The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 3, no. 7 (Apr. 5, 1974)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 9, 1976 called v.4, no. 27 but constitutes v.5, no. 1; issue for July 7, 1989 called v.18, no. 11 but constitutes v.18, no. 13.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44570954
lccn - sn 00229545
ocm44570954
System ID:
AA00014312:00240

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Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward


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Full Text
'

OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE
112- Number 18
!an peace be near?
ftMSmcK*
Price 35 Cents
fecials in Washington last week indicated
fIsrael and Lebanon have agreed on 96
nt of a plan for Israeli troop withdrawal from
em Lebanon and prospects are very good
ial agreement during the Middle East visit
Tetary of State George Shultz.
Lltz, following a meeting on Wednesday
[27, with Foreign Minister Yitzhak Shamir
other officials, was encouraged by the
lion he received and "vowed" to remain in
Middle East to achieve peace. Aftar an
ng meeting with Prime Minister Menachem
I and Defense Minister Moshe Arens left for
I repeated earlier assertions that then moat
Siplete withdrawal of all foreign forces from
ion. Israeli officials concede that the
feae government haa made a major con-
D in recent negotiations by agreeing to
\ some role for Major Saad Haddad who has
anded a private militia since 1976 in
fm Lebanon under Israeli influence.
believe that the agreement needs only a
uJ* deternuned for ""> withdrawal of
Israel, forces from Lebanon. The obstacle app^rs
to be Syria. Tiahrin, the Syrian Kovernment
EKE ama8CU8' "^ SSTSS
ZZ2ft DOt ttf P,uUm out of Lebanon WU
all I sraeh troops have left. ^^
laHSTrnX** ^0 aS2J2? guer"5a8 m L***"*. The Beirut
SHU TJa' accordm to reports, hasn't
even started working out withdrawal agreements
with Syria and the PLO.
a^? ?>urC8s "P that Syn*' withdrawal is
dependent upon wnat the Soviet Union wanS
a bg!S "^""f1 Sy^ on<* > d
sent 5,000 Russian technicians to man the
sophisticated anti-aircraft and anti-missile
missile-launchers. mue
Following his visit with laraeli officials, Shultz,
who met the next day with Lebanese government
officials, headed by President Gemayel, may also
go to Jordan, Syria and Saudi Arabia on this
special mission aasigned to him by President
Reagan.
memorial services honor
Oeerffefd's Rabbi Mfrsfcv
Rabbi Leon Miraky, of Temple
Beth Israel in Deerfield Beach,
died Friday, April 22, in Boca
Raton Hospital. He was 57.
Memorial services for the
kindly, scholarly spiritual leader
of the Century Village East
synagogue where he had served
for almost two years were con-
ducted by Rabbi Joseph
Langner, who had been serving
as the associate rabbi ever since
Rabbi Mirsky was hospitalized
earlier this year, and Beth
Israel's Cantor Shabtai Acker-
man.
Also participating in the
service, which was attended by
several hundred of the 1,800-
member congregation and Deer-
field Beach's Mayor Jean Robb
volunteers to help
to 3,000 more calli
ext week. Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and
ay. May 9,10,11 and 12, The Jewish Federation of
Iter Fort Lauderdaie is having a mini phon a-thon
5 to 7 p.m. just two hours an evening at the
Ration offices, 8360 W. Oakland Park Blvd.
ark Silverman, Federation's phon-a-thon eoordina-
ys: "We're trying to reach those 3,000 previous
Ibutors to our United Jewish Appeal campaigns who
rioulUng for 8mebody to call them for their pledge
*i 1 mi campaign.
Ve need volunteers just give us two hours of a
riKht twilight evening and each one of them will
Bs reach that goal of $4.3 million. We can do it with
rip of dedicated, committed and willing volunteers.
ve have refreshments, too."
II Mark Silverman at the Federation office: 748-
111,11 P* Rabbi Uon Mirsky
16 years of Jerusalem reunited
to be noted at daylong seminar
Dr. B. Schechterman
'"Jerusalem-Eternal and
United" is the theme for the day-
long seminar celebrating Yom
Yerushalyim (Jerusalem Day)
from 10:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Wednesday, May 11 at Temple
Beth Torah, 9101 NW 57th St.,
Tamarac, marking the 16th anni-
versary of the day that Jerusalem
was reunited as the capital of Is-
rael after 19 years of Jordanian
rule in East Jerusalem until the
Six Day 1967 Israel-Arab War.
Presented by the Jewish Fed-
eration of Greater Fort Lauder-
dale North Broward Midrasha
and its participating synagogues
and institutions in cooperation
with the World Zionist Organiza-
salute Israel's 35th anniversa
ton's Department of Education
and Culture, the day will be fea-
tured by two major addresses,
five workshops and an exhibit
titled Vicaria" depicting various
aspects of life in Jerusalem and
the rest of Israel.
"Jerusalem the Current
Political Scene" is the title of talk
to be given by Dr. Bernard
Schechterman, professor and
former chairperson, Department
of Politics and Public Affairs at
University of Miami. Former co-
ordinator of Judaic studies at the
university, he is a specialist in in-
ternational relations American
foreign policy. Middle East
Continued on Page 12
ILEVINE
Staff Writer
Worth Broward community celebrated
[tone in Jewish history when some
"ersons (police estimate) on Sunday,
I, thronged the Perlman Campus of
*>sh Community Center of Greater
luderdale for the 35th Israel Indepen-
Pay \Yom Haatzmaut] activities. It
Jay of festivity to mark the 36th year
f Jews nave had an independent state
Jrn times.
|l6acre campus at 6501 W. Sunrise
r Plantation was thronged all day long
Je opening event at 10 ajn. to closing
I ceremony at 4 p.m. when youngsters
Pwarded for their achievements in a
of athletic events held in Maccbiah
[style.
ffh gaT8 were kunchsd with an Olympic-
i pW?.the c*nPU with a flaming torch
ILL MirmeUi *nd Sue Reitsr who lit a
ln.T f?dmg torch- followed by the singing of
KSSoT*w by fcur 8tu*nu tMm th*
games were launched with Ob/mpicntyle
lii 'J'SPW with s flaming torch carried by
to!kan. .. W Keitn who lit a symbolic free-
' ? k' f,k)Wed by the singing of the national
o by four studenta fromthe Hebrew Day
|S>he atnlec events ware taking place in
|th hut28Jin the ""t>u. and in the swimming
I a5i wttohing the youngsters from the
WH8iothe North Broward community's
J2nd JCC other thousands were entertained
tartn?*,wn fro.nt of ** JCC gymnaaium. Still
EfiLlhe wfrMhniMU on aale. cold drinks,
El) ,S?7uthfn l'** fatafcMUhd pita bread.
w the hundreds of charcoalbroiled hot
I KdeT** ^ I,rMl nurk* &" WM
^ Arab .k"L "wn** as is the tourist-
b 8huk n Jerusalem's Waatsrn Wall.
Here all kinds of goods (including goodies, such as
Israeli pastries) were being bought by the celebrants
who also visited the dozens of booths and tables set up
by the score or more of Jewish organizations exhibiting
their programs and enlisting people for membership
B'nai B'rith Youth Organization had its AZA-ers and
BBGers taking charge of a variety of small games of
chance and skill in one corner of the campus, while
other BBYOera were collecting pennies in their quest
for six million of them to symbolize the millions of men,
women and children who were slaughtered by the
Nazis.
And still off in another corner was the "Petting Zoo"
Continued on Page 2
Happy Birthday, Israel! And the torch is lit to start the games.



Wfce:
^&W*&mw3MML&?te}
Celebrants of Olt:a&*W Continued from Page 1-
where toddlers had the opportunity to pet and feed
goats, sheep, and other farm animals, while next to that
area was the "pony corral" where other kids got to ride
pony.
The sun-bright day, with a brisk wind breezing in
from the west, brought out so many that the JCC
provided a sherut (Israeli cab) in the form of a Gray
Line trolley bus to transport people to and from
parking places that were as far as several blocks from
the JCC entrance.
And still the entertainment continued as Jack Fish-
man mastered the ceremonies for the various per-
formers with in-between times Israeli music ringing out
from loudspeakers as Dr. Steve Levine disc-jockeyed
the records.
The entertainers included Ruth Shin, Irene
Diamond, Nat Mash Band. Sol Gruber, Paula (Zsa Zsa)
Goldberg, Hal Dunayer'a Hannonitones, Kol Ami's
Children's Choral Group, Cypress Chase Chorafeers,
Judy and Rabbi Kurt Stone, Nat and Ida Wolfson's
dancers, Ben Kimmelman, and the Israeli star singer,
Yaacov Saaai.
And still there was more. There were films on Israel
shown in one of the 11 buildings on the campus, and in
the big auditorium-style facility, the Soref Hall, the art
exhibition of Holocaust and Israeli art by local and
nationally-known artists was available for viewing by
those seeking shelter from the sun, the excitement and
the enthusiasm of the finest demonstration of solidarity
for the State of Israel through fun and games and
entertainment.
JCC President Harvey Kopelowitz praised the work
of JCC's Israel Independence Day committee: Ivy and
Larry Levine, Susan and Rick Nathanson, Joan Jacobs,
Louise Feller, Harold Godstein, Will Shulman.

Carnival games and booths.
f;

1.000 felafels sold
r
Running races for kids.
Cheering tnrchbearer.

li'iii Hi tag (iri)Unii
In the shady area
1s-nielhitvrv I
i
i
i
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Great News For Floridians
When Florida gets not and humid (in July and August)
Do you have a summer home op north? No?
...Well Now Yoo Will! Where?
At BEAUTIFUL CIRCLE LODGE
ON SYLVAN LAKE
The Summer Reaort Of The Workmena Circle
Consider These Advantages:
There ia no iavj t
You are free of rnaoatiaUty far
Fslis ipilafT N
TWeMMCMftJaf^aMateparday
Year cheies ef private er
Diaeemt of 5% far S er 4 weak stay
10% earnest far f er bmm weak*
Sparta actMtiae
Tim ialag
Eftliaiiait
Yiddiaa eaJtare
Split ap ywmr ririt: apaad a few weaka at Orele Ledge, leave U U
fi ismdrntnlmtirm and retera far a few weeks ef aura ef tkat
Circle Ledge braed ef gees taaae.
Ferchricereea
QeMa.sllialieeatwy
'$?*-
At the petting zoo.
I
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I" PRIOR TO JUNE IS. MAIL TO
CircleLiie.45E.33St.
" New York. N.Y. 10016
I Tei*(212MM0
AFTER JUNE 15, MAIL TO:
Cards Lodft, Bei 104 RDl
HapiwaB JaacUoa. N.Y. 12533
<2I 564-1077 or (9141221-2771
Variety of booths.
Hadassah chapters
Donor Luncheon
Josephine Newman, regional
president of Hadassah. will be
the featured speaker at the
Tamar Fort Lauderdaie and Pine
Island Chapteri Donor Luncheon
on Thursday May 12 at the
Hearth Pub of the Holiday Inn in
Plantation.
Yvette Alderman, chairman, ia
in charge of the arrangements for
the day.
Program chairman Ann Salkin
announced that the Sunrise
Singers, a group of musicians
who are all senior citizens, will
perform after the luncheon.
Kiameshe Lake. New York 12751
Telephone: 1914) 794-6900
Direct NYC Phone: (2121924-6162
Hotel
GIBBER
Surrounded by our 400 private acres,
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3 Meals DailyStrictly Kosher*AII Diets Catered to
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ClubsMassage Roomlndoor and Outdoor Poois
Music and Entertainment DailyPlanned Actwwjj
All Rooms Air ConditionedTV'sCapacity 450 uu
Make "Gibbers" Your Summer Vacation Hon*
You'll Love Us. The Gibber Family


