The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 3, no. 7 (Apr. 5, 1974)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 9, 1976 called v.4, no. 27 but constitutes v.5, no. 1; issue for July 7, 1989 called v.18, no. 11 but constitutes v.18, no. 13.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44570954
lccn - sn 00229545
ocm44570954
System ID:
AA00014312:00218

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Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward


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Full Text
*Jewisti Florid fain
[l_ Number24
OF GREATER FORT LAIlDFRnAI F
Fort Lauderdale, Florida Friday, July 2,1982
fndSheehM
l^rice 36 Cents
munity Responds to Israel's Needs in Crisis
onding to the call
mobilization of the
les of the North
Id Jewish commu-
the continuing crisis
k the Jewish Feder-
[f Greater Fort Lau-
advanced almost a
Hion dollars immedi-
lor direct transmis-
] the Jewish Agency
1.
ddition, in the com-
fwide call for soli-
] and new commit-
br the United Jewish
campaign of the
lion, more than
was raised at ral-
Tamarac, Wood-
bentury Village and
lions, beginning with
t>r unity with Israel at
Bg hastily arranged for
night, June 10, at
Temple Beth Torah,
i a great response to the
If Israel's people for the
te in peace.
[of economic disruption
] the continuing action
bn, projected curtail-
bvernment funding for
flare programs and
amage of UJA-funded
ency facilities in the
upper Galilae told to the audience
by Florida's Consul General Joel
Arnon inspired a generous
response.
Consul General Arnon was
gratified by the enthusiastic
response to his remarks at the
Tamarac meeting and expreseed
his pleasure at the outpouring of
financial support as members of
the' audience handed in checks,
some for additional contributions
to UJA, some for new commit-
ments, and some in complete
payment of previously-made 1982
pledges.
The scene was repeated with
even greater response at the Cen-
tury Village rally in Deerfield's
Temple Beth Israel where Ar-
non's assistant. Vice Consul
Oded Ben Hur, was the speaker.
Arnon said that Israel must
end the vulnerability of their
northern region to attacks from
bases of the Palestine Liberation
Organization (FLO) in southern
Lebanon. He said the action
taken was in self defense to
destroy the FLO and its guerril-
las who have shelled settlements
in the upper Galilee and com-
mitted terroristic attacks on
Jews in Israel and elsewhere in
the world.
Interrupted numerous times
by applause from the audience
filling Temple Beth Torah, Arnon
said: "We are surrounded by
Arab states that have threatened
us with destruction. Israel has no
intention of claiming any Leba-
Rabbi Leon Mirsky of Century Village's Temple
Beth Israel presents $5,000 to Jean Shapiro,
Federation president, and Samuel K. Miller, C V
UJA general chairman.
nese territory not one inch of
it. We just want our children to
be able to sleep in their own beds
instead of bomb shelters night
after night. Is this too much to
ask?".
Echoing Arnon's plea to the
audience to turn its good wishes
into action and good deeds, Mil-
ton Keiner. a past president of
the Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale, declared: "We
need the money now for Israel.
Continued on Page 8
Milton Keiner
Lauderdale Will Lead 'Gathering for Life* to Poland, Israel
se life!"
pedented opportunity has been offered the
lunity of Greater Fort Lauderdale to go
for a five-day searing encounter with the
oration for the Gathering the congrega-
leaders of National Jewry with the people
[celebration of life.
pal United Jewish Appeal committee has
Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauder-
[ October 5 Poland pre-Mission Gathering.
lities will have pre-mission trips to other
}pe.
Sincoff of Woodlands, Tamarac, and his
who is president-general campaign chair-
[Federation's Women's Division, have been
I the Gathering to Israel.
lathering Mission to Poland will include the
nth camp site at Auschwitz, Cracow, War-
the greatest Ghetto resistance against the
Felice Sincoff
Dr. Arthur Sincoff
Nazis took place during World War II, and a meeting
with the existing Jewish community. The Poland ex-
perience will include boarding the Chopin Express,
carrying current freed Jewish immigrants from Moscow
to Vienna, where the Fort Lauderdale Gathering will be
greeted by and have the opportunity to visit the inter-
nationally-famous Nazi war criminals hunter, Simon
Wisenthal.
On October 10, it's on to Israel where the Fort
Lauderdale group will embrace the men, women and
children whose lives are touched through UJA contri-
butions for humanitarian needs that must be met with
outside help, and engage in parson to parson
dialogue with government leaders.
A special meeting with Prune Minister Menachem
Begin will highlight the Gathering during its celebra-
tion of life.
Dr. and Mrs. Sincoff have extended an invitation to
North Broward's Jewish community leadership to meet
with them Sunday evening, Aug. 15, at their home for
coffee and dessert and discussion of this unusual ex-
perience.
mrina Israel As a Sun and Fun Vacationer
& ......________~. uaoers and h
I AX LEVINE
[ a land of surprising
as this more evident
rhursday-to-Thursday
ent discovering Is-
|s a mission partici-
a pilgrim, nor as a
[hot springs curebut
id Sun Tourist" while
some miles north of
ras on Saturday, June
T'ith about 200 news-
[ magazine editors, re-
vel writers, column-
ed agents from scores
I the U.S. and Canada,
fa. Here just exactly
efore our arrival some
?Uinmade Katyusha
rocked this dty and
Imenta in this northern
fcraaL
*>at PLO attack, plus
~ ation attempt on Ia-
nbassador to Great
hat led to Defense
[Ariel Sharon's coin-
ashing Israel's tanks,
^ and troops to drive
Tierrillas out of South-
In.
Here we were having a Shab-
bat lunch in the Carlton Hotel,
one of the hotels and settlements
that had been evacuated a week
ago. Then, after lunch, .here we
were at Naharyia's Sail and Swim
Club, changing into swimwear for
a swim in the placid waters of the
Mediterranean Sea. We lounged
on the beach, some ot us along-
side soldiers beck from Lebanon,
some of us alongside U.S. Army
personnel who have been "ob-
servers'' with the UN troops in
northern Israel.
And there, along the nearby
coastal highway leading to the
Biblical dty of Tyre, deep inside
PLO strongholds, convoys of
armored vehicles and troop
transports rumbled north, and
helicopters shattered the silence
over the beach.
That was the evidence of war
amid the wind-sailing young peo-
ple, amid the sunbathers and the
swimmers.
Then our "Fly-Drive Rally." a
project conceived some six
months ago by the Israel
Government Ministry of Tounsm
as way to encourage tounsm,
headed south with no further sign
or sound of the raging war except
for an Army funeral cortege on
the way to a cemetery, and the
reports published in Israeli news-
papers and heard on radio and
seen on television.
The Rally was sponsored by
Continued on Page 2-
HAIQ RESIGNS
Secretary of State Alexander Halg's resignation was
announced and accepted by President Reaganata press
conference last week. George Schultz is expected to
replace Haig, and It bodes no good tor foreign policy.


As a Sn and Fn Vacationer
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j^y, July 2,1962
The Jewish Floridianof OrtattrFort Lauderdale
No Going Back to Lebanese
Community Calendar
Status Quo -Halg
By HELEN SILVER
WASHINGTON
(JTA) While not provid-
- details, Secretary of
State Alexander Haig said
Monday that the United
States would work to
achieve withdrawal of all
foreign "elements" from
Lebanon in an effort to pre-
vent a return to the status
quo which existed there
prior to Israel's invasion.
At the same time, Haig and Is-
fgjj's Ambassador to the United
States, Moshe Arena, who both
appeared separately on ABC-
TV's "This Week with David
Brinkley" program, said it waa
gUll "too early" to predict a time-
table for Israeli withdrawal from
Lebanon.
"I THINK we are going to
work to achieve an adjustment
and withdrawal of all foreign ele-
ments from Lebanon," Haig said.
He added that Lebanon has been
"racked" by internal elements
"not under the authority and
control of the Lebanese govern-
ment as well as a nation that has
been occupied by Syrian forces
for too long."
According to Haig, President
Reagan's focus so far has been to
establish a cessation of hostilities
between fighting forces in Leba-
non. Hut he pointed out that "no
one would welcome a return to
the status quo ante in Lebanon
EEC Postpones
'Protocol'
By DAVID KANTOR
BONN (JTA) Diplomatic
sources here confirmed that the
European Economic Community
has postponed the signing of a
, "financial protocol" with Israel
as an expression of displeasure
over Israel's invasion of Leba-
non. The signing was to have
taken place in Brussels.
The protocol, negotiated about
six months ago, would provide
some $40 million in credits for Is-
rael from the European Bank for
Investments over the next five
years. Although the credits bear
the prevailing commercial inter-
est rates, they are considered to
be of some political significance.
Meanwhile, Foreign Minister
Hans-Dietrich Genscher said that
West Germany will support the
evacuation of all foreign forces
from Lebanon as a key condition
to restore Lebanese sovereignty
and territorial integrity. He said
that by foreign forces he meant
not only Israeli troops. But asked
whether he included the Palestine
Liberation Organization, the
foreign Minister replied, "That
will be the decision of an elected
Lebanese government."
Widowed Persons
Training to
Aid Others
Widowed Persona Service of
U Mental Health Assn. of
Broward County will begin a
training session for men and
*wnen who have been widowed
least 18 months to teach them
how they can help the newly ha-
lved.
Pearl Siegel at the Mental
Health Aasn. office, 666-6005, is
accepting reservations for the
Ws which will be given for
0ve0dy. July 19-23. from 9 to
w:dO pjn. daily, at the South
I ^Bpus of the Florida Atlantic
University, 1616 W. Commercial
owd., Fort Lauderdale.
The training sessions are de-
f**i to enable those volun-
*** their services to provide
" on a ona-Uwme basis for the
"wly bereaved.
with all the instabilities we have
experienced since 1976," when
that country was torn by civil
war.
Haig said the United States
has not given serious thought"
to the possibility of U.S. partici-
pation in a peacekeeping force in
Lebanon. He said that the Ad-
ministration would "look
carefully at what will be necess-
ary to provide a stable situation
in Lebanon to resolve the tension
which brought about this
disaster in the first place."
THE ISSUE of U.S. troops to
police parts of Lebanon also was
discussed by Arena. While he
said Israel has made no specific
suggestions toward U.S. troops
involvement, Arena noted that
Israel and the U.S. are conduct-
ing consultations in an effort to
"structure a situation" in Leba-
non which would strengthen the
authority of the Lebanese gov-
ernment.
"We are looking for the kind of
situation that will not permit the
PLO to return and fire against
Israel again. I don't know that
that has to include U.S. troops,"
Arens said. "I suppose this is
something for the U.S. govern-
ment to consider."
SUNDAY, JULY 4
HAPPY
INDEPENDENCE DAY
Temple Emaaa-Q: 7 p.m.
Games.
MONDAY, JULY 6
Temple Emann-EI: 7 p.m.,
Games.
TUESDAY. JULY 6
Temple Beth Torah Ststerhood-
Tamarac: noon. Games. Lunch
served at nominal cost.
Concord Village Condo-Womea's
Club: 8 p.m., General meeting,
Club House, Dr. Jess Cohn and
William Cohn speakers; "Retire-
ment, Relocation and Associa-
tion."
WEDNESDAY, JULY 7
Temple Beth Ore: 7:46 p.m.
Games.
Temple Beth Israel: 7:30 p.m.
Games.
National Council of Jewish
Women Plantation Section: 8
p.m. Organizational meeting for
Business and Professional
Group.
THURSDAY, JULY 8
Temple Beth Israel: 12:30 p.m.
Games.
Temple Emanu-El: 7:30 p.m. Ex-
ecutive meeting.
SUNDAY, JULY 11
Temple Kol Ami: 6:30 p.m.
Games.
Temple Beth Torah-T
p.m. Games.
MONDAY, JULY 12
Teaapls Eaeaaa-EI: 1
Games.
p.m.
TUESDAY, JULY 13
Temple Beth Torah Siaterhood-
Tamarac: noon. Games. Lunch
served at nominal cost.
WEDNESDAY, JULY 14
Temple Beth Ore: 7:46 p.m.
Games.
Temple Beth Israel: 7:30 p.m.
Games.
THURSDAY, JULY 15
Temple Beth Israel: 12:30 p.m.
Games.
Hadassah Bermuda Club Herel:
11:30 a.m. Mini Luncheon and
cards. Bermuda Club recreation
SUNDAY. JULY 18
Temple Kol And: 6:30 p.m.
Games.
Temple Beth Torah Tamarac: 7
p.m. Games.
Temple Shaarey Tsedek Men1.
Club-Sunrise Jewish Center: 9
a.m. General meeting. Guest
speaker: Doctor from Doctors'
Medical Center of Broward
speaking on health problems.
Breakfast served.
MONDAY, JULY 19
Temple Emann-EI: 7
p.m.
Games.
TUESDAY, JULY 29
Temple Beth Torah Siatarhood-
Tamarac: noon. Games. Lunch
served at nominal cost.
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iMJtmshHoridianofOrTaterPortLauderdaU
><*H.ii?
July 4,1946
A Black Day for Jem in a Polish Village

