The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 3, no. 7 (Apr. 5, 1974)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 9, 1976 called v.4, no. 27 but constitutes v.5, no. 1; issue for July 7, 1989 called v.18, no. 11 but constitutes v.18, no. 13.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44570954
lccn - sn 00229545
ocm44570954
System ID:
AA00014312:00202

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Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward


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Full Text
e
iiewusm itnanalam
OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE
Volume 10-Number 31
Fort Lauderdaie, Florida Friday. December 4,1981
e fndShoeht
Price 35 Cents
Dine of AIPAC Assesses AWACS Aftermath
Thomas Dine, executive director of the Washington-
based American Israel Public Affairs Committee
(AIPAC) and publishers of the weekly Near East Re-
port, said it is clear that despite Senate approval of the
$85 billion sale of AWACS and other armaments to
Saudi Arabia, American Jews had won on the merits of
| the debate.
He came to Miami last week to assess the aftermath
I of the sale. He spoke at a special meeting of the Com-
munity Relations Council of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation. Among those in attendance were Rabbi
Albert B. Schwartz and Helen Weisberg, representing
I the CRC of the Jewish Federation of Greater Fort
I Lauderdaie.
Dine said: "I wish you could have been there in the
Senate. Speech after speech on the Senate floor went
something like this:' I totally believe that Saudi Arabia
is not stable. They've not been moderate on oil. They've
not been moderate on their financial support of the ter-
rorist Palestine Liberation Organization. But, I must
support my President.'"
He added: "There's no question that the President of
the United States is the most powerful lobbyist in the
nation." He, Dine said, was aided by the lobbying ef-
forts of contributors to certain Senators, and by Mobil
and other corporations.
But, he pointed out, the unity of the Jewish com-
munity "was fantastic, and we came away more
respected and stronger as a lobby."
Jewish communities, Dine told his listeners, must
develop strong alliances with labor, with other minority
groups, because "we have a good first team in Wash-
ington, but 'no bench", no depth" to counteract charges
of "dual loyalty and the anti-Semitic comments de-
livered to Senators." He added that, as American Jews,
Jewish communities should be angry that anti-
Semitism was unleashed by the debate.
He spoke briefly about the proposed Saudi eight-
point plan and said AIPAC would be keeping a watch-
ful eye on the aftermath of the AWACS sale and ita im-
pact on the Middle East, as reported in a recent issue of
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdaie.
UJA Super Sunday Jan. 17 Committee Expanding
an
and Israel
expanded
r<"
lfred Golden
nikoff chaired
Sunday committee meet-
ust month with 35 new mem-
added to the group for the
rth Broward Jewish com-
nity's participation in thena-
nw.de one-day happening to
reach out to new residents ana
new contributions for the United
Jewish Appeal.
The expanded committee dis-
cussed details of the Jan. 17
Phone-a-Thon with Super Sun-
day headquarters to be set up
that dav at the Tamarac Jewish
Center. 9101 NW 57th St., where
35 telephones will be ready for
volunteers to "reach out" from 9
in the morning to 9 in the eve-
ning.
Speaking on behalf of the Jew-
ish Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdaie which is taking part
for the second year in the nation-
wide Phone-a-Thon, Resnikoff
and Golden stressed the need for
the committee members to aid in
the recruitment of the 1,000
volunteers to make calls that day
and assist in other ways during
the exciting happening.
Among those attending the
meeting which was held at the
Jewish Community Center were
Ceil Signiund, Pine Island Ridge
Hadassah; Nat Pearlman, Sun-
rise Lakes Phase 2 and Sunrise
Jewish Center: Bertha Sheps.
B'nai B'rith Women (BBW). also
Mildred Reiter, Estelle War-
shawsky, Florence Goldberg,
Miriam Goldstein, Matty Wei-
ner, BBW; B'nai B'rith represen-
tatives included Stanley Weiner,
Benjamin Kesselman of Lauder-
daie Lakes. Alfred deBeer of In-
verrary, Reuben Strashinsky of
Sands Point, Henry Warshaw-
sky, Bermuda Club president.