l^i^Way "1JUJ ne Jeuish rionatan of Ureater tort Lauderdale
flamy Siegel speaks at teachers recognition workshop
Page 3
Distribution of the Profes-
si0nal Incentive Program (PP)
Si recognition of the
^an teachers of the area, and
major address by author poet
!nd lecturer, Danny Siegel, will
Sdight the final professional
3lh workshop of the year for
^ teachers of the Jwiahayna-
*ue and day schools of North
g^ward and Boca Raton.
Scheduled for Wvkmtoy,
uav 12 at 7 p.m. at Temple Beth
to 7206 Royl P'1 Blvd-
Margate and coordinated by the
Central Agency for Jewish
Education (CAJE) of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Uuderdale. the program will also
include concurrent workshops on
techniques and approaches for
the final weeks of school, and the
opening sessions of the new
school year in the fall.
The PIP grants recognize the
commitment of the teachers of
the area to continued self-growth
and professional development in
the courses and seminars offered
by CAJE. The program of the
year included 15 different work-
shops, lectures, mini-courses and
demonstration lessons. More
than 46 of the teachers of the
community are expected to re-
ceive PIP grants which were es-
tablished by the Jewish Federa-
tion to provide community recog-
nition of the continued in-service
staff development of the teachers
Workshop May 10 to plan
shared housing options
The U.S. Administration on
Aging received a study that sug-
gests the elderly should live with
one another to help offset a hous-
ing demand resulting from longer
lifespans and old people living
away from their families.
This Is one of the problems to
be discussed when a dozen
organizations in North Broward
conduct a workshop next
Wednesday May 10 at Fort
Lauderdale's First Presbyterian
Fellowship Hall on planning and
developing home sharing pro-
grams.
The study, released on April
23, was conducted by the Na-
tional Policy Center on Housing
and Living Arrangements for
Older Americans based at the
University of Michigan.
The study concentated on
housing needs for U.S. residents
age 65 or older. It suggested
among possibilities that the
government should target more
subsidies for renovations of exit-
ing housing with provisions that
the housing would be used for
senior citizens and retain benefits
for elderly people in shared living
arrangements.
Keynote speaker at the
"Shared Housing" workshop,
whose sponsors include the In-
terfaith Council of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale and the Jewish
Family Service of Broward
County, will be Leo E. Baldwin,
housing coordinator for the
Washington-headquartered
American Association of Retired
Persons.
JUDGE HARVEY FORD (right) was installed as pnsident of the
South Broward Council of B'nai B'rith Lodges which comprises 28
B'nai B'rith Lodges and over 8,000 members. Senior International
via president of B'nai B'rith, Malcolm Fromberg, was the installing
officer. Well over-200 people wen in attendance that morning.
Israeli
urn
Thuridiy, M*718-10PM
Hoft:
Stanley M. Rownblitt
; ItaMT Israeli Prime
Minister Ytahik Rabin
Yitzhak Rabin talks about
Christians, Lebanon, and
concessions he would
make on the Vfeet Bank.
DontmiMtn*
inside story!
of the schools in the area.
Siegel, a nationally recognized
educator and writer, will stress
the high esteem in which the
Jewish teacher has been held
throughout Jewish history. Hs
will bring selections on the Jew-
ish teacher from the vast store-
house of Talmudic and Midrashic
sources reflecting the centrality
of the teacher in the transmission
of Jewish heritage from genera-
tion to generation.
Siegel's participation in the
professional growth program will
be part of a series of talks he will
make in a three day period from
May 10 through May 12 for lay
and professional groups in the
North Broward area.
Following his address, the
teachers will divide into work-
shops that will focus on the
specific strategies necessary for
the effective closing of the school
year, including student evalua-
tion, review of curricular achieve-
ments and planning for the forth-
coming year. Among those who
will be leading seminars will be
Robin Eisenberg, educational
director of Temple Beth El in
Boca Raton, and Dorothy
Herman, educational director of
Temple Beth Am in Miami.
The evening will begin with a
supper hosted by Temple Beth
Am and will be under the direc-
tion of Joy Kahn-Evron, Beth
Am's educational director, and
Abraham J. Gittelson, CAJE
educational director for the Jew-
ish Federation, overall coor-
dinator for the program.
ALSO AT JUDAICA HIGH
Danny Siegel will speak at a
variety of functions in the North
Broward area during a three day
period from Tuesday, May 10
thru Thursday, May 12.
Siegel will begin his stay in
North Broward with a presenta-
tion to the students of the south-
ern branch of the Judaica High
School (JHS) on Tuesday, May
10 at the Jewish Community
Center. Sharon Horowitz, JHS
administrator, has arranged for
Siegel to be the guest speaker, on
Tzedakah, for the closing session
of the school.
Now is the time
With just about six weeks before the Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale Family Mission to Israel takes off from
the Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood Airport for the 1983 summer
trip of a lifetime, the coordinators of the Minion, Kenneth Kent
and Mark Sih/erman say:
"Now is the time to make your reservation. Now is the time to
complete the plans to take your children for the exciting ex-
perience of re-living Jewish heritage in the land of their
forefathers."
They noted that with the brief period remaining before the
June 16 start of the Mission, which will continue through June
26, with optional trips to other countries also available, "now is
the time" to make the reservation and make application for
passports and "get ready to go."
Both Kent and Silverman have all the details, having already
registered a number of families who have made deposits to go on
the Mission. Call either one of them at the Jewish Federation
office. 748-8200.
ISRAEL $510.
2 WEEK VACATION ~$510.
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TOR RESERVATIONS* INFORMATION ON THESE TOURS, OR OUR
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TRIANGLE TOURS-931-3031

18407 W. Dixie
Hkjhway
nonn Miami ueacn
and we never looked younger!
We've come a long way
since we used to send
the hone and buggy
down to the Railroad
Station to pick up our
guests and boasted about
electricity in every room.
From the country place
that became the summer
refuge of those who
spent the other 50 weeks
of the year in crowded
city apartments, we've
grown into one of the
most pampering resorts
of the land.
Yet deep down we re-
main the same. A friendly,
welcoming stopping off
place where you can get
away from the tensions
and problems of day-to-
day living and discover
a new world of pleasure.
As we start our 9th
decade, and with a 5th
generation of hosts
warming in the wings,
we say to you just as
we've been saying these
last 82 years:
Come up to the Nevele.
And enjoy yourself.
Nevele Hotel
EUenville. New York 12428
Hotel (914) &17XM>
rial un: 18 Hole Golf Course 10 Outdoor All Weather
Tennis Courts (Day & Night) Magnificent Outdoor
Mega Hool Health Club Indoor Pool Indoor Tennis
Kat-i|uetball Riding Private Lake Entertainment


May 10 is 50th anniversary
of book burning in Berlin
i-*Mi&*tf
The Community Relations
Committee of the Jewish Federa-
tion of Greater Fort Lauderdale
called attention to another date
that will live "long in infamy:"
May 10,1933 the date 50 years
ago when the infamous book
burnings took place in Berlin.
Even the Encyclopedia of the
Third Reich noted that the world
press denounced the book burn-
ings as a "descent into barbar-
ism." The event also helped trig-
ger a nationwide censorship ef-
fort, as all literature became con-
trolled by the German Ministry
for Public Enlightenment and
Propaganda and thousands of
writers fled the country.
The CRC warns that there is a
growing censorship movement in
America pressently. Targets of
censorship today include litera-
ture classics such as The Diary of
Anne Frank, Grapes of Wrath,
Brave New World, science texts
that discuss evolution, dictionar-
ies that include "objectionable"
words plus banning of books now
used in schools.
In its February 1983 issue,
Pro-Family Forum Newsletter
told thousands of it* grassroots
activists: ". Hitler's burning of
anti-Nazi (?) books prior to World
War II made us have an unholy
respect for anything printed in
book form. (Published) books
don't have an eternal right to
exist or to be read some
things may be burned."
People of the American Way
note that the "Newsletter's
advice while "less incendiary,"
more "insidious and intolerant
forms of censorship are wide-
spread in the United State
today."
Hitler wasn't the first to burn
Judaic literature. There was the
public burning of the Talmud in
Paris in 1242: and by Papal
decree in 1553, in Rome's Campo
de' Fiori, Venice and other places
thousands of Hebrew books and
manuscrips went up in flames.
Further information on at-
tempts at censorship in public
schools may be had by calling
CRC's director Lawrence M.
Schuval at the Federation 748-
8200.
coordinator for study in Israel
Shaw taking applications
for 1984 U.S. academies
Broward Community College has named as
coordinator of its Israel Program Susan Malter,
dean of BCC's Student development at the
South Campus.
Dr. A. Hugh Adams, BCC president, said her
expanded duties will require her to coordinate the
college's Israel Program with the College Con-
sortium for International Studies (CCIS) of
Hock land. N.Y., which joins BCC in providing
financial aid for study in Israel to students who
qualify. BCC and CCIS have a Jerusalem office
that assists in Israel.
Malter, who visited Israel earlier this year and
looked over the programs that are open to J3CC
students, has been chairperson of the Business
and Professional Women's Network of the
Women's Division of the Jewish Federation of
South Broward and is a member of the Hillel
Advisory Board.
Dr. Adams, announcing the appointment, said:
"In our shrinking world, an educated person
must have an understanding of other cultures if
we are to achieve peace in our time. I expect
Susan Malter will be instrumental in seeking that
many students take advantage of the opportunity
to study in Israel.'"'
The Israel Program at BCC is the most diverse
and complex of BCC's international programs.
Under it students spend up to two years in Israel