Gittel Garfinhel-Bresco, a winter-time resident
of Century Village in Deer field Beach and a reti-
dent in Canada'a Quebec province the rest of the
war. was a witness to a Fourth of July event in
1946 to far removed from anything the U.S. hat
teen since the days of Indian massacres that it it
almost incredible
I. Mrs. Garfinhel-Bretco wrote in Yiddish about a
pogrom in a Polish village. It was translated by
Samuel Valberg, alto a resident of Century Vil-
lage, and published on July 2,1981, in the Cana-
dian Jewish Newt. Excerpts of that article follow.
Following the Allied victory over the Nazis,
Jewish committees were organized in the larger
cities of Poland to help build s new life tor the
surviving remnants from the death camps and
those who returned from their wanderings in the
distant provinces of the Soviet Union.
Such a committee was formed in the city of
Kielce.
(But) there were bloodthirsty elements in the
Polish population, who became incensed, when
after the murder of six million Jews, they still saw
living Jews. The deeply rooted anti-Semitism
in the thousand years of Polish Jewry's history,
the Passover blood accusations against Jews, the
bestial violence of the pogrom makers in previous
times in several Polish cities, again boiled over in
Kielce.
It was a Thursday, July 4,1946, on s pleasant
sunny morning, when a large mob collected in
front of the building in the Kibbutz which housed
the Jewish committee. The mob was armed with
stones, bottles, dubs, iron posts, axes, hammers
and long knives.
A woman shouted in an eerie voice: "The Jews
killed my young son." The mob answered: "Let's
take revenge on these Jews, they came from Rus-
sia to kill us.-'
Some threw stones through the windows,
others were attempting to break down doors.
Unexpectedly, there appeared three officials of
the Polish militia and told the president of the
Jewish committee. Dr. Kahana, not to try to get
help and not to telephone anywhere, "because
everything will quiet down in a few minutes."
The Polish militia demanded that any weapons
that were kept in the house for self-defense must
be surrendered to them, because they were re-
sponsible for maintaining order.
Soon after their reouest was fulfilled, the swirl-
ing, hate-filled mob broke into the houses and
started their "holy work."
It was s kind of bloody insanity dance by mem-
bers of the crazed mob. They actually sliced flesh
off living people; hacked living bodies with their
axes. Some of the victims begged to be shot, but
the answer was "No. we will not shoot you, cursed
Jew, we will torture you."
Among the victims were pregnant <
whom they cut open and shook out the babies
Such a sisnghter has never occurred in history.
When I visited the hospital in Lodz, where
some of the victims were taken. I could not recog-
nize my brother Melech, who was among the most
seriously injured.
I searched a long time, looked and looked but
could not recognize him. All that I saw were cut
up imwlra of human flesh
Later, when members of s delegation of the
League for Human Rights visited the injured in
the Lodz hospital, they reported in the press that
this pogrom surpassed the cruelest deeds of the
Nazi murderers.
A Polish priest, a member of the League, ap-
peared at a protest meeting in Lodz and said:
"Jews, I stand before you with my head bowed. I
am ashamed to look into your eyes, because I be-
long to the same people ss those murderers. "
Fslse wss the opinion of those Jews whs be-
keved and tried to psrsusde others thatthspo.
gram in Kielce was sat isolated case. The
Kielce pogrom aroused world Jewry generally.
Those in Kielce, who, with youthful mthiisaMn
had made it their aim to build a Jewish national
UfemPouuvl.nowcouldnotberieiaonanyPouBri
soil by any power on earth. Soon after leaving the
hospital, they left Poland. Among them was my
brother Melech. So began the exodus from Po-
land.
We dare not forget that sad day, July 4,1946
Let us remember it aa a day of mourning for the
Jews who perished in Kielce. Honor to thesr
memory.
. The Encyclopedia Judaica lists the Kielce po-
grom at the largest attach onJewt in Poland in
the pott-Nazi era. Thit pogrom, instigated by Po-
lish nationalists and some Communists, provided
the impetus for large-scale Jewish emigration,
much like the pre-Nazi period when many Jews of
Poland migrated to Palestine.
Send Letters, Mailgrams to Reagan and Congress
(immunity Relations Committee of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale is urging a
letter-writing and mailgram campaign to Presi-
dent Ronald Reagan and to members of Congress
to counteract the flood of vicious mail concerning
the effort to drive the PLO out of southern Leb-
anon and restore Lebanon's sovereignty.
CRC suggests the following as a sample of a
Mailgram (at $4 through Western Union) that
could be sent: "I urge you to support Israel now
in this time of crisis. The safety sod security of
Israel depend on your support to restore peace."
A sample letter, which can be modified to
include an individual's own thoughts, was draft-
ed. This one reads:
"The PLO in Lebanon is a threat to peace and
is the base for international terrorism. This
should be considered in the formulation of policy
in the Lebanese crisis. The objective of U.S.
Middle East policy must be to press for arrange-
ments that will avoid Israel's need to act in its
self-defense again and again.
"The issue is not Israeli withdrawal, but con-
ditioning that withdrawal on arrangements that
will prevent Lebanon from being used as launch-
ing pad for attacks against Israel and that will re-
store Lebanese sovereignty which was destroyed
by the PLO and Syria.
"Such a policy calls for seizing the op-
portunities inherent in this new situation, much
ss the US. did in 1967 and 1973, in contrast to
the failed policy of 1978 that forced the with-
drawal of Israeli forces and replaced them with
pious international declarations backed up by an
impotent UN force.
"We look to YOU to stand against punitive ac-
tion directed against Israel by the UN and the in-
ternational community."
Address President Reagan at the White House,
Washington. D.C.
Addresses for area Members of Congress
follow:
SENATE: Lawtoo M. Chiles. Jr.. 437 Russell
Building. Washington. D.C. 20610 sad Paula
Hawkins, 1327 Dirksen Baildmg, Washington.
D.C.20510. HOUSE: E. Clay Shaw, 1213 Long
worth Building. Washington. D.C. 20615, Das
Mica. 131 Cannon Building, Wash lag! mi D.C.
20515, sad William Lehman. 2347 Rayburn
Building, Washington, D.C. 20615.
Shaw Speaks Tonight at Sholom
U.S. Rep. E. Clay Shaw, whose
Congressional district is
wholly within Browsrd County,
will be the guest speaker at the
Friday evening, July 2, service at
Temple Sholom. 132 SE 11th
A vs., Pompano Beach. Temple
Sholom's Rabbi Samuel April in-
vites the entire community of
North Browsrd to hear the Con-
gressman's remarks concerning
the Middle East and the feeling
in Congress about the Israel's
drive to bring peace to the
Galilee.
Earlier this week Rep. Shaw
met with the Israel Task Force of
Century Village, Deerfield Beach,
which is affiliated with the Com-
munity Relations Committee of
the Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale.
Rep. E. Clay Shaw
'Mf
cJewisfti Floridian
or Offt Fort | tutu Sail
FSED K. SHOCHET SUZANNE SHOCMET
Editor and FubUth* Eaacuttoa Edftor
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SaSPW.Oa*aMto>Hatod.. Fort Laudardala.Fl 33321 PrtonaQOByaSSMO
Friday, July 2,1982
Volume 11
11TAMUZ5742
Number 24
The Ten I^ost CJans of Israel?
The Highland Scots, so the story goes, have bid claim to being
dependents of the Ten Lost Tribes of Israel. Whether they really are or
we II never know. But one thing we do know for sure is that the first
Jewsof modern times came to Scotland in the loOCs, found it much
to their liking, and settled there.
Once established, the settlers undoubtedly discovered one of
Scotland s most famous pleasures, J&B Rare Scotch. Carefully
blended from a selection of the finest scotches. J&B has such a
smoothness and subtlety that it can truly be said to whisper. No
wonder ,t s become the favorite scotch here in AmericaScrve
JT ^ Cbnur "^P0^- ~ ^ghtful sip will
the start ofa tradition that will never be lost.
not,
J&BaltwhispcrSa


1 twist
n OJ \jmiU!l F
*&?&>,^~'&.*&?7j*&
SOOsbI
p. Mica Comments on Mid-East Eight Students Sponsored by Jewish Federation
,,c Rep. Dan Mica of Brow-
[Ito Beach Comr/esskmal
I At 11 had the following re-
K published June 10 to ths
Lressional Record:
Thursday, June 10,1982
tt. MICA. Mr. Speaker, we
,11 distressed and grvely
itemed by recent develop-
C in the Middls East, and
for a prompt cessation of
tilities in southern Lebanon.
, causes of violence are deep-
ggi and long-standing. The
found emotions of ethnic and
%jous loyalty and anxieties
ut national and individual
,ity in the fragile Middle
i nave all too often erupted
r, the painful kinds of events
| have witnessed over the past
| days
foe event that triggered the
Ut round of violence, the
j| attack on Israel's distin-
bed Ambassador to Great
iin, Shlomo Argov, was per-
j the last straw to a series of
aiting pressures and stresses
he ever-security conscious Is-
i Government. Acts of terror-
[ should be deplored, and the
ielis have proven to the past
je masters of the firm and de-
le response to such deplorable
ens. We' in the United States
i long admired the ability of
l's security and defense
i to guard its vulnerable
ation from the multiple
Rep. Dan Mica
threats it faces.
The events of recent days in
wsr-ravsged Lebanon are indeed
tragic. While we anxiously urge
the end of the fighting, and ar-
rangements to insure to the
greatest extent possible the re-
duction or elimination of terror-
ism, our interests and the in-
terests of regional stability and
security for the nations and peo-
ples of the area may be best
served by assuming a patient and
diplomatic posture. Premature
judgments regarding the current
crisis may only harm the delicate
task of restoring peace in the
Middle East.
Readers Write
\A setback to American to-
I," "Camp David accord is
'Pres. Reagan's trip to
) is overshadowed by Is-
ls action which is a blow to
erican prestige."
i are some of hysterical
burts from "experts" on the
i East, relayed by the
i-media, interpreting the Is-
I expedition into Lebanon.
ery body seems to know
It the American interests are.
at still needs to be explained
low would it serve American
ts if we would let PLO
\\y but surely bleed Israel to
B
|ftr ail. we never heard from
"Expert-circles" any
pies of concern when tonocen
i of Israeli men, women and
en have been spilled by
) bombs and bullets. Instead,
ways brings about recoffi-
dations for American-PLO ,
fcgue.
pw, at a time of a possible de-
fction of the murderous PLO,
| Expert-patriots" ring
[hands in despair that a
tble Mideast peace is being _
sad.
kve there been any reasona-
Irab peace overtures that Is-
pjected and we didn't hear
t? Hardly. But let's check-
pew facts about their "pros-
fe" partners to peace with
I PLO is doubtlessly recog-
| as the vanguard of Soviet
ation into the Middle East,
eace is not on their calling-
[they are supported by
it-influenced Syria, Iraq and
v they are financed by the
"moderates" Saudi Arabia,
Kuwait, and other oil-rich Arab
nations; Jordan's King Hussein
has a dream; PLO, Syria and Is-
rael will kill off each other,
enough for him to give the final
blow and create a great Hashe-
mite kingdom up to the Medi-
terranean coast. Do ws recognize
anyone among them as a pros-
pective caller for real peace?
Some credit for Pres. Sadat's
facing reality belongs to Col.
Khadafi's audacity, although
Sadat's wisdom and courage was
needed for him to arrive as to the
right conclusions. So far, neither
of the Arab leaders is in such a
position, or has those qualities.
Our rhetorics about a possible
strive for peace of'' moderate''
Arab leaders is just a front for
our policies which are entangled
in business considerations and
internal policies, if not naiveness.
Too much so, to pick a path of
courageous independence. We
even left the Soviets dictate to us
when to press Israel to retreat
from a final victory in its fight for
existence. That was the case in
the wars of 1966,1967,1973, and
it is the case now in the desperate
fight against the murderous
PLO.
We should only pray that Is-
rael will continue to be stubborn
in its will to live. Maybe in time
American foreign policy makers
will gain enough wisdom to rea-
lize that if it wouldn't have been
an Israel, the U.S. wouldn't have
in the Middle East a foot to stand
on by now. Maybe then, it will
adapt a foreign policy realistical-
ly consistent with national in-
terests.
RAPHAEL B. FRIEDMAN
HH HOIY DAYS
4SUCCOTH
SUCCAsa
siM
sJINs/lMtyHsM
in the woue am HOTEL
K YOUR HOME
MVEMUriASIS
Admitted to Jewish High School of So. Florida
Eight teen-agers from the
Greater Port lauderdsle area are
among the 76 student* who qua-
lified for early admission to the
Jjwiah High School of South
Florida located on the property of
the Michael-Ann Russell Jewish
Community Center to North
Miami Beach.
The eight, sponsored by the
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale, are Brooks
Gurland, Scott Kuatun, Marc
Labowitz MichsUsn Levy, Gary
Plotkin, Leon Levy, Samuel Ben
tolia and Raquel Levy.
They will be joining David
Levy, Alan Rosa, and Staci Taub
who will be returning for their
second year at the school which
opened its doors to its first stu-
dent body in the fall of 1981. The
first year enrollment was 100 stu-
dents. This fall, the school ex-
pects to double its registration.
"Ws had many more applica-
tions than we were able to accept
during our first year, this in spits
of the fact that our school em
phasixes hard work and long
hours. Our school day lasts from
8:16 a.m. to 6 p.m. and our
teachers demand serious effort on
the part of their students," said
Rabbi Herring, Principal, recent-
ly.
The kind of applicant that is
coming forward is the serious
student who is looking for an op-
portunity to not only acquire an
excellent General Studies ex-
perience but who wants to
strengthen his knowledge of Jew-
ish Studies as well.
The faculty of the High School
will grow to 20 academic instruc-
tors for the 200 students next
year. Specialist faculty for the
school are being brought from
Eiudand and Israel One of these
is presently the director of the
Pedagogic Center for Diaspora
Jewish Education, an educational
resource center located in Jerusa-
lem. The Pedagogic Center dis-
tributes educational resource
material and textbooks and
audio-visual aids to Jewish Day
Schools throughout the world.
Its director is a specialist to
media. He will also be doing post
graduate work at the University
of Miami to this field.
The curriculum for the General
Studies Department was drawn
up by the School of Education of
the University of Miami The
Jewish Studies syllabus at the
school is presently under revi-
A special feature of the
program is the participation of
ORT in its computer and science
programs. The course wffl be
taught by Dr. Giora Mann, a vi-
siting professor of mathematics
from the Hebrew University. Dr.
Mann is the head of the Division
of Science and Technology at the
school.
<@>J60R0NL
Tha dolicious, rRitrttkRi* Noah's Ark
of pasto-shapod animaia Mds lova!
Moms and kida go tor Zooroni two by two! Kids trunk Zooroni
looks as great as it tsstss And since Zooroni is vitamm-
enftched pasts simmered in tots of yummy tomsto ssucs and
tangy cheese. Moms love to pair up with it. tool
rsn
nes.M.1


