The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 3, no. 7 (Apr. 5, 1974)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 9, 1976 called v.4, no. 27 but constitutes v.5, no. 1; issue for July 7, 1989 called v.18, no. 11 but constitutes v.18, no. 13.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44570954
lccn - sn 00229545
ocm44570954
System ID:
AA00014312:00221

Related Items

Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward


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Full Text
Ill- Number 27
OF GREATER FORT LAIDFRHAI F
Fort Lauderdale, Florida Friday, Auguat 18,1962
fmSSKoehl
Price 36 Cents
he Truth Begins to Emerge from Mideast

JEO IMGB^D m ISRAEL

packages for Lebanese civilians prepared by
I Jerusalem volunteers. __]
fceli humanitarian and reconstruction aid to Leba-
ople provided by the American Jewish Joint
button Committee (JDC) a beneficiary agency
fUnited Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund of
vish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale, and
encies, counteracts the media distortions of re-
eks.
t's President Henry Taub was in Israel and Leba-
ntly. He bad JDC assist Haifa's Rambam Hos-
pital's social service department providing liaison be-
tween wounded men and families. JDC has staff work-
ing in Lebanon carrying out the tremendous program of
rehabilitation, including delivery of supplies of all
kinds, into Lebanon.
JDC last week released this update from one of its
staff members, Elaine Winik:
banese children with clothing brought in by
| Israel relief convoy.
"Today (July 21) we were in Lebanon, in Sidon,
Damour, Beirut. There ia destruction but nothing like
we have been led to eejiave. The people are not un-
friendly and certainly not intimidated by the Israelis."'
(A report ea how a dty k Lebanon ia "living"
Synagogue Affiliation Perpetuates The Faith
.ION EMERGENCY
- United Jewish Ap-
National Chairman
Loup (right) accepts a
110 million from Mrs.
A. Tisch, president of
-Federation of Jewish
3pies of Greater New
William Kahnr New
York's Federation executive vice
president.
An additional 115 million was
contributed last month for emer-
gency needs of the Jewish
Agency for Israel in carrying out
the social development and hu-
manitarian programs during the
Lebanon crisis.
With the approach of the Days of Awe,
Rosh Hashana to Yom Kippur, only a
few weeks away, North Breward's Jew-
ish residents who are unaffiiiated with a
synagogue or temple are invited to be-
come members of one of the 21
synagogues and temples which hold
services in the area and thus "help per-
petuate the faith.'' ^al
On behalfof the North Broward Board
of Rabbis, Rabbi Sheldon J. Harr of
Plantation's Temple Kol Ami, president
of the Board of Rabbis, issued the fol-
lowing message:
Traditionally, the synagogue has served three
major functions in the life of the Jewish Com-
munity.
It is a Bet HaTefillah, a House of Prayer. On
the Sabbath and the Festivals, during the Holy
Days and throughout the year, your synagogue ia
always prepared to meet your spiritual needs,
through prayer and song, through meditation and
consolation.
It is a also a Bet HaMidrash, a House of Study.
Temples serve this purpose not only through the
children in their religious schools, as our Jewish
heritage is passed from one generation to the
next, but also through adult education programs,
lectures and discussions which are held at regular
intervals in all of our community Temples.
And finally it is a Bet HaKnesset, a House of
Assembly. In your Synagogue you have the addi-
tional opportunity to gather with family and
friends in celebration and in joy, as part of your
Jewish community.
Judaism has existed in and through the Syna-
gogue for well over 2000 years, and Judaism will
continue to endure through the institution of the
Synagogue. However, to meaningfully fulfill its
function, your local Synagogue needs your sup
port through your active participation as a mem-
ber. The North Broward Board of Rabbis takes
this opportunity to invite all unaffiliated Jewish
families to join as members in the Temple or
Synagogue of one's choosing, and therefore to
help perpetuate the faith which we all hold so
dear.
and Additional Contributions Swell Emergency Fund
From every segment of the
North Broward Jewish com-
munity, new and additional con-
tributions were being delivered to
the Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale for the Israel
Emergency Fund.
And while this effort was going
on, a delegation from the Federa-
tion joined community leaders
from all parts of Florida for a
meeting this week (Aug. 11) in
Miami Beach with Shimon Feres,
leader of Israel's Labor Party,
and others from Israel and the
National United Jewish Appeal.
Knesset Member Peres, leader
of the Parliament's Opposition
party, is in accord with Prime
Minister Menachem Begin in the
movement to drive the PLO out
of Lebanon and free Israel from
the PLO's terrorism.
UJA national and regional
leadership recently returned from
visiting the scene of the conflict,
will join in providing up-to-the-
minute briefing on events in the
region and provide a detailed
analysis of the human cost of
"Operation Peace for Galilee"
and its impact upon the 1983
campaign in Federations around
the country.
Responding to the needs for
funds, in addition to securing
new contributions, many of
North Broward's contributors are
paying their pledges in full to
help in providing the cash that's
being forwarded to the UJA and
then to the Jewish Agency for Is-
rael
At a rally at Congregation
Beth HUM. in Margate, more
than $8,000 was contributed. The
speaker was Abraham J. Gittel-
son, associate director of Central
Agency for Jewish Education
and Federation's North Broward
educational director, who had
just returned from Israel. Gittel-
son, who arrived in Israel in June
Continued on Page 3


Abraham J. QitteUon (left), Central Agency for
Jewish Education director of the Jewish Federa-
tion of Greater Fort LauderdaU, newly-returned
from Israel, gives the audience at Margate's Con-
gregation Beth Hillelan up-date on the Lebanon
crisis and its effect on Israelis. And the audience,
typified by the symbolic presentation pictured,
responded with checks. Presenting them to Joel
TeUes, Federation's assistant executive director,
are Harry Olugover, Florence Goldfarb, Oeorge
Liederman and David Goldfarb.


Pag**
The Jewish Fbridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, Auguu
Early Registration Urged for American Gathering of Survivors
Ludwik Brodzki, a national vice president of the
American Gathering of Jewish Holocaust Survivors,
reported that his brother, Jacob, and Julian Feingold,
have been appointed to the National Executive Com-
mittee preparing for the first such gathering in the
United States next year.
The Gathering, which will take place in Washington,
D.C., from April 11 (the day after Yom Hashoa The
Day of RememberanceI to April 14, will focus on Jewish
civil and armed resistance against Nazi Germany.
Benjamin Meed, president of the American Gather-
ing, announcing the appointments of the local Holo-
caust survivors, said that "not only will the 40th anni-
versary of the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising be commemor-
ated, but tribute will be paid to those who participated
throughout Europe in all forms of resistance to Nazi
oppression."
He said that initial response to the first announce
ment of the American Gathering which will have specia
events at Kennedy Center, Constitution Hall, Lincoln
Memorial and Arlington Cemetery has been "over-
whelming." Because of limited seating capacity for the
indoor events, he urged that registrations be forwarded
immediately to American Gathering, One Park Avs.,
Suite 418, New York NY 10016.
He revealed that Elie Wiesel. who is chairman of the
U.S. Holocaust Memorial Council, has agreed to serve
as honorary president. The entire program will be con-
ducted under the auspices of the Days of Remember-
ance Committee of the U.S. Memorial Council.
Ernest Michel, who chaired the World Gathering
last year in Jerusalem has been named honorary chair-
man of the National Executive Committee.
According to those planning the event, tribute will be
paid to the Jews who fought back with weapons and
flame in the ghettos and those who prayed in defiance
of the edicts that group worship was forbidden. Tribute
will also be paid to the teachers who continued to teach
secretly although they did so at the peril of their lives.
"We will remember those who printed the illegal leaf-
lets of defiance and those who secretlv distributed them
in the face of severe punishment. And we will remember
those who fought with the partisan forces in the forests
and caves and harassed the Nazi oppressors at every
opportunity" Meed said.
AMERICAN GATHERING
JEWISH HOLOCAUST SURVIVORS
Early Childhood Teachers Invited for One-Day Institute
martyrdom
Nursery and kindergarten
teachers in five synagogues, He-
brew Day School of Greater Fort
Lauderdale and Jewish Commu-
nity Center of Greater Port
Lauderdale will be among the
more than 300 South Florida
teachers attending the all-day
Professionals Growth Institute
to be held from 9 to 2:30 p.m.,
Tuesday, Aug. 24. at Temple
Beth Shalom, Hollywood.
The Institute is a semi-annual
event co-sponsored by the Jewish
Council of Early Childhood Edu-
cators and the Central Agency
for Jewish Education with which
the Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale is associated.
The local area teachers come
from Temples Kol Ami in Planta-
tion, Emanu-El in Lauderdale
Lakes, Beth Israel in Sunrise,
Beth Orr in Coral Springs, and
Chassidic Festival
Returns to Bailey Hall
The Chassidic Festival from
Tel Aviv is returning to Broward
Community College's Cultural
Affairs International Showcase
in November as replacement for
the scheduled performances of
Bob Fosse's "Chicago" show.
BBC reported that the produc-
er's scheduling and touring
problems resulted in the cancell-
ation of "Chicago."
Tickets will be available to the
general public for the Chassidic
Festival after Monday, Aug. 16.
Until then current "Chicago"
ticket holders have first option to
exchange their tickets.
Those who purchased their
tickets through Bailey Hall must
return them in person to the box
office there during office hours,
10 to 3 p.m. The Chassidic Festi-
val, returning for the third con-
secutive year, is a variety show of
music, dancing and singing, pre-
senting the winners of the annual
festival held in Israel for the best
new composers and songs.
Tickets for Saturday evening,
Nov. 20, and Sunday matinee and
evening performances, Nov. 21,
re $12. Further information is a-
vailable at the Cultural Affaire
office 761-7412.
Our Family Urges You To Exercise Your Right To Vote...
Irwin and Mtmai Hart Barkowttz
nd daughtar, Anna
1
I
P l
BERKOWITZ
Broward County Court Judge
Group 12
Beth Torah in Tamarac, the Day
School and JCC.
The Institute will include sem-
inars and workshops in such
areas as Science in Early Child-
hood Education, creative move-
ment and dramatics, disciplines,
music for Jewish holidays,
literature, puppetry, arts and
crafts for the Fall holidays,
teaching math through music,
Israeli folk dancing.
Special sessions for directors of
early childhood education will
also be held.
Arlene Greenberg, president of
the educational council, noted
that the "Institute provides par-
ticipants with a wealth of ideas,
suggestions, teachniques, and
materials. In addition, it engen-
ders a sense of common effort and
collegiality for the teachers in
providing the foundation for a
child's learning in both general
and Judaic areas."
Other officers of the Council
include Gladys Schleicher of
Temple Beth Torah and Robin
Eisenberg of Boca Raton, vice
presidents.
The Council is scheduling the
second of the year's Institutes
next February and during the
year will on-going in-service
courses and workshops, an
annual retreat for directors, and
monthly meetings for the ex-
change of information on projects
and programs.
Riverside
Riverside Memorial Chapel,Inc.,'Funeral Directors
Miami Beach/Miami/North Miami Beach
Dade County Phone No. 531-1151
Hollywood/Ft. Lauderdale (Tamarac)
Broward County Phone No. 523-5801
West Palm Beach: 683-8676
Carl Grossberg, President
Alfred Golden, Executive Vice President
Leo Hack, V.P., Religious Advisor
Keith Kronish
Sponsoring the Guardian Plan Pre-Arranged Funeral
Tradition*
Itfc what makes us Jews*

SBOtom
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CANTOR JACOB J. RENZER
(N on-Partisan)
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S?.V^SYP,R?T,^AS1HS,EPRVVC?S.US ** ^^ *'
wElw^A^JS?" THE UHtm SYNAGOGUE
HEBREW SCHoS "&* F.UUV ^CREDITED REUGIOUS
TEACHERS L AFFED BY PR?SSIONAt LICENSED
ftS^ KINDERGARTEN THROUGH
K* All CLASSIC ^CONFIRMATION. REGISTRATION
OFFICE IS NOW ,N ^OGRESS AT THE TEAAPIE
942-6410 942-6411