Also Fran Merenstein of He-
brew Day School, Carol Knight of
West Broward Jewish Congrega-
tion. Ethel Gruber of Deborah
Hospital Foundation, David
Katzman of Free Sons of Israel.
Max Kronish of Castle Garden.
Harold Rose of Fort Lauderdaie,
Mildy and Irving Datz of Deer-
field's Jewish War Veterans,
Harriet Charm of Deerfield,
Sunny Friedman of Castle
Gardens.
Also Rose Port, Sam Felder-
man of Tamarac; Sylvia Shapiro
of National Council for Jewish
Women, Rose Weissman of Fort
Lauderdaie-Pompano Brandeis
and- ORT, Ethel Gruber of
Deborah Hospital Foundation,
Jerry Kaye of Plantation Omega,
Judy Fisher of B'nai B'rith
Youth Organization who'll be re-
cruiting volunteers among the
members of the Aleph Zadek
and B'nai B'rith
groups in North
Aleph (AZA)
Girls (BBG)
Broward.
nited Jewish Appeal Campaign Activities Increase
Following up on reports early this week
|icating that the Initial Gifts division
uld record its best start for a United
vish Appeal campaign at its Dec. 3 meet-
other divisions and committees
(oughout the Jewish Federation of
teater Fort Lauderdaie territory re-
ubled their efforts to make this a banner
_ for the people of Israel, for Jews else-
lere in the world, and in North Broward
linty.
This issue of The Jewish Floridian of
eater Fort Lauderdaie was printed before
hterday's (Dec. 3 I meeting where Ted
rppel. ABC News Nightline anchorman,
i the keynote speaker but, not before
iteration's 1982 UJA General Campaign
Chairman Richard Romanoff and Co-Chair-
man Ethel Waldman had reservations indi-
cating the possibility of a million-dollar
start for the campaign.
Now a busy period of fund-raising meet-
ings will follow as hundreds of volunteers
unite as "One People Indivisible" to meet
the challenges to the continuity and quality
of Jewish life in Israel and around the globe.
They will carry the message of Israel's in-
creased isolation in the world community,
the rising anti-Semitism, the entrapment of
thousands of Jews in lands of distress and
oppression, and the inflationary increases.in
the cost of fulfilling the Jewish com-
munity's responsibility to Jews in need as
they seek commitments to the 1982 UJA.
Against this background of world and
local events, the North Broward Jewish
community is responding to the call of the
Federation's various community and con-
dominium committees to plan the events
that will bring these massages to the people
and to raise the funds to meet the rising
cost of Jewish Agency programs in Israel,
of Joint Distribution Committee and HI AS
worldwide services, other programs inter-
nationally and nationally, as well as those
provided directly in North Broward by the
Federation.
And so the 1982 United Jewish Appeal is
being carried forward this month with these
events briefly listed, already scheduled and
many more to come:
Sunday, Dec. 6. at 7 p.m., the Lauderdaie
West community at its clubhouse.
Monday, Dec. 7, at 7:30 p.m., Hawaiian
dardens Phase II Men's club honors
Loomis Wolfe, Hy Brown and Jack Drexler.
Tuesday, Dec. 8, at 8:30 a.m., a breakfast
meeting of Woodmont community's men to
plan their fund-raiser for UJA.
Wednesday, Dec. 9, at 11:30 a.m., the
Women's Division of the Jewish Federation
of Greater Fort Lauderdaie has its LION
$12,500-minimum luncheon.
Thursday, Dec. 10, at 10 a.m., a breakfast
Continued on Page 2
lebrew Day School Donates Israeli Flag to JCC
| Combining a Kabbalat Shabbat
Dgram with the presentation of an
raeli flag to the Jewish Community
^nter of Greater Fort Lauderdaie to
place a wind-tattered one, the Hebrew
ay School students on Friday, Nov.
demonstrated their commitment to
State of Israel and their solidarity
Ith JCC on whose Perlman campus
i School is located.
| Both the Day School and the JCC are
long the more than 50 beneficiaries of
funds contributed to the annual
lited Jewish Appeal campaigns of the
rish Federation of Greater Fort
luderdale.
