bees Katz,
Jerry Kaye, Elaine Lamport, Sunny hmfamm, Jack
Magzen, Ruth Mantell, Abraham Martin, Abraham
Meltzer, Shirley Miller, Berte Resnikoff, Florence Sag,
Rabbi Elliot SkiddeU, Helen Stoopack. Rhode and
AriehDagan.
Crime Stoppers Day to get county wide recognition
.'rime Stoppers program honor the Drosram as well u hv tv ,.,. -____cu.__
The Crime Stoppers program
which has evolved into the most
successful operation of its kind in
the United States has selected
Saturday evening June 25 to
honor the 29 municipalities and
Broward county for its statistical
reduction of crime.
The day will be set aside to
TAPES
CARTONS
HANGERS
POIYETHVIENE
BUSINESS FORMS
TAGS-LABELS
BAGS-BOXES
WIPES
honor the program as well as
those in law enforcement in
Broward who are responsible for
the operation of the project.
The highlight will be a gala ball
at the Diplomat Hotel in Holly-
wood. Governor Graham is
expected to address the assembl-
age. The program will be chaired
776-6272
HOWARD
|ap>er a
ackacing
!?01 N E 45 STREET
FORT LAUDERDALE
by TV news anchorman Steve
Rondinaro of Channel 7.
A private cocktail reception
with the governor and Sheriff
George Brescher, Congressmen
Larry Smith and E. Clay Shaw
will be held immediately prior to
the Governor's Ball for contribu-
tors of Si ,000 or more.
For further information call Ed
Kennedy at 522-9004.
MIZRACHI WOMEN
The Masada Mizrachi Wom-
en's chapter is pU"Mng
Thanksgiving weekend, five days
and four nights, Nov. 23-27, at
the Saxony Hotel on Miami
Beach. The cost will be 1136 per
person and will include two meals
per day. Arrival will be Wednes-
day morning and departure Sun-
day after lunch.
.?My great-
grandfather
invented
Gulden's* Mnstard
CHARLIE GULDEN
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Glaze* Cornea Beef
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rhc mm m tow smc* pM: cam with ld wMer. AM
cirrou. (MM, he; kM mi mU. km MM* Mm
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Potato Sales'
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COME UP TO UK
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mwniiH.....mii 000-431-3061
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Lod Sheldrake, NY. 18789
(tW) 434-5181 ma/or emest cerde honored


Page 8
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Laudordale
Friday, Joae 3 l98a
JEWISH
COMMUNITY
CENTER
OF GREATER
FORT LAUDERDALE. INC
Jewish Community Center is beneficiary agency of the Jewfc
Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale.
The JCC Early Childhood De-
partment has embarked on a pro-
gram of expansion resulting in
added facilities and staff. The
Jewish Community Centers pre-
school, now with more room and
more teachers, can accommodate
120 children, a substantial in-
crease over the 90 enrolled last
year.
Early Childhood committee
chairperson. Dr. Rochelle Fried-
man, notes that "only a few
openings remain for two, three
and lour year olds for the 1983-84
school year beginning Aug. 29.'*
Interested parents are welcome
to visit the Center to see the Ear-
ly Childhood facilities and to
leam about the special program
which includes Jewish holiday
celebrations, field trips, arts and
crafts, cooking classes and
drama, plus many innovative
activities geared to stimulating
and teaching the pro-school child.
Call 792-6700 for an appoint-
ment or a brochure.
THE f AMIW JACOBS' KOSHER
'0k
ALL Rooms Watarvlow
Colour TV Air Cono't on.d
Ralrlg Strictly Oiotary Laws
'%T'X open all year Muslc Entertainment
._ rHLLlNS Social Programmes
25th COLL"} Pn9 chaises
MIAMI BEACH. Poo^ ^ Q
GALA SHOW SHrf Rhblncal suoenrlilon
u- cream served dally poolstd*
c;^t:mth'sMvhouo*v
:4IW-3Mia"r
Mimal/tot*-***
$Olp^PTn.Dobl. Occ-P-ncy
JULrlwBBKBHOS^CIAL
4Day-w'ht*
juifltothooAh
S'0-| o-,P.raon,DoublaOccupancy
Available BBYO summer programs
The B'nai B'rith Youth Organ
ization sponsors a variety of
Summer Leadership Training
programs in which local BBYO
leaders will participate:
1. Kalian: June 29-July 26, at
B'nai B'rith Perlman Camp,
Starlight, Pa. This is a 4 week
intensive study of Jewish
identity, wherein our youngsters
Arnold G. Simon, JCC president elect
Arnold G. Simon
At the Jewish Community
Center's annual meeting, Thurs-
day, June 9, Arnold G. Simon
wiil take office as the Center's
fourth president since it has oc-
cupied the Perlman Campus
located at 6501 W. Sunrise Blvd.
Installation ceremonies for
Simon and the other officers and
directors will take place in the
Center's Soref Hall beginning ai
7:30 p.m.
Co-chairing the annual meeting
will be Rachel Herbert and
Cheryl Levine (pictured). They
have called upon Rabbi Kurt
Stone and Rabbi Elliot Skiddell
to participate in the ceremonies
Rachel Herbert Chenrl Levine
which include a Scout Honor
Guard, the Volunteers of the
Year presentation, the Commu-
nity Service awards and the year-
ly reports about the Center's
dramatic growth and the success
of the many new programs.
Preceded by Anita Perlman,
Michael J. Weinberg and Harvey
G. Kopelowitz, Simon takes his
place in the line of leadership
with a fine record of service to the
JCC.
A CPA and member of the firm
of Blackman, Kallick and Co. for
the past seven years, Simon has
served on JCC's budget commit-
tees since 1977. He has also
served as treasurer from 1977 to
1981.
fashion the Jewish lifestyle that
fits them. Outetanding rabbi.
and exciting guest speakers helo
them in their daily projects
Hebrew, Muaic, Dance and
Drama. ^
2 International Leader.**
Training Conference (ILTcT
July 26-Aug. 16. at B'nai B'rith
Perlman Camp, Starlight, Pa.
Training in leadership skills
creative arta, Jewish learning
experience, which a Senior V P
at AT&T described aa the finest
leadership program in the
country.
3. Chapter Leadership
Training Conference (CLTCl: at
B'nai B'rith Beber Camp, Muk-
wonago, Wis. July 5-18; July 20-
Aug. 2.
J1? ^?. ftwo T*k om***
which will focus on how to build a
better BBYO chapter. They bring
home to their chapters an under-
standing of Judaism and how to
turn-on their peers to appreciate
the Sabbath, how to make their
meetings exciting and how to
build spirit.
4. Shirkada: at B'nai B'rith
Beber Camp, Mukwonago, Wis.,
Aug. 3-16. A program for BBYO
members who want to sharpen
skills in Israeli Music and Dance
and learn the techniques neces-
sary to teach them effectively.
Double decker jungi, gym doubles the fun for these JCC playmates.
JCC expands early childhood program
Maxwell House' Coffee
IsHospitality.
Lox n bagels n cream cheese is al-
most as much a pan of a traditional
Jewish household as the Mezuzah on
the door. And the most natural ac-
companiment to this American
gastronomical innovation is Maxwell
House Coffee.
The full-pleasant aroma and great-
tasting, satisfying
good flavor of
Maxwell House
has been delighting loven of good
food for half a century. And why not ?
Who would ever think of serving
first-rate food without great coffee!
So, no matter what your preference
instant or goundwhen you pour
Maxwell House? you pour flavor. At
its most satisfyingconsistently cup
after cup after cup.
tocwiu
VHOUS
K Ortifird Koshrr
mm.
A living tradition in Jewish homes for over half a century J


iJBBB3.l9v
TheJewiah Fkmdian of Greatei- F6H Lauderdale
ml Springs Coalition installing
>rs, honors Janet Oppenheimer
Kretchman JWV Auxiliary honors two past presidents
^ Oppenheimer, originator
I Coral Springs Area Coali-
Jewish Organizations in
wiU be honored by the
ijtion at its u>ual instal-
of officers at 6:45 p.m.
Hy June 5 at Holiday Inn,
J Springs.
Oppenheimer has been
jent of the Coalition since
option. She has been active
my community programs in
Springs and elsewhere in
jBroward county.