The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Eagerly Anticipating Israel Trip
fruUy,Jl-y2il
--------------------
"
Waidman
HOT&
Miami Beach's Finest Glatt Kosher Cuitint i
Open AginForThe HIGH HOLIDAYS
With Your host* Sam and Morris WaWman. Gary Shor, David iwj
ROSH HASHANA-YOM KIPPUR '
SERVICES CONDUCTED BY RENOWN CANTOR
12DayrH NHjhts(Sept. 17-28) M.*300M,PMM
(2 fflNli daily included. 3 meats Sat. ft holiday,)
S Days 7 Nights (Sept. 17-20 & Sept. 24-28) ^^
6 Days-5 Nights (Sept. 17-20 & Sept. 26-28) ^^
"Stoop at adtotoing AttonSc Teware; meals at Waidman
EARLY RESERVATIONS SUGGESTED
Phone Sam Waidman: 538-573* or 5344751
On The Ocean at 43rd Street
Among the more than 20 persons who left last
on the Jewish Federation of Greater Port
Lauderdale Mission to Israel were these young-
sters who ware scheduled to meet up with other
Fort Lauderdale youngsters and other families
from around the country for the United Jewish
Appeal-sponsored Family Mission.
Pictured are Norman Fleiaher, Dana Fleisher,
Jack Polish. Cheryl Polish, David Roth, Lisa
Roth, Marcus Padow. Both Jack Polish and
David Roth took part in the celebration for life
atop Maaada as they were called to read portions
oftheTorah.
90-Year Old Sings
At Shabbat Service
Sadie Binenbaum, 94-year-old
resident of the Plantation Nurs-
ing Home, entertained the Castle
Coodo Chaplaincy Assistants
with Yiddish songs of long so
following the Shabbat Eve serv-
ice the group conducted June 18
at the Home
Lillian M. Schoen, who has
been leading the group of Chap-
laincy Assistants for a long time,
said that threats of stormy
weather and the absence of a
rabbi who usually accompanies
the group didn't deter the volun-
teers. She conducted the service
assisted by Ruth Kay, Dolly
Klein, Miriam Levitt and Sylvia
Mulhauser.

WEST BROWARD
JEWISH CONGREGATION
announces
High Holy Day Services
will be conducted by
Rabbi Kurt F. Stone
of West Broward Jewish Congregation
Bailey HaU
Broward Community College
3501 S.W. Davie Rd.. Davie, Fl.
Rosh Hoshana
Friday, September 17
Saturday. September 18
Sunday, September 19
Yom Kippur
Sunday, September 26
Monday. September 27
Donation $30.00per seat
For information or tickets please cell:
1792-6340 791-5925 748-19M
...WASTED...
WHO WHIT TO HIVE FUN
- ANNOUNCING -
AN EXCITING VARIETY OF BUDGET TOURS
Tours Our
No Frigs One N&X
Our F-Jku Pocaregaal Tours i
The World Famous BURT REYNOLDS DINNER THEATER
and the Popular MUSCANA SUPPER CLUB
PLUS ONE. AND TWO NJGHT PACKAGES
AND DAY TRIPS ARE AVAILABLE
PERFECT FOa FUNDRAISING
a*
Col CoSki h> our FREE TOUR BOOKLET
O ^CjJom &vua; ^olSuaaAl
-OVERLOOKING PALM BEACH"
M0 DATURA STREET AT FLAGLER DRIVE
- WEST PALM BEACH 33401 -
655-8800
CALL THE PACKAGE PLAN MANAGER
~CALL NOW DONT DELAY
MANY DATES HAVE ALREADY BEEN SOLD
III
PROUDLY DISTRIBUTED
BY
MENDELSONJNC
833 First Street
MIAMI BEACH
672-5800
N'T BE FOOLED
BY SUBSTITUTES!
When spending your hard earned money for value, be sure that'*
what you get! Be certain it's EMPIRE KOSHER fresh chickens and
turkeys. Ask your butcher to show you Empire's famous Red White
and Blue tag while it's attacked to the wing. Otherwise, you risk
getting something less than the best. Make sure that you are not
another victim of deception.


Friday, July 2,1962
I !_. \ \ -
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 7
Out of the bomb shelters. Out of
the nightmare in northern Israel
endured by three generations
of children now, in settlements
and developments we helped
establish pinned down again
and again by terrorist rockets and
artillery shells.
These children and their parents
are among the immigrant families
we have brought to Israel. They are,
in the Galilee to stay, to do their
share in creating a free Jewish
society of the highest quality.
Their enduring security depends
on the future open to them as they
emerge from their shelters. On the
Jewish Agency's vital programs of
settlement, absorption, education
and community-building. On our
vigorous support of those pro-
grams. On us.
They look to us, they need us, more than ever now. Let our actions
show them we are with them. Let our support become their true shelter
- through an outpouring of 1982 campaign pledges and cash -
NOW, and in the critical days and weeks ahead.
Make and Pay Your Pledge Today.
Jewish Federation off Greater Port Lauderdale
3*0 W. akld Park BN*.
Port Lavefertlato PI. 33311--OOS) 748*200
m. &9Wi Ot#V|
TOUFE
Prepared by national \k**4 J*a*h *PP _, ,


TheJt
^r,M^w
?WHM>mWMT'
Friday.
TT*-
Ambassador Argov Still Unconscious: Community Responds to Israel's Needs
Breathing Assisted by Respirator
By MAURICE SAMUELSON
LONDON (JTA) Ambassador Shlomo Argov
remained unconscious and listed in critical condition more
than two weeks after he was shot through the head by a
young Arab as he left a London hotel following a
diplomatic dinner. A bulletin issued by the Hospital for
Nervous Disease said only that the 52 year-old envoy's
condition was unchanged.
HIS BREATHING is being assisted by a respirator,
and he underwent a tracheostomy to further alleviate his
breathing problem. The Ambassador underwent extensive
brain surgery after he was shot on June <3. Further
surgery was performed June 14 to correct a condition
caused by the wound where the bullet exited from his
head.
Dr. Norman Grant, the neurosurgeon who performed
the first operation on Argov was unable to say when the
Ambassador would regain consciousness. He had said
earlier that the wound might cause permanent paralysis of
his left side and that his vision might be impaired.
38 Senators Urge Reagan Work
To Dismantle PLO, Syrian Grip
military and terrorist activities
against Israel."
The letter concluded that "a
long range negotiated settlement
along these lines should be our
ultimate objective."

Continued from Page I
Promises, pledges, are no longer
enough."
Also participating in the vari-
ous mobilization rallies in sup-
port of Israel were Federation
President Jean Shapiro, Federa-
tion's UJA General -Campaign
Chairman Ethel Waldman, the
rabbis, cantors, and officers of
the various synagogues, as well
as community-UJA leaders.
UJA National leaders reported
community reaction thoughout
the U.S. has been swift and
dramatic. Fort Lauderdale's Fed-
eration Was high on the list of the
communities which responded
with an immediate cash contribu-
tion.
The Federation's leaden.h~
continuing efforts to hHn ^ tt
out-un&b32^^rj;
for 1982 and .U prior y^i^f
even seek out additional new T
tributors to support the hum*t
tanan programs so vitally ZT
sary now in Israel. w*'
GRATIFIED: Israel's Consul General Joel
Arnon, speaker at the packed Temple Beth Torah
sanctuary and auditorium in Tamarac, shows his
pleasure following the respone by the audience for
Us demonstration of support for Israel against
the PLO. He is flanked by Jean Shapiro, presi-
dent of the Jewish Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale, sponsors of the various community
rallies, and Ethel Waldman, Federation's 1982
and 1983 general chairman of the UJA cam-
paigns.
President Reagan
By HELEN SILVER
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) Thirty-eight Sen
ators have expressed sup-
port for the Reagan Ad-
ministration's diplomatic
effort to work for the "dis-
mantling" of the Palestine
Liberation Organization's
political and military
control of Lebanon, the
withdrawal of Syrian and
Israeli forces and the estab-
lishment of a strong central
government in Lebanon.
According to a spokeman for
Sen. Robert Packwood (R., Ore.),
one of the signators of a letter to
President Reagan, the Senators
said: "It is crucial that a cease-
fire be firmly established so that
the way will be open for steps to
reduce the possibility of further
confrontation and conflict.
Therefore we support strongly
American diplomatic initiatives
which combine the following ele-
ments:
-DISMANTLING of the
PLO'a ability to exercise military
and political control over signifi-
cant portions of Lebanese terri-
tory and to threaten Israel from
that territory; complete with-
drawal of all Syrian forces from
Lebanon; complete withdrawal of
all Israeli forces from Lebanon;
and reestablishing full control
and sovereigty of the central
government of Lebanon over all
its territory and the capability of
keeping, itself free of all foreign
forces."
The letter, initiated by Senate
Minority Leader Robert Byrd
(D., W. Va.), deplored the instab-
ility of Lebanon which has racked
that country since 1976. The law-
makers welcomed Secretary of
State Alexander Haig's state-
ment last week that "a solution
to the crisis must include with-
drawal of foreign military forces
from Lebanon, a restoration of
the unity and full independence
for that country and the removal
of the PLO's ability to conduct
Rally at Tamarac's Temple Beth Torah