During the Kabbalat Shabbat, the
program included English and Hebrew
versions of talks tracing the history of
the State of Israel flag. Max Ger-
shenoff, 4th grader, provided the
English commentary. The Hebrew talk
was given by Sharon Buchalter, 5th
grader.
Following the Soref Hall program
which was coordinated by the School's
music and Judaka teacher, Arlene
Solomon, the children marched to the
flagpole, carrying the flag which was
presented to Michael Weinberg, JCC
president; Philip Cofman, executive
director of JCC, and JCC Membership
Director Sandy Jackowitz. Joining in
. ~J^<>>
Preceding the formal preeentation of the presentation were Paul Frfcwr.Day
t Israeli flag at the JCC flagpole (pic- School president; Vice President
red here), the children of teh Day Martin Kurtz, and School admimstra-
phool, from kindergarten through 5th tor Fran Merenstein.
le, took part in the service which a* the flag was raised, the children
1 held in Soref Hall. led the singing of Hatikvah.


'" .--
Pag.-2
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, December 4
UJA1981 Campaign Surpasses Peacetime Record
NEW YORK The United
Jewish Appeal 1981 regular cam-
paign, still in progress, recorded
a total of $511.0 million in
pledges as of Nov. 13, a new
peacetime high. The previous
record for a yetar without open
war involving Israel was the
$50H.5 registered by the total
1980 campaign.
According to the report re-
leased by national UJA head-
quarters, the milestone achieve-
ment represents a card-for-card
mere use of 11.8 percent over the
previous year Final returns for
1981 will Ik- announced shortly
after the end of the year.
The report also indicated that
prospi-cts are bright for the new
record to be surpassed again by
the 1982 regular campaign,
launched two and a half months
ago. The new drive, showing a
pledge total of $81.9 million to
date, is running 24 percent ahead
of 1981.
Marked progress is also being
made in Project Renewal, the re-
port revealed, with total pledges
for the vast social and physical
rehabilitation program for
distressed Israel neighborhoods
nearing the $100 rriulion mark
since its inception. New pledges
made to Project Renewal since
the 1982 campaign began regis-
tered $3.6 million in the latest
report.
Much of the current regular
campaign's success is attributed
Palm Aire UJA Plans Set
The Pulm Aire United Jewish
Appeal steering committee met
recently to formulate plans for
the upcoming 1982 UJA cam-
puign
Palm Aire general campaign
chairman. Irving l.iliowsky. an-
nounced that the initial gifts
enrklail party would be held on
Tuesday..lun. 26.
Condominium chairmen were
Tamarac Makes
Plans for UJA
Drive
Chairman David Krani7. and
Nat Uimberg, co-chairman of
Tumarac's 1982 United Jewish
Appeal of the Jewish Federation
of (Jrcater Fort Lauderdale,
iniliuted the planning process for
the community's participation in
the campaign.
Citing the crucial and critical
situation in the Middle Fast and
the need to indicate solid support
for the State of Israel. Kranlz
and (Jinsberg told their commit-
Um> members they are aiming for a
:MI |iercenl inciease over the 1981
commitment by Tamarac's resi-
dents.
Preliminary plans were made
lor cocktail parties to be held in
various sections of the city as a
prelude to the annual campaign
breakfast to Ih> held later in the
season at the Tamarac Jewish
< 'enter.
Joining them at the meeting
held in November were these
committee members: Jack
Weiner, Morris Luslig, David
Waldman. Irving Steinlaus,
Jacob Itremon, llose Port.
(Jeorge Maer. Mathew Dinah,
Sam Federman. (Jeorge Moroni/
Castle UJA
appointed and the general cam-
paign format was planned.
The campaign will be starting
in the very near future and Chair
man l.iliowsky stated, "we an
ticipatc much greater partici-
pation this year in view of the
latest developments in the Mid-
Fast and the greater needs in Is-
rael and here in our own com-
munity."
Woodmont Men
Meet Dec 8
Lonta Colker. United Jewish
Appeal Campaign chairman in
Woodmont, announced a cam-
paign organization breakfast
meeting to lie held at 8:.'I0 a.m.,
Tuesday. Dec. 8, in the clubhouse
tent.
lie said the main purpose of
the meeting is to plan recruit-
mcnl of volunteers for the up-
aiming UJA drive.