. will be succeeded as presi-
> Louis Abramson who will
nstalled in that office by
nce M Schuval, director of
Community Relations
oittee and director of
community planning of the Jew-
ish Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale. Other officers are
Sebna Silverman and Gerald
Chalfin, vice presidents; Philip
Weinstein, Harriet Herzog, Toby
Cohen, secretaries; Moe
Schwartz, treasurer. Michael
Moakowitz is the parliamen-
tarian.
Beth Orr's Rabbi Donald R.
Gerber will be the featured
speaker and will join Sharon
Weinbrun in an entertaining
program.
Previous honorees last year
were Gail and Art Chaykin who
were among the founding
members of the Coalition.
Beth Hillel Men's Club slates two events
ie Men's Club of Congre-
[n Beth Hillel, 7640 Margate
., Margate, has programmed
>vents for the month of June.
(unday morning June 5, the
\ speaker will be Sam Pome-
vice president of the
lutton Co. He will be
ng about financial invest-
There will be entertain-
liSalzman is
president
SabalbrookORT
tSabalbrook Women's ORT
Include (he installation of of-
fal I heir luncheon Thursday
I-at 12-40 p.m. at the North
VrdaliCjivHall.
rera arc Mimi Salzman
ili ni. Bernice Goodman
*h> Ix'vin, Krancis Levine
aide Roth. Anita Ruben
vice presidents; Evelyn
i. treasurer; Ruth Good
i Helm Struden, Ruth Hey
WBcretaries; and Ruth Leeb
knieiilarian.
pVIUWV-AUXILIARY
sing out its formal meeting
ns with a party at 7:30 p.m.
day June 16 at Century
j Temple Beth Israel in
eld Keach. the Century
East Jewish War
ns Post and Auxiliary will
we other activities during
"tmer months.
and Lou Kadin (428-0682)
ne persons interested in
J part in Games parties the
I Tuesday of every month at
\ Veterans Administration
Center in Miami, and
' persons who can help out
1 '"elds of mental health,
w events, carpentry,
tics, chess, billiards and
> during daily visits at the
Outpatient Clinic on
0(1 Park in Fort Lauder-
,EXaTWG PIECES.
I^N^INCATWr
' *"hNtlonai Council of
u25^ E ORIENT,
H1 ALASKA
P|JMC||
5h|r|tyV|tcott
i?3-5127
ment by Mickey Katz and the
Music Makers.
Sunday June 12, beginning at
9:30 a.m., a picnic will be spon-
sored by the Men's Club at Birch
Park. There is no charge to
members, however, there is a 60
cents admission fee per person
into the park. Reservations are
necessary. Call the synagojrue at
974-3090. *
KRETCHMAN JWV AUXILIARY honors two
past presidents: Flo Zimmerman and Shirley
Kishter (holding plaques) are pictured with Roz
Wieselberg and Edythe Morgana. The latter duo
were hostesses for the luncheon sponsored by the
William Kretchman Auxiliary of the Jewish War
Veterans of Fort Lauderdale at the Jacaranda
Country Club. Officers oftheDept. of Florida and
members of the Broward-Palm Beach County
Council joined in saluting Past Presidents
Zimmerman and Kishter for their faithful service
to the Florida Dept. and the national
organization.
Try the best thing next to
french fries.
DEL MONTE'Catsup. It's got just the
taste kids love with their fries, burgers
and hot dogs. It's the one catsup that's
made with the same care and high
quality standards you've come to
expect from Del Monte.
So treat your family. Next to
thick, rich DELMONTE Catsup,
everything tastes better.
irtC


55"^^
Page 10
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Louderdale

Prid*y.Juna3.n
Browsin' Thru Broward
with Maggie
Dade County's newly-formed
Reconstructionist synagogue.
Temple Beth Or of Kendall will
join Ramat Shalom's congre-
gation for Friday night June 17
service at Ramat Shalom's
synagogue, 11301 W. Broward
Blvd., Plantation Annette
Lefkowhx of Hollywood Hills
(966-7760) is calling all of
Brooklyn's Lafayette High
School alimni to a planned
reunion in November .
Broward *8 Sheriff George A.
Breacher is replacing two of his
office's Cessna airplanes with a
Bell 206 B helicopter, giving the
sherriffs deputies an aviation
unit of four helicopters.
Donald Berger of Planned
Development Corp. is handling
leasing arrangements for the new
shopping center. The Shops of
Broward, now under construction
on Broward Blvd. next to Bro-
ward Mall ... At that Coral
Square Mall being developed in
Coral Springs, New York's
prestigious specialty store, Lord
and Taylor, plans to be in
business there by October 1984
. Lillian Schoen, a volunteer at
Castle Elementary school's
media center, heard from the
librarian there about the cele-
bration of Israel's 35th anni-
versary during the entire month
of May in Memphis, Tenn.
Sixteen years ago on Tuesday,
June 7, Rabbi Salome Oorea, Is-
rael's Ashkenazic chief rabbi, was
the "first Jew to reach the
Western Wall" when the city of
Jerusalem was liberated from the
Jordanians during the Six-Day
June 1967 War. For Rabbi Goran,
who was succeeded last month as
the chief rabbi by Rabbi
Avraham Shaph-a, 66, that
distinction has been one of his
proudest achievements in a long
career that included these past 10
years as chief rabbi to the Israel
Defense Forces.
United Way of Broward
County has added to its long list
of agencies it helps to support
two more: Twig House, which
provides independent living
arrangements for emotionally
disturbed young boys, and Kids
in Distress ... Dr. Gerald
Shapiro, recent guest of the
Chinese government, will show
slides he shot during that trip at
the June 19 breakfast meeting of
Deerheld's Century Village
Temple Beth Israel Brotherhood
. Esther Stern, sales and
marketing director for Environ
Towers, reports construction
starting soon for two eight-story
towers for that complex in
Lauderhill's Inverrary com-
munity.
Loren Mints, president of
Plantation's Cypress Savings
Assn. has been named one of the
volunteer officers aiding Jack
Moss in Broward s United Way
1963 campaign Jack Shifrel,
former Broward school board
member, has opened his market-
ing consultant office at 2810 E.
Oakland Park Blvd. .
Brooklyn-born Carol Dial art,
43, is getting a doctorate in Jew-
ish studies at this month's com-
mencement exercises at Yeshiva
University. She's the first woman
in the university's 97 years to get
a Ph.D.
Yaakov Kronfeld, veteran of
Israel's 1973 Yom Kippur War;
Han Surig of Israel's Bank
Leumi, and South Florida's
Gulf side lie to way
Vacation persons
4 NIGHTS only180-
2 NIGHTS omlv#005
Doubts occupancy, including taiea/grstuittes April
15 thru December IS, 1963
PACKAGE INCLUDES: 4 NIGHTS 2 NIGHTS
Double room lor 2 people 4 nights 2 nights
Continental breakfast lor 2 4 mommas 2 mornings
Dinner for 2 2 evenings 1 evening
A Welcome Cocktail lor 2 in our Gangplank Lounge
Special Go// Packages and
Discounts also available
ji&
".
RAMALW Tfyfi
11000 Gulf Shore Drive. North *- *^
VANDERBILT BEACH
Naples, Florida .1040
Miles of white sand beaches, heated
swimming pool, live entertainment in
lounge, tennis and golf nearby, boat
trips available for sightseeing,
fishing, shelling Children 18 and
under FREE in room with parents
Children's meals at menu prices
Write or call for
RESERVATIONS
813-597-3151
MMMMMMBaMTMlMlMMW *>> RTA~j
| IlltS leff Stare ftrtw. I.. MatM. Rj lte B{
| OSentftiw
I
S*md f fw brocftuts
town* rook (Mo c
arrival tai--------
D Golf Packagt D Gulfed* Getaways
oldeys)--------lor (Nad peso*)---------
NAMC.
I
MAIL !
COUPOMJ
TODAY!
ON THE GULF OF MEXICO
Aooness.
CITY STATE /IP.
* director of Israel Aliyah. Alan
' MOateia. will be taking part in a
seminar at the 10 a.m. Sunday
June 5 breakfast at Castle
Gardens Men's Club in Lauder
bill Stanley Cohen, whose
work as director of education and
youth at Sunrise's Temple Beth
Israel was prominently featured
in the May 19 Neighbors issue of
The Miami Herald, will be among
the religious school educators
meeting this week at the Federa-
tion office duscussing the need
for beginning religious education
at the nursery school level.