..Jo* 2.12
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mr
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
TT-C-
Srowsin' thrnfl]
roward -.. I
th max levine '^Jf/
Israeli impressions: Dafna
Solomon, Netanya high schooler.
a guide for the four of us in a
Hertz rent a car driving to the
city's diamond center, concerned
about her father, a reservist,
fighting in Lebanon Ron
Mscreen, Tel Aviv highschooler,
telling us how his class cheered
when the first cease fire was an-
nounced Amir Cogan, son of
a Technion professor in Haifa,
telling us not to worry about him
after directing us to our hotel on
Carmel. "I'll walk home."
Bruche Rosen of North Miami
Beach's Welcome Aboard Travel
Center being greeted by her son,
Rabbi Michael Roaen, when the
Fly-Drive Rally participants
arrived in Jerusalem Joyce
Hadley of New Orleans remark-
ing, after leaving the Memorial
Museum and Yad Vashem, "I
don't know how anybody can
deny there was a Holocaust after
seeing all that documentation
here" Though it was "Fun
and Sun in Israel" for the media
people and travel agents there
was a hush as they walked the
path of the Rightous Gentiles
leading to Yad Vashem.
One of the trees planted there
honors Carola Mueller who
winters in Fort Lauderdale and
was featured this month in Fort
Lauderdale News for her photo-
graphic talents Na'amat, the
Israeli sister organization of Pio-
neer Women who are so active in
North Broward, set up centers to
take care of Lebanese civilian
refugees Zvi Redlich. El Al
Israel Airlines regional manager
at the Miami Beach office, taking
care of the needs of the South
Floridians on the Fly-Drive
Rally. He sent greetings to Jew-
ish Floridian publisher, Fred
Shochet, and editor Leo Mindlin.
Jerusalem's Mayor Teddy
Kollek, at the farewell dinner,
urged the travel agents to start
booking tourists for the Cen-
tennial 30 celebration in Jeru-
salem in the year 2000. Jews will
celebrate 3,000 years of Judaism
and Christians, he said, will be
celebrating 2,000. "Make your
reservations early," he said .
The Mayor tokl this corres-
pondent that the woman who
handles all his foreign corres-
pondence is Shula Eisner, for-
merly of Allentown, Pa. And
Allentown. which was this
Browsin' reporter's former home,
came to the fore late at night in
Haifa when Alan Kitey, a George
Washington University student,
studying in Israel, spotted me
walking to our hotel. He's the son
of a very active Hadassah leader,
Joyce Kitey, who'll be among
those attending Hadassah's con-
vention in Israel in August.
The Association of Americans
and Canadians in Israel in a joint
project with JWB relayed "All is
well" messages to American;
from their Israeli soldier sons,
fathers and other relatives .
Such information has been cabled
daily from JWB's Israel office in
Jerusalem by JWB Israeli direc-
An-nell
HOTEL
Strictly Kosher
3 Full Course Meals Daily
Mashgiach and
Synagogue on Premises
TV Live Snow-Movies
Special Diets Served
Open All Year
Services
Mr all good shopping
Call for rates
700 EUCLID A VE.
MIAMI BEACH
CALL 1-531-1191
tor, Asher Tarmon Abe
Gittelson, Federation -CAJE di
rector of education in North
Broward, and his wife, Shulamit.
return next week from Israel.
They're leading a 21-dav study
tour of South Florida Early
Childhood Educators.
Now back to Broward: Richard
Peritz's Shalom Show on TV
Channel 51 goes from 11 a.m. to
8:30 a.m. every Sunday begin-
ning this Sunday Lilian
Wadler of Coconut Creek's B'nai
B'rith Women, was elected
programming vice president of
the North Broward Council .
Dale J. Bennan of Sunrise, was
elected a director of Fort Lauder-
dale chapter of Real Estate Ap-
praisers.
Estele B. Lorber. president of
West Broward Brandeis Uni-
versity National Women's Com-
mittee; Marion Deck, president
of the Fort Lauderdale- Pompano
Beach Chapter, and Florence
Semet, also of the latter chapter,
were among the delegates at the
June 9-13 conference on the
Brandeis campus in Waltham,
Mass. Also in Israel, visiting
their children and grandchildren,
Sunrise's Temple Sha'aray
Tzedeks Rabbi Albert N. Troy,
and his wife.
Broward s U.S. Rep. E. Clay
Shaw has been named to the
House Judiciary Committee.
This is in addition to his service
on Public Works and Transpor-
tation committee, and the Select
Committee on Narcotics Abuse
and Control ... U.S. Senator
Lawtoo Chiles has joined a group
of Senators supporting "Ameri-
can diplomatic initiatives" to
help restore a stable peace in the
Middle East Also calling for
restoring peace was Rep. Daniel
Mica whose remarks were pub-
lished in the June 10 Congres-
sional Record
Paul Rosenberg, formerly of
Rockville Center, N.Y., more re-
cently with hotels in Florida, has
been named assistant to Presi-
dent David Kate of Holiday Inn,
Plantation. Rosenberg has been
given responsibilities in both per-
sonnel, sales, and serves as gen-
eral manager Joel OUander,
currently assistant director of
National Jewish Community Re-
lations Advisory Council with
which Fort Lauderdale's CRC is
affiliated, will assume the posi-
tion of executive director of the
Conference on Jewish Communal
Service in September Joshua
"Shukie" Shomer, South
Florida's shaliach (emissary from
Israel), leaves the Israel Aliyah
Center in Miami to return to Is-
rael this summer.
Ed Sherin. senior vd at Fort
Lauderdale \s American Express,
has been named United Way
campaign chairman for 1982-83.
United Way will announce its
goal on Aug. 18. The associate
general chairman is Jack Moss,
president of Universal travel, a
former county commissioner,
who has been active with Federa-
tion and Jewish Community
Center The oneg at last
week's Ramat Shalom Shabbat
Eve service honored Nancy Zieg-
ler's graduation from nursing
TAPES
CARTONS
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handling contributes ft4
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and a diversified activities center. All Jewish organizations
premises. Interest Free 50% 5 year mortgages available or 80% fan.
cing at 14% interest for 29 years: both with no points & no do* I
costs. j- ^
5800 N.W. 2nd Avenue. Boca Raton, Florida 33431 or
phone (305) 994-0400 (Boca). 426-3600 (Broward),
949-6109 (Dade)
Some faces ate recognized
all over the world.
From New\brk to New Delhi, and throughout
the world, American Express* Travelers Cheques
are known and acceptedWhich isn't surprising
when you consider that American Express has
been the leading travelers cheque for years.
Or that we have 105,000 refund locations.
And nearly 1000 uorkJwideTravd Service
Officeswhere you can act everything from
a travelers cheque refund to travel assistance.
_So carry American Express Travelers
Cheques. Even if you're not recog-
nized, they will be.
!U


.v.July 2,1962
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Pagell

Jewish Books
I in Review
is a service 61 the IWB Jewish Book Council,
15 East 26th St., New York, N.Y. 10010
tions are too sublime (Zohar).
Except for providing some his-
torical and literary background
to each section, the readings are
without annotation and lack a
flavor they might have in more O^"1 M- Qoldrefch's proven
appropriate contexts. An appen- tatoota as a writer whose books
du of further readings to each ** deep knowledge of Jew-
section would also have been lsh history and literature, this of-
helpful. faring is a disappointment
Jewish Literature for Young Adults
JWB Presents Awards to JCC
I Treasury of Jewish Literature:
from Biblical Times to Today.
\dited by Gloria Goldreich. Holt,
hnthariand Winston, 521 Fifth
[venue. New York, N.Y. 10175.
12411 pages. $13.50.

1

i U'sBH 4*8'
r.
Child's Bible by Anne Edwards),
a sampling from the Apocrypha
and the Mishna, Hasidic tales,
liturgical pieces and post-biblical
mysticism, memoirs, poetry,
stories by Hebrew and Yiddish
authors and contemporary
American and contemporary
writers.
One does not quarrel with the
selections per se. Each is worthy
in itself, some are acknowledged
masterpieces. But it is sheer
chutzpah to entitle this slight
book a "treasury" or to refer to it
as a "compendium" (as does the
jacket). The selections are Ms.
Goldreich's personaleven idio-
syncraticchoices to represent
Jewish literature throughout the
ages. Some of the selections have
too childish a tone for the in-
tended audience (those from A
Child's Bible) and some selec-
riewed by Esther Nusabaum,
naz Upper School Librarian,
rYork.
I Each season a new crop of
oks destined to be popular as
ir and bat mitzvah-confirma-
l gifts appear: attractive, well-
entioned moderately-priced,
lit often nothing more than the
thologizing of material already
bailable elsewhere. Such a book
A Treasury of Jewiah Litera-
t. edited by Gloria Goldreich
|uthor of Leah's Journey, Four
ays, Lori, etc.) who is also re-
onsible for the selections.
| A slim volume with an artistic
ok jacket, it ranges over the
Inturies "from biblical times to
|day" (its subtitle) in telescopic
inner, focusing on the story of
bseph. verses from Isaiah,
alms and Ecclesiastea (ex-
Jrpted, inexplicably, from A
Bonds Has
Special Cash
Campaign
[Howard Samuels, chairman of
Greater New York Bonds
paign, will visit the Fort
Puderdak' community in con-
nction with an intensive drive
V state of Israel Bonds to turn
islanding commitments into
plly needed investment dollars
Israel's economic develop-
pnt, u was announced by Joel
p'nstem, general chairman of
F North Broward State of
M Bonds.
[Samuels is a member of "Oper-
|n Welcome," a task force
Imposed of Israel Bond leaders
po are visiting Jewish commun-
es throughout the United
ates in behalf of the special
Wd effort.
[Citing the immediacy of
ae's economic needs. Rein-
stressed the importance of
"K investment dollars to
Fel. adding: "Israel relies
av'ly on Israel Bond invest-
pnts for economic strength and
wth."
Fecontinued: "Prime Minister
*"' visit to the United States
u* an opportunity to de-
'irate that we recognize the
ous sacrifice that has been
r fo; peace and that we un-
tand the importance of help
Israel build a strong
ny."
Henry F. Hyman (left), chairman of the Jewish
.Community's Center's Association for the Deaf,
accepts the award presented to the JCC for its
multi-faceted program for the deaf. The pre-
sentation at the JWB Biennial in Chicago waa
made by Natalie Stone of New York, chairman of
JWB's program award committee.
Next to them are Rovi Faber who received
JWB's 1982 New Leadership Recognition Award
and Joel Berkowitz of Boston, chairman of the
JWB committee which selected her for her service
as founder and continuing as honorary chairman
of the WECARE program.
If you believe that a vacation
should be spent in an exotic lancl
where ancient sights stir your senses
and people warm your heart-
a perfect blend of fascination and
relaxation with long, lazy days and
magical nights of music, laughter
and fine cuisine-all at a cost that's
easily affordable-you believe
in miracles.
-M*r This summer, come to Israel.
The miracle on the Mediterranean
TK^noTall your Travel Agent. Israel Government Tburut Office. 4151S. W. Freew^, HouKon. Tex- 77027