studying a curriculum designed to suit the
student's needs under five different programs:
University and College Study; Specialized
Schools and Institutes; Alternative study op
port unities; Service Learning programs and
individually designed study curriculum Studies
are conducted in English and are designed for all
religions.
Malter, who earned two master's degrees, said
that all of Israel: its universities, colleges,
technical schools, kibbutzim, moshavim,
development towns, newspapers, hospitals, and
community centers become places to learn.
Students receive BCC credit which is transferable
to upper level universities.
The cost of the program, she said, varies widely
from as litt;le as $1,500 for study on a kibbutz to
about $3,000 at one of.the major universities.
These figures include tuition,, room and board for
a year and round-trip air fare. The rates, she
added, are subject to change. And some
scholarships are available.
"This." Malter said, "is an unbelievable op-
portunity for students to really get a feel for the
country, its history and culture. The advantages
of the program are twd-fold. Curriculum offerings
are arranged to enable students to make normal
progress toward a degree. Students receive ex-
posure to a foreign, ancient land."
Broward county's Congress-
man E. Clay Shaw last week an-
nounced he's accepting applica-
tions from young men and wom-
en interested in seeking nomina-
tions for admission to the U.S.
Air Force, Merchant Marine,
Military and Naval Academies.
A letter of application from
candidates should be sent to him.
Candidates must be U.S. citizens,
legal residents of Florida's 15th
Congressional District (mostly
central Broward county), unmar-
ried and be at least 17 years old
but not past their 22nd birthday
Professional Working Women
meet May 9 at BCC
on July 1, 1984. All applicants
must take the SAT or ACT exam
on or before next Nov. 6.
Shaw said he bases his selec-
tion on SAT or ACT scores, class
rank, grade point average, school
records, leadership potential and
extra-curricular activities'. .
Nominations should be sent to
U.S. Rep. Shaw at his local office,
Broward Federal Bldg., 299 E.
Broward Blvd., Fort Lauderdale
33301, not later than Oct. 15 for
the classes entering in June of
1984.
A panel discussion on "Living
with Priorities: Women, Work,
Family" with prominent profes-
sional working women as panel-
ists will feature the 6 p.m. Mon-
day, May 9 meeting of the Cen-
tral Network for Professional
Working Women of the Women's
Center st Broward Community
College
The panelists at "Brown Bag
Dinner" meeting in Bldg. 19,
faculty dininjr room of BCC'b
Central Campus at 3501 SW
Dayie Rd., will be Broward
County Commissioner Marcia
Beach. Miami Herald's Broward
food editor Lucy Cooper, Attor-
ney Fran Arnold. ArtisJ Mar
garet Aiken, and Gillian O'Neal
f Pan Am Airlines.
Shoni Labowitz is taking res-
ervations for this monthly
meeting BCC's Women's Center
475-6657.
Shavuot and Man's destiny
UJSL Mayors to participate
in conference in Jerusalem
Mayors from nine American
cities and counties participated in
the fourth annual Jerusalem
Conference of Mayors this week
in Jerusalem jointly sponsored
by the AJCongress, the U.S.
Conference of Mayors, and the
Jerusalem Institute for Israel
Studies.
The theme of this year's con-
ference is "The Dynamics of Ur-
l>an Life: Coping With Different
Population Groups." The Ameri-
cans were joined by counterparts
from Israel, as well as mayors of
cities in Bolivia, Colombia, Ger-
many, Panama, Switzerland and
Uruguay.
Participating from Florida
were Mayor Stephen Clark of
Miami, and Mayor Bill Frederick
of Orlando.
Mayor Teddy Kollek of Jew
salem served as host for the con-
ference, which will deal with the
continuing challenges of effec-
tively serving the needs of differ-
ent ethnic groups in urban and
suburban areas.
Jewish Floridtian
of O/Mlw Foft laudaroato
frtMShochi
EO^indSSIlhor '***"*** SUZANNE 8MOCHCT
***"t"J??*'y?"""' "O0" ft-SWaMy Mi.nct JSP"" ^'^
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2300 E Hallanoato Botch Blvd.. Soil* T0T-Q hiiwhUM Fi jjoob PtmJt-uA*
PI** I20NE6S.SI .Worn, F!. 33112 Phon. SrTmT^
MomOor JTA. Sovon Art*. WHS. NEA, AJPA and FPA
JOMOh Flondian Do*. Nol GuvantM KaohruHi of Mafchand.M Advariiiad
SUeSC*HniOWRATES 2rM^mom$7SO ,LoCA,..USsWatYo^ n^Wo,*,,,,
______ Jow'On Fodtration of G,.,t Fort Uudordai* ^
nTFe25.TsW.*.^
SJS0 WO*tt-dP SMI Fort Uuo*I..FL 333*1 Phon. (SOsT^wSoT '
Friday, May 6.1983
Vobrtp12
23IYAR5743
Number 18
This year Shavuot holiday $ are Wednesday and
Thursday, May 18 and 19 with memorial services
on May 19.
At the foot of Mount Sinai, more than 3000
years ago, a nomadic people awaited the giving of
what was to be their Law and their guide through
all succeeding generations. Shavuot is the an-
niversary of JUDAISM, just as Pesach is the
anniversary of the Jewish PEOPLE. Before that
time. Jews had no clear understanding of their
religion. They knew little about God and had no
knowledge of what He expected of them. The
proclamation of the Law gave them a clear idea
and they started the practice of Judaism.
However, Scripture tells us that the first attempt
failed, resulting in the fragmentizing of the
tablets. A lesser man than Moses, having keenly
suffered the obtuseness and ingratitude of his
people, upon seeing the Golden Calf, might have
reached the end of his patience, lost control of his
anger, might have thundered his verbal assault
upon them, and had them slaughtered like cattle
according to the mores of that era. Even God
might have withdrawn. But Moses pleaded for
another chance and the Ten Commandments
embodying the major teachings of God, have'
mce been universally accepted as the basis of all
brotherhood and justice.
It isi of no great importance, except to
SSl^St hl! ""P0*** "d indisputable
iSSr^fV6 h"Uwy ^^ ** Souianda of
yaare touching every country on earth a
civilization and culture which may be traced to
the veryb-jpnning of recorded time; an unin
torruptedluerature and tradition from day?
ST*^1"^ *^f** *nd ocial legislation as
old as the Ten Commandments. ^"I"M""**
The voice that sounded on Sinai was never
silenced. The proclamation of the moral truth
never ends. The Mosaic legislation is eternally
valid because it is humanitarian rather than
theological. It demands not so much thinking u
doing; not creed but the moral conduct of life. The
Torah was given to glorify and beautify man's life
on earth. It was designed to help create
kingdom of heaven on earth. The Law has a
practical purpose which immediately concerns the
world about us.
Of all ancient religious writings, the revelation
at Mount Sinai was the closest to the daily life of
humanity. How much closer could it have been
when it bids every man love his neighbor as
himself, and teaches him how to do it!
With our present day world embroiled in
contentions that may well sound the death-kneU
of our current civilization, it is well that we pause
a bit longer than usual at the celebration of this
Shavuot, and contemplate what the occasion
portends.
On Shavuot, therefore, it becomes the duty of
every rabbi and preacher to proclaim the eternal
validity of Moses' teachings. It has been because
of their everlasting relevance to the daily Ufe of
humanity that these principles have survived
millenia of persecution. The commandments of
God were never shallow, unreal, or hazily
mystical. They gave life to a people that. *
forever facing death. They brought s light unto
the world, a vital and vigorous influence in tne
spiritual deaur.v of mankind.
JACK8AU



fonScfHEW head urges BB
to become advocate for elderly poor
***** t.iw rvtM*ynjm*i-&r
Ct'KrFl
*m&
Sunrise Lakes Phase I tops1982 UJA total bytttf
WASHINGTON Dr.
Arthur Flemming, former secre-
tary of Health, Education and
Welfare, has called on B'nai
B'rith to become an advocate on
behalf of the nation's elderly
poor.
"Millions of America's elderly
have been cut off from life, he
told a meeting here ot the Jewish
service organization's three pro-
gram commissions.
Flemming was honored by
B'nai B'rith's Community
Volunteer Services (CVS) Com-
mission for "outstanding contri-
butions in community service,
citizenship and humanitarian-
ism'' He was presented with
B'nai B'rith's Chai (life) Award.
The Chai Award has been
presented since 1974, when the
late Supreme Court Justice Tom
C. Clark was named its first re-
cipient. Others who have won it
are Harold Russell, chairman of
the President's Committee on
F.mDlovment of the Hand!-
AJCongress warns against book
capped; former United Nations
Ambassador Arthur J. Goldberg,
former Veteran's Administration
director Max Cleland; the late
humorist Sam Levenson, and
U.S. Rep. Claude Pepper. >
The former Cabinet officer,
who is currently chairman of the
National Council on Aging,
director of the National Coalition
for Quality Integrated Education
and former chairman of the U.S.
Commission on Civil Rights, said
tve'noT^cn^ STFE ** ^^ Phsenberg, Barney Straus. Rose Lipsky, Mark Weissman,
millions of isolated elderly.
"These people need an advo-
cate, they need someone to build
and maintain bridges," he de-
clared.
Flemming noted that B'nai
B'rith had several programs that
included the elderly and praised
CVS for directing thousands of
member-volunteers to reach out
to them and other groups needing
help.
censorship in local
school boards
Although school boards are
empowered to set school policies
and standards, they should not
be allowed to censor school li-
brary books simply because area
residents demand it, says the
American Jewish Congress.
The national Jewish organiza-
tion's Governing Council has
adopted a resolution against
school library censorship and
directed its regional offices to
contact the organization's legal
staff concerning library censor-
ship in their areas.
The AJCongress resolution
states that "attempts to remove
certain books and other learning
materials from the libraries of our
country's public schools have
multiplied. The objects of these
attacks frequently have been not
works of questionable taste or
dubious relevance but literary
classics by authors as distin-
guished as Aldous Huxley, Bern-
ard Malamud and Richard
Wright."
The resolution continues:
"Book removal campaigns come
from a variety of sources. Re-
gardless of the source" of motiva-
tion, they are inimical to the in-
terest of the students."
It notes that school libraries
are surely not the place for pro-
moting a single political point of
view, inculcating a religious doc-
trine, or fostering a particular
ideology. Indeed, school libraries
are a means toward broadening
outlooks. They are an essential
antidote to the necessarily lim-
ited views and ideas presented
through the classroom curri-
culum."
Acknowledging that parents
nave a legitimate interest in the
>oks read by their own children,
tL re8ohltion contends that
they have no legitimate interest
, "trolling or limiting access
"> books read by others' chil-
dren."
^?S"Vn* Court, in a case
mvolvuu, the removal of books
*XL?# 8cbol and I"**"- hi**
y libraries in a Long Island
^, held that th7 First
Jjendment itsslf imposes some
JJUtions on a schodboarde
*on to remove books from
Jhool libraries. In a friend-of-
- AJCongrsas argued that
gjoval of the books violated the
^'tutjon because it was
I SSL*"!* ducukm.l
idtouL ,* ** "lapsrmisaibU
^calconsklarations."
Sunrise Lakes Phase 1 club-
house was filled with more than
400 residents Sunday night,
April 24, who came to honor the
State of Israel on its 35th anni-
versary and stayed to show their
support by pledging a 16 percent
increase over their last year's
United Jewish Appeal contribu-
tions in a campaign headed by
Jack Rosenberg and co-chairmen
Nat Goldman and Ralph Frucht.
They and their committee
vowed to continue the campaign
after honoring Phoebe Negelow
Straus, Rose Lipsky, and Mark
Weissman, executive vice presi-
dent of Menorah Chapels.
After presenting Straus with
his plaque, Mrs. Lipsky, in turn,
was honored as president of Sun-
rise Lakes Phase 1. Oscar Gold-
stein mad* the presentation to
Weissman.
A plaque will be presented also
to Lou and Frances Korins who
were unable to attend the cele-
bration which included Eddie
Schaffer on the program as well
as Joe Bernstein. M#rcia Satloff,
Oscar Goldstein.
piano.
The campaign heads, Rosen-
berg and Goldman, expressed
their thanks for the work of the
refreshments committee: Hy
Trafslman. Al Goldberg. Jack
Kaufman; and the hostess com-
mittee, headed by Thelma Roeen-
feld, including: Mildred Kane,
Peggy Donenfeld, Marcia Satloff,
Pearl Spring, Min Weinberg,
Tillie Friedman, Evelyn Wein-
apple, Alice Raymond, Kate
Bertisch, Edythe Zuckerman,
Rosa Green. Dorothy Fleischer,
Laura Krieeel. Anne Appel.

I

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Temp Tee whipped cream cheese.
It's bigger than the bagel.
iocl
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-'.