Michael W. Moskowitz of
Coral Springs, a member of
Federation's Attorneys'
Division, has been promoted to
the member status of the Fort
Lauderdale law firm of Goldberg,
Young and Borkson David
Levenfdd, formerly of Chicago,
Boston and Buffalo, and more
recently on the staff of the Inter-
national Council of B'nai B'rith
in Washington, has been named
community relations coordinator
for American Israel Public
Affairs Committee (AIPAC) .
Milton Shostak, BBYO chairman
of Deerfield Beach's B'nai B'rith
Lodge, collected $50 from
members at a recent meeting and
turned in as 5,000 pennies toward
the six million pennies gosl of the
AZA and BBG chapters in Brow-
ard county.
Samuel K Miller of Century
Village East, elected last week as
a vice president of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale, missed the annual
meeting at which the election
took place. He's in Israel with a
large delegation of Cenvill's resi-
dents now touring Israel where
they are dedicating a grove of
trees in honor of the late Dr.
Marcos Nuabaum who was a
member of Federation's Com-
munity Relations Committee .. .
Daa Jsffe, professor of English at
the University of Missouri-
Kansas City, is director of the
Longboat Key Writers Confer-
ence to be held Aug. 7+12 at
Longboat Key near Sarasota.
The conference program empha-
sizes the writing of fiction and
poetry.
In a rare contested election for
presidency of 18-year-old Temple
Beth Israel, Sunrise, Bill Brooks,
the nominating committee's
nominee for president, defeated
Dr. Jack Zomlefer Century
Village East's JWV auxiliary,
besides winning several awards
as last month's Broward-Palm
Beach District Council Post and
Auxiliary Convention, gained the
honor of having its Bertha
Raphaalsoa elected Auxiliary
president, and Esther Pow,
junior vice president Gary
Starr, son of Janet and Welly
Starr of Plantation, who was
graduated from Duke University
last month, enters University of
North Carolina's Dental School
in the fall.
Broward County's Adminis-
trator Floyd Johnson has
scheduled "town meetings"
during which taxpayers can ask
questions about the 1964 county
budget. Sessions from 7:30 p.m.
to 9:30 p.m. will be held June 6 at
Coconut Creak High School, June
13 at Fort Lauderdale City Hall.
June 16 at Pompano Beach City
Hall and June 20 at Sunrise City
Hal .. Dorothy and Dan Bob!
of Fort Lauderdale s Good News
Fellowship Church will show the
film they made in Israel and
produced by "Friends of Israel in
America Inc." at the June 23
nwetrns; of Century Village
East's B'nai B'rith chapter.
Carl Froaaaan of Pompano
Beach, who just returned from
trip to Poland, reports attend-
ance at Warsaw's Great Synago-
gue, re-built by Polish Govern-
ment, had only 100 persons at
Sabbath service when be was
there and only five prayer
books for the congregation. He
met people there from the U.S.
who want to join him in making
contributions to buy prayer
books for the synagogue, noting
that of Poland's Jewish
population of some 4,000 elderly
persons, about 1,000 live in
Warsaw.
Stan Bernard. NBC-TV News
European correspondent, flew in
from Moscow to spend s few days
with his parents, Cele and Max J.
Schwartz of Holiday Springs,
Margate. He was an honored
guest at a small gathering of
friends and neighbors during
which he spoke of his coverage of
world-known personalities .
Bonnie BerkowiU was recently
appointed secretary in the Engi-
nsering Department of I
sity Community HospiJ
Tamarac. She's the fimuS1.
woman employee in the tment mm.- ."."
Miriam and
In, among Temple
S
B
Am's most dedicated wort
celebrated their 50th 3
anniversary at the M
|^gogues Friday May 17^|
TECHNION TECHNOLOGY Addressing the Atlanta Chaptt
the American Society for Technion, former Secretary of St
Alexander M. Haig (aboveI commented that the United States m
profit by taking advantage of the technological advances be
pioneered at the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology. "The m
of the Technion," said Haig, "which directly contributes to I
technological prowess of Israel both for security and social \
plication, also benefits the United States. As has been the cast, it it
America's best interest to be the beneficiary of these technology
advances."
IRVING
S^Bind.H0LLYW00D
TheLevoJor'
Vertical Blind
fl


V
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Friday, June 3,1983
Th*Jiwh Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Noted scholar will address Advanced Bible Study Group
Guest lecturer for the year's
final session of Hug Tanach, Ad-
vanced Bible Study Group, or-
ganized by the Jewish Federa-
tion's Central Agency for Jewish
Education for intense study of
the Book of Psalms, will be Rabbi
Avrohom Feuer, editor of a
superb commentary on Psalms.
Hug Tanach'a scholars have
met fortnightly in the board room
of the Jewish Federation during
the year. The concluding session
lor the group, all of whom are
familiar with the Biblical text
and the commentaries in both
Hebrew and English, will be held
at 10 a.m. Monday June 6 at the
Federation.
Deriving profound ethical,
moral, spiritual and religious
values from their meetings on
various chapters of the Book of
Psalms, the group is anticipating
a rewarding scholarly experience
during its meeting with Rabbi Rabbi Avrohom Feuer
Feuer who has completed the
i i ..... --------------:
Page 11
fifth volume of a comprehensive
commentary on Psalms, embody-
ing the collective wisdom of the
traditional commentators of the
past 2,000 years.
Rabbi Feuer, ordained at
Telshe Yeshiva in Cleveland
where he studied for 17 yean and
was lecturer in Talmud and Jew-
ish Philosophy for five years, has
authored books on the Ten Com-
mandments, Tashlich and Jewish
Education. Currently he is the
rabbi of Congregation Ohr Chaim
in Miami Beach.
Abraham J. Gittelson, Federa-
tion's CAJE director of education
and coordinator of the group's
sessions, speaking of Hug
Tanach, said: "We drew upon the
extraordinary range of insights of
traditional and modern commen-
tators, each of which revealed
another facet of the irridescent
gem of Biblical spiritual exalta-
tionthe Psalms."
Adding to that comment was
Memory, stamina, stress,
part of National Bible contest
If you like trivia and study,
I have a super memory, long en-
I durance and can handle stress,
I than the National Bible Contest
I is for you. These are the bask in-
I gradients that make up the char-
lacter of contestants who go
| through the ordeal of a regional
land then a national competition.
I Surviving these rounds may get
lone to the international competi-
Ition held in Israel in the fall of
I each year.
/ What great Biblical Jewish
pleader was slow of speech" and a
"clumsy speaker"?
2. Which commandment pro-
|mises long life, if you obey it?
3. Which Biblical leader eaid
f'Sun in Givon, stand stiU"!
These were some of the 120
[questions posed to the students
jo! the Beth Am Religious School,
[when they participated in the re-
Igional finals of the National Bible
Contest, coordinated by the Cen-
Itral Agency for Jewish Education
of the Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale.
Under the direction of their
principal, Joy Kahn-Evron, the
Beth Am sixth and seventh
graders were the only students
from the North Broward area in
the examination which was given
throughout the United States
and Canada under the sponsor-
ship of the Department of Educa-
tion and Culture of the World
Zionist Organization.
Abraham J. Gittelson, Federa-
tion's CAJE director of education
noted that "we are delighted that
the students of Temple Beth Am
were the first North Broward
school in recent years to partici-
pate in the National Bible Con-
test. Their principal and instruc-
tor, Mrs. Kahn-Evron, made an
excellent beginning this year in
preparing the students for the
examination and we look forward
to many winners from that con-
gregation and others that will
participate in the years to come.
The Bible Contest required de-
tailed knowledge of the books of
Exodus and Joshua, with ques-
tions probing almost every chap-
ter included in those books. Je-
rome Herehon, CAJE staff mem-
ber, served to coordinate the
examination on a local level and
to prepare extensive study
material for the students at Beth
Am and other schools which par-
ticipated in the examination.
Representing South Florida in
New York at the national finals
were four students from the He-
brew Academy of Greater Miami,
Miami Beach, in the intensive
Hebrew department, and one
student from Temple Israel of
Greater Miami in the High
School English department.
Answers to the questions
above:
1. Moses
2. Honoring one's father and
mother
3. Joshua
Unth grade graduation atHillelDag School]
The Ninth Grade Class of the
[Samuel Hillel Community Day
[School. 19000 NE 25th Ave.,
North Miami Beach, will hold its
[graduation exercises Thursday.