IrvaUr Fort LaudtrdaU
**>, July;
Temple Kol Ann's First Israel Tour Group
Includes 6 Students to be Honored at Masada
1982
Programs for Frail Elderly
An
This week another group of
North Browmrd resident* left for
Israel with six children partki-
patina in B'nai Mitzvah service
on Masada before the group is
scheduled to return July 11.
Rabbi Sheldon J. Harr, spirit-
ual lander of Temple Kol Ami,
Plantation, will be leading 72
persons from his congregation,
including the six from the Tem-
ple's Religious school, on the
Temple's First Israel Tour.
The Bar and Bat Mitzvah stu-
dents in the tour are Bradley Ar-
nowitz, son of Mr. and Mrs. Da-
vid Arnowitz; Stacey Ardman,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Martin
Ardman; Johanna Carr, daugh-
ter of Dr. and Mrs. Matthew
Carr; Tracy Hollander, daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Hollan-
der; Mark Horowitz, son of Mr.
and Mrs. David Horowitz, and
Andy Litvak, son of Dr. and Mrs.
BarisUtvak.
The six boys and girb have
been students in the religious
school since its inception. They
will have honors accorded to
them in the ruins of the syna-
gogue of the Masada fortress.
Rabbi Harr will conduct the
B'nai Mitzvah ceremony, and
also special Shabbat services and
a Yizkor service at Yad Vaahem,
the Memorial to the Six Million
Martyrs of the Holocaust. The
group will visit the major cities of
Israel as well as the Reform Jew-
ish Kibbutz in the Negev; the
Hebrew Union-Jewish Institute
of Religion in Jerusalem for
Shabbat worship, and the Leo
Baeck school in Haifa which is
partially supported by Kol Ami's
Religious school children.
LAUDERHILL'S
HEBREW CONGREGATION
The Hebrew Congregation of
Lauderhill will have Rabbi Israel
Halpern and Cantor Leibde
Feldman and his choir officiate
on the High Hob/ Days.
Tickets wilf be on sale mid-
July.
Mr. and Mrs. Sy Vinocur will
sponsor a Kiddush at the Syna-
gogue, 2048 NW 49th Ave., on
July 17 to celebrate Sy's 80th
birthday.
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Wolfe is
sponsoring a Kiddush on July 31
to celebrate Harry's 87th bulb-
day.
B'not Mitzvah
TEMPLE BETH AM
Jeffrey Davis, son of Paul and
Sheila Davis of Coral Springs,
Mitzvah on
Jury 3 at 9
will become a Bar
Saturday morning,
s.m. services.
TEMPLE BETH ORR
Saturday, June 5 marked the
B'not Mitzvoh of DeagJae Hal-
par, son of Mrs. Betty Helper,
and Donna Wsraskw, daughter of
Dr. Jay and Marilyn Wechsler.
On Saturday, June 12, the
B'nai Mitzvah of Dean Oppan-
keaamar and lam Wexk* was ob-
served. Debra is the daughter of
Peter and Janet Oppenheimer,
snd Ian's parents are Jack and
Sandra Wexler.
Marc Rath, son of Barbara
Roth, and David Rnssnthal, son
of Barry and Gerry Roeenthal,
were B'nai Mitzvah on June 19.
Oren Baumaa, son of Jerome
and Esme Bauman, and Eric Ep-
stein, son of Charles and Ste-
phanie Epstein, became B'nai
Mitzvah at services on Saturday,
June 26.
TEMPLE BETH TORAH
Sherri Sherman, daughter of
Gary and Sandra Sherman of
Sunrise will become a Bat Mitz-
vah at services on Friday night,
Jury 2.
Saturday morning, Jury 3,
Jason Stevens, son of Joseph and
Sheila Stevens from Sunrise; and
Andrew Sultan, son of Lloyd and
Mine Sultan of Sunrise will cele-
brate their B'nai Mitzvot.
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL
Marcia and Bert Maslow are
having a double Mitzvah this
weekend. Daughter Mindy
Fischer becomes a Bat Mitzvah
at the Friday, July 2, service at
Temple Beth israel, Sunrise, and
son Lance Maslow becomes s Bar
Mitzvah at the Shabbat service,
July 3. Also becoming a Bar
Mitzvah at the Shabbat service is
Neil Eiman, son of Elaine and
Leon Ehnan of Fort Lauderdale.
Emergency Response Pro
gram, providing 24 hour Trkt
for isolated frail elderly, is svsil-
able in Broward County. The
project, which is funded by
Florida's Community Care for
the Elderly Act, offers portable
electronic equipment containing
s help button which, when press-
ed, initiates a warning signal at
Holy Cross Hospital. The Hos-
pital Staff immediately calls s
person in the community who has
volunteered to respond to the
particular client's call for assis-
tance.
The cost for the Emergency
Response Unit is based on a slid-
ing scale in accordance with the
senior citizen's ability to pay-
Catholic Community service is
the lead agency for the program
which is funded through the Area
Agency on Aging.
For further information re-
garding Emergency Response,
Broward Seniors are encouraged
to call 622-2666.
Day Cars AvaUahW
Snoot Day Care ___
special faculty baaS ***
for thLfraT^yds^?
sens, who require constant .J*
viaion yet are able to trsv.2*
weekday to aduft dsy^*
grama where they iMttkhS,
"variety of actrritie. incffi'
noontime hot meal progno^1'!
Contributions are encoaraa,]
to hasp support the
which are funded through' a
Area Agency on Aging of nJ
ward County. All ofX^rlZ
are nonaectarian and are oonu.
residents 60 years of
older.
Pnjje*
e d
Rabbi Named by WB Jewish Congregation
At the present time, space .J
vailable for clients at the folk*
mg Senior Day Care Cent*. I
Persona interested in securing j
formation, are encouraged to erf
the project doseet to their home
Central Service Senior Da>l
Center, 4634284, 437 SwS
Ave. Ft. Lauderdale.
Northeast Senior Dsy Cmtm
- 781-0461. 801 NE Msli
Pompano Beach.
Rabbi Kurt F. Stone
Rabbi Kurt Franklin Stone,
currently serving as rabbi-in-
residence at Yavneh Day School
in Cincinnati, Ohio, and rabbi of
that city's Congregation B'nai
Tzedek. takes up his duties Jury
16 as spiritual leader of West
Broward Jewish Congregation,
the area's newest Reform congre-
gation.
A native of Los Angeles, he
has had a varied career, beginn-
ing with an internship in the
United States Senate, continuing
in California politics lor s time,
going to the Soviet Union in the
summer of 1979 to gather data on
trafhing techniques, and touring
the U.S. as s story-teller and
actor in the role of Sholom
Aleichern.
Since his recent marriage to
the former Judith Braun of Indi-
anapolis who was educated at
Indiana University and the East-
man School of Musk and who has
appeared in dinner theaters in
Fort Lauderdale and Naples.
Fla.. and elsewhere, he and Mrs.
Stone have toured as "Mr. and
Mrs. Sholom Aleichern." offering
programs of story and song.
A graduate of University of
. PLANNING A TRIP
Travel wMh Nsttonal Council
Jewish women. For new >ewj^
Brochure describing sen-
sattonal tours to ISRAEL, with
sneaneions to egypt, Switzer-
land. GREECE, EAST AFRICA;,
lllghwotils In Europe, Chins snd I
the Orient, Cetombia Highlights.
and |he Canadian Rockies.
PImm call Luttaa Schalu
742-3631 or EUe Forma.
7414HS
California, Stone attended Rut-
gers University, where he did
graduate work as s fellow of the
Eagle ton Institute of Politics,
during which time, he was a poli-
tical analyst for ABC news. He
received a master's degree at
Hebrew Union College-Jewish
Institute of Religion, where he
was ordained in 1980 as president
of his class. He has taught in
Jewish schools and adult educa-
tion programs during the past
seven years, and while at Hebrew
Union College served pulpits in
California. Arkansa, Vermont,
Pennsylvania, and Michigan.
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TBJPLE SHOLOM. A FAMILY ORIENTED, CONSERVATIVE
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IN OUR COMMUNITY.
^{Sl-^YJNV,Ti ""AFIUUTED. THEIR CHILDREN
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FORALL CLASSES IS NOW IN PROGRESS AT THE TEMPLE
942-6410 942*411


I July 2,1*2
TA Jewwft Fioridian of QrtaUr Port Lauderdale
Page 13
JCC Installs Officers
at Annual Meeting
mmi
G. Kopelowitz wu in-
ki oresident of the Jewish
Uy Center of Greater
Lerdale at the annual
ship meeting held earlier
Wh in the Samuel M.
[all on the Center a Perl-
opus at 6501 W. Sunrise
ftjntation.
j:eeds Michael J. Wein-
lo, during the course of a
bn his year as president,
33 percent increase in
ship during the year.
than 200 members and
attended the meeting
st President Anita Perl-
man presiding as the installation
officer.
Philip Cofman, executive di-
rector of JCC, reported on the
initiation of new services during
the year and new projects
launched, including a new kit-
chen in the Soref Hall, new facil-
ities for the Toddler programs,
and construction of the Acker-
berg Sculpture Garden.
A sound-slide show depicted
the variety of events and pro-
grams available for JCC's mem-
bers ranging in age from tiny tots
to the frail elderly.
The Hebrew Day School Chil-
dren's Chorus entertained.
JCC OFFICERS: Arnold Simon, first vice presi-
dent; Dr. Denis Truokin, secretary; Harvey
Kopelowitz, president; Ivy Levine, Paul Frieser.
Louise Feller, vice presidents; Michael Weinberg,
treasurer.
PUBLIX ANNOUNCES
A delicious, nutritious* new bread
KASHAand HONEY BREAD
from
Made with Wolff's Kasha', the roasted heart of the
buckwheat kernel, it has*slightly nutlike flavor and texture...
great for sandwiches or toasting, or just with butter
or your favorite spread. Buckwheat as you may know.
is the highest in balanced protein of anything in the
vegetable kingdom, just slightly less than eggs.
Wild Winds Farms with it's Bakery. Gourmet Restaurant.
FARMS
Maple Sugar House, Barbecue Pavilion, Gardens.
Country Stores and Nature Center, is located in the heart
of the buckwheat growing country in Naples, New York.
The recipe for Kasha and Honey Bread was developed in the
country bakery at Wild Winds Farms and visitors to the two
restaurants on the Farm enjoyed it so much that
we at Publix felt you would enjoy it, too.
We hope you will try this new Wild Winds. Kasha.and Honey bread
and that you will visit the Farm if you are in the beautiful Finger Lakes area
south of Rochester, New York.
You'll find this fine loaf in our bakery department along with other premium breads
SPECIAL COUPON
Without coupon 99*
g Wild Winds Farms *m
^rr KASHA and HONEY BREAD
OFF
Made with Wolffs Kasha (Roasted Buckwheat Kernels)
(Limit one coupon per to.0 Exp. Poc-boc 31.1882 Southeast Coeat only
(8)
'Wolff's Kasha, known for over fifty years as
of our Publix Supermarkets.
the standard of excellence in buckwheat products, is sole- in the Jewish Food Section


14
' The Jewish mndianofGriater Port Lauderdale
Prnki
Jerome Dick Named National Chairman
Of UJA's Third Annual Super Sunday
Jerome J. Dick of Arlington, National Chairman of the United UJA National Chairman Robert
Virginia, has been named for the Jewish Appeal "Super Sunday," e. Loup announced today,
third consecutive year to serve as scheduled for January 23, 1968,
L
fet^
Jewish Family Services (JFS)
of Broward County offers coun-
seling to individuals and families
in a wide variety of problems.
Case histories published hen
show how some problems are re-
solved. Since all relationships
with its clients are confidential,
names and identifying characters
have been changed
A Potential for Living
Jen came to Florida as a last
hope. Her parents had been tell-
ing her to come with her children
for years. She never had the
courage. She was too tolerant,
too forgiving, and too frightened
to make a move from Minnea-
polis. She never thought about
herself or her children always of
him and of his temper. She did
not hear how desperate Margo
and Jennifer were getting. How
they heard the fighting but tried
to be asleep for fear their dad
would find them listening and
would begin to beat on them as
he did on their mother.
Jeri's story is a common one.
Though each time a case as in
hers comes through Jewish
Family Services it sends chills
through the spine. Jen was vul-
nerable, gullible, and lacked self
respect and self esteem She saw
herself as a nonentity.
The facts are usually predom-
inant in other similar cases. As
with Jeri, her husband's father
had been super punitive, beating
him for everything as well as an
alcoholic and a wife beater. These
behaviors were to be cast in the
character of her husband at an
early age. As with wifebeating it
is cyclical and goes on con-
tinuously with each generation.
Jeri needed support and a place
to life. Her refuge became her
parents condominium. The
thought of leaving him was filled
with anxiety but the anger was
17 years worth so her decision
became instant.
Jeri was unusual because of her
courage. She knew she did not
like herself but she liked herself
even less when she realized what
she was doing to her children. So
all of them packed and jetted out
one summer day in June of 1961.
As with other abusers, Jeri's
husband pleaded vehemently for
her to return with his two kids.
He asked for forgiveness. After
being the target of his in-
adequacies and having the scars
to prove it she renegged und tried
to get help.
Jeri came through Jewish
Family Services because she
could not do it alone. We first
worked on her anger and her
anxiety. She was able to re-
channel her anger into some
constructive things as in looking
for employment, going swim-
ming, and talking it out amongst
her children, parents and this
caseworker. We worked on prob-
lem solving and looking at the
reality of her situation. Each time
she received letter from her
husband she would get a feeling
of guilt and shame and she be-
came aware through our sessions
that this was his manipulative
tool and that he would, as he did
in the past, use it at all costs to
bring her back because that is
what historically happened.
She was aaked to join Al-
Anons and Al-Ateens. These
groups became a very supportive
way of gaining closer perspective
of a very real disease, that of al-
coholism. Her husband waa both
an alcoholic and a drug abuaer.
Both she and her two children are
involved in these groups and they
have proved quite helpful.
Jeri was also able to procure a
job in her field, vocational
counseling. She gained much
reinforcement for her efforts.
Jeri realized, through therapy
and her own awareness, how she
possessed positive energies. She
was taught to put them to
constructive use. Jeri began to
think of Jeri and captured her po-
tential for living.
Has*
0^1
Any Time is
a Good Time for a
Holiday Inn* "OVERNIGHTER*
GREAT ROOMS 4 FULL MEALS (TIPS INCL)
Only 50 PER COUPLE
ANY NIGHT (Reservations Suggested) Call 655 8800
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The "CWrwghter" include* a big. comfortable Room,
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RESERVATIONS SUGGESTED
OFFER VAUD {JNVL DEC 15. 12
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S3& J&ssffVvs^v&&
Dick, a UJA National Vice
Chairman, served as Chairman of
the first Super Sunday in 1981.
The highly successful nationwide
telephone marathon opens the
public phase of the U JA-Cotn-
munity campaign.
Super Sunday '82 set a new
record for the event by raising
more than 926.8 million in 139
U.S. communities.
A member of the UJA Board of
Trustees, National Campaign
Policy Board and National Pro-
ject Renewal Task Force, Dick is
also National Chairman of the
UJA Washington Mission Pro-
gram.
Dick served as President of the
UJA Federation of Greater
Washington for three years. He is
a member of the Executive Com-
mittee of the Board of the Council
of Jewish Federations and sits on
the national boards of the
American Jewish Joint Distribu-
tion Committee, the Jewish Wel-
fare Board and the Hebrew Im-
migrant Aid Society.