,y> August 13,1982
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort LauderdaU
Page 3
m"
tied Renewal
It's Making the Difference for Zvia
Emergency Fund
By WENDY ELLIMAN
RAM AT H ASHIKMA. ISRAEL A year
ho if anyone had told Zvia Haddad aha would
day graduate with profesaional qualification!
i a university, she would have simply smiled.
.ie eldest of five children of an Afghaniatani
other and a Yemenite father, aha had grown up
,one of Israel's distressed urban areas, where
veryday problems are all-consuming and
liversity education a luxury beyond thinking
ut seriously.
: for Zvia, it is going to be different.
Her own determination, her mother's aelf-
/
fvia Haddad
rifice and foresight, and a special effort by The
leration of Jewish Agencies of Greater
hiladelphia through Project Renewal, are
ening the world of professional social work to
r. At 21, Zvia has made a leap that most people
'I not make in a lifetime. The odds she has
lercome are tremendous.
|Her parents. Yosef and Hedva Haddad, arrived
Brael within a few months of one another in
S. They were placed in the same immigrant
orption center and moved to Ramat HaShik-
i later that year. They were to become one of
81,600 families in that rapidly built, over-
Med and soon deteriorating neighborhood,
fng at the lowest socio-economic level of Israeli
losef Haddad had not held a steadv iob for as
ack as Zvia can remember. For the past six
i he has been treated for alchoholism. It is
ova Haddad who held the family together.
pout formal education, aha worked aa a
managed to keep her five children off the
fe, and sent them to schools outside the
Khborhood. She was determined that her
aren be equipped with the tools to overcome
Tdisadvantages and build better lives.
[via s mother ensured that her eldest daughter
the best education she could get for her. This
BKtuending her to 8cho01 outside Ramat
Mikma, where the standard of teaching would
*tter and her peer group academically
Jwud\unlike nx>8t of bar contemporaries in the
piborhood. Zvia did very well in high school.
! ^u[ ?7yned of B0"1* to university," says
until I did my military service, I never
anyone who had gone to University. In the
la A^n ,,u a mea>cl orderly, and my CO.
' ^r He to,d me that I had potential. He
jed me nagged at me, actually until
Je Hebrew University's Paul Baerwald
.,' j ^^ Work had a place for her. She has
r*ed a four-year course there, and for 26
each week, Zvia studies psychology,
^ya^^twtics.Hergoalistobecomea
f'UI social worker.
?A Hotel Worker
^profession where you work with the
ft "id old, the aick and the lonely, all the
"* need help," aba says
* Haddad is delighted that Zvia is
, Continued from Page 1
for educational study mission,
was able to provide first hand in-
formation About the damage in-
flicted on communities in north-
em Israel by the heavy shelling
and rocketing inflicted by the
i coffee
she works for six to eight hours a day STthe co'l
shop of the King David Hotel *
"It's busy there," she says, "and you're alwavn
SKi5Lbut KM??* sss&aSr
fill are1gI,eat' ?<* the hotel guests are usually
Pleasant Best of all, the hotel is really gtSdabout
KbSl -working houra around 558?
She goes home to Ramat HaShikma only once
2SS W"S8- With "'"dyingand working. I
can t manage it more often than that," she sa?s.
H.SWh^thl?g! fre changing in Ramat
HaShikma The Haddads have at last been
moved to a larger apartment. "It was done by
Project Renewal," says Zvia. The Federation of
Jewish Agencies of Greater Philadelphia is linked
with Ramat HaShikma under the joint project
between the people of Israel and world Jewry to
rehabilitate Israel's disadvantage neigh-
borhoods. The apartment I grew up in was one
of a hundred in Ramat HaShikma which was
condemned. When Project Renewal began, my
family was given a new home," says Zvia.
After learning about Zvia'a remarkable
achievements, Philadelphia's Federation decided
to help by awarding her a university scholarship
on condition that she practice as a social worker
when she graduates.
Zvia was given news of her scholarship by the
Jewish Agency's Renewal Department. At firat
there was a long silence.
.. ,'1 **ont know wnat to My." h said at last,
"I'm so excited, so pleased, so happy. It'll help so
much."
The scholarship will be easing the next four
years for Zvia. "The best thing is that I know
there are people who really care, who linked then-
future to mine," she says.
In Jerusalem, Zvia lives in the university's
dormitory, sharing a room with another girl, a
second year law student from Kiryat Ekron, also
a distressed Israeli neighborhood.
To some, the room could seem crowded with
two girls sleeping and studying there, but by
comparison with the damp single room which
Zvia once shared with three brothers and a sister,
it is spacious and comfortable.
Exceptionally determined and exceptionally
bright, Zvia is one of the few who have managed
on their own to get over the obstacles facing the
people in Israel's Project Renewal neighborhoods.
"It's wonderful that my parents are out of that
damp dark apartment. I 'm studying... By
the time my sister starts university she's 16
now and wants to be a doctor I'll be working
and be able to help her."
That is what Project Renewal is all about:
giving people what they need to permanently
overcome socio-economic disadvantage, join the
mainstream of Israeli life and then be able to help
others from the same background do the same.
Sunny
emergency,
solicitations
than $2,500.
Friedman. For the
be made personal
and raised more
dinated by Harry Glugover, co-
chairman of the Greater Margate
Area UJA-Federation committee
and Florence Goldfarb of Beth
Hillel. They were assisted by
George Liederman and Mrs.
Goldfarb's husband, David.
Residents of Cypress Chase re-
ceived a letter from Philip
Schwirck, the association's presi-
dent, and his UJA co-chairman
Bernard Juli. Juli's wife, Betty,
followed up with phone calls, and
then Schwirck and Juli began
ringing doorbells and collected
checks totalling more than
$2,600. They presented these
checks at the end of July to Joel
Telles, Federation's assistant
executive director, and promised
more would be coming. The total
came primarily from residents in
Buildings three and four, with
other residents and a neighbor-
hood branch bank also making
contributions. This trio will also
seek out their vacationing neigh-
bors and "snowbird" residents.
And in the nearby community
of Castle Garden, Sol Cohen fol-
lowed up the yeoman work that
had been done earlier in the year
during the regular campaign by
UJA-Federation Castle Chair-
Meanwhile the Miami Beach
meeting resulted in a call to com-
munities to supplement the 1963
campaign with a Special Fund
Campaign.
Ethel Waldman, who success-
fully chaired the Federation's
1982 campaign which produced
more than $4 million, just re-
turned from a special Prime
Minister's Meeting to Israel and
a fact-finding visit into Lebanon.
She and Kenneth Bierman,
Federation's campaign chairman,
and others from the Federation
were among those in attendance
for the meeting called by UJA'a
national chairman for 1963,
Robert E. Loup of Denver, and
Florida's Regional UJA Chair-
man Alan L. Shulman of Palm
Beach.
They learned of the need to de-
velop a Special Fund campaign to
help ease the extraordinary fi-
nancial burden the Jewish
Agency must bear in restoring
and replacing humanitarian serv-
ices and programs that were des-
troyed or have been impaired by
Lebanon crisis.
Loup said: "Because we did
not raise enough money in the
past, the people of Israel have
had to bear the cost of life-en-
hancing programs that are right-
fully our responsibility."
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NEW FOR THE HIGH HOLY DAYS 5743
The Shof ar That Lost Its Voice
by David E. Fass illustrated by Martene Lobell Ruthen
The day before Rosh Hashanah young Avi races home lo
practice blowing the shofar for the children's service only
to find that no sound comes out. As he searches for the
reason, he suddenly finds himself within the shofar
where he discovers a magical world of enchanting music
and ethical principles that leaches him the meaning of
Rosh Hashanah.
Intended for young readers, ages nine through
twelve, The Shofar That Lttst Its Voice is written
simply but with a profound message for both
parents and children.
$6.95 hardcover
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J


The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Wday, Augut ia .^
Jewish Floridian Eyewitness in Lebanon
FREO K 8MOCMET
Editor and NtWitt
orQraaMrForttaarJardal*
SUZANNE SHOCHET
fUW'*h*l!^?fc?'L><'>*m<,*f **< MK-May Bl-Waakly Daianc. ol yJO?
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Friday, August 13,1982 24 AB 5742
Volume 11 Number 27
Aug. 12,1952
24 Jewish Writers
Executed in the USSR
Irving R. Friedman, chairman of the Community Relations Com-
mittee of the Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale, and
CRC's Director Lawrence M. Schuval released the following informa-
tion received from Abraham J. Bayer, director of the International
Commission of the National Jewish Community Relation Advisory
Committee, one of whose responsibilities is concern for Soviet Jews:
Thirty years ago, Aug. 12, 1952, in the dark cellars of Moscow's Lu-
byianka Prison, after months of torture and interrogation, 24 of the
leading Jewish writers, artists and poets were executed. This was the
culmination of Stalin's campaign to destroy Jewish culture in the
Soviet Union. Thirty years later, in August of 1982, although murder
is now "unfashionable," repressive measures against Jewish expres-
sion are still the norm. .
The Soviet Union, with the third largest Jewish community in the
world, is the only country with a large Jewish population without a
single Jewish school for children! Even private teaching of Hebrew is a
violation of KGB "rules." Recently, Jewish activists teaching Hebrew
in their homes, in small groups of three to six people, have come under
severe pressure. For these people, the dream of a Jewish life in the
USSR or Israel is still alive but under daily fire.
. The newest tactic is that of stripping academic degrees
earned by Jewish scientists who request to go to Israel.
How can you erase acquired knowledge f In the USSR, I
guess, simply by saying "I want to go to Israel.1". The
USSR says We're taking your degrees awaysr
Others such as Ida Nudel, who recently completed a four-year term
for hanging a banner outside her apartment saying, "KGB, give me
my visa," are being pushed to the brink. After coming back from Si-
berian exile, she was not permitted to live in Moscow and was denied
residence in Riga. Now, she is in an isolated town, without family and
her sister waiting in Israel. Her first application to leave: 1971!
After several years of a slight opening of the doors, emigration is
down to a virtual trickle. In August of 1979,4,000 people were allowed
to leave. If the trend of this past year continues, then no more than
180 or leas will leave in the month of August, 1982.
The reverbations of that infamous night of August 12,1962, are still
being felt amongst Soviet Jews. They are not free to learn about their
past and unable to carve out a future: it is any wonder so many want
to leave?
'\gs5^=^T^......T" 1
).fffV,<.^/:'tvVv..'M-.,j;Jv.vVj
Following is the testimony of Douglas M.
Bloomfield, legislative director of the American
Israel Public Affairs Committee, before the
House Foreign Affairs Subcommittee on Europe
and the Middle East, on July 13,1982. Mr.
Bloomfield had just returned two days earlier
from Lebanon and Israel.
During my visit to Israel and Lebanon, I saw
tens of thousands of captured weapons. Tanks,
cannon, rockets, launchers, rifles, handguns and
ammunition of every conceivable kind and size.
They were pre-eminently Soviet, but of other
origins, as well. I saw dozens ot crates of un-
opened Soviet-made Kalachnikov assault rifles
snipped via Benghazi, Libya, or directly from the
USSR; they had packing instructions as well as
operating directions in English. I brought back
the service manual for the Soviet AKMS machine
gun. I also saw hundreds of U.S.-made M-16
rifles, many of them in their original shipping car-
tons with labels showing they were originally sold
and shipped to Saudi Arabia; they had been
transferred to the PLO. There were over 1,000
new West German G-3 aasault rifles, one of the
best in the world. I also saw Chinese-built anti-
aircraft gun8 and cannon, plus more arms from
Vietnam, Korea and the Soviet bloc. There were
even guns used by the Nazis in World War II.
PLO Arsenal
Some of those anti-aircraft guns were attached
to many types of vehicles, from Dodge pick-up
trucks to Toyotas to Chinese trucks. Then there
were the night sights, handguns, grenade launch-
ers, RPG's and Katyusha rockets. Many of the
grenade launchers were stamped in English,
"Made by Fatah." Fatah is the main branch of
the PLO and is Arafat's own organization.
Ironically, only a relatively few pieces of the So-
viet and Chinese arms had markings in Arabic;
most were in English.
There was also the other equipment, like the
uniforms, boots, trophies for auto mechanics,
typewriters, a Bell and Howell tape recorder and a
fully-equipped listening lab.
It has been estimated that the Israelis have
captured enough material to equip a very large
army.
Weapons were found everywhere. In mosques,
schools, homes, public buildings, caves and un-
derground bunkers even U.N. offices. At a
UNRWA Vocational Training School in Sidon,
Israeli troops found stores of weapons, ammuni-
tion, training materials, an audiovisual lab and
the personal office of Yaair Arafat with his picture
on the wall flanked by a swastika.
I spoke with many Lebanese, both Christian
and Muslim, and they volunteered that they were
glad to see the Palestinians gone. Many had
stories to tell of their treatment and trauma under
the PLO.
I saw perhaps as many as 10,000 Lebanese
driving south from Beirut returning to their
homes with the car full of relatives and the
family's possessions tied to the top. Many were
refugees from the fighting of the previous two
weeks, but thousands had been displaced by the
civil war in 1976 and were finally able to go home.
One Shi ite Muslim couple had seen its home
destroyed six years ago by the Palestinians in the
south so they were now making their bom. s-
former PLO headquarters in Sidon. The Pi/? !
taken over an apartment building and a tJ^^
next door. I was told by sorneTocal resUenu!?
when the PLO came to Sidon in the 7foiu
pelled all the Lebanese patients and staff 0ftL
Lebanese Red Crescent hospital and instalkrU
own people. The apartment building nextdonr
became a headquarters and barracks. Organ
tional charts and posters and pictures of Lenf*
were still on some wallsbut hot the one wh*.
the new Lebanese occupant had written in kZ
"Death to Arafat. Long Live Begin." Her huT*
band said the plumbing was not working and;.
before we had arrived, he had climbed up BE
crawl space above the bathroom to fix the oinia*
Instead of pipes, he found a large anti-aircraft
gun, still in its original packing. Everywhere It
looked, he said, he found ammunition of all kinrU
and shapes, and he wanted it hauled away asiaL
as possible. w*
I also saw the captured documents. The oidm
to draft children of terrorists 12 years and okhr
for PLO duty; the tank drivers' licenses; notes on
Gromyko-Arafat meetings; Soviet graduation
certificates for PLO officers; shipping labels for
weapons sent from U.S. plants to Saudi Arabia
andlists of courses taken by PLO terrorists in
foreign countries.
But the moat alarming of all was the report
which shows that UNIFIL forces passed on ioal
ligence information to the terrorists and a writtn
agreement between the Norwegian UNIFIL
battalion and the PLO over the placement of a
terrorist gun rxwition-called "The Nest'-for
firing into not hern Israel.
Media retortions
I did not encounter the widespread destruction
and havoc I had expected from the newspaper and
television reports I had seen here in Washing
There were two good reasons:
1 It had not been there in the first place Tree
there was destruction. Bombing and shelling and
fighting produce the rubble of war. Butindtiei
like Tyre, Sidon and Damour. it was largely con-
fined to areas adjacent to the main highway and
some key crossroads. Even in those towns which
had seen heavy righting, the destruction was
limited and most parts of them were untouched or
suffered only minor damage.
2. Clean-up began promptly. Every street wu
passable. Rubble had been cleared and moved to
the sides of the roads to be taken away Recon-
struction waa taking place along side continua-
tion of construction that had begun before the
fighting. Life was returning to what passes for
normal in that beleaguered country.
The people I saw in Lebanon-both Christian,
and Muslimswelcomed the Israeli operation to
remove the terrorists from their country. Now
they want all the foreign troops- Palestiniani
Syrians, and I sraelis- to leave so that they can
get on with the rebuilding already underway. I
urge all Members of Congress to go personally to
Lebanon, as ReoreeenUti vee Wilson and Sil-
jander and Senators Levin and Dodd have done,
to see for yourselves the differences between the
sensationalized media version and the reality of
the situation in that country.
UJA Names 'Operation Breakthrough9 Chairman
NEW YORK- Nathan
Braunstein, of Allentown, Pa., a
national vice chairman of the
United Jewish Appeal, has been
named chairman of UJA's
"Operation Breakthrough", it
was announced by UJA National
Chairman Robert E. Loup.
In his new post Braunstein will
direct UJA's programs for con-
tributions capable of gifts of
$10,000 and more to the annual
UJA-Federation Community
campaigns who are not currently
giving to their full potential.
Praising Braunstein's ability
tenure as chairman of UJA's
Mid-Atlantic Region that led to
his nomination as National Vice
Chairman, Loup said: "Nathan
Braunstein has shown an ability
to bring the needs of the pro-
grams we fund to local aware-
ness, and translate the concern of
American Jews into tangible
support for our people in Israel.
"This will be crucial in the
days ahead, when the Jewish
Agency's resources are going to
have to be stretched to the abso-
lute limit as the costs of Israel's
Lebanon effort result in the bur-
den of social development falling
in the national fundraising carno- ^n f 8dal develoPnt falling
aign demonstrated during his mcre".8in81y *> the Agency." The
"* "" Jewish Agency is a prims re-
Soviets Continue to Clamp
Down on Jewish Emigration
...
NEW YORK (JTAI -
Charlotte Jacobson, chairman of
the Soviet Jewry Research
Bureau of the National Confe-
rence on Soviet Jewry, reported
that 186 Jews arrived from the
Soviet Union in Vienna with
Israeli visas, during July. She
noted that "Soviet authorities
have decided to allow the Jewish
emigration movement to become
a trickle, merely allowing a few to
come through gates that are virt-
ually closed. In the meantime,
are damn damned behind those
gate*." T.' ;;.- ..-
n1** ^Y.** Jewiy ">*reh
Bureau will continue to closely
!Fmi%rciewi?h "^tiorr from
me u&bK, Jacobson said She
5& Witt NCSJ'" chairman,
I heodore Mann, will discuss the
the NCSJ Executive Committee
which will evaluate U.S. partici-
pation in the Third International
Nathan Braunstein
cipient of funds raised in WAi
campaigns.
Long active in Jewish fl**1'
Braunstein, a belt manufacuu*
has served as campaign <*
man, vice president and pre*|
of the Jewish FederaUoe
Allentown. He served on*
board of Allentown TajF
Beth El and the Jewish t
munity Center. He led the**
Atlantic Regional Mission to"
land and Israel and p*rt*!
aaiaiaiaa 11 11 1 n "
-
hundreds of thousands of others j P"fr Ocfcp*r, "^.jjfcgj VJ A
A*'I ......... i*mm*mmsjmmmm*m*msBm _-. .-
Hrime AliM*