(June 9 at 7:30 p.m. in the
[wool's Friedman-Uhlar Audi-
Itorium.
Fifteen students who have
lmpleted their studies in the
ninth grade will be graduated,
according to Rabbi Dr. Joshua
Tarsis, principal of the Day
School.
The president of the Hillel
School. Mr. Michael Scheck, will
preside over the ceremonies and
will be assisted by the principal;
Dr. Jerome M. Levy, assistant
Child's Holocaust reminder
-Si" Wein- 12-yer-oid
nddaughter of Florence
J00L Horowft* of Tamarac,
*~1 this thoughtful reminder
'Holocaust."
'We remember the Holocaust
ilT,uay and how ** Germans
the Jews in every way. The
gw shipped us to cancan-
n camps in old cattle cars,
We were put in gas chambers
,rLne' while we were dying
^ermanshadfun-ManyJews
\ ages were trapped like
kinin1" CT*- In Germany.
kl""ig of Jews was Hitler's
* news. We were put in
idW Mm ^P*' had no
n '^strapped us. tortured
^d su^ ^ ^ The ^
"were so powerful there was
XLe codd do- The Gar-
loved to see our blood spill,
y wanted was to kill. VVnue
T? watched "*>*
hmJi WW we were trapped
"71 barbed wire. Hitler's
^fulloffirT^'
"With the Germans we
couldn't cope, all that we had left
was hope. We remember the Jews
that tried to be brave, and bow
the Germans drove them to their
graves. During the Holocaust,
there was a lot of bloodshed, at
the end six milion were dead. As
Jong as the Jews will stick to-
gether, all the Jews will last for-
ever."
principal: and Mr. Marshall
Baltuch, executive director.
Diplomas will be presented to
the following graduates bv Dr.
Stanley Spats, education vice-
president:
Keith Howard Brooks, Tamara
Joy Dennis, Henry Gevurtz, Jef-
frey Lang Goldstein, Rivka Aliza
Goldstein, Sylvia Gurinsky, Neil
Lang, Tracy Eve Layne, Billy
Liebesny, Ita Ruth Mourino,
Danya Rothenberg, Rina Beth
Spitzer, Karen Stern, Adam
Shawn linger, and Fred David
Zemel.
Special awards will also be
presented to outstanding
graduates who have excelled in
different areas of Hebraic and
Secular studies.
A collation will follow the cere-
monies. Friends and relatives
who wish to attend should RSVP
to the school office-831-2831. I
another member of the group,
Rabbi Albert B. Schwartz, direc-
tor of Federation's Chaplaincy
Commission. He said: "Each
Psalm, in its own unique fashion
reveals the presence of the Al-
mighty in the Universe, the
necessity for man's faith in God,
and both the challenge and the
richness of spiritual life that re-
sults from that faith."
At each of the sessions, an-
other member of the group would
conduct the study, drawing not
only upon the commentaries, but
on his or her own life experiences
in order to reveal both the open
and hidden messages embodied
in the text.
Questions raised at the start of
each session, requiring answers
from the session's leader or
dialogue among the group, in-
cluded the authorship of various
Psalms, the implications of title
headings, the musical references,
the place of Psalms in Temple
worship and in the synagogue
liturgy, and the influence of
Psalms on world literature.
Guest scholars at the previous
two sessions were Dr. Yehudah
NILI installs new officers
The "Nib"' chapter of the
American Red Magen David for
Israel (ARMDI) recently install-
ed its new officers.
ARMDI representative Bob
Schwartz was the installing of-
ficer. Janet Oppenheimer, ad-
visor for the new ARMDI chap-
ter, participated.
Taking office as president is
Sam Lefkowitz. He will be
supported by Carol Katz, Felice
Greenstein, Linda Aflalo. vice
presidents; Moe Schwartz,
treasurer: and Cnariene Pieason,
secretary.
American Magen David for
Israel provides emergency
medical and disaster services 24
hours a day with first aid treat-
ment and physician service;
blood and blood products
(produced by its blood bank and
blood fractionation center);
ambulance and mobile intensive
care units, and a large network of
clinics and substations in Israel
The next masting of the Nil!
(Hebrew for glory) chapter will be
at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday June 22
at the Coral Springs City Hall
annex (old library), Sample Road
and Coral Hills Dr.
Shamir, professor of Judaica at
University of Miami and Florida
International U., and Rabbi
Menachem Raab, director of
CAJE's Day School Dept.
Besides Gittelson and Rabbi
Schwartz, other members of the
group included Rabbis Elliot
Skiddell, Mordecai Brill and Is-
rael Halpern; Dr. Diana Ileis-
man, Phillip Teicher, Max
Rolnick, Joshua Lichtiger,
Gilbert Vaupan, Aryeh Dagan,
Gillian Gillenstein. Florence
Kerens, Al Singer, Bernard Reif-
man, Mark Erden, Sol Farber,
Ahimoan Kasap. Paul Grenitz.
Following his session with the
Hug Tanach, Rabbi Feuer will
meet with the rabbis who com-
prise the volunteer Chaplaincy
Corps of Federation's Chaplaincy
Commission.
Rabbi Feuer will discuss with
them the use of "Psalms as
Therapy." Traditionally, the
Psalms, the scholars aay, have
been a source of comfort for both
the individual Jew and the Jew-
ish people in times of sorrow,
despair, persecution and oppres-
sion.
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Friday. June 3, lflffl
Community Calendar
THURSDAY, JUNE 2
Temple Beth Ind of Deerfield
Beach Sisterhood: Noon. Instal-
lation meeting.
Temple Beth Israel, Sunrise:
Noon. Games.
Yiddish Cultural Groan-Sunrise
Lakes: 1 p.m. Meeting. Sunrise
Lakes Phase 3 Clubhouse.
Pioneer Women-Negev Chapter:
9:30 a.m. Board meeting. Brew-
ard Federal, Century Village,
Deerfield Beach.
ORT:
North Browsed Region: 9:30
am. Board meeting. Broward
Federal. Shaker Village Recrea-
tion Center.
Sahalbrook Chapter: 12:30
p.m. Luncheon. City Hall. North
Lauderdale
Sunrise Village Chapter: 12:30
p.m. Meeting. Broward Federal,
3000 University Dr.. Sunrise.
B'nai B'rith Women Sunrise
Chapter: Noon. Meeting. Sunrise
Lakes Phase 1 Playhouse.
FRIDAY. JUNE 3
B'nai B'rith Women- Inverrary
Chapter: 11:30 a.m. Broward
Federal. 3000 University Dr.,
Sunrise.
SUNDAY, JUNE 5
Temple Kol Ami-United Jewish
Appeal: 10 am. Breakfast.
Speaker: Oscar Goldstein.
Temple Beth Am Men's Club:
9:30 a.m. Breakfast.
Temple Kol Ami Sisterhood:
June 5-10. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Rum-
mage Sale
Temple Kol Ami: 6:30 p.m.
Games.
Temple Beth Torah: 7 p.m.
Games.
MONDAY, JUNE 6
Temple Emanu-El: 7 p.m.
Games.
B'nai B'rith Lauderhill Lodge: 1
p.m. Meeting. Castle Recreation
Hall.
B'nai B'rith Women-Fort Lau-
derdale Chapter: 12:30 p.m.
Meeting. Speaker: Al Golden.
Broward Federal, 5518 W. Oak-
land Park Blvd., Lauderhill.
National Council of Jewish
Women-Gold Coast Section:
12:30 p.m. Meeting. Coconut
Creek Recreation Center.
HADASSAH:
Gilah-Inverrary Chapter: 9
a.m. Bus trip to Miami. $12. Call
484-0973.
Armon-Csstle Gardens Chap-
ter: Noon. Meeting. Castle Rec-
reation Center.
TUESDAY, JUNE 7
Temple Beth Torah Sisterhood,
Tsmarac: Noon. Games. Lunch
served at nominal cost.
American Mizrachi Women-
Masada Chapter: Noon. Meeting.
Temple Beth Israel, Sunrise.
Brandeis-Fort Lauderdale-Pom-
pano Chapter: 1 p.m. Meeting.
Coconut Creek Recreation Cen-
ter.
National Council of Jewish
Women-Plantation Section:
Noon. Luncheon. Woodmont
Country Club.
ORT Points of America: 11 a.m.