The complimentary breakfast
is open to all of Woodmonl's men
residents.
"We bops to get many new
volunteers so that our 1982 UJA
will be highly successful in
raising the much needed funds
for Israel, for Jews all over the
world, and the dream of a healthy
community and the elimination
of racism and anti-Semitism.'*
Colker said.
Sunrise Lakes
Phase III
UJA Event
Forms
I u preperat ion for their show of
support for the 1982 United
Jewish Appeal of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale, the Castle Gardens
committee will meet at 10 a.m.,
Dec. 7, at the Hebrew Congre-
gation of Lauderhill; to discuss
plans for their activities. Pledge
cards will be distributed at that
time.
you've
got
willpower!
ITS THE POWER TO WlX THE FUTURE BY
LEAVING A LEGACY TO MAOAMAM TODAY'
BUHD A BPOGE BETWEEN 7 DECADES
OF PAST ACHeVEMENT IN ISRAEL
AND A TOMORROW OF OUTSTANDING
MAOASSAH SERVICE IN
MEDICINE. YOUTH RESCUE AND
CAREER EDUCATION
The Sunrise Ukes Phase III
Committee will conduct its an-
nual United Jewish Appeal
Campaign on Wednesday eve-
ning. Feb. 3, at 7:30 p.m. in the
Main Clubhouse at Phase III
Featured will be the appearance
of the television and nightclub
personality POddie Schaffer at the
main clubhouse that evening.
Schaffer is one of American's
most beloved humorists.
All residents of Sunrise Lakes
Phase 3 are cordially invited to
an entertaining evening for
Israel. Refreshments will be
served following the en-
tertainment.
MAIL TO
HADASSAH WILLS & BEQUESTS
DEPT
so west sam sireat.
Nk York. N Y 10019
Plmi nfl m mtomnny
brocnuwThty ShM B*
H^mOfnbWf^d fl PfXM "
|0*on UJA Campaign Activities
Continued from Page 1
meeting for the residents of Lauderdale
Oaks.
Sunday, Dec. 13, at 10 a.m., breakfast at
the Sunrise Jewish Center for the Sunrise
Ijakes Phase II community.
Thursday. De^. n, dinner at the Wood-
lands Country Club, UJA honoring David
Miller, one of the community's most com-
mitted residents to Judaism.
And meanwhile hundreds of other volun-
teers are being recruited to take part in the
Super Sunday Jan. 17 Phone-a-Thon at
Tamarac Jewish Center where 35 tele-
phones to reach out to new contributors to
the UJA, to new residents of North Brow-
ard, and to those who are not associated
with the organized UJA fund-raising efforts
in the various communities and condo com-
plexes.
by the report to the continuing larael. pledge total of S5.764.301 com
level of 1982 fund raising achieve- Four missions in November, pared to $4,357,070 from the
ment produced by UJA's intensi- involving 520 participants, same contributors last year, for
fied program of missions to amassed a regular campaign an increase of 32.3 percent
Israel Update at Hawaiian Gardens II Dec 7
UJA Committee are Brown, Aar-
on Rarish, Lou Berman, George
(ilasscr, Charles Cc.r:,l,, Max
I ley man. My Henkin. \]gn
Kushner, Mannie Schnapp, Urry
Stn.ll, Jack Schalli-r. Harnev
Slol.M. '
!><-Nsert will be served and
everyone is welcome, Wolle said
An update on the continuing
isolation of Israel in the world
community and the support
needed for Jews in Israel and all
over the world will lie told by Joel
II. Telles to the Hawaiian Car-
dens I'hasc II Men's ('luh United
Jewish Appeal evening at 7:30
p.m., Monday, Dec. 7, at the
I'hasc 11 Clubhouse.
Phase II UJA Chairman
IxKimis Wolfe said that Telles,
assistant executive director of
the Jewish Federation of (ireater
Fort Lauderdale, will be the
guest speaker at the evening af
fair at which Wolfe, lly Hrnwn
and Jack Drexler will tic honored.