wfry.Aug*13'1"2
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
______
P*5
PLO Has Weapons for Army of 150,000
The PLO blasted tunnels through
I solid rock in mountains in southern
Lebanon in which to stack crates of anna
(Picture on left) and floor to ceiling
|stacks of rifles (picture on right).
The Russian marking on the crates
I translate to "parts for tractors." Gideon
Ipatt, Israel's Minister of Industry and
Commerce, in a recent interview in
[London, said: "The PLO would have
been incapable of building such storage
bases. Only the Americans, the Israelis
or the Russians could have accomplished
such a task- And so far, no one has sug-
gested that the Americans or Israelis
were involved."
Patt indicated that he believes the
Soviets planned to send troops into
Lebanon. He said: "The quantities of
arms of various kinds is just unbelieva-
ble." He enumerated Israel's inventory
of these caches which will take Israel
almost two months to pick up the war
materiel and bring it to Israel:
"... weapons for an army of 150,000
- and the PLO had only 15,000 men;
tents, blankets, foods 8,000 tons of
coffee beans 70,000 to 80,000
Kalshnikov rifles thousands of
rocket-propelled grenades tens of
thousands of shells hundreds of
Katyusha rockets and launchers and
several surface-to-air missile systems
(SAM)"
The Israeli Cabinet official, who had
been interviewed by the foreign editor of
London Jewish Chronicle, Joseph Fin-
kelstone, said the storage places, tun-
nels, were air-conditioned with power
supplied by electric generators.
He said PLO supplies shipped into
Lebanon came from Russia, Yugoslavia,
Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, and "some
150,000 blankets arrived from North
Korea."
W Director Chosen for Israel Mission
International Red Cross Distorted Casualty Figures
Shirley K. Miller, executive di-
ctor of the Jewish National
fund ui i one of 10 other JNF directors
the U.S., selected to go on a
ct-finding mission for an in-
ept h study of the JNF projects
everely damaged in Israel's
orthern Galilee by PLO shelling
i recent months.
Announcement of Mrs. Miller's
election was made by Barrett
othenberg of Coral Springs,
"7 president He said the trip is
onsored by the JNF national
and Will extend from Aug.
|4 through Sept- 6. '"' J
He said the schedule includes
wiring Israel from the Galilee to
! Negev, with emphasis on the
An-nell
Hotel
Strictly
Kosher
$

3 Full Course Meals Dairy
Mashglach a Synagogue
on Premises
TV Live Snow Movies
Special Diets Served
Open All Year Services
rmtood
Cantor I
MIAMI Bl / '191
TEMPLE
EMANU-EL!
The Pioneer Reform Jewish
Shirley Miller
water supply, the numerous land
reclamation and reforestation
projects, and the living condi-
tions in the areas.
Discussions with the staff of
the Jerusalem office of Karen
Kayemeth Leisrael will be part of
the educational briefings for the
JNF staffers.
Shirley Miller's JNF office at
800 W. Oakland Park Blvd. has
been working closely with syna-
gogues, organizations and com-
munal agencies during the almost
two years she has headed the of-
fice. Inquiries about planting
trees in Israel, Blue Boxes, and
JNF programa, may be had by
calling the office 561-4812.
high
holy day
services
International Red Cross, which
has refused official recognition of
Magen David Adorn (Red Shield
of David), Israel's relief agency,
has been charged with "delib-
erate" distortion of the casualties
in Lebanon.
The charge was leveled by Is-
rael's Minister of Health Eliezer
Shostak. At a recent Knesset
session, he demanded that the
Red Cross acknowledge the true
figures and publicize the tremen-
dous program of medical and hu-
manitarian aid provided Leba-
nese civilians.
Shostak said: "We have a long
account with the International
Red Cross. It's attitude towards
Israel and the Magen David
Adorn has been one of patent dis-
crimination down the years."
Magen David Adorn, almost
from the first day Israel Defense
Forces started its assault on PLO
strongholds in southern Lebanon
early in June, was the first
civilian group to enter Lebanon.
Magen David Adorn meets all
the requirements except one. Its
symbol, the shield of David, has
not been accepted. Yet Interna-
tional Red Cross has accepted the
Red Crescent of Islam. The Pal-
estinian Red Crescent Society,
headed by Yasir Arafat's brother,
made many of the exaggerated
reports about civilian casualties
in Lebanon.
Despite repeated applications
for recognition, and a comment
by the president of International
Red Cross last January that the
refusal "may seem discrimina-
tory to some," the international
society did list Magen David
Adorn on its 1980 honor roll for
the Israel agency's help to
countries that have suffered
natural disasters.
J
ll
FOR THE AFFAIR OF YOUR LIFE
The perfect setting for any joyous occasion... day or night.
Hotel rooms for out of town guests.
Banquet and meeting facilities for conventions and
seminars ... large or small.
KB
^
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WCM MO COUNW cus
14401 SW 62 Ave., Miami. Florida 33158
(305) 236-7161 Ext 126/128
Call or write to Catering and Convention Department
r
Broward County for over 40 yean.
High Holy Day services at Parker Playhouse
For information retarding tickets, membership
(Ten^Enwui-ElhorK)buiUirnjrKl),religkHJ
choc* and Temple affiliates and service* calL
_________731-2310_________
3245 West Oakland Park&rvd., Ft Uuderdale
PROUDLY DISTRIBUTED
BY
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MIAMI BEACH
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DON'T BE FOOLED
BY SUBSTITUTES!
When spending your hard earned money for value, be sure that'a
what you get! Be certain it's EMPIRE KOSHER fresh chickens and
turkeys. Ask your butcher to show you Empire's famous Red White
and Blue tag while it's attached to the wing. Otherwise, you risk
getting something less than the best. Make sure that you are not
another victim of deception.


Page 6
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Frida
y- August 13,m.
Uwijh Family Services fJFSt
of Broward County offers coun-
seling to individuals and families
in a wide variety of problems.
Case histories published here
show how some problems are re-
solved. Since all relationships
with its clients are confidential,
names and identifying characters
have been changed
Once He Was A Problem;
Now He's A Lawyer
Seven years ago the Viktor
family came to the North Bro-
ward office of the Jewish Family
Service because son, John, had
been extremely introverted. The
family consisted of John, 16, a
younger brother and a sister; his
father Jay, 50, and his stepmo-
ther, 30, who had married Jay
five years ago.
John's natural mother had died
when he was 10. She had died
after a long, lingering cancerous
illness. John, even at that early
age, had become accustomed to
the thought of death so that he
never verbally or emotionally ex-
pressed grief when she died. He,
also, was unable to relate well to
his father who had been brought
up in a non-communicative
family.
Since his father's second
marriage, John had become ex-
tremely introverted. He had few
friends. He rarely socialized. He
did well in school, but refused his
stepmother's requests to do
household chores or mow the
lawn. He resented and vented
anger when his father's wife
asked him to babysit, at times,
and
with his younger brothc
sister.
The parents decieded to seek
JFS counseling help. When John
learned that the entire family was
supposed to go to JFS, he refused
to talk or eat supper with the rest
of the family. But go to JFS he
did. Then, after several family
sessions, counseling continued
only with John and the highly -
qualifed JFS staffer.
Several months of counseling
produced a new awareness of
himself and his family to, the
point John was able to express
his feeling of loss for his natural
mother. He realized his resent-
ment-love relationship with his
stepmother that he was able to
relate on a better emotional level
with his parents.
He now could express his emo-
tions easily. He began making
friends, male and female, and he
finished high school, He was
urged to continue counseling at
college. He did. Now he's a law
school graduate, successful at the
bar examination, and engaged to
be married.
DAY
for
THI HIQH HOLY DAY
}
BRING YOUR FAMILY
TO OUR HOUSE
FOR THE HOLIDAYS!
Indoor e Outdoor Ton nit Indoor ft Outdoor Pools
Robert Trent Jones Get! Course Poors** Lunch
Health Club, Saunas ft Co-Ed Whirlpool Spa Jogging
Indoor Mini-Gelt ft Gym Boating ft Fishing On Our Lake
Indoor Disco ReNer Skating. Entertainment ft Nit* Club
Children s World ft Pool. Day Camp ft Teen Program
.HOTEL (114) S47-S1M. NTC (712) M7-442I. IN MONTREAL |514| Ml-7000 J
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Olympic Swimming Pool Full Block of Private Beach
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(^ p APPROPRIATE ENTERTAINMENT
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A confirmed High Holiday reservation made at the Crown
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COMPLIMENTARY LUNCH in the coffee shop.
KM DOLLAR KOSHER
HOTEL