PK<<5
The Jewish Flortdian of Greater Port Lauderdaie
Friday, M
y 6,1983
Blind Center has ivbbi-in-residence'
Wynmoor couple volunteers
for month's work in Israel
Sheila Johns, Ben Liebman, Rote Katz meet Rabbi Solomon Geld.
When Sheila Johns, director of
\.nc Eroward Center for the Blind,
spoke at a recent meeting of the
Chaplaincy Commission of the
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdaie, she mentioned
the number of Jewish clients
served by the Center.
Her words led to nora word.-,
among the members of tne Com-
mission headed by L>r. Alvin
Colin and the upshot of all those
words was the decision to seek a
volunteer rabbi who could visit
the Center at various times to
counsel with the Center's client.
The perfect choice and ready
acceptance of the assignment to
become the "rabbi-in-residence"
was Dr Solomon Geld; the
scholarly spiritual leader of Mar-
gate's Temple Beth Am, who is
liiinself legally blind. Among the
urst people to meet with Rabbi
Geld were Ben Liebman and Rose
Katz, both of Sunrise.
He also met other clients as
well as volunteers who help out at
Barbara Studley speaker on Israel
Barbara Studley. WNWS talk
show personality, who has
captured the attention of people
of South Florida with her com-
ments, will be a special guest
speaker at Temple Beth Israel of
Deerfield Beach on Monday, May
16 at 10 a.m.
Studley recently returned from
Israel, where as a guest of the
government, she interviewed
leaders of both Lebanon and
Israel and is prepared to bring
firsthand information to her radio
audience and to Century Village
East residents.
This event is sponsored by
Rabbi Joseph Langner of Temple
Beth Israel and the Century
Village East Israel Task Force.
the Center and other volunteers
who provide the transportation
for blind persons to get to the
Center located 650 N. Andrews
Ave., Fort Lauderdaie.
Some of the clients and volun-
teers are one-day-a-week visitors
to the Centers. On the first day of
visit there, Rabbi Geld met with
the "Tuesday clients." Among
them were Harold Kir stein of
Margate, Volunteer Moe Cooper
of Lauderhill, Jack Saltzer of
Tamarac, Jane Benjamin of Hol-
lywood, Hollywood Volunteer
Bernie Steinberg.
Rabbi Geld met others at Cen-
ter including Mildred Glover ol
Hallandale, Adele Jacobs, a vol-
unteer from Lauderdaie Lakes:
Herbert Leslie of Plantation;
Hedy Weinberg of Hollywood,
Hilda Bruman. a volunteer from
Sunrise's Water Bridge who is
the Center's treasurer: and Katie
Brooks, the Center's volunteer
coordinator.
' RAVIOLI SAUTE SPECIAL N
The Jewish Homemaker's Guide to Delicious Italian Cooking \
Makes the Most of Chef Boy-ar-dee Cheese Ravioli. '
11 cup chopped or whole small
onions
h cup chopped carrots
2 tablespoons butter or marganne
12 package (10 or I frozen whole
green beans, cooked and drained
1 can (150z.) Chef Boy-ar-dee
Cheese Ravioli in Tomato Sauce
dash garlic salt
1 tablespoon chopped fresh
parsley
W cup water
1. Saute onions and carrots in butter in medium-sized
saucepan.
2. Add remaining ingredients; cover and simmer for
15 minutes. Serves 4.
Put a new bright taste into your brisket
Careee Vegetable Mutant Saace
h cup green beans, I" pieces,
fresh or frozen
h cup diced celery
V> cup chopped onions
Vi cup cauliflower florets, fresh or frown
6 tablespoons Gulden s Mustard
2 tablespoons Pineapple juice
Blanch all the vegetables in boiling water for 7
minutes: drain. Combine with Gulden's Mustard
and pineapple juire Store in refrigerator. Serve
with cold or hot meats such as brisket, pas-
trami, corned beef, salami and bologna.
Mates approiimatery 2 cup
Cook
it with
GULDEN'S
FniityMMUrtSa.ee
GULDENS
h cup chopped appU
h cup chopped pear
V cup chopped canned
ding peaches
h cup raisins
6 tablespoons Gulden's Mustard
I tablespoon cling peach syrup
Blanch apples and pears in boiling water for 5
minutes; dram. Add peaches, raisins. Gulden's
Mustard and peach svrup; stir well More in re-
frigerator. Serve with cold or hot meats such as
brisket, pastrami, corned beef salami u\{
bologna Makes 2 cups
The Mustard good enough to cook with
,.V- -
Sylvia and Ben Dinkes of
Coconut Creek, who will be
among the first contingent of
"Volunteers for Israel" begin-
ning a 30-day tour of voluntary
service in Israel in June, provided
the following information about
the program.
American volunteers were so
effective in volunteering their
services while the war was going
on in Lebanon, that the program
has now been expanded for the
summer months because the need
hasn't diminished.
With some 30.000 Israeli
troops in Lebanon, the manpower
shortage in Israel is acute. Vol-
unteers from America must agree
to work for 30 days at tasks to be
assigned depending on need. Pri-
marily this will include various
forms of manual labor in Army
warehouses or on kibbutzim.
Board and lodging will be fur-
nished in exchange for services.
The only cost is for a subsidized
air fare, plus $10 for registration
and paper work by the New York-
based Volunteers for Israel.
Though the Israeli workweek is
six days, eight hour per day, ex-
cept for a short day on Fridays
volunteers wili organized tours, and personal
travel, with an opportunity to
meet and work closely '*.
Israelis. '
Groups of volunteers will be
departing on the following dates
from New York: June 2, 5, 21 25
and 30; July 13, 14, 20, 27 28
and Aug. 14.
Mr. and Mrs. Dinkes, who'll be
leaving this month, welcome in
quiries about the program. Addi-
tional information is available at
the office of Volunteers for Israel
147 E. 76th St. New York City
10021; phone 212-988-2122.
Senior VPKinancul TonnulUnt
Tu Shflter Coordinator
Will You Naad
A Tax Shelter In 1963
The tlma to plan is now!!!
Call to arrange your free consultation
Arthur J. Laager
305-492-8410
Slwnon American EiptMt
3098 E Comm*'Cil BivC
Fl Liud'3ai fi
DO YOU REMEMBER THE
BEAUTIFUL CATSKILL MOUNTAINS
IN TNE SUMMER? ESCAPE THE
FLORIDA HEAT AND COME ON UP!
THE WORLD FAMOUS CONCORD RESORT HOTEL
OFFERS YOU A SPECIAL SUMMER
ALL INCLUSIVE PACKAGE
$1,083.00. 2 week stay
Dbl Occ Per Person.
Standard Room, air (are not
included ^ 4
Includes. ,
.0.15 Days and 14 Nights
D Round trip transport
Airport to Hotel
D Concord representative
will meet you and handle
your luggage and transfers
? Gratuities for waiter and
maids during your stay
? Local and State Taxes
:: 3 Full Meals daily
3 Special Diets Available
3 2 Cocktail Parties
D Welcome drink upon
arrival
ft Entertainment every night
Q"W 9 hole golf, tennis
(irtdoor & out). HealthCiub
COMEON
UPPACKAGE
$434
WEEKLY
(Minimum 2 weeks stay)
Per person, dbl.occ .
Standard Room Does not
include air fare, round-trip
transfers, gratuities and
7%J>atesTax_
Superior Room-$504
Executive Room$546
Tower Room$616
EARLY BIRD SPECIAL
A $50 REFUND per person
for reservations made by
June 15th for a minimum
two week stay in Superior.
Executive or Tower rooms
ONLY (Also applies to all
inclusive package for
Superior, Executive*
Tower rooms )
and Outdoor Pool
For reservations or any further information, please don't hesitate
to call us direct Toll Free 800-431-3850, or contact Helen and
Norm Levin in Florida at 305-485-6861 (They will also assist
you in making your plane reservations) or Call Your Travel Ageni
ONLY AT THE
CONCORD


Friday, May 6,1983
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Laudirdnl*
Page 7
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. '



Page 8
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Fnd*y.May6,
--------
Young Leadership weekend conference
has Fort Lauderdale representation
The Young Leadership
program of the Jewish Federa-
tion of Greater Port Lauderdale
will be represented at the 6th
annual United Jewish Appeal
Plorida Regional Young Leader-
ship conference during the
weekend of May 13-15 at the Gre-
nelefe Resort in Haines City near
Orlando.
Several couples have made
arrangements with Federation's
Young Leadership coordinator
Mark Si 1 verm an to take part in
the Conference featuring Danny
Siegel, a co-editor of the Third
Jewish Catalog, and author of
several books; and Mark
Talisman, director of the
Washington Action office of the
Council of Jewish Federations
(VJF).
CJF. the Florida Assn. of Jew-
ish Federations, and the Florida
Regional office of UJA is
sponsoring the conference.
Nancy and Fred Goldstein are
heading the Young Leadership
group from the Greater Fort
Lauderdale area at the con-
ference. Among those joining
them will be Dr. and Mrs. Robert
Dolgow, Dr. and Mrs. Ben Reiter,
and Mr. and Mrs. Jeff Faine.
William Millhorn to address Beth Am on Mid-East
media distorted or chose to
Temple Beth Am, 7205 Royal of Wars." will be the &*>-P^}*?*.**
Palm Blvd., Margate willhoit subJ* of ^ address on Friday. 2 Sjfefftft! 5"^d
win,., o iiii5 V u. ii o. tk o___ l- accounts about the massacres in
William B. Millhorn II, formerly Mav 'J at tne 8 pm. worship e.K, .A cu-mi.
an ordained minister with the 8erv'ce- He wUI Present reasons *****and J,hatlUa
Assemblies of God, whose loT ,srael's rush into Lebanon,
recently published book, "Wars ana"'e"> questions which the
Children taking part in May 6 service at Temple Beth Israel
The Shabbat service at 8 p.m.
Friday, May 6 (tonight) at Tem-
ple Beth Israel, 7100 W. Oakland
Park Blvd., Sunrise, will include
a special Mother's Day program,
the blessing of all congregants
celebrating May birthdays and
wedding anniversaries, and the
participation in the service by the
29 children of Miriam Klein's Bet
class of the Temple's Religious
School.
The children participating in-
clude the following:
Tammi Adelstein, Debbie
Brechner, Russell Devendorf,
Marci Diem, Andrew Fishbein,
Rayna Friedman, Scott Golden,
Mama Goodman, David Green -
baum.
Margate Seniors celebrate
national senior week
The Northwest Focal Point
Senior Center in Margate will
celebrate National Senior Week
May 8-14 with a variety of events
to honor the major role Senior
Centers play in providing a wide
range of services.
Margate's Mayor Leonard
Weisinger issued a proclamation
designating the entire month of
May as "Older Americans
Month-' with special mention of
Margate's Senior Center Week.
The week's events include a
srxfia! Kxercise for Health class
at 10 a.m. Monday May 9, fol-
lowed in the afternoon by a fun
and fitness walk on David Park's
new physical fitness trail.
The award winning film "Close
Harmony" will be shown at 1
p.m Tuesday May 10 at the
Senior Center with an invitation
extended to a group of students
from Coconut Creek High School
to watch the inter-generational
movie.
Hints on reducing costs of
electricity will be explained at an
FPL presentation at 1 p.m.
Wednesday May 11, with the
week's program concluding May
12 with an Open House in the
morning and entertainment and
refreshments at 1 p.m. that day.
Tamarac AARP to
hear efficiency expert
The Tamarac chapter of the
American Association of Retired
Persons (AARP) meets Monday,
May 9 at 1 p.m. in the Tamarac
Jewish Center Social Hall, 9101
NW 57th St. Guest speaker will
be Carla Coleman.
She is executive director of the
Governmental Efficiency Study
Committee of Broward County.
She will speak on "Best ways to
effectively pursue our legislative
goals".
-SHOWTIMES-
pri .Sa t. 4 Sun. Matinee 2:46-7:00 M0
Mon. Thru Thor. 7:00 a 9:00
"SENIOR CITIZENS"
$2.00 Mon. thru Thur. a Matin**
$2.50 Fit-Set S Sun. Night
Special Rale For Group* Over SO
"MANOR ART CINEMA"
1444 N.E. 2* St. FT. LAUDERDALE-PHONE S64-4476
wOM.PUMHwytU.ri W W 11. Otttmt Wl **.
Adam Harmelin, Lonnie Her-
man, Lenny Herold. Scott Jaffe,
Matthew Klein, Alan Lebovitz,
Jennifer Levine, Adrianne Mei-
sel, Adam Meyer, Seth Miller,
Melanie Pinkert.
Pam Rot hen berg, Dan Ruda,
David Rudnick, Ross Sabath,
Rosanne Satz, David Schloss,
Stacey Tuckman, Joanthan Wes-
ton, Jason Yoskowitz.
THE TEMPLE B'NAI MOSHE YOUNG SISTERHOOD in pon.
pano Beach recently installed their officers under the guidance of
Rabbi Morris A. Shop. They included (pictured) Rhonda Shtr
president; Sandra Estner, secretary; Melinda Shop, treasurer; and
advisors, Martha Jacobs, Rachel Shop, and Celia Fried Tht
Sisterhood will be in charge of the weehly Oneg Shabbat and fund
raising projects for the Synagogue.
Beth Israel in Deerfield Beach to hear author \
The Brotherhood of Temple
Beth Israel of Deerfield Beach,
200 S. Century Blvd., will hold a
bagel and lox breakfast on Sun-
day, May 15 at 10 a.m. The
special program will feature
author William B. Millhorn II
whose book "Wan and Rumor,
of Wars" has just been publish
ed, baaed on his firsthand ac-
counts of the war in Lebanon.