?
AUGUSTA COHEN (center) of Majectic Gardens in L
sents a SI.000 check to Sy Sugar, director of the Senior "P
phony of' Lauderhill, towards a music library at the '' J%1
1176 NW 42nd Way. Loohing on is Sylvia M Raymond^1
for the symphony, who said the library will be named th
Cohen Music Library in honor of Mrs. Cohen's late husband
devout music lover. ^
El Al May Fly Tourists
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA> El
Al may fly out tourists who were
caught in Lebanon during the
course of the fighting, Transpor-
tation Minister Haim Corfu said.
Corfu said he knew of many such
tourists.
El Al was ready to honor any
tickets of other airlines originally
made for flight from Beirut. The
problem which has not yet been
solved was how to get those
tourists trom Lebanon to Israel.
Corfu said he had asked I
consent of Defense Mina
Sharon to operate two I
one from Nahariyi to I,
the coast, and the other!
yat Shmona to NabtUyi J
central region.
Zvi Zafriri. the director^
of the Israel train net_
posed to reconstruct tat]
from the border point
Hanikra to Beirut. Ho i
could be completed
weeks at the cost of 1
Maxwell House Coffee
Is Hospitality.
Lox n bagels n cream cheese is al-
most as much a pan of a traditional
Jewish household as the Mezuzah on
the door. And the most natural ac-
companiment to this American
gastronomical innovation is Maxwell
House* Coffee.
The full-pleasant aroma and great-
tasting, satisfying
good flavor of
Maxwell House*
has been delighting lovers of good
food for half a century. And why not?
Who would ever think of serving
first-rate food without great coffee!
So. no matter what your preference-
instant or goundwhen you pour
Maxwell House* you pour flavor. At
its most satisfyingconsistently cup
after cup after cup
K CmitM KJ*r
*mg tradition in Jewish hornet fnr n~ Aalfa ctnturt


K.July 2.
1962
The Jewish Floridian of Ortattr Fort hautUrdcde
Pgel5
North Broward B'nai B'rith Garners Awards
^rect convention of the
iT State Aaeodatfoii of
p^B nth Lodge, hridrtth.
aver Hotel in Miami Beach.
-j, Broward figured promin-
JTin the award preeentatione.
iDeerfield Beech Lodge wee
j Florida a Outatanding
i of the Year" for ita varied
arris. "Notable activitiea in
ammunity Volunteer Services,
Llel Affairs, educational and
hr-faith relations projects
-rited the award," a apokeemen
I The "Outstanding President of
, Year" award went to Arthur
ller of Wynmoor Lodge, Coco-
ht Creek. He won recognition
& significant contributions in
lembership acquisition and
dership ability.
iNorman Weinstein, a past
aider* of the State Aaeocia-
bo announced the awards. "I'm
ud of these accompliah-
boU," aaid Weinstein, also
that B'nai B'rith in
was reaponsible for
|5.2 millions of Israel Bond
i in 1982.
Sholom Sisterhood
Installs President
In. Irwin Stenn
|RocheUe Stenn was in-
as president of Tern-
Sholom Sisterhood at a
on recently in the Temple's
alHall.tl32SEllthAve.,
pnpano Beach. Succeeding
ha Freed who receive a bou-
fet of flowers presented by
us president, Dr. Milton
on, Mrs. Stenn will head
Sisterhood's work with the
omen s League for Conaerva-
"e Judaism, the congregation,
l civic organizations.
k>m'a Rabbi Samuel April
led at the ina^ll^tln^ which
1 the following take office: Lee
[mstein, Margie Schwartz, Dr.
Pda Roaenthal, Ada StoUar,
tyl Goodman, Lillian Shore,
presidents; Blanche Alloy,
urer; Anne Gilbert, Beverly
fner. Betty Sells. Selma
secretaries.
*hea Lipson, catering chair
^ and co-chairman, Minnie
"eunan, and their committee
' the lunch with Helen
"> charge of arrahge-
Qts.
fwticipanu in the program in-
"a Rabbi April's wife, Judy;
ntata performed by the Lil-
' "ahn Trio, and the Temple'a
PU>r Jacob J.Renzer
David Katzman, president of
the North Broward B'nai B'rith
Council, expressed his gratifica-
tion with the recognition awarded
his group and presented the
Council's "Man of the Year"
prize to Rubin Binder of Margate
Lodge.
Binder was acclaimed for his
dedication and involvement in
various B'nai B'rith projects, es-
pecially his inspired stewardship
of program activitiea during the
past year.
A paat president of Margate
Lodge, the North Broward Coun-
cil, the Broward Past Presidents
Club and a National Commis-
sioner for Israel Affairs, Binder,
an active member of Federation's
Community Relations Commit-
tee, resides in Margate with his
wife, Ethel, where both partici-
pate in numerous community, re-
ligious and charitable activities.
WOMEN' LEAGUE
FOR ISRAEL
Bonaventure chapter of Wom-
en's League for Israel is vaca-
tioning this holiday weekend at
the Boca Raton Hotel and Club.
Arrangements were made by the
chapter's travel chairman, Lil
Mandell.
Ruth Sparber, Florida repre-
sentative for WLI at 791-4840, is
seeking new members for the or-
ganization which supports a
variety of projects in Israel, in-
cluding four homes it has built
for immigrant girls in Haifa, Tel
Aviv, Jerusalem and Natanya.
The League now has 16 chap-
ters in south Florida.
NATIONAL COUNCIL
OF JEWISH WOMEN
Business and professional
career women are being invited to
form a branch of the National
Council of Jewish Women-Plan-
tation Section by Marianne Falk
and Fran Schopp. Rebecca Gins-
berg reported that the Plantation
Section of NCJW which serves all
of West Broward will have its
first meeting for the branch at 8
p.m., Wednesday, July 7. Pro-
spective members of the daytime
group are also being invited to
this meeting.
Bell Intioduces
The Maid B/The Minute
NEAR EAST $22Pa
EUROPE $14Z/.80
UNITED KINGDOM *125OT
NonaAcxj Can Dial al-Minule Overseas Call
Have family or friends in Israel,
Europe, or the UK? Now you can dial
Overseas Rate For DiaJaWe Countries
Dial Role
topon
Rale levels First minute Addftonol minute Hours
UNITED KINGDOM/REIAND Standard $206 $126
Discount 156 95
Economy 125 ______76
7om-lpm
lpm-6pm
6pm-7om
EUROPE
Standard
Discount
Economy
237
1.78
1.42
1.33
1.00
80
7am-lpm
lpm-6pm
6pm-7om
PACIFIC
Standard
Discount
Economy
422
3.17
2.53
158
I 19
95
5pm-ll pm
I0om-5pm
llpm-IOom
CARIBBEAN/ATLANTIC
Standard
Discount
Economy
168
126
101
113
fl5
68
SOUTH AMERICA
Standard
Discount
Economy
2.77
2.08
166
1.18
B9
7!
NEAR EAST
Standard
Discount
Economy
3.68
276
221
133
100
B0
CENTRAL AMERICA
Standard
Discount
Economy
2.62
197
1.57
1.13
85
.68
AFRICA
Standard
Discount
Economy
289
2.17
173
1.48
111
B9
INOIAN OCEAN
Standard
Discount
Economy
522
392
3.13
217
163
130
IN* on not dntaWe. itw o 3-iwuH mmmum and or om*oi tsghw
la-, ,_ .daU apply o Conodo and Mbuco Chw* wi* your tocol oo^oKy
KawtZSnt o*tad oBOcolhb*dit<.UdSioWi__________
them, or almost anywhere else in the world,
at low one-minute rates. The 3-minute
minimum call is no longer
in effect except in
countries that are not
dialable.
This chart gives you
the new 1-minute dial
rates, the lower rates for
each additional minute,
and the new calling times:
Standard, Discount, and
Economy.
Bargain rates are
available 7 days a week,
day or nighteven to
countries that never had
reduced rates before.
No International
Dialing in your area? You
still get the new 1-minute
dial rate as long as special
operator assistance is not
required.
"Hello World" costs
less than ever before.
Want to know more?
Call our International
Service, toll free:
1800874-4000.
4pm-IOpm
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mast ?aNUTi/tAnomoNAi mini/it
'.


Red Magen David Presents Revue
Ticket* are oo sale for the mu-
sical revue that the CoL David
Marcus Chapter of Fort _
dale of the American Bad
David for Israel (ABMDlf ir
present ins, Sunday night, Oct.
31, at Sunrise Musical Theatre
ARMDI is dedicated to pro-
viding support for
David Adorn, the
: of the Red Cross.
caL
Magen David
Red Sasaki of Dev*.
the