OLATT
IM4IMtt SttBNNSMCft
leservatisnNNMsl -538-9045 Of 531-5771
Vour Hoets. Michael Lefkowttz a Alex Smiiow
AT OHEL B'NAI RAPHAEL-Additional in-
structions to additional members of the newly
former "Chevra Kadisha" (The Holy Society to
aid in the preparation of deceased persons for
burial) were given by Rabbi E. Rosther. He is
pictured with those attending. From left:. Max
Schneeweis, Leonard Hyman, Isaac Auster.
Philip Singer, Philip Weinstein, David J. Sttrn.
Rabbi Rosther, Sam OtlL Joseph Wtiu Jod
Zomlefer, Sidney Sussman. The Chevra Kadiilu
is being coordinated by Rabbi Albert I
Schwartz, director of the Chaplaincy Commwno,
of the Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Laud*.
Hale.
Rep.'s Target Refuseniks
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
The 43 freshman members of the
House of Representatives are
making daily speeches on the
House floor on behalf of Soviet
Jewish refuseniks in a campaign
that began last week and will
continue through September. The
campaign was announced by
Reps. Christopher Smith (R.
N.J.) and William Coyne (D.,
Pa.), co-chairman of the 97th
Congressional Class for Soviet
Jewry.
"Working in conjunction with
the National Conference on
Soviet Jewry, we have targeted
those refuseniks who have been;
awaiting visas for more than six
years," Coyne explained. He said
each member has adopted one or
two refuseniks and will be writing
to the proper authorities in the
U.S. and the Soviet Union on
their behalf.
SMITH, who spent nine days
in Moscow and Leningrad last
said: "One can never
imagine the extreme
January,
actually
hardship the refusenik families
face on a daily basis in their at-
tempt to secure religious free-
dom.*; He said he returned ft
hia trip "with a deeper
comai..
ment to human rights m,
and a deeper commitment for tW
TEACHERS
Interested in positions
in the Hebrew and Sunday schools
of North Broward
CALLCAJE
Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale
748-8200
DOIT
FOR ISRAEL
BY DONG IT
IN ISRAEL
Have a swim in the cool Mediterranean.
Take a hike up breathtaking Masada.
Or enjoy a delicious dinner
overlooking ancient Jerusalem.
This year, do it In Israel.
Because now more than ever,
when you do it in Israel, you'll be doing it for Israel, too.
You'll be having more than the best vacation ever.
You'll be showing Israel you love her
when she needs it most.
So this year.
take that special vacation In Israel.
For Israel. And for you.
A
ISRAE. RIGHT NOW.
et
-aaavMw
-\
w


Friday. August 13,1982
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 7
Touro Stamp Being Issued Aug. 22
The oldest existing synagogue
in the United States, historic
Touro Synagogue in Newport,
ll dedicate in 1763, is
featured in a 20-cent commemor-
ative postage stamp.
The first day of issue ceremony
will take place Sunday morning,
Auk 22, in the Synagogue with
Postmaster General William F.
Bolger as dedication speaker.
Rabbi Theodore Lewis of Touro
Synagogue and Aaron J. Slom,
president of the Society Of
Friends of the Synagogue, also
will participate.
The Synagogue was built prin-
cipally by Sephardic Jews from
Spain and Portugal who had fled
the Inquisition and found in the
Rhode Island colony the religious
freedom they sought.
In 1790, President George
Washington visited Newport and
received a letter of welcome from
the Touro congregation. Part of
his reply read: "For happily the
Government of the United
States, which gives to bigotry no
sanction, to persecution no assis-
tance, requires only that they
who live under its protection
should demean themselves as
good citizens, in giving it on all
occasions, their' effectual sup-
port.'"
The design of the stamp honors
Touro Synagogue as an historic
American building and a symbol
of America's tradition of religious
freedom. The view of the Synago-

w
Touro
i Synagogue
j \- I-.HK1 i,
> To bigotry,
no sanction.
^ To persecution,
I no assistance.
< *n rj(t- W.hii tgi i h
Greatly enlarged reproduction of stamp
SA20c
TAPES
CARTONS
HANGERS
POLYETHYLENE
BUSINESS FORMS
TAGS LABELS
BAGS BOXES
WIPES Ak
776 6272
ffOWARO
ACKACING
1201 N E 45 STREET
FORT LAUDERDALE
gue, in full color, is from a paint-
ing by Donald Moss of Ridge-
field, Conn., and the typography
is the work of Bradbury Thomp-
son of Riverside, Conn.
First Day Cancellations
The U.S. Postal Service is
making it available for people to
get first day cancellations even
though they may not be able to
attend the first day ceremonies.
Customers are encouraged to
purchase the Touro stamps at
local post offices, affix them to
envelopes in the upper right
corner. Peelable return address
labels are recommended for this
purpose at least U of an inch
from the bottom. A filler of postal
card thickness should be inserted
in each cover. These covers
should be placed in a larger
A Costa Cruise
is easy to take.
Tkke the
Bahamas
Party Ship.
Amerikanis from Miami,
3- and 4-night cruises.
It's half price sail time on the fun-loving^
spacious Amerikanis sailing *rorn^^^\
Miami, August 2 through ^aa^H T %J .
November 19,1982.
I
That's when the sec-
- ^ond person in your cabin cruises
for 90% less at a savings of $202.50 to
$332.50! Choose a 3-rught cruise to Nassau
sailing every Friday or a 4-nroMcruise to Freepon
and Nassau sailing every Monda* ^uot
So have some fun at these easy-on-the-pocxei
prices Just calf your travel agent. It s that easy.
Amerikanis of Greek registry.
O"wiOOl^IOI-l)Oifdc^n>ndK>wncal0o^
nd up Th oiMr it capacity eonnouad n0 MM*
w,tn II,
[OSTA CRUISES
Tkke it easy. TakeaCosta/
n ^ p* fSS*c2 3K i "** *
envelope and mailed before Sept.
21 to Customer-Affixed Enve-
lopes, Postmaster Newport, RI
02840-9991.
To have the Postal Service,
affix the Touro stamps, personal
checks in the exact amount of the
20-cent stamps to be applied to
the addressed covers will be ac-
cepted for orders up to the limit
of 50 covers. The Postal Service
says don't send cash and postage
stamps are unacceptable as pay-
ments. These orders must be
addressed to Touro Synagogue
Stamp, Postmaster, Newport, RI
02840-9992 and also must be
postmarked no later than Sept.
21.
Waldman
HOTEL
Miami Beach's Flnaat Qlatt KmImnulaina^3>
Op^AfllnForTheHIGH HOLIDAYS
With Your host. Sam and Morris Waldman^ Gary Sher. David Diamond
ROSKHASHANAYOM KIPPUR
SERVICES CONDUCTED BY RENOWN CANTOR
12 Days'-11 Nights(Sept. 17-28) '300 pw
(2 meals daily Included. 3 meale Sat. holiday*)
8 Daye-7 Nights (Sept. 17-20 & Sept. 24-28) *-250
6 Daye-5 Nights (Sept. 17-20 & Sept. 28-28) ^'200
*8*MP at adjoining Atlantic Towers; maato at WaMman
EARLY RESERVATIONS SUGGESTED
Phone Sam Waldman: 538-5731 or 534-4751
On The Ocean at 43rd Street
Maxwell House9 Coffee
Is After Shopping Relaxation.
Shopping for a "good buy" has be- a close friend. The good talk. The
come one of America's favorite pas- good reelings. The warmth are some
times. It's always fun to find new of the things that go along with
things, see the new fashions and Maxwell House? Perhaps that's why
perhaps pick up something new for many Jewish housewivesdon't shop'
the house or family.
Another favorite pastime is to come
home from shopping, kick off the
shoes and relax with a good cup of
coffee. Maxwell House* Coffee. The
full-pleasant aroma and great-
tasting, satisfying flavor is
the perfect ending
to a busy shop-
ping dav. Espe-
cially when
relaxing with
K Certified Koeher
for Maxwell House* They simply
buy it. It's the "smart buy" as any
baiabusta knows!
So; no matter what your prefer-
enceinstant or groundwhen
you pour Maxwell House? you pour
relaxation. At its test.. .consis-
tently cup after cup after cup.

NAXWEU 1l H0U&
2f


tiivmi. r.Mi
A living tradition in Jewish homes for over half a century.


Page 8
The Jewish Ptoridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, August 1|. i*,


Pointer Presented for JCCAD's Torah
fft
Charles and Sylvia Block with Elli Levy
Lauderdale Jewish Deaf has received a Yad (Torah
The Fort _
Community Center Assn. of the
pointer: as a Rift, memorahzin*
BBYO Names Assistant Director Here
Melech-AZA.
Specific responsibility for the
supervision of B'naiB'rith Youth
Organizations (BBYO) in North
Broward and West Palm Beach
has been assigned to Debra
Roshfeld who W a graduate of
Brandeis Univereity and did
graduate work in psychology at
the University of California at
San Franciso. She will also be
responsible for the over-all ad-
William Shurtock who had been a
gabbai and a Baal Kriyah (reader
of the Sefer Torah) for many
yean at a Brooklyn congrega-
tion.
Shurtock, who died six years
ago, was the father of Sylvia
Block who with her husband,
Charles, made the presentation to
Elli Levy. The Blocks of Pine Is-
land Ridge. Plantation, had read
in the July 16 issue of The Jewish
Floridian of Greater Fort
Lauderdale about JCCAD s ac-
quisition of a Czech Memorial
Scroll rescued from the Holo-
caust and restored at the West-
minister Synagogue in London.
The Yad is the first of the
"dressings" to go with the un-
adorned Torah which will be used
by the JCCAD when the
"signed" High Holy Days serv-
ices for the deaf are held in Sep-
tember.
Out of love and respect for the
Torahs, Jews dress the scroll
with a cloth mantle, and with
ornaments on each roller, known
as a Tree of Life, or perhaps a
Keter, crown which goes over
both rollers.
Elli Levy, who can be reached
at the Jewish Community Center
of Greater Fort Lauderdale, 6501
W Sunrise Blvd.. Plantation,
1#
'
Among her first actions as as
sistant regional director, Debra
Roshfeld issued a plea for ad-
visors for the BBG and AZA in
North Broward aa well as in
Hollywood and North Miami
Beach, noting that more than 700
teenagers are enrolled in these
JlKso^aTr^yl^f phon^ 7^7 < said JCCADis
W uSeSd in serving" as vo- Eg that .ddhW *;
lunteer advisors. She can be tions will enable the group to
reached at the office she is main- have their Torah properly aress-
Uining at the JCC 792-6700. ed.
Boh Roth follows Torah reading by his son David, and.laek Pohtll
{
Assistant EwdthtJ
"We thank you for coming to Israel at
this difficult period when the war in Lebanon
is still going on. it shows your support".
This phrase was echoed time and again throughout
Israel to the 30-odd members of our 1982 Jewish Feder-
ation-sponsored Family Mission from the Fort
Lauderdale area. The group, which departed on June
20th. was led by Sheldon and Loia Polish, who were
accompanied by children. Jack and Cheryl.
Also on the missions were Dr. and Mra. William
Fleisher and children Dana and Normaj; Afv^n
Some faces ate recognize
all over the world.
Debra Roshfeld ,
ministration of BBYO pro-
eramming in the area extending
from North Miami Beach
through West Palm Beach.
Serving as Assistant Fto}a
regional director for the Gold
Coast Council. Debra Roshfeld
will be directing the BBYO office
at the Jewish Center of Greater
Fort Lauderdale, 6501 W. Sun-
rise Blvd., Plantation. In this
jurisdiction there are seven B'nai
Brith Girls (BBG) chapters and
four Aleph Zadek Aleph (AZA)
chapters.
The BBG chapters and their
presidents are Ahavah, Giselle
Zyserman of Lauderhill; Chai,
Alyson Epstein of Coral Springs;
Emet, Nikki Sard of Plantation;
Nevuah, Denise Kantrowitz of
Coral Springs; Shemesh, Marci
Shuster of Davie; Simcha. Risa
Srebro of Coral Springs; Yaron,
Debbie Davis of Plantation.
The AZA chapters and presi-
dents are Exodus, Steve Kasaof
of Coral Springs; Davamu, Ames
Friedman of Plantation; Melch,
Doug Allen of Plantation, and
Palmach, Joel Israel of Coral
Springs.
BBG adviaora include Selma
Tellee of Lauderhill. Gail Back-
iin of Pembroke Pi**. .Fto-je
Fisher of Plantation, GydaWui
jjin of Coral Springs, Cathy
. Nissenfeld and Nancy Caloeao,
both of Plantation. Also from
Plantation is Dr. Dennis Trupkm
giving aa an advisor to the
i.'
From New\brk to New Delhi, and throughout
the world, American rZxpress^Travelers Cheques
are known and accepted.Which isn't surprising
when you consider that American Express has
been the leading travelers cheque for years.
Or that we have 105,000 refund locations.
And nearly 1000 worldwide Travel Service
Officeswhere you can get everything from
a travelers cheque rdiind to travel assistance.
So carry American Express Travelers
Cheques. Even if you're not recog-
nized, they will be.
e AiMon b*mOnm Ml