Maxwell House Coffee
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Friday. May 6,1983
ARMDI 'Nili' chai
Installation of officers for the
neW "Nili" chapter of American
Bed Magen David for Israel
(ARMDI) of Coral Springs will
Mke place Wednesday. May 11 at
7 30 pm. at the City Hall Annex
Building (Old Library) in Coral
Springs Guest speaker Yaakov
Kronfeld, former Israeli army
officer, will give a special presen-
tation in honor of the formation
of the new chapter.
'' '
The Jewish Fbridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale

\Y
Page 9
ARMDI is the sole supporting
arm of the United States for
Magen David Adom (MDA), Is-
rael's second line of defense.
MDA supplies blood and blood
products, ambulance service and
emergency medical treatment.
The City Hall Annex BuUding
is located on the corner of Sample
Rd. and Coral Hills Dr. Parking
is available in the rear of the
building.
Recognition, school enrollment
focus of Kol Ami weekend
On May 13th, at the regular
Shabbat service which begins at
8:15 pm., Temple Kol Ami,
Plantation, with Rabbi Sheldon
Harr and Cantor G. Nathan
Corburn officiating, part of the
evening worship service will be
devoted to recognizing the retir-
ing officers and directors and the
installation of the new leadership
for the coming year. Paul Frank
will be re-installed as president,
serving his second term.
Plaques and certificates
awards will be presented to 45
members for outstanding and de-
voted service to the Temple in
many varied areas.
Sunday, May 15 from 9 a.m. to
1 p.m., members of the education
committee along with members
of the membership committee
will be on hand at the Temple to
re-enroll approximately 700 re-
turning religious school students
as well as to welcome new
students and their parents.
Representatives from the Youth
Choir, the Junior and Senior
Youth Groups, will also be
present to answer questions
about these programs. Herb
Blusher is supervisor of the
youth programs.
Registration for the Kol Ami
preschool, fall program and
Summertime Fun program for
2'/i, 3 and 4 year olds continues
and inquiries about these pro-
grams should be directed to
Arlene Lasko 472-1988 or Faye
Geronemus 792-4597.
Abraham Haber Tor ah School
to graduate 57 students
On Shabbat morning, May 14,
57 graduates of the Middle
School Department of the Abra-
ham Haber To rah School of
Temple Beth Israel will parti-
cipate in the special graduation
iniiv. These students have
in cissf ully completed the
i K limitary and middle school
department Conservative
': Kil.nl i Ullil'ulum.
The graduation program will
be an integral part of the tradi-
tional Shabbat morning service,
with the students participating in
all aspects of the service. A
The Yiddish class of Lauder-
dale West, which meets twice
monthly and will finish its classes
in May, recently enjoyed a spe-
cial educational program in which
representatives from a cross sec-
tion of Judaism were able to
present their particular
philosophy. Participating in this
event were Rabbi David Gordon,
who presented the Conservative
view; Richard Goldman of Tem-
ple Ramat Shalom representing
the Reconstructionists
philosophy; Aolf Greenbaum of
Temple Kol Ami for the Reform
expression; and Millie Schneir
who presented the Orthodox out-
look.
The question and answer
forum following the presentation
was moderated by Jack Fishman.
Rabbi Gordon stated that most
rabbis normally would not of-
ficiate at a mixed marriage. On
the question of kashruth, Rabbi
Gordon said that the basic reason
for the observance of that ritual
was for discipline. He also
credited its observance as a
strong link in the survival of the
Jewish people.
Speaking for the Reform wing
of Judaism, Adolf Greenbaum
told the audience that Reform
began in 1807 and places' the
emphasis of its direction on
education of youth, the presence
of women on the Bimah, and
music to enhance the beauty of
the worship service. He called the
Reform service a "Happy Serv-
ice."
Richard Goldman said that the
Reconstructionists with 70
congregations around the coun-
try believe, "The past has a vote,
not a veto," and that they were
Panelists (left to right! Richard Goldman, Rabbi David W. Gordon,
Millie Schneir and Adolf Greenbaum.
the first to introduce Bat Mitz-
vah, the first to ordain a woman
rabbi and treat women with full
equality in the Temple.
Having lived for many years in
a completely Orthodox environ-
ment, Millie Schneir spoke nos-
talgically of her father makfaaa
wine and her early life in an
Orthodox home "Orthodoxy,"
Mrs. Schneir said, "is a more
private form of worship. A way of
devotion that is more serious and
less social.
"The practice of separation of
the sexes is to create an atmos-
phere of complete concentration
on worship and prayer."
The questions, which came
from an audience of over 300,
were both provocative and in-
teresting and the panelists in
turn supplied informative an-
swers.
The program was completed
with story and song by Nat
Schriffman, Yiddish poetry by
Harry Sail, and Irene Diamond at
the piano. Comedy was provided
by Jack Fishman who gave his
version of the Donahue program
in "Yinglish."
special tribute to Israel program
will be offered by the students.
Rabbi Phillip a. Labowitz will Beth Hillel of Margate
receive the class gift and will
offer a special blessing to the
graduates. Diane Gordon, rep-
resenting the Parents Assn. will
present the graduation awards
and gifts. Rev Weston. rep-
resenting the Parents Assn., will
llulier Family, and Stanley L.
Cohen, director of education and
youth, will present the diplomas.
Al Lang, president of Temple
Beth Israel, will offer the con-
cluding remarks.
Chamber Music series
set for next season
The third season of Broward's
friends of Chamber Music will
feature return engagements by
|ih<' Juilliard String Quartet, the
|Tkyo String Quartet, and the
l'--au\ Arts Trio, who were
piling the six in the original
|*ruj which had its inception in
pl- The 1982-83 season, which
pa-ntly closed with stirring
i*rformance by the Canadian
Krass, was increased to seven
ncerts which will be the same
"umber in the coming season.
The 198384 schedule will also
Include the Muir String Quartet,
Me Dorian Winds Quintet, the
^nulena Players, and the
Mm-tii String Quartet. The Muir
Juilliard Quartets appeared
joint White House recital in
<1y April, with lUhak Perlman
P host and narrator.
Subscription prices for the
wre seven concert series have
en maintained at $40. $60, and
L and a" Parents above $40
wxdeductible contributions.
Student subscriptions are $30.
New subscribers may send
requests to Broward's Friends of
Chamber Music, 7950 N.W. 4th
Place. Plantation, FL 33324.
to sponsor
trip to Israel
Temple Beth Hillel of Margate,
7640 Margate Rd., is sponsoring
a trip to Israel from Oct. 5
through Oct. 19. The $1795 price
is from Miami per person double
occupancy. The tour includes five
star deluxe hotels, compre-
hensive sightseeing, luxury air
conditioned motorcoaches, all
entrance fees, transfers and
baggage handling. The fully
escorted tour also includes round
trip air fare from Miami, break-
fast and dinners daily, expert
drivers, guides and service
charges.
For additional details call
David or Flo Goldfarb at 971-
6236.
THE FAMILY JACOBS' KOSHER
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Page 10'
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Brow/sin' Thru Broward
with Maggie
The Federation's Community
Calendar recorded its first 1984
events last week. The Jewish
National Fund of Broward
County is sponsoring the Israel
Ballet March 28 and 29 at Brow-
ard Community College's Bailey
Hall. JNF President Barrett
Rothenberg says it will be one of
the major fund-raising events for
the $1 million JNF project in the
Negev, the Lahav Recreation
Park ... He noted, and hoped,
other organizations would
schedule their dates early and
check Federation's calendar to
make certain dates are clear for
major events. Call Helen Steig-
man at the Federation 748-8200
or write with dates of major 1983-
84 special events to her at
Federation, 8360 W. Oakland
Park Blvd., Fort Lauderdale
33321.
I