Meeting. Ground Round Restau-
rant, S.E. 17 St., Fort Lauder-
dale. Call 472-7346 or 475-7220.
PIONEER WOMEN NA'J
Hatikvah Sunrise
11:30 a.m. Meeting. Sunrise
Lakes Phase I Playhouse.
Tamars Chapter: Noon. Meet-
ing. Waterbridge Recreation
Center, 1060 Del La go Circle.
Sunrise.
American Red Magea Dsvid-
Ashkelon Chapter: 7 p.m. Year
end meeting. Soref Hall. Jewish
Community Center.
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 8
Temple Beth Israel,
p.m. Games
Temple Beth Orr: 7:46 p.m.
Games.
Hadassab^ilah Inverrary: 12:30
p.m. Meeting. Inverrary Country
Club.
B'nai B'rith Women-Lakes
Chapter: Noon. Meeting. City
Hall. Laudanum Lakes.
B'nai B'rith North Broward
Council. 7:30 p.m. Meeting.
Broward Federal. 6800 N. Uni-
versity Dr., Tsmarac.
Pioneer Women Na'amet-Nata-
aya Chapter: noon. Installation
meeting. Congregation Beth Hil-
lel, Margate.
Pianist Women Na'amat Negev
Chapter: Noon. Meeting. Deer-
fields Temple Beth Israel.
Al Cnmmnahj Organisation
Presidents: 10 a.m. Annual com-
munity day meeting by Women's
Division of the Jewish Federation
of Greater Fort Lauderdale,
Central Agency for Jewish Edu-
cation of the Jewish Federation
of Greater Fort Lauderdale and
Broward Community College.
Subject: Strategies of Leader-
ship. Boardroom. Jewish Federa-
tion of Greater Fort Lauderdale,
8360 W. Oakland Park Blvd. Call
Iris Steinberg 748-8200.
THURSDAY, JUNE 9
Temple Beth Israel, Sunrise:
Noon. Games.
ORT Tamarac Chapter: Noon.
Installation luncheon. Italian
American Club, 7310 W. McNab
Rd.. Tamarac. Call 721-1299.
ORT-Corol West: 11:30 a.m.
Strawberry Festival f astuon
Show. Temple Beth Hillel. 7640
Margate Blvd.. Margate. Call
973-8585.
Jewish Community Center: 7:30
p.m. annual meeting. Soref Hall.
Hadassah-Blyms Margate Chap-
ter: 10 a.m. Board meeting.
Home Savings Bank. Atlantic
Blvd. and State Rd. 7, Margate.
SATURDAY. JUNE 11
Temple Sha'arey Tsedek Sister-
hood: 9 p.m. Social evening.
Temple. Sunrise. Call 741-9185 or
741-6565.
SUNDAY. JUNE 12
Congregation Beth Hilel: 9:30
im. Picnic. Birch Park. Call 974-
3090. .
Temple Beth Torah Meae Chm:
10 a.m. Breakfast meeting.
Temple Beth Orr: 8 p.m. Cantor-
ial Concert. Tickets $5-7. Omni,
Broward Community College,
Coconut Creek.
Temple Kol Ami: 6:30 p.m.
Games-
Temple Beth Torah: 6:46 p.m.
Gsmes.
Aaaodation of Parents of Ameri
csn Israelis: 1:30 p.m. Meeting.
Jewish Community Center.
MONDAY, JUNE 13
Temple Emanu-El: 7 p.m.
Games.
TUESDAY, JUNE 14
Temple Beth Torah Sisterhood,
Tsmarac: noon. Gsmes. Lunch
served st nominal cost.
Hsdssssh-Somerset-Shoshens
Chapter: 10 a.m. Board meeting.
Somerset Phase I, Recrestion
Hall.
Deborah Hospital Foundation-
Sunrise Chapter: 11 a.m. Meet-
ing. Sunrise Lakes Phase I, Play-
house.
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15
Temple Sha'arey Tsedek Sister-
hood: Noon. Meeting.
Temple Beth Israel, Sunrise: 7
p.m. Games.
Temple Beth Orr: 7:45 p.m.
Games-
Jewish National Fund: 7:30 p.m.
Board meeting. Temple Emanu-
El, Lauderdale Lakes.
THURSDAY, JUNE 16
Temple Beth Israel, Sunrise:
Noon. Games.
Hadassah Blyma Margate Chap-
ter: Noon. Meeting. Congrega-
tion Beth Hillel, Margate.
Jewish War Veterans-Century
Village Post and Ladies Auxil-
iary: 7:30 p.m. Meeting. Temple
Beth Israel, Deerfield Beach.
Mica supports veterans
legislation reported by the
House Veterans Committee
B'nai B'rith youth convention
WASHINGTON Congress-
man Daniel A. Mica ID., Fla.)
today announced his pleasure
over the recent action of the full
Committee on Veterans Affairs.
"The unanimous support of these
bills in the Veterans' Affairs
Committee paves the way for
action on the House floor," Mica
said. "It is my hope that these
measures will receive the same
level of support in the House ss
they have received in the Com-
mittee."
The Veterans' Affairs Commit-
tee recently reported unanimous-
ly seven bills to the House floor.
"This legislation will serve to as-
sist veterans of all eras in a
number of areas by increasing
the cost of living adjustment,
providing educational and job
training benefits, and keeping the
Outreach Centers operating,"
stated Mica.
The bills reported by the Vet-
erans Affairs Committee include
the following measures:
A three year extension of the
Veterans Administration's psy-
chological readjustment program
for Vietnam veterans. Outreach
centers which are scheduled to
close in Sept. 1984 will extend
their programs until Sept. 1987.
A study of post traumatic
stress disorder and related read-
justment problems among Viet-
nam veterans which is due Dec.
31,1985.
A 4.1 percent increase in the
cost-of-living adjustment for dis-
abled veterans and their surviv-
ors effective April 1,1984.
Increase per diem rates for
domiciliary care from 16.36 to
$9.50, for nursing home care from
$12.10 to $16, and for hospital
care from 11325 to 116.90, effec
tive next Oct. 1.
A "Peace-time G.I. bOl"
which would provide $300 pa-
month for an approved program
of study to former members of
the Armed Services who have
served over three years. This
measure will assist in the recruit-
ing snd retaining of high quality
military personnel.
An "Emergency Vietnam
Veterans Job Training Act"
which will provide job training to
unemployed Vietnam veterans.
Establish an Advisory Com-
mittee on Women Veterans
within the Veterans Administra-
tion.
Expand the Board of Veter-
ans Appeals to speed up the
process of handling appeals.
Provide mortgage assistance
to veterans with loans guaran-
teed by the VA in order to avoid
foreclosure of such loans.
"I expect that a number of
these bills will be brought before
the House for consideration
soon," Mica said.
Two hundred members of the
Gold Coast Council B'nai B'rith
Youth (AZA and BBG) gathered
recently at the Konover Hotel on
Miami Beach for their annual
convention.
Outgoing president. Pam
Kraus from Plantation, and
Harvey Gluckman from North
Miami Beach, gave their State of
the Council speeches.
New leaders for Gold Coast
Council were elected and in-
stalled. They are: Brooke Ziegler.
president (N'siah), from Lauder-
hill: Eric Dauer, president
(Godol), from Plantation; Nikki
Sard, vice-president (S'ganit),
from Plantation: Darrin Moshe.
vice-president (S'ganl, from
Plantation; Sherri Stewart, vice-
president in charge of member-
ship for North Broward, from
Fort Lauderdale; Aliza Spelter,
vice-president in charge of mem-
bership for South Broward and
North Miami Beach, from Holly-
wood; Jason Wormser, vice-
president in charge of member-
ship for North Broward, from
Coral Springs; Bettina Cantor,
secretary (Madricha), from
Hollywood, and Edward Capp,
secretary (Mazkir). from Planta-
tion.
One of the highlights of the
convention was a presentation of
35,000 pennies made by Palmach-
AZA and Nevuah-BBG from
Coral Springs.
The Gold Coast Council youth
are continuing their project of
raising six million pennies to sen-
sitize their membership and the
community as to the enormity of
the number six million. Ap-
proximately one million pennies
have been raised to date.
The 1983 Gold Coast Council
Convention was coordinated by
Karen Sandier from Hollywood
and Eric Ronkin from Palntation.