,y, August 13,1982
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page9
led an'Overwhelming' Impression
visiting such places as the Mount of OUvee which offers
a panoramic view of the old and new cttv; planting trees
in the late U.S. Vice President Hubert Humphrey
forest; Mount Herri and the military cemetery. Our
visit to Yad Vashem, the memorial for the Six Million,
was an emotional experience for everyone. We par-
ticipated in a memorial service that left very few dry
eyes.
At a Holocaust Memorial near Jerusalem, t
hderat ion of Greater Port Lauderdale
daughter Dorothy and grandsons, Jay,
tott; Drs. Walter and Mildred Padow and
[Michael and Marlene Rifkin; Bob and
land children David and Lisa, Mark
. j Federation staff. My wife Selma and I
i Fort Lauderdale group. We were joined
kit family of Nashville, Tenn., and the
ly of Providence, R.I.
lhat the nation was on a war footing from
ire arrived at Ben Gurion airport. This
Impounded as we traveled to the Galilee
lines of armored vehicles and soldiers
into Lebanon. Practically every Israeli
lith had a relative or close friend who had
|ck into service. But there was a spirit of
once and for all, the PLO would be
I Lebanon and the northern border areas
safe from shelling. To a man, the
the government in its military ac-
ting the cost in lives of young soldiers as
nomic impact on the country-
street in Kiryat Shemona, which is in
the mountains that provide Israel's
ebanon, I was amazed at the close
be city to the PLO positions atop the
could virtually roll a stone down the
and it would hit the city. This same
I evident as we stood atop the Golan
pked down into the Hula Valley.
iir eyes one settlement after the other
\<- "sitting ducks". I had to ask myself,
Israelis live under these conditions for
?" Going down into a bomb shelter on
Hehamia was a frightening experience,
pned that the entire Kibbutz population
in the shelters during one period of
lay and early June.
fas part of a national United Jewish
nission of over 300 people from all parts
lix buses we toured virtually the entire
he Good Fence at Metulla to the Negev
a 10 day mission there is no wasted
^st at 7 a.m., in the bus at 8 a.m. and
el in time for dinner.
IV
he first three days was the Dan Hotel in
I here we took daily trips to such places
iwv just a few miles from the new
formerly Israeli-held Sinai. Most of
(les on this Moshav came from Yamit
this location that today is still sheer
are a determined group of people who
pvelop a blooming oasis within a few
visited Yad Mordechai, a small Kib-
[bnrdpr. which wan first attacked by
48 War of Independence. The govern-
tructed the battlefield which depicts
t>tians who attacked the 160 Israeli
a tribute to Israel's determination to
aged was on our itinerary and this
[moving experience. This "Malben" is
' Joint Distribution Committee, which
am the UJA appeals, and is home to
aen and women. They are well cared for
ifortable atmosphere. We had an op-
Jt with some of the guests and learned
am all parts of the world.
Museum of the Diaspora, located on
|Tel Aviv university, showed ua the
tion that offers a multi-media
be history of the Jews In the Diaspora.
ated north of Tel Aviv and is one of
l being remodeled through Proie*t
1 co-sponsored by the Fort Lauderdale
visit there afforded a first handop-
our dollars working in a moat
i We saw a newly built recreation center
[en with classrooms for pre-schoolers;
dential area and aaw the "before and
dale's total group.
Atop Masada in ancient synagogue.
From a truly personal standpoint, Selma and I en-
joyed two wonderful additional treats during our visit.
Our daughter, Judy, who made aliyah a year ago, wae
able to spend some time with us. We stayed three daya
on KibbuU Palmachim where she lives. This Kibbutt is
located on the Mediterranean Sea, about 25 miles south
of Td Aviv.
Kfar Saba orchestra entertains visitors.
after" of several apartment buildings.
The renovations were remarkable and along with the
physical improvements, social workers are instructing
the populace of the area, who are primarily North
Africa Jews, in areas of hygiene and other basics. A
quick stop at an elementary school turned into a half-
hour visit as we were entertained by a group of 40
delightful youngsters from the school band there made
up a drum and flute corps. The Mayor of Kfar Saba
addressed our group and thanked all American Jews for
their help and was most appreciative of our visit.
Tourists' delight: Lou Polish and Selma Teiles on
cameL MaQ l had the wonderf||| thrill of meeting, for the
first time, members of my late father's family who
survived the Holocaust and came from Romania to
Israel. It is impossible to describe the feeling of meeting
an entire new-found family of nearly 40 aunts, uncles
and cousins who are alive and well in Israel. Between
my so-so Yiddish and their broken English, we un-
derstood each other.
Sea of Galilee boat ride to Kinneret.
One of the highlights was a luncheon-boat trip on the
Sea of Galilee which took us past the beautiful city of
Tiberias to the southern tip of the Sea at Kinneret.
Our ride to Jerusalem took us through the West
Bank and Jericho which is totally populated by Arabs.
Reaching the outskirts of Jerusalem we recited the
Shecheyanu, got off the bus carrying olive branches
and drank some wine ... a most impressive ceremony.
Mv first visit to the Western" Wall is an experience, that
is most difficult to put into words. The hundreds of
Jews offering Shabbat prayers is a aight that will never
be forgotten.
Our walk through the old walled city is like reliving
history, and a tour of the Arab market is an eye-opener
and a far cry from the supermarkets and malls that we
have in the U.S. Of course, regaining on price is halt
the fun of shopping there.
Planting trees in Hubert Humphrey Forest.
One of the purpose, of the familyjnj-ton wa.to
conduct Bar-Bat Mitzva service at Maeada. andwe were
rSeged to witness 32 boys and girls participating in
ffis mSrfng ceremony u, the no.-nt ,g^Vy"
Masada. Lunch at Em Gedi and a dip in the Dead Sea
^..welcome respite from the dry de~rth-t that wa.
weU over 100 degrees.
The reminder of our time in Jenmimn ww spent
Detail of Holocaust Memorial by Nathan Rosenberg,
Warsaw Ghetto Uprising survivor, who titled the huge
sculpture in front of which Fort Lauderdale s contin-
gent posed, "From Destruction to Redemption."
During our ail-too brief visit, the singular thought
kept recurring that in 34 years as a nation, with all of
the wars, the internal problems, the enormous ecc nomic
difficulties with 100 percent plus inflation; v. h the
absorption of Jews from different parts of the world and
struggling against adverse world opinion that the
Israelis have accomplished so much is truly
remarkable.
The spirit of the people, young and old, is one of
determination that they wul survive and will continue
to live with freedom despite the fact that they are
surrounded by hostile nations bent on their destruction.
This spirit is evidenced all over the nation ... on the
Moshavim, the Kibbutzim and in the cities and set-
tlement towns. They are able to care for their elderly
and sick, educate the children, keep the economy going
and try to live as normal a life aa is possible under these
dire circumstances.
I wonder how many other countries or peoples could
have continued. It's an interesting question It is
obvious that Israelis are encouraged by help from
America both financial and spiritual. I am sure that
I echo the thoughts of everyone on the mission when I
state Umt each of ua was afforded a unique opportunity
to reaffirm our belief that Israel will survive but only
with our help. We Jews m America must do whatever is
necessary to be certain that Israel does survive and
continue to live in freedom.


Page 10
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday,

*
AumtlJ
The Truth Begins to Emerge from Mideast
Continued from Page 1
was filed by the Miami Herald's Middle East corres-
pondent and published in the July 30 issue indicates
how the citv is being restored and thousands of Leba-
nese, who left during the PLO occupation, had re-
turned.
(And a New York Times dispatch from Sidon is head-
lined "Lebanese Tell of Anguish of Living under the
PLO.")
Elaine Winik's report continues: "Food is plentiful.
Traffic jams are monumental. There obviously is gaso-
line.
"JDC is doing its usual quiet efficient job. Mat-
tresses have been delivered and cooking equipment.
Kerosene stoves, a warehouse full that had been found
in Israel, were brought into Lebanon and are now in the
hands of needy Lebanese. JDC is working in close coop-
eration with Lebanese social workers Moslem and
Christian.
"Postal services, banks, transportation have not
functioned in the seven years the PLO dominated this
part of the country. They are functioning now."
(George F. Will, nationally syndicated columnist, in
to
the Aug. 2 issue of Newsweek, wrote: "Lies are
weapons and are today the PLO's most effective
weapons. Newspapers that are fastidious about the
truthfulness of grocery ads print anti-Israel ads filled
with patent lies about Israeli-cauaed casualties."!
Elaine Winik's report continues: "A little boy spoke
to me in French. He was "glad the PLO was gone."
Why.' I asked. They are bad.'
" 'What do they do?" 'They kill children and people.'
'Why?' 'Because they want Lebanon to be Palestinian.'
(George Will writes: "It is hard to prove but easy to
believe that Israel, by aiding Lebanese Christians since
1975, has saved more civilian lives than have been lost
in this war.")
Elaine Winik writes: "War is cruel-this one is no
exception, but when I asked how the parents of Leba-
nese youngsters wounded by a Syrian landmine came to
be with their children at Tel Hashomer (near Tel Aviv),
the answer came quickly. 'The IDF (Israel Defense
Forces) brought them of course."
"Was this war necessary? Our children don't sleep in
shelters so we have no right to ask the question. What I
do know is that the media has been .,i. \
treme. Casualties and destruction vl M
stated. We have no need to be ashamed n,
but every reason to be proud. They haw ji
tect their home and their homeland." ***
(George WB concludes his easav -ul ,
graph: "Person, far from the theai tf JN
violence, persons making fine moral cauwS
Israel's conduct and fretting that IimZi i
soul.' must hear Gold. Meir's word. TL* *
collective eulogies, bat Israel will -!,'"*'
world will .peek well of it ."> ""I
In full-page newspaper ads. the Nation^
Leadership Conference for Israel, headouan.^?
York, protested "the widespread iise^fSS
Hitler, genocide and the Holocaust in reJ!?
events in Lebanon resort to such lanS
to defame the Jewish people as a whole m
the growing number of independent imoruL
scene confirming Israeli claims that theorbrind!
ty figures were highly exaggerated. Wn [
troubled that this technique of the big hV h*li
strong impact on media coverage of the LeWJ
tion.
Helping Jerusalem's Girls Town
Organizations in the News
Fran Massel and Elza Lov> .
Century Village in DeerfiK
Beach are inviting men ana
women to help support Jerusr!
Girls Town (Bayit Lepletot) by
attending a luncheon card y... .>
at noon, Monday, Sept. 2, Labor
Day, in Temple Beth Israel
Deerfield Beach.
4 The women report that Jerusa-
jlem Girls Town cares for orphans
(and neglected girls from toddl m
iage until young adulthood when
ithey become self-sufficient.
y)onation is $3.50 with the pro-
ds to go directly to Girls
vn. No tickets will be sold at
door.
NCJW Also Offers
Aid in Lebanon
The Plantation Section of the
National Council of Jewish
Women notes, that like so many
other American organizations, it.
too, is offering aid to the war
victims in the Lebanon crisis.
A significant NCJW thrust of
aid was opening its residential
facility, Manof, in Nahariya, Is-
rael, to displaced Lebanese
mothers and children.
NCJW has instituted an accel-
erated drive in the U.S. for funds
to make food and clothing avail-
able for the Lebanese until they
can be resettled.
NATIONAL COUNCIL
OF JEWISH WOMEN
North Browsrd Section
National Council of Jewish
Women, North Broward Section,
will hold a mini lunch and card
party at noon. Wednesday, Aug.
18. at the Lauderdale Lakes
Safety Bldg., 4300 N.W. 36th St.
Proceeds will benefit "Kids in
Distress,'' a community project
in which the section is engaged.
Donation $3.
HADASSAH
Fort Lauderdale-Tamar
Dr. Michael Leinwand. execu-
tive director of the Southeast Re-
gion, Zionist Organization of
America, based in Fort Lauder-
dale, will present the Film, Jeru-
salem, City of Gold, narrated by
Edward Asner, at the season's
opening meeting of Fort Lauder-
dale-Tamar chapter of Hadassah
Mondav. Sept. 13. in the Public
Safety Bldg.. Lauderdale Lakes.
The chapter will have a boutique
at 11:30, refreshments at noon,
with the meeting starting at
12:46 p.m.
WEST BROWARD
JEWISH CONGREGATION
announces
High Holy Day Services
will be conducted by
Rabbi Kurt F. Stone
of West Broward Jewish Congregation
Bailey Hall
Broward Community College
3501 S.W. Davie Rd.. Davie, Fl.
Rosh Hoshana
Friday, September 17,8:00 p.m.
Saturday, September 18,10:00 a.m.
Sunday, September 19,10:00 a.m.
Yom Kippur
Sunday, September 26,8.00 p.m.
Monday, September 27,10:00 a.m.
Donation $30.00 per person
For information or tickets please call:
792-6340 791-5925 748*1988
Please join us!
Deerfield Sisterhood Sets Meeting, Party
Sisterhood Temple Beth Israel
of Deerfield Beach holds its first
membership meeting Sept. 9 and
its Fall Festival Luncheon-Card
Party. Oct. 21. Both events will
be held at the Temple.
The new season activities at
the meeting 12:30 p.m.. Thurs-
day. Sept. 9. will be highlighted
by the singing of Beth Israel's
Cantor Shabtai Ackerman, tenor.
The Fall Festival Luncheon-
Card Party at noon. Thursday,
Oct. 21, according to Fran Mas-
sel, will have a limited number of
tickets available at $3.50. None
will be sold at the door.
Reservations are still available
for the Sisterhood's Thanksgiv-
ing weekend at Crown Hotel in
Miami Beach.
B'NAI B'RITH WOMEN
Coconut Creek
Alice Berkowitz will present a
book dramatization at the noon,
Thursday, Sept. 2, meeting of the
B'nai B'rith Women of I
Creek at Temple Beth
chanter's new meeting _
Mini-lunch will be served!
Temple which is located al
Royal Palm Blvd., Margud
I!
B*01
Traditional Coamaaaarity
High Holy Day Services
WILL BE HELD AT N
7ETTIPLE ETTlHnU--
S245 W. Oakland Park Boulevard. Ft Uaderdtt i
RABBI MORRIS SKOP AND
CANTOR ROBERT GOODMAN
Contribution: $35.00
For ticket tatontio 731-2310 or vWt the Tt
temp&e
sbo&oih'
CONSERVATIVE SYNAGOGUE
HIGH HOLY DAY SERVICES
at
132 S.E. 11th Ave., Pompano Beach, Flo.
RABBI SAMUEL APRIL CANTOR JACOB J. RENTER
SELICHOTH- Saturday. Sept 11. 1962 11:00 fufc
ROSH HASHANAH
W^StpL17 7:00 Ml
$!.. Stpt. lit*.. k\$UL
Sai.,StptlWi 1:15 AM.
Sermon I Shofar Serrici
YOM KIPPUR
Sun., Stpt 26th 7:00 P.M. Kof Ni*i
Mon., Stpt 270. 9:00 W
Yiifctr 12:00 Now
Mi-cka 5:00 r.M.
NtiUk 4 Closiaf MO ML
n Our Temple Sholom Family
Congregation
You Weed Temple Sholom
CAP,,lEiSi,GNED SEATING. PRAYER BOOKS SUPPUfl>
EARLY RESERVATIONS SUGGESTED. CALL TEAAPLE OFFICE
^^oS^S^iSSS^ SCH001 ~ PROFESSIONAL STAFF
AND CONTRACTION REGISTRATION IS NOW IN PROGRESS
AT THE TEMPLE SHOLOM OFFICE
92-64 10 942 6411