.Serving with Wolfe on the
Sunrise Lakes II Meets Dec. 13
Itabbi Albert B. Schwartz, di
rector of the Chaplaincy Com
mission of the Jewish Federation
ol (ireater Fort Lauderdale, will
provide an insight into the world
of g Uxl Jewish Appeal does when he
speaks at the Breakfast mooting
at 10 a.m., Sunday. !><<. 13, at
the Sunrise Jewish ('enter.
The meeting arranged by the
Sunrise Jewish ('enter-Sunrise
Lakes I'hasc 11 committee will Ik
highlighted bv the honor to be
bestowed on Flsie and Hy Silver
man
Chairman Nat Pearlman snidjfe lh,'n th<' OOWmittet'
onriale to have KaaM anitial Gifts luncheon :.
was appropriate
Schwartz as speaker for. this
meeting liecausc the chairman
emeritus of the committee is one
ol Kal>t>i Schwartz's colleugues.
Sunrise Jewish Center's Itabbi
Albert Troy.
i'eurlman and co chairmen
liduis Cohen, U-onard Goldman
and Sidney Permission will re
|K>rl at the breakfast on the re
sulLs achieved earlier this week
held its
at the.l<'tt
ish ('(immunity ('enter.
With an outstanding group nf
honorary chairpeople serving
with them, the committee arilici
putes a capacity attendance Dec
13 in the Sunrise Jewish Center
to show their support and siili
darity for the ponpk- ol Israel
The most respected name
in Jewish funeral service
In the world
Not surprising.it's River-
side, and there are many
reasons.
If you've ever worked with
any of our people on com-
munity projects ranging from
fund-raising drives for Israel
to enhancing Jewish education,
you'd understand. If you've
ever experienced the compas-
sion and kindness of Riverside
counselors.you'd have an even
deeper appreciation of the
reasons for Riverside
leadership.
At Riverside, we have
the largest Jewish staff
available from any funeral
director in Florida. More
important, they are people who
understand Jewish tradition
and honor it.
They carry on a tradition
that for over three generations
has been a priceless assurance
to Jewish families.
Our people. They make
Riverside the most/espected
name in Jewish funeral service
in the world.
The Largest Jewish Staff
In The World.
Carl Grossberg, President
Andrew Fier, Vice President,
New York and Past
President of the Jewish
Funeral Directors of
America.
Charles Salomon, Vice
President, New York.
In Florida:
Alfred Golden, Executive Vice
President.
Leo Hack, V.P., Religious
Advisor.
Sam Rosenthal
Kenneth Kay, V.P.
Keith Kronish.F.D.
Mark Ginsberg, F.D.
Harvey Pincus, F.D.
Douglas Lazarus, F.D.
Carmen Serrano, F.D.
Robert Burstein
Arthur Zweigenthal
Isaac Nahmias
Samuel Gotland
Jules Fischbein
Elaine Gardner
Lena Rothfeld
SoniaGale
Bernard Eilen
I Sol Silver
Charlie Blumkin
Ida Rosenberg
Barney Selby
Edward Dobin
Ralph Rubell
Guardian Plan Counselors:
Ira Goldberg, Manager
Steve Fischman
Joel Kay ,
Syd Kronish
DickSorkin
Henry Bofman
Joseph Bass
ADDRESSES:
MIAMI BEACH: 1920 Alton
Road {19th St.) / 531-1151
NORMANDY ISLE: 1250
Normandy Drive/531-1151
MIAMI: 1717 S.W. 17th St.
(Douglas Rd.)/443-2221
NORTH MIAMI BEACH: 16480
N.E. 19th Awe. 1947-8691
HOLLYWOOD: 2230 Hollywood
Blvd./920-1010
FT. LAUDERDALE (Tamarac):
6701 West Commercial
Blvd. (E. of University Rd.)/
587-8400
WEST PALM BEACH: 4714
OkeechobeeBlvd./
683-8676
Five chapels serving the New
York Metropolitan area.
RIVERSIDE
Memorial Chapel. Inc. / Funeel ft'telc*
Tradition. It's what makes us Jews.
i Sponsoring the Guarflian Pln
V Pre-Arrnajed Funeral.
liimrtllMii
Plan..