FAU announces special scholarship
The Personnel Assn. of
Broward County will award a
special $250 scholarship to a
Florida Atlantic University stu-
dent pursuing a career interest in
Human Resources Management.
To be eligible for the award an
applicant must be a Broward
County resident and a full-time
student at the junior or senior
level at FAU, according to Janet
Albert, Personnel's president.
The scholarship award will be
based on the student's academic
record, extra curricular activities
and achievements, employment
history, and the applicant's
career objectives in human re-
sources management.
The award recipient will also be
eligible for a full-tuition scholar-
ship awarded by FAU's College
of Business and Public Adminis-
tration.
Applications should be re-
ceived by June 15. Those in-
terested in additional information
should contact Ella Smith.
director of Student Services for
the College of Business and Pub-
lic Administration, at 393-3650.
Kutsher 's Playaway Plan
Gives You The Stars!
BEN VEREEN LOLA FALANA
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July 16 July 23
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Peter Ganyard. Manager
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Friday,
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5735
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Temporwity out ol Mock
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44.14
45.60
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50.10
FAT
1.44
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1.71
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2.35
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SALE PRICE F.E.T.
P165/80R13
46.86
P175/80R13
48.57
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49.85
50.82
56.92
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52.32
56.92
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60.45
64.62
59.70
81.73
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66.44
P235/75R15 71.26
149
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175SR14 52.10 1.81
185SR14 55.06 211
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Friday, June3^5^

Kol Ami marks junior choir first year
B'nai-B'not Mitzvah
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL
Members of Kol Ami Junior Choir
Following the 8:15 p.m. Friday
June 3 Temple Kol Ami service
the Junior Choir, under the
direction of Arlcne Solomon, will
present a cantata, "Joseph and
His Amazing Technicolor Dream
Coat." The Junior Choir is
completing its first year, having
at recent presentation.
been organized last fall by Sherri
Poliakoff. The choir is made up of
36 students from 4, 5 and 6th
grades. The choir was one of the
featured acts on the program for
Israel Independence Day
Celebration at the Jewish
Community Center, Sunrise.
The Bat Mitzvah of
Rosen, daughter of Jerome and
Joyce Rosen of Plantation, will
take place on Friday June 3 at
Temple Beth Israel in Sunrise.
The B'nai Mitzvah of Todd
Gornatein, son of Deanna Gom-
stein of Lauderhill, and Eric Har-
melin, son of Barry and Micki
Harmelin of Davie, will be held
during the Saturday morning
worship service on June 4 at Beth
Israel.
Naomi Thomas, daughter of
Myron and Myma Thomas of
Plantation, will be honored Fri-
day June 10 on the occasion of
her Bat Mitzvah at Beth Israel.
Mark Lynn, son of Dr. Jerold
and Nettie Lynn of Plantation
will celebrate the occasion of his
Bar Mitzvah at Beth Israel's
Saturday morning June 11 serv-
ice.
Alice Herman, daughter of Jan
and Ira Herman of Lauderhill,
will observe her Bat Mitzvah on
Friday June 17 at Beth Israel.
Brent Gross, son of Karen
Gross of Sunrise, and Lloyd
Kraasner, son of Alan and Roberta
Krassner of Lauderhill, will be
honored Saturday June 18 on the
occasion of their B'nai Mitzvah
at Beth Israel.
TEMPLE BETH TORAH
The Bat Mitzvah of Marde
Dubin. daughter of Richard and
Linda Dubin of Coral Springs,
will take place on Friday, June 3
at Temple Beth Torah in Tama-
rac.
Jeffrey Levine, son of Robert
and Michele Levine of Coral
Springs, will celebrate hia Bar
Mitzvah on Saturday June 4 at
Temple Beth Orr breaks ground
June 12 for new Sanctuary
Temple Beth Orr will break
ground at 9:30 a.m. Sunday June
12 on the Temple grounds. River-
side Dr. and Royal Palm Blvd.,
Coral Springs, for construction
for a S2 million structure housing
a large sanctuary, social hall,
offices and kitchen facilities.
Beth Orr's President Joel
Lev ens ton will deliver the key-
note talk and Coral Springs
Councilman Jim Gordon, mam-
bar of the congregation, will in-
troduce state, county and local
officials who have been invited to
take part in the ceremony.
Long planned for the Temple
which now has a membership of
500 families, the new facility has
been designed by architect Barry
Sugarman. The committee for the
building project, which began to
take shape when the congrega-
tion bought additional acreage in
Jury 1981 in back of its present
structure, has bean chaired by
Stan Bernstein. The initial
Capitol Funding program
directed by Buddy Himber. The
structure is expected to be com-
pleted in the fall of 1984.
Beth Orr's Rabbi Donald R.
Gerber and the Temple's Cantor
Nancy Hausman will take part in
the groundbreaking ceremony.
Beth Orr sponsors Cantorial concert
June 12 has been set as the
date for the Cantorial Concert
being sponsored by Temple Beth
Orr at Broward Community
College's Omni at 8 p.m. The
program will be a varied selection
of contemporary and traditional
music and will be sung by Cantor
Nancy Hausman of Temple Beth
Orr, lyric soprano; Cantor
Jerome Klement of Temple
WANTED
Excellent year around Bal Koreh, Baal
Schachris on High Holydays in large conser-
vative temple. Salary, age and references
required.
Call 426-0392 or 428-6619

Temple Sha'aray Tzedek
Sunrise Jewish Center
Rabbi
ALBERT N. TROY. D.D.
Cantor
JACK MARCHANT
Proudly Announces That High Holy Day
Services Will be Held at Our New Temple on
Pine Island Road and 41st Street in Sunrise.
Tickets Can be Purchased at Our Present
Temple on Sunday, Tuesday and Thursday,
From 9:00 AM to 12:00 Noon.
We Welcome All Unaffiliated Famines to Join
with us in Prayers, and to become Members of
our Congregation.
For In formation and Reservations Calk
Harry Brooks, 74*3050 Sam Marcus 47^681
Emanu-EI, tenor; Cantor Stuart
Pittle of Congregation Beth
Brein, tenor; Cantor Martin
Rosen, of Temple Beth El,
baritone; and Cantor Irving
Shulkes of Temple Sinai of North
Dado, baritone. Tickets are
priced at $6, S6, and S7. Patron
seats are $15 and include a wine
and cheese party with the artists
after the concert. Included in the
program will be the Temple Beth
Orr Choir under the direction of
Arlene Solomon. Tickets are
available at the Temple office and
at the Omni box office.
New Leadership
at Emanu-EI
During the Sabbath Services
on Friday evening, June 3, Rabbi
Jeffrey L. Ballon will install the
officers and members of the
board of trustees of Temple
Emanu-EI for the 1983-84 year.
Incoming officers are Sylvia
Friedman, president; Harvey
Alkow, Richard Levy, Josephine
Newman and Frances Smith, vice
presidents; Stanley Friedman,
treasurer; Carey Fischer and
Levona Stemgold, secretaries.
Elected as members of the
board of trustees are Nat Baker,
Elliot Barnett, Gary Glass, Alvin
Gross, Gary Hacker, Rhonnie
Leder, Janice Nankin, Carolyn
Russell, Estelle Wagner, and Eva
Wittcoff.
Also Harold Blinchikoff, Jac
Fast. Hilda Ivers, Walter
Loewenhere, Bert Rudy, Lee
Shainman, Ed Slater, John
Strong, Lloyd Stuart, Florence
Weissberg and Herbert Yevalson.
USY established
at Beth Am
Temple Beth Am, 7206 Royal
Palm Blvd., Margate, has
initiated United Synagogue
Youth Canter to provide a broad-
ened youth program for the
students of the religious school.
Membership is open to 8th grade
through high school students.
For additional information call
Lisa Weineoff, Bath Am a youth
director, 974-8660.
Beth Torah.
Heide Weinatock. daughter of
Samuel and Malca Weinstock of
Coral Springs, will celebrate the
occasion of her Bat Mitzvah at
Beth Torah's Friday evenine
June 10 service. ^
Daniel Wiemik, son of Barry
and Roni Wiemik of ConJ
Springs, will be honored Satur-
day June 11 on the occasion of
his Bar Mitzvah at Beth Torah.