, August 13,1982
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lander dale
Page 11
irowsin' th
roward
Ith max levine
[more detailed account of
ng the truth in Lebanon, in
on to the Page 4 An Eye-
,$ in Lebanon article in this
is the nine-page Lebanon
litness article by Martin
[ in the Aug. 2 iasue of The
Republic Motrls
jr of Plantation, interested
omoting the study of the
governments philatelic
[it, provided the photo of the
Synagogue commeorative
stamp reproduced in this
J The Jewish Floridian of
]ter Fort Lauderdale.
ntor Irving Gi naiiiaii has
engaged by Margate's Tem-
eth Am to succeed Castor
i Botoshanaky Ben Re-
reports Temple Ohel
Raphael at 4361 W. Oak-
ark Blvd. has tickets avail-
their High Holy Days
es at the Temple and at
auxiliary services at
Hall in the North Mali
kland Plaza Atty.
Weinstein seeking the
Senate seat in Broward's
29 is the son of Moses
i, a New York Supreme
justice .. Seeking be-
a Broward County Court
is David W. Singer who's
ily involved with the Com-
Volunteer Services group
B'rith Richard N.
Fort Lauderdale wants
judge, in Broward's Cir-
ourt. He had been an assis-
attorney with Dade's
I Gerstein Too late to
er for the Sept. 7 primary.
you're not yet registered
Oct. 2 is deadline for
| election.
the first 30 days following
fs entry into Lebanon to
the PLO, 2,500 North
can Jews have filed for
(immigrant status) to
according to Moshe
jter, director, Israel Aliya
r of North America. This is
1,000 more than a normal
js requests. gbroward
[Yiddish clubs are getting
the new season, accord-
Sunny Landsman of
ary. She'll be interested
ving that Yiddish is alive
nee also. Noe Grass and
Kerner, nlect rers t
ne's Paris University for
r>ry Judaica, headed a
experts who just com-
400-page, 23,000-word
?Yiddish dictionary.
Zwelman, Jewish War
national commander,
receipt of a 16,000
I Oil check for American
Joint Distribution Com-
IIJDC1 aid to the civiliam
i of Lebanon Bro-
heriff Robert Butterworth
it s a felony for wilfully
Maliciously tintging a
lor worship. Previous law
fKJSYTME
SCHECHTER'S
^.KOSHERHOTEL
Vi^GLATT
inom*rnimiHomr
, OR DAY WEEK-END
hm^atsstfl -tnr
14 days 3 nlfMt
l*.3ts||Bta,
[INCLUDIN6 MEALS
B" wvn task) ace
nnTutriM
PNE: 1-531-0061
* 'o 38th Sit MUM* BCACM
EjMSCWCHTHhMKMy,,
considered it only misdemeanor
. Connie Francis, the singer
making a comeback, was Gary
Wagner's guest on his Freilach
Time Fort Lauderdale WAVS
radio program last Sunday
morning.
Harriet sad Leo Van Blerkom,
celebrating their 50th wedding
anniversary, were honored at last
Friday's Oneg Shabbat of B'nai
Shalom, the new Reform congre-
gation at Century Village, which
holds services at Deerfield's
Menorah Chapels .. Menorah
in Sunrise notes Mark P. Gins-
berg joined the staff as funeral
director and Scott Cutler has re-
ceived his license as funeral di-
lector and embalmer. Murray
Simon, executive director of
North Lauderdale's Western
School, reports the new elemen-
tary wing is scheduled for com-
pletion Aug. 24. This is the
school where Hebrew
Congregation of North
Lauderdale holds its Erev Shab-
bat and Shabbat services, 8200
SW 17th St., in schoolroom 3.
Bertram H. Gold, executive
VP of American Jewish Commit-
tee, reports A JC has published a
34-page booklet Anti-Semitic In-
cidents in the Community .
Coping with Eruptions .
Preventing Future Outbreaks.
It's available at $1.60 per copy
from AJC. 166 E. 66th, NYC
10022. The booklet is aimed at
helping schools, communities and
community organizations deal
with anti-Semitic outbursts .. .
Fort Lauderdale's Gold Coast
Opera is having choral auditions
at 7:30 p.m., Aug. 30, at Broward
Community College's Omni audi-
torium Realtor associate
Billie Schoenfeld has been ap-
pointed office manager of Harvey
Kosberg's Rainbow Real Estate
Center in Plantation.
A member of B'nai B'rith Dis-
trict Five'a board of governors,
for 10 years. Alfred Golden, exec
utive vice president of Riverside
Memorial Chapels in Florida, has
been awarded life membership on
that board. He's currently on
"sabbatical leave" from the
board of the Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale follow-
ing a full six years of service. .
New York Congressman Mario
Biaggi ia asking Congress to de-
signate next Dec. 11 as FioreUo
La Guardia Memorial Day, ho-
noring the 100th birthday of the
feistv New York Citv mayor who
died in 1947 at age of 64 .. And
on Dec. 12, Florida's Anti-Defa-
mation League is honoring Fed-
eration's Past President Victor
Gruman of Inverrary at a break-
fast at Tamarac Jewish Center.
Marcia Wschtel, daughter of
Dr. Garry and Linda Wschtel. an
11 th grader at Nova High School,
celebrated her 16th birthday in
Israel during the eight-week
quinmester she was attending the
High School in Israel. So enthus-
iastic is she about the intensive,
concentrated course of study
there that she hopes many more
teenagers from North Broward
will attend Dean Witter
Reynolds securities firm opened a
branch office at Inverrary Center,
according to Donald WeiUman,
manager Ronald Scnagrin,
VP of the Scnagrin firm's six
wine and gourmet food shops in
South Florida, reports its ad-
vertising account has been as-
signed to Birkenes and Fc
of Boca Raton.
PLANNING A TRIP
[Travel with National Council of
(Jewish Women. For new 1M2
I Brochure describing sen
isatlonal lours to ISRAEL, with!
{extensions to EGYPT, SWIT-
ZERLAND, GREECE, EAST
(AFRICA; Highlights In Europe,
{China and the Orient, Colombia
(Highlights and the Canadian
(Rockies.
PLEASE CALL
FRANCES BERNSTEIN
74*0465
StateCouncil on Aging Seeks Members
Candy Rechtschaffer, execu-
tive director of Broward's Area
Agency on Aging, is the local co-
ordinator for the Florida Council
on Aging which will hold its semi-
annual conference Sept. 14-16 in
Orlando.
At the present time, a drive is
being initiated to increase Bro-
ward's membership in the Coun-
cil which encourages linkage with
advocates for the elderly
throughout the state so that a
network of information can be
provided for senior citizens on a
continuing basis. Yearly mem-
bership dues are f 15 for individu-
als with a special membership fee
of $5 for persons over 60.
Broward's Area Agency on
Aging notes that Homemaker
Services is a new community care
for the elderly project available to
Broward residents over 60 who
are frail and homebound
The leading agency making
this service available throughout
the county is Catholic Communi-
ty Services (622-2556) which de-
veloped the program with plann-
ing assistance of the Area
Agency through which state
funding is provided. A
homemaker would be able to
prove provide, on a once a week
basis usually, light housekeep-
ing, light shopping and some
meal preparation for "needy
seniors" who are unable to per-
form these tasks independently.
STATE OF
ISRAEL BONDS
BOUGHT AND SOLD
Invest in
Israel Securities
Wl'RE SOCIALISTS IN
ISRAII SECURITIES.
e e
TRANSACIK >NS DAILY VIA TELEX
[() ISRAll' STOCK EXCHANGE.
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Securities
an* Lm* !>< 0
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New York N Y 1001?
(212)759 1310
Corporation toh Free teooi 221 -abip.
f
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Page 12
..'.
._
ThmUmUh Fhridian ofQnatr Port Laud***
Prida
y.A
^ewi*.
Community Calendar
U.S. Aircraft Carriers Start Jewish Libraries
THURSDAY, AUG 12
Temple Beth Israel: 12:30 p.m.
Games.
Temple fimaan-El: 7:30 p.m. Ex-
ecutive Committee meeting.
SUNDAY, AUG. 15
Temple Kol Ami: 6:30 p.m.
Games.
Temple Beth Torah-Tamarac:
7 p.m. Games.
MONDAY, AUG. 16
Blyma Chapter: Noon. Luncheon
and card party, $3.50.
Congregation Beth Hillel, 7634
Margate Blvd., Margate.
Temple Emanu-El: 7 p.m.
Games.
Hadassah-Kadimah Chapter:
Noon. Luncheon and card party,
$3. No tickets sold at door. Tem-
ple Beth Israel.
TUESDAY, AUG. 17
Deborah-Sunrise Chapter:
Luncheon and
p.m.
Bldg., 4300 NW 36th St.
Temple Beth Iarael: 12:30
Games.
National Council of Jewish
Women-Career and Professional
Branch: Evening Meeting.
Elaine Kouchel, 245 Jacaranda
Dr., Plantation
SATURDAY, AUG. 21
Temple Emanu-El Couples Club:
p.m. Beach Party.
SUNDAY. AUG. 22
Temple Kol Ami: 10 a.m.. Get
Acquainted Brunch, new resi-
dents, prospective members.
Temple, 8200 Peters Rd., Planta-
tion.
Temple Kol Ami: 6:30 p.m.
Games.
Temple Beth Torah-Tamarac:
7 p.m. Games.
MONDAY, AUG. 23
Hadassah: Tamar-Fort Lander-
dale Chapter: 12:30 p.m., dessert
luncheon-card party. Donation
$2.60. Broward Federal, 3000 N.
Springtree Coun^ ffl? 8860 | E&rS^sKLK
Temple Emanu-El
Springtree Dr., Sunrise.
Temple Beth Torah Sisterhood-
Tamarac: Noon, Games. Lunch
served at nominal cost.
free Movie: 1 p.m., The Seven
Little Foys,"
WEDNESDAY, AUG. 18
ORTInverrary Chapter: 11:30
a.m. Summer Luncheon-Card
Party. Suburban Restaurant,
5227 N. State Rd. 7, Tamarac.
Temple Beth Orr: 7:45 p.m.
Games.
Jewish National Fond: 7:30 p.m.
Board meeting. Temple Emanu-
El.
Temple Beth Israel: 7:30 p.m.
Games.
Sunrise Jewish Center Sister-
hood: Noon, General meeting.
Program: Representative of Doc-
tors' Medical Center of Broward,
Inc., will speak. Refreshments.
THURSDAY, AUG. 19
ORT North Broward Region:
Board meets 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Lauderdale Lakes Public Safety
Conference Set
by Coral Springs
Coalition
"The State of the Jewish Com-
munity in Coral Springs" will be
the major theme of mini-confer-
ence at 8 p.m., Monday, Aug. 23,
at the Holiday Inn, Coral
Springs.
The Coral Springs Area Coali-
tion of Jewish Organizations has
invited presidents of every
Jewish organization in the city
and other Jewish community
leaders to take part in discussing
the theme and its sub-heading:
"Where Have We Come From
Where Are We Going."
Organizations and their presi-
dents listed by the Coalition as
participants include:
Palmach AZA, Joel Israel;
Chai BBG, Marcy Kreiger;
Nevuah BBG, Elaina Preissman;
Temple Beth Orr, Joel Leven-
ston; Congregation B'nai Israel
of Ramblewood East, Herb Da-
vis; Jewish War Veterans, Sam
Lefkowitz; Women's Jewish War
Veterans, Helen Taub; B'nai
B'rith, Leonard Feiner; Brandeis
University Women, Barbara
Weinstein; Ramblewood East
ORT, Florence Dash; Ramaz
Hadassah, Maxine Wolgin and
Estelle Elpern; Ramblewood
East Hadassah, Pauline Krew-
son; Coral Springs ORT, Rhoda
Gould.
Among community leaders in-
vited are Larry Schuval. Com-
munity Relations Director of
Fort Lauderdale Federation;
Rabbi Donald Gerber of Temple
Beth Orr, Mike Weinberg of
Jewish Community Center of
Greater Fort Lauderdale; Mark
Steingard, Coral Springs UJA
chairman, and Johl Rotman.
p.m.
Games.
TUESDAY, AUG. 24
Temple Beth Torah Sistsrhood-
Tamarac: Noon, Games. Lunch
served at nominal cost.
WEDNESDAY, AUG. 26
Hadassah-Kavanah-Haverim:
7:30 p.m., Membership Meeting,
Salad bar, Sunrise Bank, Oak-
land Pk. Blvd and Pine Island
Rd., Sunrise.
Temple Beth Orr: 7:45 p.m.
Games.
Temple Beth Iarael: 7:30 p.m.
Games.
Sunrise Jewish Center Sister-
hood: Noon. Luncheon and card
party at Temple.
THURSDAY, AUG. 26
Temple Beth Israel: 12:30
Games.
Temple Emanu-El: 7:45
Board meeting.
SUNDAY, AUG. 29
Temple Kol Ami: 6:30
Games.
Temple Beth Torah-Ti
7 p.m.Games.
MONDAY. AUG. 30
Temple Emanu-El: 7
Games.
TUESDAY. AUG. 31
Temple Beth Torah Sisterhood
Tamarac: Noon, Games. Lunch
served at nominal cost.
p.m.
p.m.
p.m.
c:
p.m.
NEW YORK-Presonnel a>
board 13 U.S. aircraft carriers
will be able to learn more about
the Jewish People and Jewish
culture as the result of a new pro-
ject launched by JWB.
Books of Jewish interest have
been shipped to aircraft carriers,
where, according to Dr. Diana B.
Coran, director of JWB's
Women's Organizations' Serv-
ices, they will be used as the nu-
clei of small Jewish libraries.
The project was made possible
by the Manhattan JWB
Women'8 Services Committee.
The committee's chairperson, the
late Hortense Braunschweiger,
had suggested the project to Dr.
Coran.
Rear Adm. Neil M. Stevenson,
deputy cheif of chaplains, U.S.
Navy, enthusiastically welcomed
the project.
In a letter to JWB, the admiral
wrote:
"The action of JWB to provide
books on the Jewish faith to the
Chaplain's offices of our aircraft
carriers for the use of ships' com-
pany is appreciated.
"I'm certain that the texts will
be greeted with enthusiasm, pro-
vided with appropriate publicity,
and located where they will be
readily available to personnel of
the Jewish-faith and to others."
The aircraft carriers that will
receive the books from JWB are
the: USS Midway, USS Coral
Sea, USS Forrestal, USS Ranger,
USS Independence, USS Kitty
Hawk, USS Constellation, USS
Enterprise, USS America, USS
Kennedy. USS Nimitz, USS
Eisenhower and USS Carl
Vinson.
The JWB is the U.S. govern-
ment-accredited agency that pro-
vides religious, Jewish educa-
tional, and morale services to
Jews in the armed forces, their
families and hospitalized
veterans on behalf of the Ameri-
can Jewish community.
At the same time, JWB is the
network and national headquar-
ters of Jewish Community Cen-
ters, YM and YWHAs and camps
in the U.S. and Canada serving
one million Jews.
It seeks to strengthen and per-
petuate the quality of Jewish life
in North America through the
Jewish Media Service, the JWB
...WANTED...
CONDO AND SOCIAL GROUPS
WHO W1NT TO BATE FUN
- ANNOUNCING -
AN EXCITING VARIETY OF BUDGET TOURS