I


tt
mdian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page .3
AJCongress Says Saudi Repudiates Israel Recognition
FMtor'l Note: The following
lament was issued by Ed
lenders, chairman of the Com-
{mission on International Rela-
\tions of the American Jewish
{Congress:
"In an effort to counter the
I widely publicized exposure of
Crown Prince Fahd's 'peace plan'
as an empty gesture, the acting
I Saudi delegate to the U.N. last
month generated virtual euphoria
among his country's supporters
here when he asserted that the
plan 'does recognize Israel' and
that it is a basis for negotiations
with Israel rather than a formula
for an imposed settlement. The
euphoria didn't last long. The
very next day, the Saudi govern-
ment repudiated this statement
by announcing that the delegate
was 'not authorized to interpret
the plan.'
"Thus, the Saudi Government
made it unequivocally clear that
President Reagan's praise, at his
Nov. 10 press conference, for the
Saudi 'plan' as implying 'recog-
nition of Israel's right to exist as
a nation' and 'willingness to
negotiate' was utterly un-
founded. It is apparent that the
Saudis, who often characterized
Israel as an illegal Zionist en-
tity,' still cannot bring them-
selves to include Israel as one of
the 'states' or 'countries' which
according to Article 7 of their
festival of Freedom Dec 20 in Coral Springs
plan' have the right to live in
peace.
"After the pain and hardship
of the past 30 years, after the
territories it has returned and the
risks it has taken in order to live
up to its obligations under the
Camp David accords, the very
least Israel is entitled to before
the U.S. accepts an ostensible
peace plan is that such a plan
clearly, unambiguously and
beyond doubt, recognize Israel's
legitimacy as a sovereign state
and that it advance rather than
undermine the Camp David pro-
cess.
"We call upon the President to
demonstrate his stated commit-
ment to Camp David and Reso-
lution 242 by renouncing his sup-
port for the destructive Saudi
'peace plan' and by taking ener-
getic steps to help Israel and
Egypt bring their crucial auto-
nomy negotiations to a successful
conclusion."
In keeping with the spirit of
the City of Coral Springs'
"Hometown Holidays" festivi-
ties, the inaugural Festival of
Freedom Hanukah in Coral
Springs 1981 5742 will be held
on Sunday. Dec. 20 from 6 to 8
p.m., at the Mullins Park Show-
mobile and community building
located on 29th St. in Coral
ijtfngs.
The celebration is designed to
educate and inform the entire
community about the holiday, its
meaning and its history. The idea
of an annual Festival of Freedom
was developed by the area Coali-
tion of Jewish Organizations.
"We hope to inform all our
friends and neighbors as to our
Jewish traditions and values and
what better way to do this than
the holiday season," said Janet
Oppenheimer, Coalition presi-
dent.
A varied program with an
emphasis on Judaic customs and
traditions has been prepared by
Chairperson Marta Luzim. A
multi-media presentation of the
story of Hanukah will be
featured. Prominent Israeli
dancer Yusi Yanich, and Jerry
Layton and the Singing Rain-
bows will provide entertainment.
An art gallery will be set up
displaying works of local artists,
Judaic pieces donated by mem-
bers of the community, creative
displays prepared by local reli-
gious school children, a UJA
exhibit and many works of art
and artifacts contributed to the
show by Masada Imports.
Rabbi Donald R. Gerber of
Temple Beth Orr will light the
first Hanukah candle and place it
on the Menorah. All participants
are urged to bring flashlights for
this part of the program. It is
also suggested that chairs and
blankets be brought.
Acting as liaison between the
NCCJ Forum Meets Dec. 16
William S. Ruben, Chairman of
the Board of Jordan Marsh-
Fterida, will be the speaker at the
third National Conference of
Christians and Jews Forum to be
held Wednesday, Dec. 16, noon at
Gibbv's Restaurant, 2900 NE
12th Ter., Fort Lauderdale. The
topic will be "The Corporate
Structure: What Is Its Responsi-
bility to Social Concerns?"