m
Soviets Assured About Beirut Embassy
By KEVIN FREEMAN
NEW YORK-OTAJ-
Premier Menacbem
has disclosed that 1
Soviet President
Brezhnev exchanged
recently in which the Soviet
Union reminded Imel
its troops were in I
ity of the Soviet
in Beirut.
appearing on the CBS-
TV program "Face the Nation,"
said the letter was received "a
few days ago" and spoke of the
locale of the Embassy in rehitaan
to the posit ion of Israeli troops.
He said it spoke of the Embassy
and "nothing else."
THE ISRAELI Premier said
be replied to the letter just prior
to his departure to the United
States and reminded the Soviet*
that the Israeli government
respected the immunity of the
Soviet Embassy. At the same
time. Begin said he also reminded
the Soviet Union of Israels right
to self-defense.
Begin s appearance on the CBS
program came just a day before
he was scheduled to meet with
President Reagan at the White
House. In preparation for the
meeting with Reagan, Begin met
last Friday with Secretary of
State Alexander Haig in New
York. The issue of Lebanon and
the long stalled autonomy talks
for Palestinian autonomy are ex-
pected to be discussed tomorrow.
Begin said that the autonomy
proposal is the most far reaching
of its kind ever proposed. He
again said that Jerusalem must
be one of the sites for the autono-
my negotiations, a point that ha.
stalled the autonomy talks be-
cause of Israel's insistence on Je-
rusalem as a site and Egypt's
refusal to hold the talks there.
BEGIN WAS asked whether
he felt Egyptian President Hosni
Mubarak has been embarrassed
by the Israeli invasion into Leba-
non and by the continued insis-
tence to hold the autonomy talks
in Jerusalem. He responded rhe-
torically, "Did I embarrass Pres-
ident Mubarak because we de-
fended our people?''
Regarding the Israeli invasion
of Lebanon, Begin would not
specify on how long the Israeli
troops will remain there. He said
this could not be measured in
days but would depend on "a
criteria of security.''
According to Begin, Israel
seeks to have a multinational
peacekeeping force in southern
Lebanon to keep the Palestinian
terrorists from shelling Israel'a
northern settlements. He said the
United Nations Interim Force in
Lebanon (LIMPID is not suffi-
cient.
The Israeli Premier would not
explain why" the Israeli troops
went beyond the originally statec
intentions of the Israeli operation
to push the Palestinian terrorists
40 kilometers (25 miles) north of
the Israeli-Lebanese border. Be-
gin seemed to imply that this oc-
curred because the Israeli forces
ware pursuing the Palestine Lib-
eration Organisation.
REGARDING THE the fate of
PLO Chief Yasir Arafat, Begin
aid Israel had no plans to cap
turehim, "because wo don't want
to deal with him at all. He would
be a trouble for us. Let him go
Ha
had become
for the
Asked what he sees in the fu-
tara for Israel. Begin spoke
senary of his nine grandchildren.
"I have deep faith in my heart
m v grandchildren will have
he said
BOWLING CHAMPS: Lorry Gutfrman lUtft), captain o/ti.
Boy Condo Assn. Friday Uagua Bowling Club, and two m,
his team. Jack Jackson and Eddie Qratnbarg, display tkt
thty won at the Margate Bowlarama.
(** Unm hMiex
Up 6.2 Precent
TELAVTV | JTA) The cost of living index rose in
May by 62 percent, the Central Bureau of Statistics an-
nounced.
The increase, twice that of last May (3.3 percent),
brings the COL increase in the five months since the be-
ginning of the year to 41.4 percent, up from the 36 percent
increase during the first five months of 1961.
The Bureau said it was still too early to forecast the in-
fluence of this week's price increases, following measures
to help pay for the war, on next month's COL index.
MAURICE R. PERESS, M.D.
MaesBSBlaaBar imaili mil Ca#4atMw ennlerii
f^WfaaVvM AMNnCvfl rWWVKVf SOCleffy
Announces The Opening Of His Office
For The Practice Of
GYNECOLOGY, INFERTILITY,
MICROSCOPIC TUBAL SURGERY, and
REPRODUCTIVE ENDOCRINOLOGY
At
CAMINO REAL CENTRE
Suite 200
7100 West Camino Real
Boca Raton, Florida 33433
TELEPHONE: (305) 368-5500
OFFICE HOURS: BY APPOINTMENT
I
I
Friday, July 2-7:58
Friday, July -78
Friday, July 16-7:56
Friday, July 23-7:53
Friday, July 30 7.-50
T"Pv "i*Jr "
711202 ixftp. "M
IT
Ma-ruth A-Uih Ado-nye. Klo-haynu Melech Ha-oUm.
Asherkitl'shanu H'mil/.-vo-uv. V Utv-va-nu
I. hiiil-Uvk \jivr shHShebhat.
Hlvss,;l art I liu. () LonhnirCml. King of the Unirrrtf,i
II If /;i/v .am lifieilus with Thv commandments
I < i >,,,/,,/ M to kindle theSiibbuth light*.
3$&r^
me
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ThtJewiih FhrhtlanofQnaurFortLaudirdaU
Pgal7
l(l< in Texas
Paramilitary Activities Dealt Blow by U.S. Court
MERY, Ala.
ckwoods locations
n states, members
z Klan and Nazi
tions and their
hizers regularly
marksmanship and
maneuvers. Armed
sophisticated
they are prepar-
what they claim is
race war." Then-
are all non-white
jews, liberals and
itors."
per, a significant victory
paramilitary opera-
won last week in Hous-
, when United States
Judge Gabrielle
. of Houston ruled that.
Klan paramilitary train-
camps are illegal in the
was.
HERN Poverty Law
Attorney Morris Dees
that McDonald's ruling
way for lawsuits
|Klan groups in Alabama
slates which have laws
the Texas law cited by
I.
ision was issued in the
| the Vietnamese Fisher-
ssociation v. the Ku
, which was filed by the
h Project of the
Poverty Law Center on
f Vietnamese refugees
been harassed by the
ng the Texas Gulf
exas Attorney General
hit* joined with the
asking Judge McDonald
he private armies oper-
the KKK at several loca-
he state.
aid the ruling is signifi-
iuse it is the first time in
tory that a federal court
ifically addressed the
ary issue and because
ion has broad implies-
r stopping organized
by armed racists in
states.
X AS lawsuit was filed
of 1981 after several
I of Klan harassment of
t Vietnamese fishermen
brook and Kemah, Tex.
has allied with some
hermen in an effort to
Vietnamese from their
es and fishing jobs.
etnamese-owned shrimp
re burned by arsonists,
its to Vietnamese and
ho were friendly with
se became a regular
(Ian held armed "boat
to frighten the Viet-
I and well publicized Klan
I complete with heavily
[Klan soldiers," were fre-
ences. At one such
rally, Klan leader Lou* Beam
gave a demonstration on the
"proper way to burn a shrimp
boat." ^
Following the filing of the class
action lawsuit, the direct harass-
ment of the Vietnamese dimin-
ished, and in May, 1981 Judge
McDonald issued an injunction
affirming the rights of the Viet-
namese and ordering the Ku Klux
Klan to leave them alone.*
A NEW film1 by Klanwatch
shows Beam pointing to a Jewish
reporter and saying to a compan-
ion, "That little kike has betray-
ed his country, and when the time
comes he will have to be
executed." Since the injunction
against Beam and his Klan
group, Beam has left Texas and
has been a regular visitor at the
Aryan Nations headquarters in
Idaho. The Aryan Nations is a
Nazi-style right-wing "religious"
organization.
The issue of illegal paramilita-
ry training was left for further ar-
guments and was not decided
until now.
Dees, who was the chief coun-
sel for the Vietnamese, said
Judge McDonald's decision on
the paramilitary training comes
at s time when the KKK in Texas
appeared to be trying again to in-
timidate the Vietnamese. A
public demonstration by the
Texas Klan has been scheduled
for June 12. Now, however, the
Klan will be unable to operate at
that demonstration in any milita-
ry capacity.
Attorney General Mark White
said he was "extremely pleased
with the ruling. Hopefully, this
will be the first step to end the
Klan's paramilitary involvement
in the Southwest."
IN ADDITION to Dees and
White, the Vietnamese were re-
presented by attorneys John
Hay slip of Texas City, and David
Berg and Philip Zelikow of
Houston. The Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith filed a
friend-of-the-court brief in the
case.
The Ku Klux Klan and other
organized hate groups are in-
volved in far more extensive
military activity today than
many people realize.
In Texas alone, the Klan con-
ducted military training exercises
at at least four locations. Klan
leader Louis Beam was among
the organizers of the Texas
Emergency Reserve, a unit which
functioned much like a national
guard or Army reserve unit.
ACCORDING to sworn tes-
timony, it has a command struc-
ture, its members own or have
access to an extensive arsenal of
such sophisticated weapons as
AR-16 semi-automatic rifles,
semi-automatic 12-gauge shot-
guns known as the Atchisson As-
sault 12, which resembles a
machine gun and is capable of
rapidly firing up to 20 magnum
shells, and other assorted car-
bines, rifles and shotguns.
The TER even has a regiment-
al flag. Some of its members are
veterans, and film clips of their
training exercises demonstrate a
high degree of familiarity with
military tactics. A military
expert who testified in the law-
suit described the TER as a
"viable military organization."
The Klan leaders in Texas, like
their counterparts elsewhere in
the nation, tell their followers
that they must train and prepare
for "a coming race war."
SUCH TRAINING has been
conducted, according to investi-
gations and research by Klan-
watch, in a dozen states.
Probably the most widely
known paramilitary activity out-
side Texas is that of Bill Wilkin-
son's Invisible Empire, which
allowed the press to photograph
some training in 1980 at "Camp
My Lai" near Cullman in north
Alabama. Armed Klan soldiers
from that organization appear
frequently at Wilkinson's rallies
and marched, while wearing mili-
tary-style combat uniforms,
down a main street in Birming-
ham in 1980.
Klansmen and Nazis from the
United States and Canada joined
forces in 1981 to launch a military
invasion against the independent
island nation of Dominica, but
the invasion was thwarted by fe-
deral agents and nine of the 10
men arrested received prison sen-
tences.
In Nashville, Tenn., during
1981, federal agents also foiled a
Ku Klux Klan plot to dynamite
several Jewish-owned businesses,
a synagogue and a television sta-
tion which the Klansmen par*
ceived as "too friendly" to Jews.
KLANSMEN and Nazis have
also recently engaged in joint
paramilitary training in North
Carolina. White-robed Klansmen
and brown-shirted Nazis there
hold a heavily armed observance
of Hitler's birthday each year.
Texas's statute which bars
Klan paramilitary activity is Tex.
Rev. Civ. Stat. Ann., art. 5780
sec. 6 (Vernon). Similar laws are
on the books in 24 other states,
including Alabama, California,
Connecticut, Florida, Idaho,
Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky,
Touisisna, Maine, Maryland,
Massachusetts, Michigan, Missi-
ssippi, Nebraska, Nevada, New
York, North Carolina, North
Dakota, Washington, West Vir-
ginia and Wyoming.
Obviously, the ruling now
means that actions can be
brought against Klan groups
which are conducting or may seek
to conduct paramilitary training
in any of these states.
Bonn to Mark 50th Anniversary
Of Nazi Book-Burning in 1933
BONN (JTA) The 50th anniversary of the burn-
ing of banned books by the Nazis in May, 1933 will be
marked next year by a commemorative week and a confe-
rence on emigre literature in the city of Osnabrueck.
In collaboration with the city's university, a wide range
of activities is being planned to illustrate the extent and
importance of the loss to science and the arts caused by
the Nazi regime. They will include exhibitions, concerts,
films and stage productions to honor the memory of
artists, writers and scientists persecuted by the Third
Reich.
Former Chancellor Willy Brandt has agreed to deliver
thf inaugural address on May 10,1983.
WE CATER
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Mama


77k* Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Stark Contrast Between War and Peace
Fr*>.
ByHUGHORGEL
DOHA (Beirut Suburbs)
A car trip from the Israel
border at Rosh Hanikra to
this luxury bedroom
suburb just south of Beirut,
on a beautiful hilltop over-
looking the international
airport, reveals a patch-
work, piecemeal sort of war.!
The road followed the coast, al
times almost on the beach itself;
at other places on diffaides high
above the blue Mediterranean.
Sometimes for two or three kilo-
meters (a mile or so) the narrow
two-lane roadway is undamaged.
Orange and fruit groves are
dusty in the summer heat but un-
harmed. Farm buildings and vil-
lages are whole, with bright
flowers or vines trailing over
them.
BUT THEN you come to a
Synagogue Directory
Orthodox
Temple Obel B'nai Raphael (733-7684), 4361 W. Oakland Park
Blvd.. Lauderdale Lakes 33313. Services: Dairy 8 a.m. and sun
down; Friday 6:45p.m.; Saturday 8:46a.m.
Synagogue of Inverrary Chabad (748-1777), 7770 NW 44th St.,
Lincoln Park West. Sunrise. 33321. Services: Daily 7 and 8 a.m.;
Saturday and Sunday 9 am.; evenings 7:45 p.m.; Friday and
Saturday 7:30 p.m. Study Groups: Women, Wednesdays at 8
p.m ; Men, Sundays following service. Rabbi Aaroa Liebsraaaa.
Young Israel Synagogue of DeerfieJd Beach (4211367), 1640
Hillsboro Blvd.. Deerfield Beach 33441. Services: Dairy 8:15
a.m. and sundown; Saturday 8:45 a.m. and sundown; Friday 7
p.m Presidium: Jacob Held. Morris Septimus. Charles Weeks
press. Cantor Sol Chaaia.
Young Israel Synagogue of Hollywood-Fort Lauderdale (966-
7877), 3291 Stirling Rd., Fort Lauderdale 33312. Services: Daily
7:30 a.m. and sundown; Saturday: 9 a.m.; Sunday 8 am. Rabbi
Edward Davis.
Conservative
Congregation Beth rlfflel of Margate (974-3090), 7640 Margate
Blvd.. Margate 33063. Services: Daily 8:15 a.m. and 5:30 p.m.;
Friday 8 p.m.; Saturday 8:45 a.m. Rabbi Joseph BergUs.
Hebrew Congregstion of LauderhiU (733-9560). 2048 NW 49th
Ave.. Lauderhill 33313. Services: Daily 8:30a.m. and 5:30 p.m :
Friday 6 p.m.: Saturday 8:45 a.m. President: Maxwell Gilbert.
Hebrew Congregstion of North Lauderdale (for information:
(741-0369). Services: Friday 7 p.m.: Saturday 8:45 am. at
Western School. Room 3. 8200 SW 17th St.. No. Lauderdale,
President: Murray Hendler.
Temple Sha'aray Tzedek (741-0295). 8049 W. Oakland Park
Blvd.. Sunrise 33321. Services: Daily 8 am.; Friday 8 p.m.;
Saturday 9 a.m. and 7 p.m Rabbi Albert N. Tray, Cantor Jack
Merchant.
Temple Beth Am (974-8650). 7205 Royal Palm Blvd.. Margate
33063. Services: Daily 8:30 am. and 5:30 p.m.; Friday 5 p.m
and 8 p.m.; Saturday 9 a.m.; Sunday 8 a.m. Rabbi Dr. Solomon
Geld. Cantor Mario Botoshanaky.
Temple Beth Israel (742-4040), 7100 W. Oakland Park Blvd..
Sunrise 33313. Services: Daily 8 a.m. and 6 p.m; Friday. 5:30
minyan and 8 p.m.; Saturday 8:45 am. and sunset: Sunday 9
am Rabbi PhilUp A. LabowiU. Cantor Maurice Nee.
Temple Beth Israel of Deerfield Beach (421-7060), 200 S. Cen-
tury Blvd.. Deerfield Beach. Services: Daily and Sunday 8:30
am. and 5 p.m.. Friday 8 p.m., Saturday 8:45 a.m. and at
candle-lighting time. Rabbi Leon Marshy. Cantor Shabtai Ac
kermaa.
Temple Shalom (942-6410), 132 SE 11th Ave., Pompano Beach
33060. Services: Dairy 8:45 a.m.. Friday 8 p.m., Saturday and
Sundays 9 a.m. Rabbi Samuel April. Cantor Jacob J. Reaxsr.
Temple Beth Tarah (721-7660), 9101 NW 57th St.. Tamarac
33321. Services: Dairy 8:30 am. and 6 p.m.; Fridays 6 p.m. and
8 p.m. Rabbi Israel Ziaunannen. Cantor Heavy Bslasco.
Congregation B'nai Israel of Coral Springs (for information:
753-6319) for Ramblewood East residents only. Services: Daly
at 8:30 a.m. snd 5:30 p.m.; Saturdays at 9 am President: Herb
Davie.
Refo
Temple Eaaaaa-B (731-2310), 3245 W. Oakland Park Blvd.
Lauderdale Lakes 33311. Services: Fridays 8:16 p.m.; Saturday
services only on holidays or celebration of Bar-Bat Mitzvah
Rabbi Jeffrey Bailee. Cantor Jiroeai Klaaatnt.
Temple Kol Ami (472-1988). 8000 Peters Rd.. Plantation. 33324.
Services: Fridays 8:15p.m.; Saturdays 10 30 am Rabbi Shel-
don Harr, Castor Gene Corbura.
Temple Beth Or (753-3232). 2151 Riverside Dr.. Coral Springs
33065. Services: Minyan Sundays 8 a.m., Tuesdays and
Thursdays 7:30 am.. Fridays 8 p.m.. Saturdays 10:30 a.m.
Rabbi Donald R. Gather.
West Browsed Jewish Ciiaisnalfon (for information: 741-0121
or P.O. Box 17440, Plantation 33318). 7473 NW 4th St.. Planta-
tion. Services: Fridays 8:15 p.m; Saturdays for Bar-Bat Mitz
vah only. PiiaHmt: Don Workman.
Temple B'nai Shalom of Deerfield Beach (for information: 426-
2532). Leopold Van Blerkom) Services: Fridays 8 p.m. at
Menorah Chape-, 2306 W. Hillsboro Blvd.. Deerfield Beach.
RcconstractJoiurt
i (472-3600). 11901 W. Broward Blvd.. Plantation.
Fridays 8:16 p.m.. Saturdays omy for Bar-Bat Mitz-
vah, 10 am Rabbi Robert A. Ji
7219 or 9734628.
Rabbi Aaron B.
of Cocennt Creak (for information
.0 Box 4384. Margate 33088). P
974-
Ji.
Israeli Soldiers going up to the line