No Fritfs One Night Package Tour* Our Specialty
***
Our Fully Packaged Tours Include
The World Famous BURT REYNOLDS DINNER THEATER
and the Popular MUSICANA SUPPER CLUB
PLUS ONE. AND TWO NIGHT PACKAGES
AND DAY TRIPS ARE AVAILABLE
*
PERFECT FOR FUNDRAISING
Cull Ccjftn ( .* out FREE TOUR BOOKLET
!-

-OVERLOOKING PALM BEACH
100 DATURA STREET AMI AOLER DRIVE
WEST PALM BEACH 33401 -
655-8800
CALL THE PACKAGE PLAN MANAGER
CALl NOW DO/VT DELAY
M4.W HATFS HAVE At READY BEEN SOLD
September Holiday Dates
Are Open!!
Complofr Paekagmt Available
From Only
S22.50 pr night
Lecture Bureau, the JWB Jewish
Book Council, the JWB Jewish
Music Council, and Israel-related
projects.
P^ of Greater Ne?a
Programs Available atLibrai
Yo"ng brand
Broward County Library
system has a number of pro-
grams being presented at various
branch libraries this month, all
free to those wishing to attend.
Arlene Trister, regional coor-
dinator of the Deborah Hospital
Foundation, will present a slide
show of the "Hospital with a
Heart" and explain the services
and availability of the hospital at
2 p.m., Wednesday, Aug. 18, at
Sunrise Library, 6600 Sunset
Strip.
Paula Cohen will lead a Sing-a-
Long at 2 p.m., Thursday, Aug.
19, at Lauderdale Lake branch,
3621 NW 43rd Ave.
A macrame class for adults is
being presented from 11 a.m. to
12:30 p.m., Wednesday, Aug. 25,,
at the Lauderhill branch, 1174
NW 42nd Way.
And at 2:30 p.m.. Monday,
Aug. 23, Jack Tannen will be at
the Percy White branch at 837 E.
Hillsboro Blvd. in Deerfield
Beach. He will describe how the
rare book market opperatea and
how people may participate in it
as a collector or benefactor.
John Swan and the Swing
Machine will present a concert
from Dixeland to Fusion at 2
p.m., Aug. 21, at the Margate
Catharine
Park Dr.
A film of the first nlar,,
of CLIO awards fo,**
international, national
and local advertising of 2!
year in all media will be,
11 a.m. and again at il
Tuesday. Aug. I4 .t^J
City branch, 2800 NW 9al
Pompano Beach, and at 7,
Thursday, Aug. 26, at tfj
erdale Lakes L
43rd Ave.
For boysandgirlaofij
Lauderhill branch at liTd
42nd Way has check.* a
monopoly games availiakl
6:301 to 8:30 p.m., thT3
Tday:Aug.l7,24andj
We do business
the right \
FVLu*rt*,fWI
monentini
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? ^C%2BS.C^-r.-^rt

SUNRISE JEWISH CENTER
Takes this opportunity to wish all
our friends and neighbors for the
coming year a happy and healthy
new year.
Tickets for the High Holy Days aft
on sale now at the Temple.
8049 W. Oakland Park BW.
Eserj Merninc Except Sit
Rabbi 9 a.m. 12 Noon cantor
Albert N.Troy Jack I
Alto at Sunrise Lakes
Phast II Urn Mhmim
EsstyTatsdiyaTlMirsdiT
from 6 p.m. I b.m.
8120 Sunrise lakes Bhfd.
Price of rickets'30.00 Each
Far Farther laforeiftiefi Cat
Tl Teiaptt At
741-0295


Ly, August 13,1982
The Jewish Floridian ofQnat*r port Uuderdale
**''*" '" !L ..' .....I i I _1 I
Pag13
Shamir Denies Coolness Toward Him By Reagan
., J WEINTRAUB (third from left) was installed as president
Sisterhood of Temple Beth Israel, Sunrise. Installation was con-
Iby Abby Cohen. Others installed included, Leonore Shapiro,
yiock, Sylvia Baslaw, Florence Thaler and Ellen Kamen, vice
Hts; Vera Scerdlih, treasurer; Joan Cohen and Hilda Kopman,
tO Ethiopian ;__
Resettled
wad
Jewish Agency for Israel,
kjor recipient of United
J Appeal-Federations cam-
I has dsvesspad a moat ef -
program for the reception
orption of Ethiopian Jews
i), more than 2,000 who
i brought out of refugee
nto Israel.
' of the Falashim are pur-
live lives in Israel's cities
i; over 100 are proper
| university enrollment; a
already enrolled in the
School of Work, and
preparing to astabliah
(all Falasha moahav.
pite of this reocrd of
nent by the Israel
ent and the Jewish
claims are being made
stablishment of an alter-
kip, an independent, un-
I organization, the Amsri-
?n. for Ethiopian Jewa
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Foreign Minister Yitzhak Shamir
iof Israel denied that he found a
i coolness toward him by President
! Reagan when he met with him at
the White House.
"It was a friendly atmosphere
in the mornings as it was (at the
State Department) in the after-
noon," Shamir told reporters
after a nearly three-hour meeting
with Secretary of State George
Shultz, including a working
lunch.
"Of course there are some diffi-
culties" between the United
States and Israel, Shamir added.
But he stressed as he had this
morning that the two countries
Jewish Home
Blown Up
PARIS (JTA) A house
belonging to a prominent Jewish
family was blown up by a bomb
Saturday morning near Toulon in
the south of France. The house
which is owned by a Marseilles
manufacturer, Daniel Cohen, was
empty at the time. The bombing
caused heavy damage. Police in-
vestigators said they found leaf-
lets inscribed "Death to the
Jews."
had "identical goals in Lebanon."
Pool reporters who attended
the picture-taking session at the
opening of the meeting at the
White House said there was none
of the usual friendly small talk
that normally marks those occa-
sions. The reporters noted that
when Israeli Ambassador Moshe
Arena tried to break the ice with
a remark, the Americans did not
respond.
But when Shamir was asked
directly this afternoon if the U.S.
was trying to put some distance
between itself and Israel, because
of Israel's bombardment of west
Beirut, Shamir replied, "I
wouldn't say so."
HER-BETS
RESTAURANT CATERERS
Serving Dade and Broward Counties
Proudly Announces its
Kosher Catering Division
Exclusive caterers to
Temple Zion Temple Or-Olom;
Weddings, Bar-Bat Mitzvahs, Anniversaries
On & Off Premises
For Personal Service (No Obtiga Hani
Call Betty at:
591-2559 592-8948
NEAR EAST *22PB0
EUROPE $1.427.8Q
UNITED KINGDOM *L2S7d
NowNbu Can Dial al-Minule Overseas Call.
Have family or friends in Israel,
Europe, or the UK? Now you can dial
| Community
i of the Jewish Federa-
preater flea Uuderdale
is soliciting funds for
which the Israel
it feels is counter-pro-
does not endorse the
AAEJ nor any other
wrations because the
pernment brings out of
las many Jews as it can
done. The methods used
fcive and perilous. The
pte that any non-coor-
ndependent operation
sly jeopardize efforts to
liiopian Jews.
reports that AAEJ
I coordinate its proposed
with the Israelis at any
fved word from the Is-
nent that the Ameri-
h Community refrain
: in, or aiding inde-
"scue efforts in
reel. Other offi-
cers are Adele
Epstein, Belle
Appel, Pearl
Zoppel, vice
presidents; Belle
Strauss,
reasurer;
Kdythe Milstein,
Dorothy Wein-
gart, Lillian
Siegel, secre-
taries. The chap-
ter maintains
the WLI Thrift
hapter and Boutique
* Shopat5460N.
I* State Rd. 7.
1 Overseas Rale For Didable Countries i
Die 1 Rats
Reoon Rale lsb First minute Additional mm* Hours
UNITED KINGDOM/REIAI $2.08 IAS 125 $126 .95 76 7om-lpm Ipnvopm 6pm-7om
Discount Economy
EUROPE .__. 2.37 178 1.42 133 100 B0 7am-lpm Ipnvopm 6pm-7am 1
Discount Economy
PACIFC 422 3.17 2.53 \M 1.19 .95 5pm-llpm I0om-5pm II pm-rOom
Stanoora Discount Economy
CARIBBEAN/ATLANTIC Standard Discount Economy 1.68 126 1.01 1.13 85 .68 4pm-IOpm 7am-4pm lOpmVam
SOUTH AMERICA Standord Discount Economy 2.77 2.08 1.66 1.18 89 71 7am-lpm Ipm-Wpm I0pm-7om
NEAR EAST Standard Discount Economy 3.68 2.76 221 1.33 1.00 80 8om-3pm 9pm-8am 3pm-9pm
CENTRAL AMERICA Standord Discount Economy 2.62 1.97 1.57 1.13 85 .68 5pm-11pm 8am-5pm llpm-8om"
AFRICA Standord Discount Economy 2.89 217 1.73 1.48 III 89 6om-l2Noon l2Noon-5pm 5pm-6om
INDIAN OCEAN Standard Discount Economy 522 3.92 313 217 1.63 130 6pm-lom lam-llom Ham 6pm
For counfflM Ihoi o^l%'*odded on all cotbb*d>lhe United Stole* -d/rd

them, or almost anywhere else in the world,
at low one-minute rates. The 3-minute
minimum call is no longer
in effect except in
countries that are not
dialable.
This chart gives you
die new 1-minute dial
rates, the lower rates for
each additional minute,
and the new calling times:
Standard, Discount, and
Economy.
Bargain rates are
available 7 days a week,
day or nighteven to
countries that never had
reduced rates before.
No International
Dialing in your area? You
still get the new 1-minute
dial rate as long as special
operator assistance is not
required.
"Hello World" costs
less than ever before.
Want to know more?
Call our International
Service, toll free:
1 800 874-4000.
,4
(g) Southern BeN
fine
[f
Bell Intioduces
TheWorld B/The Minute

i
nsmJ"/! lrio:


TageTT
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdaie
FricUy, AUgUKla
Beth Israel's Simchat Torah Israel Tour
Marks Leader Sam Gottlieb's 46th Trip
Sam Gottlieb, a member of
Sunrise's Temple Beth Israel,
who'll be leading his 46th trip to
Israel in October, has committed
himself for the purchase of 1,000
trees to be planted in Israel.
The Men's Club of Temple
Beth Israel is sponsoring the
Simchat Torah tour that Gottlieb
will lead, departing from Fort
Lauderdaie on Thursday, Oct. 7,
arriving in Israel in time for
Hoahana Raba Erev Shabbat.
and the great celebration
throughout Israel for Simchat
Torah, Sunday, Oct. 10.
The return to Fort Lauderdaie
is scheduled for Wednesday, Oct.
27 following a custom made tour
of the State of Israel, including
three days at the Dead Sea-
Masada area. The trip includes
two meals a day and stay at four
and five star hotels for the partic-
ipants.
Additional information is
available at the Temple 742-4040.
Emanu-El Services
At Parker Playhouse
Temple Emanu-El will again
hold its High Holy Days services
at Parker Playhouse in Fort
Lauderdaie with Rabbi Jeffrey L.
Ballon and Cantor Jerome Kle
ment conducting the services.
The Rosh Hashan a service will
begin at 8:15 p.m. Friday, Sept.
17.
In addition to the Parker Play-
house services, Temple Emanu-
El makes its sanctuary at 3245
W. Oakland Park Blvd., Lauder-
daie Lakes, available for the com-
munity. Rabbi Morris Skop,
retired spiritual leader of Temple
Sholom in Pompano Beach, and
Cantor Robert Goodman will
conduct the traditional services.
Ticket information is available
at the Temple office 731-2310.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
Sylvia Friedman, president of
Temple Emanu-El, and members
of the membership committee
will host the Oneg Shabbat fol-
lowing the 8:15 p.m., Friday,
Aug. 20 service at the Temple,
3245 W. Oakland Park Blvd.
Rabbi Jeffrey L. Ballon and
Cantor Jerome Klement will
conduct the service to which all
unaffiliated area residents are
invited to attend. Guests will be
able to learn about the Temple
and its membership
TEMPLE
SHA'ARAY TZEDEK
Temple Sha'aray Tzedek, Sun-
rise Jewish Center, will hold High'
Holy Days services at the Center
at 8049 W. Oakland Park Blvd.,
and in the main auditorium at
Sunrise Lakes Condominium
Phase 2. Tickets are available to
the public at both locations. In-
formation is also available by
phone at the Temple office, 741-
0295.
HEBREW CONGREGATION
LAUDERHILL
President Maxwell Gilbert of
Hebrew Congregation of Lauder-
hill reported tickets are now on
sale for the High Holy Days
Services to be conducted by
Rabbi Israel Halpern, formerly of
Detroit, and Cantor Leibele Feld-
man. The choir will be under the
direction of Philip Erstling.
Tickets and information are
available Sundays through Fri-
days, 9 to 10 a.m.. at the Hebrew
Congregation's synagogue, 2048
NW 49th Ave., phone 733-9560.
BethTorah NamesEducationalDirector
In preparation for an expand-
ing Religious. School from
nursery classes through ninth
grade Temple Beth Torah in
Tamarac has named Abraham
Martin as its director of educa-
tion.
A native of Israel where he was
educated and served in the Israel
Defense Forces before coming to
the U.S., Martin is a graduate of
Gratz college, earned a bachelor's
degree at St. Joseph's and a mas-
ter's at VUlanova, and is continu-
ing post-graduate studies in
Jewish education administration,
Jewish history and Bible at
Dropsie. These colleges and uni-
versities are all in the Philadel-
phia area where he has served as
director of education of the Mis-
palelim School in Wallingford.
Martin, who was also director
of education at the Lake Hia-
watha (N.J.) Jewish Center, an-
nounced open house for the Reli-
gious school and registration for
classes for those not already en-
rolled from 10 to 1 p.m., Sunday,
Aug. 22.
Beth Torah announced the
school's opening sessions for
nursery school will begin
Wednesday, Sept. 1: Grades 5, 6
and 7, Tuesday, Sept. 7; Grades
3, 4, 8, 9, Wednesday, Sept. 8;
Sunday School, Grades K, 1 and
2, Sunday, Sept. 12.
TEMPLE KOL AMI
New residents of Plantation
and others interested in learning
about Temple Kol will receive a
#
i

CandlriighlinK Til
Friday, Aug. 137:40
Friday, Aug. 207:34
Friday, Aug. 27-7:27
Ba-ruch A-tah Ado-nye. Elo-haynu Melech Ha-olam.
Asher kid shanu B mitz-vo-tav, V'tzee-va-nu
L'had-leek Nayr shel Shabbat.
Blessed art Thou, O Lord our God, King of the Universe,
Who has sanctified us with Thy commandments
And commanded us to kindle the Sabbath lights.

special welcome at the 8:15 p.m.,
Friday, Aug. 13, service of the
congregation conducted by Rabbi
Sheldon J. Harr and Cantor G.
Nathan Corburn.
Rabbi Harr will talk about the
concept of what it means to be
part of the Jewish community
through synagogue affiliation.
All unaffiliated families in the
community are invited the wor-
ship with the congregation at the
Temple at 8200 Peters Road,
Plantation, and join in the Oneg
Shabbat following the service.
WEST BROWARD
JEWISH CONGREGATION
David Cohen, heading the edu-
cation committee at West Brow-
ard Jewish Congregation, reports
Religious School classes will be
held in the Reform congrega-
tion's sanctuary at 7473 NW 4th
St., Plantation. Classes will begin
with Kindergarten through third
grade at 9:30 a.m., Sunday, Sept.
12. The fourth through sixth
grades will meet 4:30 to 4 p.m.,
Mondays and Wednesdays, with
the seventh grade tentatively
scheduled to meet Tuesdays and
Thursdays.
B'nei/B'not
Mitzvah
Bar Mitzvah and Bat Mitzvah
honors will be conferred respec-
tively on Eric Steinberg, son of
Rochelle and William Stemberg,
and Robin Fisher, daughter of
Francine and Sheldon Fisher, at
the 10:30 a.m., Saturday, Aug.
14 service at Temple Kol Ami,
8200 Peters Rd., Plantation.
BETH ISRAEL
Alisa Lewis, daughter of
Helaine and William Lewis of
Sunrise, will become a Bat Mitz-
vah at the Friday evening, Aug.
20, service at Temple Beth Israel,
7100 W. Oakland Park Blvd. The
following morning, Barry Rick-
man, son of Lorraine and Mervyn
Rickman of Sunrise, will become
a Bar Mitzvah.
SHA'ARAY TZEDEK
Scott Jay Wolfe, son of
Roberta and Stanley Wolfe, will
become a Bar Mitzvah at the
Saturday morning, Aug. 28,
service at Temple Sha'aray
Tzedek, Sunrise Jewish Center.
Zakaka Dead at 87
TEL AVIV. --
Yefet Ben-Avraham Zakaka,
leader of the Samaritan com-
munity in Israel, died last Friday
in his home in Holon. He waa 87
years old. He was burned in the
Samaritan cemetery in Kiryat
Shau. His father, Avraham
Zadaka, was the first Samari to
leave Nablus in 1905 to settle in
Jaffa, bring the Samaritan com-
munity into clots contact with
the Jewish community for the
first time and laying the founda-
tion for the Israeli-Samaritan
community in Jaffa as an off-
shoot of the main community in
Nablus. Yafet Zakaka broke with
, Samaritan tradition whan he
married a Jewish woman in 1934
This has become a practice fol-
lowed by many other Samaritans
InMemoriam
The Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Laadardak- m*
Mdaeas the deaths, recently of two of Ha laminine*^*
Bruce Fine of Paba Aba, Pompano Beach, and Moe SwSN
Ocean Mile. Fort Laodardala. Tha Federation Ual?l^
Waees to the famffias of Brace Fir*, a benefactor aELftSH
tioa's Foandatioa of Jewish Phtarthropa. *, tS^VH
founding member of Fort Lsa denials'. Temple Ema El '
The Federal Ion and Ra Community Relations Commits ^
their condolences to Morton Silberman of Miami nra^L4"!
the American Iarael Public Affairs Committee (AIPAtT!? fl
wife, Val. died earlier this month. *M.nja,l
Synagogue Directory
Orthodox
Temple Obel B'nai Raphael (733-7684), 4351 W Oakland I
Blvd., Lauderdaie Lakes 33313. Services: Daily 8tailll
p.m.; Friday 6:45 p.m.; Saturday 8:46 a.m. and 7:15pm
Synagogue of Inverrary Chabad (748-1777), 7770 NW 44tU
Lincoln Park West, Sunrise, 33321. Services: Daily 8a.m uS
p.m.; Friday, 7 p.m.; Saturday 9 a.m. and 7:30 pm e2!
Groups: Women, Wednesdays at 8 p.m.; Men
following service. Rabbi Aaron Liebermaa.
Young Israel Synagogue of Deerfield Beach (421-1367) i
Hillsboro Blvd., Deerfield Beach 33441. Services: Daily l,
a.m. and sundown; Saturday 8:46 a.m. and sundown; Fridnl
p.m. Presidium: Jacob Held, Morris Sept anus, Charks Wt
press, Cantor Sol Chasin.
Young Iarael Synagogue of Hollywood Fort Lauderdaie I
7877), 3291 Stirling Rd., Fort Lauderdaie 33312. Service*: I
7:30 a.m. and sundown; Saturday: 9 a.m; Sunday 8 a ml
Edward Davis.
Conservative
M
Congregation Bath Hillel of Margate (974-3090), 7640 Ml
Blvd., Margate 33063. Services: Daily 8:15 a.m. and 6:301
Friday 8 p.m.; Saturday 8:45 a.m.
Hebrew Congregation of Lauderhill (733-9660), 2048 NW -
Ave., Lauderhill 33313. Services: Daily 8:30 a.m. and 5:30p
Friday 6 p.m.; Saturday 8:46a.m. President: MaxwellGifan.
Hebrew Congregation of North Lauderdaie (for
(741-0369). Services: Friday 7 p.m.; Saturday 8:46 mi
Western School, Room 3, 8200 SW 17th St., No.
President: Murray Hendlar.
Temple Sha'aray Tzedek (741-0296), 8049 W Oakland
Blvd.. Sunrise 33321. Services: Daily 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.;!
8 p.m.; Saturday 9 a.m. and 7 p.m. Rabbi Albert N.
Cantor Jack Merchant.
Temple Beth Am (974-8650), 7206 Royal Palm Blvd., Ma
33063. Services: Daily 8:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m.; Friday 51
and 8 p.m.; Saturday 9 a.m.; Sunday 8 a.m. Rabbi Dr.I
Geld, Cantor Irving Grossman.
Temple Beth Israel (742-4040), 7100 W. Oakland Park 1
Sunrise 33313. Services: Dairy 8 a.m. and 6 p.m; Friday, 5l
minyan and 8 p.m.; Saturday 8:46 a.m. and sunset; Sundnj
a.m. Rabbi Phillip A. Labowitz, Cantor Maurice Nea.
Temple Beth Iarael of Deerfield Beach (421-7060), 200 S.
tury Blvd., Deerfield Beach. Services: Daily and Sunday 8J
a.m. and 5 p.m., Friday 8 p.m., Saturday H:45 a.m. and!
candle-lighting time. Rabbi Leon Mirsky. Cantor Shasta /
kerman.
Temple Sholom (942-6410), 132 SE 11th Ave.. 1'ompano I
33060. Services: Daily 8:45 a.m., Friday 8 p.m.. Sataafcyi
Sundays 9 a.m. Rabbi Samuel April, Cantor Jacob J. ft
Temple Beth Torah (721-7660). 9101 NW 57th St.,
33321. Services: Daily 8:30 a.m. and 6 p.m.; Fridays6pjni
8 p.m. Rabbi Israel Zimmerman, Cantor Henry Belaseo.
Congregation B'nai Israel af Coral Springs (for in*
753-6319) for Ramblewood East residents only. Servk*i:l
at 8:30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m.; Saturdays at 9 a.m. Praskkat:!
Davit.
Reform
Temple Emanu-El (731-2310), 3246 W. Oakland Park:
Lauderdaie Lakes 33311. Services: Fridays 8:15 p.m.; ^
services only on holidays or celebration of Bar-Bat
Rabbi Jeffrey Ballon. Cantor Jerome Klaaaent
Temple Kol Ami (472-1988). 8000 Peters Rd., PlMtottaJJ
Services: Fridays8:16p.m.; Saturdays 10:30 a.m. Bass)J
don Harr, Cantor Gaaa Corburn.
Temple Beth Orr (763-3232), 2161 Rivaraide Dr.. Cora] L_
33066. Services: Minyan Sundays 8 a.m., Tuaidart
Thursdays 7:30 a.m., Fridays 8 p.m., Saturdays 10:*'
Rabbi Donald R.Gerber. Cantor Nancy Hausman
Wast Browsrd Jewish Cnaarraasfisa (for information: 74H
or P.O. Box 17440, PlantatSon33318). 7473 NW 4th 8t,"
tion. Services: Fridays 8:16 pjn.; Saturdays for Bsr-Bsti
vah only. Rabbi Kart F.I
Temple B'aai Shalom of DatrfWd Beach (for ^ormf1*-.l
2532), Leopold Van Blerkom) Services: Friday"i P]
Menorah Chapels, 2306 W. Hillaboro Blvd.. DeerfisM Baa*
Reconrtractionirt ~
at (472-3800). 11301 W. Browtrd 1
Plantation, 33326. _
only for Bar-Bat Mitzvah, 10
>SAisS
.Saw*'!
7210 or 9734628,
B
JUtajL _
af Coesaat Creek <<" *?*mJ
O. Bos 4884, Margate 33063)




' August 13,1982

The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
NORTON
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Page 15
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P155/80R13 5Q.84 1-46 BR78x13 73.91 2.07 155x12 44.33
P175/75R13 58.90 175 CR78X14 75.34 007 145x13 39.74
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185/70x13 61.67 1
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Page 16
the Jewish Floridtan of Great*
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