Dawn Chaifeti. daughter of
Mel and Harriet Chaifetz of Sun-
rise, will observe her Bat Mitrvah
ORTHODOX
TEMPLE OREL B'NAI RAPHAEL (738-7684), 4M1 W. Oakland Park Blvd.,
Laudardala Lakeo 36313. Sat iluiei Sunday thrwiahThurodayaaLin.. 6p.m.;
FrtdayBa.m.,7p.m.; Saturday :46a.m., Tp.m.
SYNAGOGUE OP INVEBRAHY OHABAD (748-1717). 7770 NW 44th St.,
Lincoln Park Wait, Sunria* 83*21. Servtoee: Sunday through Friday 8 a.m.,
7:80 p.m.; Saturday 9a.m., 7:30p.m. Study grcwr*: M*n. Sundaye following
eervtcee; Woman, Tuaadaya 8 p.m.
YOUNG ISRAEL OP DEERFTELD BEACH <421-1*17), 1880 W. HUlaoora
Blvd.. Deerfleld Beach 88441. SarvtCM: Sunday through Thuraday 8 a.m..
IVSO p.m.; Friday 8 a.m.. 8 p.m.; Saturday 8:40 a.m.. 8:80p.m Casterftal
I MortoaForaoe
YOUNG HRAEL SYNAGOGUE OP HOLLYWOOD-FORT LAUDERDAIX
(901-7877). 8381 Stirling Rd., Fort Laudardala 83312. garitoait Monday
through Friday 7:80 a.m., and eundown; Saturday. 8 a.m. aundown, Sunday
8 a.m.. .undo wn. BabM Ed ward Da via.
CONSERVATIVE
TEMPLE BETH AM (974-8800). 7300 Royal Palm Blvd.. Margate 1S0O.
SarvtcM: Monday through Friday 8:80 a.m., 0 p.m. Friday late aarviea8
p.m.. Saturday 9 a.m.. 5 p.m.; Sunday S a.m., p.m. BabM Dr. Bnlanna
OaM. Cantor trvta g Timiaa
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL (749-4040). 7100 W. Oakland Park Blvd. Sunrlea
38313 Servtoee: Monday through Thuraday a.m., p.m.; Friday 8 am.,
0:10 p.m.. 8 p.m ; Saturday 8:40 am aunaet; Sunday am.. p.m.
PMtttp A. Labewito. Oaator Maortoe arm
Century Blvd. Deerfleld Beach 81441
a.m., 0 p.m. Friday late aarviea p.m
I1|tithntlmi >MIeaeaklMa O
(421-7080). 100 8.
Sunday through Friday 8:89
Saturday 8 40 a.m., and at candle-
" Mala.
TEMPLE BETH TORAH (731-7880). 1KB NW 87th St., Taanarac IMS
Servtoee: Sunday through Friday 8:80 a.m.. p.m. Late Friday aarviea 8
p.m. Saturday 8:48a m ,0pm Oaator Hoary Betoeee.
TEMPLE B'NAI MOSHE (843-0380). 1484 SE 3rd St Pompano Beach 18049
Servtoee: FridaySpm _
TEMPLE SHA'ARAY TZEDCR (741-0280).8048 W. Oakland Park Brvd,
Sunrlae 88321 Servleoa: Sunday through Friday 8 a.m.. 8 pm ; Late Friday
ae rvlce 8 p.m.; Saturday 8:48 a.m.. 6:80 p.m. kMO^ ARtort N. Trey. Caaear
Jack Marcbaat.
TEMPLE SHOLOM (942 6410). 112 8E 11th Ave., Pompano Botch 88M8.
Servicea: Monday through Friday 8:48 a.m. Friday evening at 8. Saturday
and Sunday Sam. Baked Samuel April. Taalir Tank niai--
CONGREGATION BETH BTLLEL OP MARGATE (874-8080), 7440 MarraM
BJvd^Mara-aU88088. larvkwi Sunday through Friday 8 16 am .8:80pjn.
Late Friday aervlce 8pm. Saturday, 8:4Sa.m., 6:80pm BabM DavM
CONGREGATION B'N AJ ISRAEL OP CORAL SPRINOa (For RambUwood
Eaat realdenU), 788-6816. Servtoee: Dairy 8:80 a.m., 8:80 p.m.; Saturday
am HarbDavia. r----------
HEBREW CONGREGATION OP LAUDERHILL (TM Mat). RMS NW 4Mb
Ave., Lauderhill 38818 Servtoee: Sunday through Friday 8:80 a.m.. :
pm.; Saturday 8:40 a.m., aundown followed by study daae m Pirka Avot
BabM Iarael Halpera. *
HEBREW CONGREGATION OP NORTH LAUDERDALE (713-7383 or TO-
2722) Servtoee at Ban yon LakeeCondo, 6040 Bailey Rd.. Tamarac, Friday al
8pm; Saturday 8a.m. AIT*----- "
I OBR (768-8283). SUB RrverMde Dr. Coral Sprtnga
a: Sunday 8 a.m.; Tuaaday, Thursday 7:80 pan.; Friday 8 p
aturdaylOam. aUbM Doawld B. O^arbw, C8mb*w Naaoy bfeaoa
(4J.MM).L-
Baacb. Friday 3 p.m.
TEMPLE EMANU EL (781-2810). 884S W. Oakland Park Blvd.. Laudardala
TEMPLE B'NAI SHALOM OF
MononUi CfcapoM. MM W. HlUakwm B^vd.,
TEMPLE ROL AMI (472-1888). SM0 Peter.Rd.. PlanUMoa88M4 "**"
g*Uy : 16pm, Saturday 1080 am. RaAeMTTi iim ------rw-^,Oae
(4W
^t^SSnS^^^ *~ *-*
WE*?^yA"PJy COBOBBOaiBMi (7RMS40). 7411X*>**;
PlanUtlon Sarvieea: Friday 6:18 e m Saturday, oary Mr Bar-Bat MKivaa
ceUbraUona TbbMMskTirtaaJU. iiaMj.eiapaw
BAMAT SHALOM
(4TM6M). 11881 W
i P-sn.; Saturday, oary
kUtsvah. 3?


.JaW*.'!*
t H Grtuter Port Lauderdale
[FrkUy
June 17
g'nii Mitxvah of Matthew
. gon of Ann Richman of
.J' nd Mare Wimu,
riviichiel *nd Diane Wu-
VSS-. wiU be hdd
^ Saturday morning
J0n June 18 at Beth Torah.
"TEMPLE BETH ORR
B'nai Mitzvah of
-er, son of Hazel and Dr.
i Kraemer of Coral Springs,
Marc Padernacht, son of
l and Charles Padernacht,
[of Coral Springe, waa cele-
| at the May 28
Beth Torah
service at
in Coral
TEMPLE KOL AMI
B'nai Mitzvah of Ricky
jt son of Loraine F. Paea-
[f Fort Lauderdale, and Rety
i, son of Dyan and Richard
i of Plantation, will be held
the morning service on
Saturday June 11 at Temple Kol
Ami in Plantation.
The Bat Mitzvah Twinning of
Jenifer Levy-Jacobs, daughter of
Mrs. Barbara Levy-Jacobs of
Davie and Katerina Khaimchaev
daughter of Iaaak and Raise
Khaimchaev of Moscow, USSR
will take place on Friday June 10
at Kol Ami.
Saturday morning June 4 the
B'nai Mitzvah of Jon Hainan,
son of Marilyn and Jerry Halpern
of Plantation, and Adam
Symons, son of Susan Symons of
Plantation, will take place at Kol
Ami.
WEST BROWARD
JEWISH CONGREGATION
Jodi Gail Stern, daughter of
Alvin and Sharon Stern of Plan-
tation, waa called to the Torah in
honor of her Bat Mitzvah on Sat-
urday May 28 at the West Brow-
ard Jewish Congregation in Plan-
tation.
^--- -_____ '/' /,-
M*$i Page 15-
First 'Twinning' Bat Mitzvah at Kol Ami
On Friday June 10, at 8:16
p.m., when Jenifer Levy-Jacobs
daughter of Mrs. Barbara Levy-
Jacobs of Davie, steps up to the
pulpit at Temple Kol Ami, she
will establish a link with a Soviet
Jewish family who had applied
for emigration and been denied
permission since 1973.
Jenifer has chosen to share her
Bat Mitzvah with Katerina
Khaimchaysv of Moscow in a
"Twinning' ceremony, the first to
be bald at Temple Kol Ami, 8200
Peters Rd., Plantation.