iiiJ.lllll
i
*
imtatti
stretch of rooda few kilo-
meterspockmarked by shell
and bomb craters. The buildings
alone the roadside are heavily
damaged. Syne look completely
destroyed.
Telephone and electricity wires
trail along the ground. Pylons
and phone polls are shorn off by
shellfire or blast. The carcasses of
damaged or burnt-out cars litter
the roadsides.
Some of the vehicles were pro-
pelled by the blasts on top of the
rubble of what once was a house.
The differencebetween the
undamaged areas and the evident
signs of warshows where the
advancing Israeli forces had to
use their heavy fire power of the
Air Force to silence or overcome
pockets of terrorist occupation or
resistance.
The Lebanese will tell you that
this is a true picture of their
country under Palestinian and
Syrian occupation. They all ap-
pear to agree that hope for the fu-
ture of their beautiful but un-
happy country lies only in the
rapid departure of "all foreigners
and that includes you Israelis as
well as the Palestinians and
Syrians."
THE ROAD from Rosh
Hanikra to Beirut passes through
a number of villages and two
main townsTyre and
Sidonand a third, smaller
town. Damour, some 10 miles
south of Beirut. It is in all three
that war damage is most evident,
and civilian casualties reportedly
the highest.
The damage and the casualties
were not caused in the week of
fighting because Israel sought to
reek vengeance on the Lebanese.
but because it was at these spots
that Israel had to fight against
well-armed opposition, even if
terrorist forces ware not a regular
army.
According to a local civil en-
gineer from Tyre, almost two-
thirds of the town was destroyed
by air raids, artillery and tank
fin. But he said the casualties
ware "remarkably small." The
Israelis dropped leaflets in
Arabic before mWing their as-
sault, warning residents to take
refuge outside the town or in the
Red Crescent section of the town.
But even so, the number of
civilian dead runs into the several
hundred in Tyre.
DAMAGE WAS especially
heavy in the port area where
nail vessels were sunk near the
breakwater and buildings on the
waterfront were severely
damaged or completely dee-
In Sidon further to the north
the second largest town in Leba-
non, property damage in the cen-
tral downtown and commercial
area was the most severe. Large
parts of the long central street
will have to be razed and rebuut
because the buildings are beyond
repair. But it is surprising that
the damage and casualties were
not higher, for Palestinian arms
and ammunition dumps were
found in the basements of high-
rise buildings along the street.
The residents say they were
aware that they were living on
terrorist and guerrilla arms
dumps, but claim they could do
nothing about it.
They kept promising to re-
move them, but never did any-
thing about it. And when the au-
ra ids started, we even took shel-
ter in the basement, among the
ammunition and bombs stored
there." one woman resident told
newsmen.
THE NEWSMAN visited the
arms dump, next to the building
now housing the Israel army's
"town major" trying to restore
civilian life to damaged Sidon.
They could see the descriptions
on the boxes, in English, Russian
and Chinese, showing the coun-
tries of origin of the material.
Some had been shipped from
Libya, and some boxes, painted
white, read "medical supplies"
though they contained mortar
bombs.
About 30 such arms caches
have been found, all in the base-
ments of residential buildings.
The assault on Sidon, and the
battle to gain possession, was
heavy because Sidon was a main
center for the Palestine Libera-
tion Organization's occupation of
Lebanon.
Although casualty figures
have not yet been released, they
were probably lower than they
might have been because of la
raeli warnings, transmitted
through the Red Cross and other
organizations, to the towniolk to
take refuge on the beach, whore
they would not be harmed while
the Israelis dealt with the Pales-
tinians.
m #
SOME 70.000 of
100.000 residents spexj
nights on the beach, i
were still there this
to return home
dwellings no longer
are living under the p_
the shore, surrounded by j
strung plastic sheets,
any sanitary facilities i
more than the cloths i_
on their backs. Than
play naked in the fly 1
around them.
The visible damage aj
and the refugees stlj
beach, have given rise I
ous credibility gap
raeli officials and
spokesmen and i
visiting southern
and can still see the i
damage and talk to
refugees.
Damage in the towno
was heavy because this I
originally Christiu |
dominated by a
forcibly taken by
ing the civil war and t
Palestinians a few
with its Christian
pelted. It was c
garded as a prune I
by the Israelis-
BUT DESPITE tail
and damages caused bjl
against the Palestininr
and guerrillas during (
"Peace for Galilee,
Lebanese in the
remarkably little
rancor, even by Mo
during the fighting
They do not km*'
blame for their
serves for not having I
gainst the Pslesteail
earner; their f
ing too weak by'
Israelis for rolling
with awesome fin
strength.
JTAratur8yB**]
Kosher Nutrition Sii
Available For
Community's Elderly At
The Service Agency for Senior
V****" ccperation with the
Jvwiah Federation of Greater
Fort Uuderdale and the Jewish
Community Canter serves a nu-
tritious and strictly kosher hot
meal every weak, Monday
through Friday, to all persons 60
y*" of age and older at two no-
JntoOB.sites: at the Canter. 6601
Sunrise Blvd., Plantation,
and at the Orioles shopping
tar. 4322 N. State Rd.
. Special programs and activi-
ty auch as movies, arts and
crafts, card games.
tainment. eM*rij'fa
are organized &%**
meat of the psrtiapw*
tfon. ti*MporteO
home is provided d*
The Service A|B*r I
Citizen* suggest!
contribution for thai
the cost.
Amy Spark
Community CawV
nioramformatioiiW'
adults mUrestsd T
friends and
Kosher nutrition w


ftidiy.Jy2'196*
is .1
Th* Jewish Fioridian of Greater Port LauderdaU
NORTON
SMNJCe 1924-
TIRE CO.
MKTVl
CLOSED
Monday, July 5th
So our employees can enjoy the
holiday with their families.
Pafel9
i
JiSTr*0 OAVS
HaUSTHIMttWICAUt
tttl
155SR12 29.96 1.53
155SR13 3235 1.61
165SR13 3g.^;T8Q ------size sale price ret.
PfMCI
175SR13 37.g^l02 *A78x13 24.61_ 1-59
42.86 2.28
UtJ,
165SR14 33,33 2^5 C78x13 27.47 1-80
175SR14 39.34 Z04 *C78x14 9A|T7 TS
185SR14 42.M 2 28 MMt jgg
155SR15 36.04 TJ2 E78x14 29.25
165SR15 39.46 198 F78x14 3Q.66
EXPERIEMCEIIMTESMTY
, THAT SAVES rOHMMEY
Since 1924 Norton Tire Co. has offered
quality brands, competitive pricing,
fast & efficient service. T/A high tech
specialist store managers, certified
mechanics, personal integrity plus
guaranteed satisfaction. You pay no
I extra for our service and experience.
4 PLY
POLYESTER CORD WHITE
H78x15
L78x15
G78X14 32.32 2.26
H78X14 33.84 2.99
G78X15 32.40 2.35
3*06
35.98
2.54
2.79
Available in 2 ply only
POLYSTER CORD, FIBERGLASS BELT WHtTEWALLS
SIZE
P1657
80R13
P175/
80R13
P185/
80R13
P185/
75R14
SALEPHICE F.E.T.
39.54
P1957
75R14
42.04
.167
1.64
1.78
1.93
2.06
SIZE
P205/
75R14
P215/
75R14
P215/
75R15
P225/
75R15
P235/
75R15
SALE PRICE F.E.T.
43.30
45.20
45.05
2.31
2.47
2.49
2.70
2.89
/ '
asr
cord bolts for strength and
Polyester cord body for a smooth,
quiet ride.
Belted construction for good mileage
and traction.
Wide whrtewaM for up-to-date styling.
FLORIDA
HEADQUARTERS
FORALLBFQ
BETDCLM
P METRIC POLYESTER CORD
GussiniDwinniiuis
SIZE
P155/80B13
P165/80B13
P175/80B13
P185/80B13
P175/75B14
P185/75B14
P195/75B14
P205/75B14
P215/75B14
P225/75B14
P155/80B15
P165/80B15
P205/75B15
P215/75B15
P225/75B15
P235/75B15
PRICE
31.51
33.32
35.24
37.38
38.23
39.30
41.22
42.30
43.61
45.90
35.24
36.91
43.50
44.94
47.09
49.38
F.E.T.
1.44
1.50
1.63
1.69
1.70
1.79
1.95
2.07
2.20
2.35
1.68
1.83
2.15
2.34
2.46
2.65
[HIGH TECH'
\RADIALS
LIFESAVO.
XLM-mRAD
SIZE PRICE F.E.T
P155/80R13 49.19 1.53
P165/80R13 51.18 1.69
P175/80R13 53.05 1.78
P185/80R13 ^^n^^^P 1 92
P195/70R13 55.50 1.98
P205/70R13 57.15 2.14
P205/70R14 62.17 2.23
P175/75R14 5138 1.82
P185/75R14 57.15 2.04
P195/75R14 62.17 2.18
P205/75R14 6435 2.34
P215/75R14 6631 2.48
P225/75R14 7038 2.68
P195/75R15 66.20 2.33
P205/75R15 6732 2.47
P215/75R15 69.99 2.59
P225/75R15 7236 2.78
P235/75R15 7733 3.01
Wg SEHVICE NATIONAL ACCOUNTS
ASK ABOUT THE
T/ACOMP
OAOC: Export/Whoteaate
aeNWt2Ay*. 063-7040
NORTON
1*84-
TIRE
.HIALBAWr^MSPPMNOatMWJ
, a, cSgiTr*^ 446-eioi TJ2^a2?
i iiirni liUMI t MIAMI AIWPOP.T
i33eoNW7rAvrw-e4i^.wa6 8t*Meo*ytt sea-uei
t PT LAUOSWOALS
1740 E. SunrM* BM) 403-7588
PLANTATION
aei N. state Rd. 7 867-2iee
*
* LAWI PAHK/N. PALM eACH |
532 N L*MBM1. 646-2544
aaesw. iitioroeMt 427-
tepti
r4a-7464 rd*Q4#ov*yd. 562 0656 441 6 W Comnwrotel BKM 736-2772 2604 Sou*4l St 464-6020
tfaSSSlBAOM *A^NOAU.Ofl^MKM(rOUAI t.T^MAUAC t.vBWOBBAOM
^ L^mZd6T2-S3S3 13872 8.1* 66th 81. 367-0126 N. U*varlty Or. at McNab Ad 721-4700 766 21* Slraat 567-1174
^Sitthpaw t.HOtTsn pompano smaom davtona bbach
OOfM 6 211^^667-7S7S 3O100 S FPdaral Mwy 247-1622 3151 N. Pwterte Mwy. 643-4200 907 Vofcate Ava. 256-7467
oSmuSoWS 4VIMOUWR)00 *STPAU*SSAON t*NA#LS
>ranOhd.^v233-624l 497 8. State ft* 7 667-0460 SSoulh06te 632-3044 2065 E.-fcrwaml 774-4443
2O3908 DtK*"wy. # OaW x r. S4 |UBt Pte Of OnMjfrtte Or. 473-4700


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Mintage
Ulhn Lights
uamm&.iwiY.llSwv.wam*.mtimm*m
mmuems 100$ s n^ .-v.oi
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