And here's Federation
youngest UJA phon-a-thon
volunteer calling on volunteers to
help Federation reach 3,000
previous contributors who are
awaiting a call for their pledge to
the 1983 campaign. That's Mindy
Beth with the phone at her ear.
The daughter of Pearl and Jod
Rein stein of Plantation, born in
March, was among the scores of
babies in strollers who took part
in the April 24 Israel Indepen-
dence Day celebration at the
Jewish Community Center .. .
Hebrew Day School, located on
that JCC campus, is adding a
seventh grade to its school year
beginning in September. Fran
Merenatein, director, says the 8th
grade will be added for 1984-86
school year, completing the fully-
certified, accredited educational
program from nursery through
middle school.
Sbep Schoenfcld of Margate
calls attention to his Broward
Harmonica Group: Harry
Drobkin, Chock Levineon, Max
Rudd, Ida Kaplan, Frank Gott-
lieb and himself. They're availa-
ble (721-3546) to entertain for an
hour-long show, or to play at
luncheons, dinners, parties and
you name it ... Rath Kay,
Miriam Levkt, Aaa Smuckler
and Edith Schlanger who is the
incoming president of National
Council of Jewish Woman,
graciously filled in at the Friday
April 15 Oneg Shabbat service at
Plantation Nursing Home when
Rabbi Rudolph Waia* /and
Lillian Schoen, who ragafatry
officiate at those services, L /
unable tS be present. >
Mark A. Levy, vice president-
construction of Oriole Home*
Corp., took part in the firm's
groundbreaking for The Gather-
ing Place development at
Cypress Bend in Pompano .
Jerry Kaufman has been named
tax manager of Fort Lauderdale
Spear, Safer & Co. CPAs.
Herbert Azif has been named a
committeeman of the newly-
formed American Legion Coral
Springs post Steven Spiel-
berg, creator of E.T., is planning
the film adaptation of Thomas
Keneally's novelized true story of
Oakar Schindler saving Jews
from Nazis detailed in the book
Schindler s List Dorothy
Rosenblatt of Century Village's
Grantham has been knitting
yarmulkes or if you prefer the
Hebrew: kip pot for some of
the men who'll be in group
leaving for Israel later this month
on a trip being led by Fran
Nusbaum. whose daughter and
family live there, and Irving R.
Friedman Senior Citizens
Retirees Club of Sunrise leaves
May 15 for a seven-day tour-trip
to New Orleans.
David Sandier, formerly of
Plantation and former director of
Federation's Foundation of Jew-
ish Philanthropies, has opened
his law office in Washington for
general practice and representa-
tion on legislation pending before
Congress Michael Greenberg
of Minto Builders appointed
Heidi Thompson as social direc-
tor for The Township, Coconut
Creek's rapidly developing com-
munity Dr. Herman Weiss,
69, Tamaroc professional mental
health consultant, was one of
seven members named to Brow-
aid's Nan S. Hutchlnson Senior
Hall of Fame.
Sonia Ginsberg has been pro-
moted to the poet of executive
director of Broward Assotiation
for Retarded Citizens (BARC),
the agency which gets volunteer
support from Federation's
Chaplaincy Commission with
programs for Jewish clients at
BARC's homes ... Dr. Joan
Gilbert Segall, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Herman Gilbert of Sun-
rise Lakes Blvd., has been
selected to participate in 1983
Fullbright Seminar on History
and Culture in Korea this sum-
mer. Dr. Segall is supervisor of j
social studies with Roxbury (NJ
school board.
David Copperfield, the brilliant
magician who performed recently
on TV, is the son of Rebecca and
Hy Kotldn who were members of
Federation's Chaplaincy Com-
mission director Rabbi Albert B.
Schwartz's congregation when he
was spiritual leader of a congre-
gation in Perth Amboy, N.J. .
Broward County's Reconstruc-
tionist synagogue, Ramat
Shalom in Plantation, is getting
its first counterpart in all of
South Florida. Miami Rabbi
Rami Shapiro has organized
Dade's first Reconstructionist
synagogue: Temple Beth Or with
40 families joining in the first
Shabbat service April 22 at
South Dade Jewish Community
Center.
Israel Diary, the Thursday
night WPBT-TV 2 production,
will air Miami's host-producer
Stanley M. Rosenblatt interview-
ing former Israeli Prime Minister
Yitzhak Rabin at 10 p.m., Thurs
Friday May 6,1983
day, May 12 Former Jewish few hundred Hebrew Union Huh
Family Service caseworker Deb- Holy Days Prayer Book No 9?!!
bie Coslow Fox (who hsd worked
in both of JFS offices in Lauder-
dale Lakes and Hollywood) and
her husband, Robert Fox, con-
tinue to receive congratulations
on the birth of their son last
month Incredulous! the
Page One banner headline in The
Miami Herald that the alleged
diaries of Adolf Hitler "revealed
that he despised Jews." Was that
news?
Liberal Jewish Temple of
Coconut Creek has more prayer
books to give away. Arthur
Savht reporting that it gave to
Deerfield's Temple B'nai Shalom
Shabbat praver books now has a
give away since' the congreMti^
of Wvnmoor Village VS.
chased the new Oates of R..
demotion prayer books for h.
High Holy Days services. Int
ested congregations can ciii
Savitt at 973-6628 OOPS*
The name of Florence Straus wu
omitted inadvertently last week
from the published list of men,
bers continuing to serve on the
board of Jewish Family Service
JFS holds its annual meetinB
May 11 Jewish Federations
annual meeting Tuesday evening
May 24 at Sunrise's Temple Beth
Israel is open to all contributor*
to the 1983 United Jewish ApZ
campaign.


STEAKS SEAFOOD
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Facilities A vailable for Group and
Organization Luncheons and Dinners.
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Friday. May 6| 1W3

The Jewish Floridian ofGreater Fort Lauderdale
-PagtU-
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ISRAEL NOW
AND WELL GIVE
TOTHE
THE J)AND
THE$
Its all yours. A wonderful vacation in ancient, mystical
Jerusalem or the sparkling Mediterranean city of Tel Aviv.
With hotel car and round trip airfare included. It's El Al's
"Sunsation S3" tour package And its unpehevable for
only $829. '"
Kbull board an El Al Jumbo jet at JFK Airport in New
tork and fly non-stop to Ben Gurion Airport. \bu may
choose to stay in the exciting 20th Century city of Tel
Aviv in a luxurious hotel overlooking the sea. Or you may
want to go on to Jerusalemwhere first class accommo
dations will make you feel like King Solomon. An Avis
Rent A Car will be yours for 5 full days so you can
leisurely drive to the places you've only read about in the
Bible. You'll love exploringfrom the Jordan valley to the
breathtaking heights of Masada.
One thing more. As a special bonus. El Al will give
everyone on our special "Sunsation S3" 6 Day/5 Night
tour a ZQ% discount voucher. You'll be able to use it on
your next roundtrip El Al flight from the USA to Israel
anytime through May 31st. 1984.
So call your Travel Agent or ring El Al and ask for the
sun. the moon and the stars. This April and May. you can
get them.
The Airline of I srael
Price it pet peion based on double occupancy, effective April 5th to May 28th. KJ83 One Avis
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1
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Page 12
m_j^li^j*<{m*-**lsiei!#

Mfc*
Seminar May 11
The newly elected Board of Directors pictured
are: (top row, left to right) Roslyn Goldberg, Bert
Stark. Sally Rodin, Fanny Hochman and Helen
Levine; (bottom row, left to right) Ruth
The B'nai H'rith Women's
chapter of Lauderhill celebrated
Israel's 35th birthday and at the
same time honored past and
present officers of the chapter at
a gala party held at the Castle
Recreation Center in Lauderhill.
Sally Radin. former Woman of
the Year Volunteer, who served
as chairman, greeted over several
hundred members and guests.
Nathanson, Theresa SaU, Marilyn Glazer,
Rosalind Ornstein (installation speaker), Ruth
Glassberg, and Audrey Feinberg.
Continued from Page 1
studies, and socio-political move-
ments.
Dr. Schechterman has been a
consultant and lecturer for the
U.S. Departments of State, De-
fense, and the National Security
Council, as well as the Israeli
Foreign Ministry and the London
Economist intelligence unit. He
has authored numerous articles
for various international publica-
tions.
The other major speaker will be
Gene Greenzweig, executive di-
rector of the Central Agency for
Jewish Education (CAJE) head-
quartered in Miami, who will
delineate Jerusalem and the
Jewish people through eternity
during the morning session.
The many facets of Jerusalem
will be explored in five concurrent
workshops to be held following
lunch and a music program fea-
turing Ami Gilad, an Israeli ac-
cordianist.
Danny Siege!, author and L
turer; Abraham J. Gittefeon
sociate director at CAJE
Federation's North Broward
rector of education; Efrat AU
formerly of Israel's Yad Be&75
Institute, will be among
workshop leaders.
Others are Rabbi Morton 1,
ovsky of Hollywood takine'
workshop participants on tTt
of Jerusalem" in Yiddish'
Yossie Shochet, the Israel's?
iach (emissary) based in Mi
will talk about the reality
spirituality of living in Je
lem.
The registration fee, payable i
the door, is $3 and includes lun
Helen Weisberg, Federatio
CAJE administrator of the No
Broward Midrasha, said
members of Federation's Ad
Education Committee will
honored for their volunteer i
ices during Midrasha's IS
year of activity.
er, installed the new officers of
the chapter. They are Myrle
Fidler, president; Grace Fishlin,
Ruth Nathanson, Bert Stark,
Helen Levine, vice presidents;
Audrey Feinberg, treasurer;
Marilyn Glazer, Fannie Hoch-
man, Roslyn Goldberg, Theresa
Salz, secretaries; and Bertha
Mayos, counselor.
Rochelle Stenn to begin 2nd term
as Sisterhood president
as
Rosalind Ornstein, national
B'nai B'rith Women commission-
Roc helle Stenn will be installed
president of the Temple
Sholom Sisterhood for her second
term on Thursday, May 12 at
noon in the Temple's social hall
at 132 SE 11th Ave., in Pompano
uulbii
You have the power to Will the future by
leaving a legacy to Hadassah today!
Your Will can continue Hadassah* achievements
in Israel for a better tomorrow.
hadassah
Beach.
Rabbi Samuel April will install
the following officers who will
serve with Mrs. Stenn: Lee
Gornstein, Hannah Shaines,
Zelda Rosenthal, Pauline Braun,
Ethyl Goodman and Anne Gil-
bert, vice presidents; Blanche
Alloy, treasurer; Ruth Baum,
Beverly Werner.Betty Selis and
Selma Zager, secretaries; and
Esther Cannon, parliamentarian.
The installation luncheon is
being chaired by Helen Ruben.
Rhea Lipson, and Minnie Finkel-
man head a committee compet-
ing the arrangements.
Judy April will deliver the in-
vocation and Cantor Jacob J.
Itin/iT will participate.
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SIZE PRICE | F.E.T.
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180/65-390 90.30 194
190/65-390 -------------, 99.91 2 09
220/55-390 WHITE 102.39 226
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P1I8/7W14
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P215/75R14
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WE SERVICE NATIONAL ACCOUNTS