Ruben is chairman of the Dade
\Js\inty Coordinating Council;
iPresident-elect of the Greater
Miami Chamber of Commerce;
Past President and chairman of
the board of the United Way of
Dade County; member of the
Governor's Revitalization Board;
winner of the NCCJ Silver
Medallion Brotherhood award in
1977. He was also the recipient of
the Dade County Outstanding
Citizen Award of the Shalom
Lodge of B'nai B'rith, 1977 and
the National Humanitarian
Award of B'nai B'rith in 1979.
In an effort to gain a deeper
understanding of current
community issues and to develop
a more informed public opinion,
the Broward chapter of the Na-
tional Conference of Christians
and Jews initiated the NCCJ
Forum, an ongoing series to
which the community is invited
to hear outstanding speakers or
panelists address topics of
concern. After the presentation,
there will be an opportunity for
discussion and expression of
viewpoints.
The cost of the luncheon is $8
and reservations may be made by
mailing a check to NCCJ, 5950
West Oakland Park Blvd., Suite
200, Fort Lauderdale, 33313.
NCJW
NCJW North Broward Section
will hold a Hanukah party at
noon Wednesday, Dec. 9, in the
recreation room of the Broward
Mall. Potato pancakes, ap-
plesauce and coffee will be
served. Donation $1.50.
Charge Begin Attack on Kibbutzim
Shakes Base of Pioneer Structure
NEW YORK (JTA) Itz-
hak Korn, a member of the Cen-
tral Committee of Israel's oppo-
sition Labor Party has charged
that Premier Menachem Begins
recent attacks on kibbutzim and
other officials' attacks on the
Histadrut "shake the base of the
pioneering structure and can de-
stroy the pillars of Israeli
society."
Korn, a leader in the World
Zionist movement, asserted that
the only "counterweight against
a tendency to careerism in Israel
among the people are Labor
institutions which believe in pro-
gressive democracy, values based
on the ideals of kibbutzim and on
the principles of the early
founders of Israel."
ADDRESSING a meeting here
ot the National Council of the
League of Friends of Labor Is-
rael. Korn said that it was "vital
to Rave a larger periphery" of
Jews through the world who will
show solidarity with the kib-
butzim and Histadrut in Israel
especially since, he added, the
present government of .Israel
often attacks pioneering groups
in the Jewish state."
"All Israel is united against
the external dangers, such as the
eight-point Saudi Arabia (peace)
plan," he said, "but we can never
accept attacks on the pioneering
groups of Israel."
Several hundred delegates
attended the gathering of Uw
League which Korn described as
"an independent group which
sympathizes with the ideals of
Israeli labor." Korn said that he
hoped the government would not
attack kibbutzim, since a great
number of Sephardim in Israel do
not belong to kibbutzim, and that
"an attack by the Prime Minister
of Israel on kibbutzim which de-
clares that the settlements are
rich further exacerbates tensions
between Ashkenazim and
Sephardim."
KORN, who helped found the
League of Friends of Labor Israel
a few years ago, also announced
at the Council meeting that a new
World Council would hold its
first meeting in Israel in January
for a founding Convention. Dele-
gates will attend from the U.S.
and Canada, France, Australia
and other countries, he said.
City, the Parks and Recreation
Department and the Coalition is
Honorary Chairperson Elaine
Kerzner. Chairman of the Art and
Artifacts exhibit is Mark Stein-
eard, president of International
Fine Arts, active in the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort Lau-
derdale.
Owners of unique and interest-
ing items relating to Hanukah
may lend them for display by
calling Mark Steingard, Janet
Oppenheimer, or Marta Luzim.
Volunteers from area communi-
ties are welcome to join the fes-
tival by contacting the same
people.
The Coral Springs Jewish Coa-
lition is comprised of 18 Jewish
organizations in the area. Repre-
sentatives of these organizations
meet regularly to identify the re-
ligious, cultural, educational,
social and social welfare needs of
the community and to plan, en-
courage and conduct activities to
satisfy those needs.
Student Appreciates Israel School
Scott Burgess, son of Natalie Burgess of Fort Lauderdale, a stu-
dent in Judaica High School, recently returned from a quinmester of
study at the High School in Israel located near Tel Aviv.
A letter he addressed to the Jewish Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale tells a little bit of his feelings about being able to attend
the school. It follows:
"I would like to express my appreciation for the scholarship money
that was awarded in order for me to attend the High School in Israel
program.