During the ceremony, a chair
will be on the Bimah and will be
marked and remain vacant to
symbolise Katerina's Bat
Mitzvah in absentia. Her grand-
parents live in Israel and the
Levy-Jacobs have written and
been in communication with
them.
Brandeis National Women's conference
More than 300 delegates from
every region of the country will
attend the 35th Anniversary
Conference of the Brandeis Uni-
versity National Women's Com-
mittee (BUNWC), June 8-12 on
the Brandeis campus in Wal-
tham,Maae.
The National Women's Com-
mittee, founded at the same time
as the University, in 1948, is the
largest "friends of a library"
movement in the world. Confer-
ence delegates will represent the
BUNWC's 126 chapters and
some 65,000 members. The
BUNWC has contributed more
than $20 million in support of the
Brandeis libraries.
The Conference theme will be
"Touch the Future" particu-
larly significant because deie-
stallation at Temple Sholom
Sperber has been
president of Temple
of Pompano Beach.
the nominating com-
Jaej Bernard Gelbart. The
[of officers was presented at
toril congregational meeting
I the following officers were
cted.
avid Gordon, executive vice
dent; Julian Sharlet, Dr.
i Rubenstein, Fran Parnass,
Ehrlich, and Dick Spiers,
(presidents; treasurer Joseph
with Alyce Arrick and
i Sacks, secretaries.
are Leonard Kinker, George
Levenson, and Hyman Schwartz.
Trustees are Gertrude Millman
and Edward A. Newman.
The installation of the new
officers will take place at the
Friday evening worship services
on June 3. At that time Rabbi
Samuel April will install all those
elected.
Esther Cannon, chairman of
the community relations com-
mittee of the Temple, will be the
keynote speaker for the evening.
Her topic will be "Devotion to
the Temple."
Hard-hitting facts focus
of Studley address
lite Liff and
married 70
David
years
Deitch
ago in
tore for the congregation
Couple at Tamarac Convalescent Center
renevring wedding vow of 70 years ago
decorated, and will provide the
liquid refreshments, honey cake
and musk in honor of Kate, now
89 years old, and her husband,
David, who is 94.
Joining the wedding party,
with many arrangements taken
care of by a granddaughter, Judy
Schneider of Sunrise, will be her
husband, Jay Schneider; the
Deitch's daughter, Edith Smith;
Kate's brother Eli Liff and his
wife, Sylvia Liff.
Possibly coming from out-of-
town will be some other grand-
children, great-grandchildren,
and great-great-grandchildren.
Dw living in Tamarac Con-
ent Center, Kate and David
oing to renew their wedding
i Monday afternoon, June 6,
[the anniversary date of
r happy event in 1913. It will
uring a marriage ceremony to
bnducted by Rabbi Albert B.
jrartz, director of the Chap-
i Commission of the Jewish
ttion of Greater Fort
dak.
An overflow crowd of about
1,800 people filled the sanctuary
and party rooms of Temple Beth
Israel, Deerfield Beach, on May
16 to hear Barbara Studley of
Radio Station WNWS in a talk
updating the Middle East situa-
tion and stressing the increased
Russian influence in Central
America.
Ms. Studley, who recently re-
turned from a trip to Israel and
Lebanon, pointed out that the
various mediae had not been fair
nor correct in showing the
damage that had been done in
Lebanon. Some of the pictures
shown of destroyed buildings had
been damaged several years ago
in battles between Christians and
the Moslems. The Israelis had
taken extreme care not to
damage buildings near PLO
strongholds.
In her interviews with many
Lebanese, Studley was told that
most Lebanese were glad to see
the Israelis come in end drive out
the PLO, who had taken over
public and private buildings for
their own use.
The talk was arranged by
Temple Beth Israel in conjunc-
tion with the Israel Task Force of
Century Village East. The latter
group is made up of officers of 25
organizations in CVE. Molly
Fishman, co-chairman of the
Task Force, acted as chairman.
gates will particiate in the dedi-
cation of Brandeis's new Leonard
L. Farbert Library and a welcome
to the University's president-
elect Evelyn Handler. The forth-
coming years will also be touched
by delegates in their planning
sessions and in the many pro-
grams scheduled where the future
of the University and the librar-
ies will be discussed.
A special highlight of the five-
day Conference will be the pre-
sentation on the evening of June
9 of the prestigious Abram L.
Sachar Silver Medallion to Dr.
Mary S. Calderone, distinguished
physician, public health ex-
pert.and pioneering leader in the
field of human sexuality.
WE TREAT VARICOSE VBM0 WITHOUT SURGERY
ROBERT M. BIEGELEISEN.
M.D., F.R.S.A.
PRACTICE LIMITED TO
INJECTION TREATMENT OF VARICOSE VEINS
AND CAPILLARY DILATATIONS (SPIDER VEINS
BY COMPRESSION SCLEROTHERAPY
24 S.E. 6th STREET
BOCA RATON. FLA. 33432
368-7033
1111 N. 36th AVENUE
HOLLYWOOD. FLA. 3302h
981-3808
BY APPOINTMENT ONLY
Cohen, the Center's
rator, is having the room
the wedding will take place
mean Cancer Society has golf offer
(American Cancer Society
Boffer for golfers.
r* donation of $10 or more,
k can play Broward
fr's most prestigious golf
this year. This card al-
|play on 11 courses once
ut a greens fee. Golf carts
Ptra. Between May 1 and
131, Bonaventure, Broken
. California Club (Miami),
I Springs, Deer Creek, Holi-
PPrings, Hollywood Lakes,
pry, Oak Ridge, Palm Aire
"ny West will honor the
[donation of $30 or more,
""<" for a regular foursome
fianued.
[more information, contact
^rd County Unit of the
"> Cancer Society at 467-
3363 or send name, address to-
gether with donation to: ACS
Golf Card, 1303 E. Las Olas
Blvd., Fort Lauderdale 33301.
24th Birthday
The Art and Cultural Commit-
tee of the City of Lauderhill,
chaired by Ruth Nathanson
working in conjunction with the
Lauderhill Birthday committee
honoring the 24th birthday of the
City of Lauderhill. announced
that the winners of the essay and
poetry contest will read their
entries at the formal opening of
the new City Hall on June 25.
Judges for the contests, which
included a poster competition,
were Ruth Nathanson, Ruth
Glasberg and Janet da Costa.
Ws Easy to feel Lite a IHon
Without Sparing a Dine
EXECUTIVE
DIRECTOR
jj" Jewish Congress, a national public affairs and
m relations agency, seeks an Executive Director for Its Fk
^Jjhe position requires a strong background In oommunlt
BSRt, iMoe analysis and advocacy, membership *
tMftaatts),
' Psn. Please send resume and salary history In oonflosocel
"" Sleoel, Director of Regional Operations.
AMERICAN JEWISH CONGRESS
it
WwwYort,
At first glance, its just a living room
fled with furniture. Or maybe its
a garage filled wKhtoofe. Or a closet
fined with dothes.
It might not be worth much to you.
but to us its worth melons. Its worth
rnedk^andmedk^surjpsestor
irxJtoent residents of the Miami Jewish
Home and rtoaptal for the Aged.
Everytrsng you donate to the
Douglas Gardens Thrift Shops is
ta* glad to pick up your merchandise at
your convenience. A licensed
appraiser is abatable upon request
Ca the Dougtes Gardens Thrift
Shops- when you leHJeawte your
home, clean out your garage and
straighten up your closets.
Its that easy. And youlteel like a
mason without spending a'dbm
15713 N.W. 27th Awe.
500 NE 79th St.
131491 IsJandate Peach Bud
Irving Cypen.ChakTnanol the Board
11 ..i^ n'- ** -:iiij
rtaroKj oecK, 11 Miim
Aaron KravsxChaHnwv Thrift Shop

Fred DHkt, Executive Dkector


W1HB 11
Pag* 16
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
^^y. Juoj J
*'.*,
Warning: The Surgeon General Has Determined
That Cigarette Smoking Is Dangerous to Your Health
SOFT PACK WO's FIITER. MENTHOL 2 mg. "laf. 0.2 mg. nicoiine
av. per cigarette by FTC method.
OprjrjUa t levers retted either the Oec 81RC Report or FTC method
NOW THE LOWEST OF AU. BRANDS
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We promise you less,
NOW
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(
fYngUIKTIilOOVTB^OWOMUg)


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