***mm*
B'nai-B'not Mitzvah
Kol Ami Confirmation Service announced
TEMPLE BETH TOR AH
Jody Gordon, daughter of Da-
vid and Carol Gordon of Sunrise,
will be called to the Bimah Friday
evening, May 6, on the occasion
of her Bat Mitzvah at Temple
Beth Torah in Tamarac.
Clifford Wolff will celebrate his
Bar Mitzvah. Saturday, May 7,
at Temple Beth Torah. Clifford is
the son of Judy Taub of Coral
Springs.
TEMPLE BETH AM
Heath Bleacher, son of Stanley
and Carole Bleecher of Coral
Springs, will be called to the
Torah in honor of his Bar Mitz-
vah, Saturday, May 7 at Temple
Beth Am in Margate.
Jay Kupennan, son of Martin
and Evelyn Kuperman of Coral
Springs will celebrate his Bar
Mitzvah Saturday, May 14 at the
Temple.
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL
Adam Kell, son of Susan Kell
of Sunrise, will celebrate his Bar
Mitzvah Saturday morning, May
7, at Temple Beth Israel in Sun-
rise.
Saturday morning. May 7,
Mark Erst ling, son of David and
Sandra Erstling of Lauderhill,
will celebrate the occasion of his
Bar Mitzvah at Temple Beth Is-
rael.
Leslie Stein, daughter of Dr.
Sheldon and Jackie Stein in
Plantation, will be called to the
Bimah on the occasion of her Bat
Mitzvah Friday, May 13 at Tem-
ple Beth Israel.
TEMPLE KOL AMI
Saturday morning, May 7,
Suzanne Friedman, daughter of
Ellen and Milton Friedman of
Plantation, and Amy Jacobeon,
daughter of Ruby and Howard
Jacobson of Plantation, will be
called to the Bimah on the occa-
sion of their B'not Mitzvah at
Temple Kol Ami in Plantation.
Called to the Bimah in honor of
his Bar Mitzvah will be Jaaoa
Chalik, son of Lynn and Herbert
Chalik of Plantation, Saturday,
May 14 at Temple Kol Ami.
Andrew Stein will celebrate his
Bar Mitzvah Saturday, May 14,
at Temple Kol Ami. Andrew is
the son of Joanne and Louis
Lanza of Plantation.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
Saturday morning, May 14,
Robert Genaer, son of David and
Francine Genser, will celebrate
the occasion of his Bar Mitzvah
at Temple Emanu-El in Lauder-
dale Lakes.
RAMAT SHALOM
Staci Ziegler, daughter of
Nancy Ziegler of Plantation and
Terry Ziegler of Plantation, will
celebrate her Bat Mitzvah Satur-
day, May 7 at Ramat Shalom in
Plantation.
TEMPLE SHOLOM
Nadine Comlter, daughter of
Dr. and Mrs. Donald Comiter,
will be honored Friday evening
and Saturday morning May 6
and 7 on the occasion of her Bat
Mitzvah service at Temple
Sholom, Pompano Beach.
*
I
I
j
I
I
I
I
A Well BalaarrW Sammer Pr*freat. ..
SPOUTS V4TI AT 4JITS StirvCE COMF1 TEMS
Large Florida Area Enrollment 70 Miles From Washington
The observance of Shavuot will
begin on the evening of Tuesday.
May 17. The holiday which com-
memorates the giving of the
Torah to Moses on Mt. Sinai
Temple Kol Ami, traditionally
holds Confirmation Service at
that time for students of its Reli-
gious School who have completed
three years of additional Jewish
education beyond Bar or Bat
mtzvahMay Jewish best-seller list
The 7:30 p.m. service will
honor the following young peo-
ple: Scott Bortz. Susan Brown
Felicia Fagelson Brad Ftokel-
stein. Jennifer Hirsh, Debbie
Jacobaen, Lie* Laing. Haw
Rosenfeld, Wendy Sachs and
Debbie Zelman.
Presenting the Confirmation
certificates will be Rabbi Sheldon
J. Harr: Morris Ezry, Religious
COMPUTERS at CAMP
Z protossionaHy designed and conducted course available
I for children of a* ages enrolled at our eight-week
camps
I CAMP WOHELO for girls
CAMP COMET for boys
55 Yrmr / Qhi, Cmmp.n, lj< Miami fmmUj
High It The Bit- BWar Wm.Mi.iu
* 12S11 Old Route 10, Weynaeboro. Pa. 172SS
Contact: Owner-Director, Morgan I. Levy. C.C.D.
[fil(717>742*,*
WASHINGTON Based on a
sampling of Jewish bookstores
across the United States, The
B'naiB'rth International Jewish
Monthly has {elected in its May
issue the fol .owing as best-selling
books of Jnwish interest. They
are listed alphabetically by title.
HARDCOVER
The Bar Kokhba Syndrome.
Yehoshafat Harkabi. Rossel
Boohs $15.96. Exploration of
current Israeli policies in the
light ofth' Bar Kokhba rebellion.
The Little Drummer Girl. John
Le Carre. Knopf. $15.95. An
English woman is caught be-
tween Israeli intelligence agents
and PLO terrorists.
Schindler'a List. Thomas Keneal-
ly. Simon & Schuster. $16.95.
The true story of a German in-
dustrialist who sheltered thou-
sands of Jews during the Holo-
caust.
Temple. Robert Greenfield. Sum-
mit Boohs. $15.95. A young man
can't find his place in American
society.
Tali. Aharon Appelfeld. E. P.
Dutton. $12.95. Fiction. A young
girl who escapes the Holocaust.
PAPERBACK
The First. Step. Rabbi Zalman
Schacter. Bantam. $5.95. Philo-
sophies of Judaism.
Great Hebrew Short Stories.
Alan Lelchuk and Gershon
Shaked, editors. Meridian. $9.95.
Eight classic Jewish stories.
Into that Darkneae. Gitta
Sereny. Vintage. $5.95. Interview
with the commander of the Treb-
linka concentration camp.
Finally, a
Catskill resort
that lets you
stop eating
long enough
to have
some fun..."
$350and$365
Per week, per person (dbl.occ.)
Every Room with Private Bath,
Air Conditioning and Color TV
For reservations and
information phone
TOLL FREE
1-800-431-3854
Hotel Brickman
South FaHsburg. N.Y 12779
Master Card. Visa. Amex
Overlooking a great
18 hole gotf course
When you escape the Florida heat
this Summer, escape to something
more than non-stop overeating.
Escape to the Brickman.
We know that you go on vacation to
do more than live from one meal to the
next. That's why we're on the Modified
American Plan, serving two sumptuous
meals dairy. Breakfast (until 11:30 am),
and Dinner (from 6:30 to 8:30 pm).
Midday snacks? Magnificent Pool-
side Coffee Shop.
There will be no announcement at
I pm calling you back to the Dining
Room which you just left, no need to
rush off the golf course or tennis courts.
Linger at the pool all day if you choose.
We have one outdoor and indoor (con
taming health club and jet whirlpool
spa). Play duplicate bridge, take art
classes, go folk dancing, jog. or work
out on our Universal minngym. In short,
enjoy a full day of outdoor activities and
sunshine, and all the other fabulous
things we have to offer, including enter
tainment that's second to none.
So come to the Brickman. Where the
meals are fun. not something that
gets in the way of fun!
1-Jin't fame mold.
Your host for three generations.
The Posner Family
Ratner'a Meatless Cookbook.
Judith Gethers and Elizabeth
Lefft. Ballantine. $2.95. Meatless
Jewish recipes.
School director; and Paula Cart I
education vice president.
Supplementing the service w-.
be original portions written b|
each confirmand as part of th*l
preparation for Confirmation I
Each of the students has devil j
oped material for the servid
which deals with one of the T|
Commandments. All of the TOD.I
firmands will be participating joj
the service along with Rabbil
Harr and Cantor G. Nathan Cor j
burn.
Shavuot observance continu
at Temple Kol Ami on Wednesl
day morning with a Yizkor Servf
ice at 10:30 a.m.
MM
TEMPLE OREL B'NAI RAPHAEL (788-768*), AMIW. Oakland Park Blvd.,
Lauderdal* Lake* 83818. Service*: Siaiday through Thursday 8 a.m..Ip.m.;
Fridays* m., 7p.m.; Saturday8:45a.m., 7p.m.
SYNAGOGUE OF DTVEmBABY CHABAD (74S-17T7), 7770 NW Mth 81,
Lincoln Park Waal, Sunrise 88881. Sarrteeai Sunday throur,h Friday I a.m.,
7:80 p.m.; Saturday 9 a.m., 7:80 p.m. Study groups: Men, Sundays followlni
service*; Women, Tuc*day8p.m Babbi Ar I !> laaa.
TOUNO ISRAEL OF DEERFtELD BE ACM (431-18871, 1880 W. HUlaboro
Blvd.. Deerfleld Beach 88*41. Service*: Sunday through Thursday 8 a.m.,
8:80 p.m.; Friday a a.m., 8 p.m.: Saturday 8:48 a.m.. 8:80 p.m Cantor 8*1
On PinHlian: MertoaPergeoh,BMaeyBeRaatsr,AbrahamWeak.
YOUNG ISRAEL SYNAGOGUE OF HOLLYWOOD-FORT LAUDERDAIX
(8*6-7877). 3291 Stirling Rd.. Fort LaudardaJ* 88813. Service*: Monday
through Friday 7:80 a.m andaundown; Saturday. 8a.m.. lundown; Sunday
8 am. sundown. EafeM Edward Da vta.
CONSERVATIVE
TEMPLE BETH AM (974-8*60). 7306 Royal Palm Blvd.. Margate MM.
Baivleeai Monday through Friday 8:80 a.m.. 8 p.m. Friday late lervtct I
p.m.; Saturday 8 a.m., S p.m.; Sunday S a.m.. 5 p.m. Babbi Dr. Sokaaaa
Geld Cuter Irvktg Oreeemaa.
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL (743-40*0). T100 W. Oakland Park Blvd. Sunrk*
88818. Benlnae; Monday through Thuraday S a.m.. 8 p.m.; Friday a.m.,
8: SO p.m., 8 p.m.; Saturday 8:48 am lunaat; Sunday lam, 8 p.m. BMW
rhUh> A. Labowlto.Caator Maurice N*.
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL OF DEERFTELD BEACH (431-70801, 308 8
Century Blvd. Deerfleld Beach 88441. Sarvtoaei Sunday through Friday!: K
a.m., 8 p.m. Friday late aarvlc* 8p.m.; Saturday 8:48 a.m.. and at candle
llghtmg time Rabbi Jaaaph Laagaer. Oaater Shabtal a*h*r*aa
TEMPLE BETH TORAH (731-7080). 0101 NW 87th St. Tamarac IBB.
Servlcea: Sunday through Friday 8:80 a.m.. p.m. Late Friday lerricel
p.m. Saturday 8:45a.m., 8 p.m. Oaater Bry Beie.r..
TEMPLE B'NAI MOSHE (942-5380).1434 SB 3rd St.. Pompano Beach 380*3.
Service*: Friday 8 pm. Rabbi Morris A. She*.
TEMPLE SHA'ABAT TZEDER (741-02*6).804* W. Oakland Park Blvd.,
Sunrlae 88831. Servleee: Sunday through Friday 8 a.m., 5 p.m.; Late Friday
ervices p.m.; Saturday 8:48 a.m.. 8:80p.m. MaMd ARart W. Trey.Caator
Jack Ma reheat.
TEMPLE SHOLOM (942-8410), 183 8E 11th Are.. Pompano Beach MOW
Servleee: Monday through Friday 8:48 a.m. Friday evening at 8. Saturday
and Sunday 9 am Rabbi Samuel April. Caaeer Jacob Baaaer.
CONGREGATION BETH HILLEL OF MARGATE (974-8080), 78*0 MarpU
Blvd.. Marcatr 88088. Service*: Sunday through Friday 8: IB a.m 8 JOp m
Late Friday aarvlc* 8 p.m. Saturday 8:48a.m.. 8:80p m Rabbi DavM
CONGREGATION B'NAI ISRAEL OF CORAL SPRINGS (For RambUwood
Fait realdenta). 758-6319 Service.: Dally 8:80 a.m., 8:80 p.m.; Saturday I
am Herb Da via. Preaideat
HEBREW CONGREGATION OF LAUDERHILL (TM-0MO). 3048 NW 4v
Ave.. Lauderhill 38313 Service*: Sunday through Friday 8:80 am., :
pm.; Saturday 8:48 a.m.. sundown followed by study elaea In Plrk* Avot
RebbilaraelHalpeni.
HEBREW CONGREGATION OF NORTH LAUDERDAIX (733-7383 or 78-
3733). rvtaaeat Ban yon Lake* Oondo, 80*0 Bailey Rd., Tamarac. Friday*!
* p.m.: Saturday 8a.m. Al~
______ REFORM
TEMPLE BETH OBR (7M-1333), Mil Rtverald* Dr., Coral Spring* MOB
Servleee Sunday 8 a.m.; Tueaday. Thuraday 7:80 p.m.; Friday P-"-
Saturday 10 a.m. Rabbi DaaaM R. Oerber, Cauater Ne**sy **aamea
TEMPLE B'NAI SHALOM OF DEEBFIELD BEACH (434V3682) Service*"
Manorah Chapel*. 3808 W. HUlaboro Blvd., D**rn*ld BMCh, Friday I P>
"NatbaaHFtab. Coaler Merrte
TEMPLE EMANU-EL (781-3810). 8MB W. Oakland Park Blvd.. LaudenW*
Lake. 88811. Servleee: Friday 8:18 p.m.; Saturday, only on holiday*
celebration of Bar-Bat MiUvah ~
at
3SFUZ&2%!~
TEMPLE KOL AMI (473-1888), 8300 Patera Rd.. Plantation 88834. -"""
Friday 8:16 p.m.. Saturday 10:80 a.m. Rabbi Mtillia Harr. Oaator am
Oerbura.
LIBERAL JEWISH TEMPLE OF COCONUT CHEER (SIl-SaMI.eerrt**!
Friday ntght aervlcea twice monthly at Calvary Presbyterian ChurcBJJ"
Coconut Creak Parkway. Rabbi Brace S. TTarabal Temple* loundUil Sa"
AareeRuaea.
WEST BBOWABD JEWISH CONGREGATION (T83-8840). WIIWJ"":
Plantation. Servleee: Friday 8:18 p.m.; Saturday, only tor Bar-B*t Bit***"
celebraUone BabM Kurt F. Staae.
BEOONSTBUCnONIOT
- (T38800). 11801 W. Broward Blvd.. P^to*%'fav
j^^'Jl P m ; Saturday, only tor Bar-Bat Mttsvah, M A*-
RAMAT SHALOM


^Srlay-May*^
Community Calendar

THURSDAY, MAY 5
Temple Beth Israel Sunrise:
-oon. Games-
Tempi* Sholom Sisterhood:
1> 30 p.m. Installation of offi-
cers. Temple Social Hall. Pom-
pano Beach.
ORT-North Broward Region:
Executive committee meeting.
Broward Federal.
Pioneer WomenNegev Chapter:
Board meeting. Broward Federal.
BNAIBRITH WOMEN:
Coconut Creek Chapter: Noon.
Paid-up membership luncheon.
Temple Beth Am, Margate.
Sunrise Chapter: Noon. Mini
Lunch. Gueat speaker, Al Gol-
den. Sunrise Lakes Phase I Play-
bwae -. ...
B'nai B'rith Estate Unit: 8
p.m. First annual wine and
cheese party. Executive House,
4400 Club. 4300 Rock Island Rd.,
8th floor penthouse suite.
HADASSAH:
Bat-Ami Tamarac Chapter:
11:30 a.m. Boutique. Noon.
Meeting. Tamarac Jewish Cen-
ter.
Blyma Margate Chapter:
12:30 p.m. Closing meeting of the
season. Congregation Beth Hillel,
7634 Margate Blvd., Margate.
Armon Chapter: Donor lunch-
eon. Turnberry Country Club.
Rayus Tamarac Chapter: 1
p.m. Meeting. Tamarac Jewish
Center.
Yiddish Cultural Group-Sunrise
Lakes: 1 p.m. Meeting. Sunrise
Lakes. Phase 3, main clubhouse.
and Sisterhood: 9:30 a.m. Moth-
er's Day Breakfast. Tickets $1.
Call Flora Weller 974-4175 or
Murray Kirschbaum 972-0820.
MONDAY, MAY 9
Temple Beth Israel Sisterhood:
7:46 p.m. Board meeting. Temple
Beth Israel, Sunrise.
Temple Emanu-El: 7 p.m.
Games.
ORT North Broward Region:
11:30 a.m. Fifth Annual Honor
Roll Luncheon. Guest speaker
Oded Ben-Hur, Israeli Vice-Con-
sul. Diplomat Hotel, Hollywood.
HADASSAH:
DeerfUd-Kadimah Chapter:
Noon. Donor Luncheon. Boca
Pointe Racquet and Golf Club.
Boca Raton. Call Ethel Podell
427-6898.
Tamar-Fort Lauderdale Chap-
tar: 11:30 a.m. Meeting. Public
Safety Building, Lauderdale
Lakes.
Gilah Chapter: 11:30 a.m.
Donor Luncheon. Inverrary
Country Club, Lauderhill.
Plantation Yachad Chapter:
Noon. Installation and luncheon
meeting. Jewish Community
Center. 6501 W. Sunrise Blvd.
Reservations: 587-8580.
American Association of Retired
Persona, Inc., Tamarac Chap-
tar: 1 pjn. Meeting. Guest
speaker Carla Coleman, executive
director Governmental Efficiency
Study Committee Broward
County. Tamarac Jewish Center
Social Hall.
SUNDAY. MAY 8
Temple Kol Ami: 6:30 p.m.
Games.
Temple Beth Torah: 6:45 p.m.
(lames.
Temple Beth Israel of Deerfield
Beach: >> p.m. Mother's Day Din-
ner-Dance. Tickets $9. Call Sadie
Bodner 421-6840
Temple Beth Am, Men's Club
TUESDAY, MAY 10
Temple Emanu-El Sisterhood: 11
a.m. Luncheon and installation of
incoming officers.
Temple Beth Torah: 11 a.m.
Games.
Temple Beth Torah: 7:30 p.m.
Board meeting
Temple Beth Am Sisterhood:
TTT
COME UP TO THE
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v? Baggage Handling And Umo Transportation
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Al Taxes and Gratuities included In Rate
Perionataed Service With Extra Care For Special Diets
13 Gourmet Meats Daly OCocktall Parties
Great Entertainment Q 2 Shows Nightly
'Dancing to 3 Orchestras
Fret GoK on Two 18-Hole Golf Courses, Tennis. Roeer
Skating, Heat* CM). Moor-Outdoor Pools, Outstanding
Scwal Programs 4 Speakers-And Much Morel
Ca* Tot Ffit Mr
800-431-3856
BiSu-tTs
Loch WnleWhf, N.Y. ltTW W
3 I
Noon. Luncheon and card party.
Donation $3.50.
PIONEER WOMEN
N A'AM AT:
Broward Council: Noon: Gala
donor luncheon. Crystal Lake
Country Club.
Tamara Chapter: Noon. Meet-
ing. Water Bridge Recreation
Center. 1050 Del Lago Circle.
Sunrise.
B'NAI B'RITH:
Hope Chapter: Noon. Meeting.
Jewish Community Center, Soref
Hall.
Ocean Chapter: 11:30 a.m.
Mini lunch. Guest speaker Linda
Francese, Bell Tel. speaker. Gal-
leria, lower level, Palm Court.
And E. Sunrise Blvd.
Deborah Hospital Foundation.
Sunrise Chapter: 11 a.m. Meet-
ing, Sunrise Lakes Phase I Play-
house.
WEDNESDAY, MAY 11
Temple Beth Or: 7:46 p.m.
Games.
Temple Beth Israel, Sunrise: 7
p.m. Games.
Sunrise Jewish Center Sister-
hood: Noon. Meeting.
Central Agency lor Jewish Edu-
cation: 10:30 a.m.-3 p.m. Yom
Yerushalayim Education Day.
Temple Beth Torah, Tamarac.
Hadassah-Rayus Tamarac:
Noon. Luncheon. Inverrary
Country Club, Lauderhill.
B'nai B'rith-Lakes Chapter:
Noon. Meeting. City Hall, 4300
NW 36 St., Lauderdale Lakes.
American Red Magen David for
Israel-Nili. Coral Springs Chap-
ter: 7:30 p.m. Installation of offi-
cers. Guest speaker Yaakov
Kronfeld, former Israeli army of-
ficer. City Hall Annex Building.
Coral Springs. Call 752-8478.
Castle Women's Club: Noon.
Mother's Day program. Castle
Recreation Center. 4780 NW 22
Court.
Pioneer Women Na'amat-
Natanya Chapter: 12:30 p.m.
Meeting. Council Meeting
Rooms. 1303 N.' Sflrtfe ftd. 7.
Margate.
Brandeis-Fort Landerdale-Pom-
pano Chapter: 1 p.m. Meeting.
Coconut Creek Recreation.

THURSDAY. MAY 12
Temple Beth Israel. Sunrise:
Noon. Games.
Temple Emanu-El: 7:30 p.m. Ex-
ecutive Committee Meeting.
HADASSAH:
Blyma-Margate Chapter: 1
a.m. Board meeting. Home
Savings Bank. Atlantic Blvd.
and State Road 7. Margate.
Orah-Sunrise Chapter: 10:30
a.m. Mini lunch and entertain-
ment. Call 741-7219.
Tamar-Fort Lauderdale Chap-
ter and Pine Island Ridge Chap-
ter: Noon. Donor luncheon
Hearth Pub, Holiday Inn,
Plantation. Call 791-6061.
ORT:
North Broward Region: 10
a.m.-2 p.m. Board meeting and
installation of officers. Lauder-
dale Lakes City Hall, Council
Chambers.
Royal Plantation Bonaventore
Chapter: 11:30 a.m. Mini Lunch.
Guest speaker Dr. Claire Thun-
ing. subject "Relationship of Diet
in Prevention of Cancer." Brow-
ard Mall, Community Room. Call
748-7984.
Tamarac Chapter: 11 a.m.
General elections meeting.
Italian-American Club, 7310 W.
McNab Road, Tamarac. Call 721-
1299.
FRIDAY. MAY II
Temple Bath Am: May 13-16,
three days and two nights, at the
Eden Rock Hotel in Miami
Beach. $140 per person. Call Har-
riet Stern 973-7668 or Celia
Glickman 974-6761.
Workmen's Circle: May 13-16.
Second Annual Institute for Yid-
dish Culture. Palm Beach Hilton,
A1A, Palm Beach. Call C. Shrift-
man 721-3451 or I. Tabachnikov
973-7929.
Continued from Page 1
were James Stepner. chairman of
the board of the synagogue, who
lauded Rabbi Mirsky's work with
the congregants and in the com-
munity: and Rev. Saul Kirschen-
liaum. president of the congre-
gation, a retired cantor, who
chanted the 23rd Psalm in
Hebrew.
Rabbi Langner termed Rabbi
Mirsky a talmudic scholar who
"gave of himself striving to
achieve higher goals for the
congregation and the com-
munity."
Honored last December with
the David Ben Gurion Award
presented by the State of Israel
Bond Organization, Rabbi
Mirsky was an active member of
the Jewish Federation's Com-
munity Relations Committee and
the Federation's Chaplaincy
Commission, serving as a volun-
teer chaplain, making regular
visits to patients at Cypress
Community Hospital in Pom-
pa no Beach.
Before moving to Deerfield, he
served for 27 years as the rabbi of
Congregation Sinai in West
Haven, Conn., and was chaplain
of Yale University Hospital in
New Haven.
Mirsky. who was buried in
Elmont. N.Y.. is survived by his
wife. Georgette; three married
daughters, seven grandchildren;
and his father, Joseph, a brother
and a sister.
Officers and directors of the
Federation joined the community
expressing sorrow at Rabbi
Mirsky's death.
?&i
K1
/ Q For Boy* Girl. 6-16
V ^y0"* MOUNTAIN Of FUH Where Spring
Vfisj!^^ Comas A Spends the Summer
a^ MOUNTAIN CITY o*
All Water Sports in Our Own Twin Spring Fed Lakes
White Water Canoeing Mt. Trail Hikes Lapidary
Tennis Arts Crafts Sailing Skiing Gymnastics
and Dance Go Cart* Trip* by Canoe
Rock Climbing Basketball Soccer Softball
Hockey Zoological A Science Program
All Dietary Laws Observed** Shabbat Services
Madical Statt Available at All Times
Accredited Member American Camping Association
"St"
Your Camp Directors
COACH J.I. MONTGOMERY
MORRIS I SHEILA WALDMAr
STAN A BARBARA MINTZ
n
Miami Beach Phone 305 538-3434 or Write
P.O. Box 2888. Miami Beach. Fla. 33140
NEW COMPUTER PROGRAM
ISRAEL
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r
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S Star deluxe hotels Breakfast a Dinner Dally Comprehensive
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Luxury Alr-Condltloned Buses Bsggsge Handling All Service
Charges
DEPARTS: May 2.23.25. June 6,15. July 11.1t
Aug. 8,15. Oct. 5,10,17, Nov. 7. 21 Dec 5,19.
From
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tram Near
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ALSO AVAILABLE SPECIAL ROSH HASHANA PKG.
Bar Mitzvah /Car Rentals / Hotels
ISRAEL
ISRAEL
Telex: 523761 TRAVEL TOUR FTL
TRAVEL TOURS 445 Stirling Rd.. Ft Lauderdale. Fl 33314
dade 944-0411 brow 584-9664 pbch736-2466
GREAT
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KOSHER SPECIAL
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Private Bath Daily Maid Service
1 Noon Day Snack (Jewish Shows)
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f MAY1toOCT30
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WEEKLY
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Includes 2 Kosher Meals Dly.
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1050 WASHINGTON AVENUE
MIAMI BEACH, FLA. 33139
CALL (305) 531-6621
OPEN AIL YEAR ROUND
Norman Schwartz, Cwner
Arthur Folk. Mgr
* JCW


F*
The Jewish FloridimM of Gremter Fart.
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