"Although I was in Israel for only eight weeks, I have learned
more about my Jewish culture and heritage than I have in my entire
life.
"I have always had an interest in the country and people of Israel.
After this extraordinary experience, I am part of Israel and one day
soon, I shall return. It was an experience that I will always remember
and can apply in my future.
"I would welcome the opportunity to talk to any students or
group of students about going on this program. I would try and an-
swer questions and encourage participation in the High School in Is-
rael program.
"Thank you for your assistance.
"Sincerely,
"Scott Burgess."
AT HEBREW DAY SCHOOL: In the Pre-
Kindergartern class, there are two conductors,
Robby Grieper and Marc Reiner, busy keeping
their train on schedule, and in the other photo,
working together on a class project, are David
Shulman and Ellen Novoseletsky, daughter of
Russian emigres who were resettled in North
Broward through the cooperation of the Jewish,
Federation of Greater I Fort Lauderdale and the
Jewish Family Service.
Want An Immediate Tax Deduction?
By creating a Charitable Remainder Trust with the Foun-
dation of Jewish Philanthropies of the Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale, You retain income on your donated
assets for life and receive a tax deduction this year.
Our attorneys and accountants can show you how-without
fee or obligation. Tax Laws governing charitable gifts change
January 1.
Also, in many cases, those who create their own Foundation
or Special Fund within the Foundation of Jewish Philan-
thropies BY THE END OF THIS YEAR will be eligible for
significant tax benefits.
CALL TODAY748-8200
David Sandier, Director
Foundation of Jewish Philanthropies
Leo Goodman, Chairman
Sheldon Polish, Co-Chairman
Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale
8360 W. Oakland Park Blvd., Fort Lauderdale 33321


Basta 2
Page 4
Thm F-* CJ--
77ie JewisA Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, December 4,

Two Good Resolutions
The General Assembly of the Conference of Jewish
Federations and Welfare Fluids just ended in St.
Louis has come up with two pretty good resolutions.
One of them places Soviet Jewry at the top of the list
of American Jewish priorities.
Another one points to the urgent plight of Falasha
Jewry in Africa.
The two resolutions both aim at saving Jews. The
difference is that Soviet Jews are favored. They are
Ashkenazic. They are Western. They are White.
They represent a cultural and intellectual Jewish af-
finity. They are educationally and civilizationally ad-
vanced. It is they, among other Europeans, whom
the founding Zionist fathers had in mind when they
envisioned the establishment of a new Jewish state
to become Israel.
The Falashas are not favored. They are African.
They are Black. They represent a cultural and intel-
lectual Jewish curiosity. They are educationally and
civilizationally of an entirely different world. No
founding Zionist father could have had them in mind
when they envisioned the establishment of a new
Jewish state to become Israel.
Still, are they not, by their own allegiance and suf-
fering at the hands of oppressors today, Jews? We
are told that the answer is yes, but the question is
how many of us feel this in our hearts. Indeed, the
Falashas, themselves, accuse Israel of not feeling
this way and of remaining deaf to their pleas for de-
liverance.
The import of the two resolutions at the C JF As-
sembly is to reawaken our sensibilities to this pro-
found problem. Soviet Jews spurn their visas to
Israel, and we are implored to take them to our
hearts. Falasha Jews beg us to take them out of the
land of their bondage and bring them to Israel, and
we ignore them.
Perhaps the CJF resolutions will spur us to correct
our inadequate handling of this African Jewish
tragedy.
Book to be Studied ~
A new book, The New Fascists, is a product of the
work of Prof. Paul Wilkinson of Aberdeen University
m England. Wilkinson traces the links between the
Palestine Liberation Organization and neo-Nazi
groups going back as far as 1969.
PLO groups including instructors and propa-
ganda."
It was in that year that Nazi leaders, at a secret
meeting in Madrid, pledged to support" Fatah and
other.
There are countless paradoxes in the marriage. By
definition, the neo-Nazis are ultra-right wing. By
definition, the PLO, argues Prof. Wilkinson, "boast
of their intimacy with the Communist world as a
whole. ."
Still, that does not stop the Nazis. It never did.
After all, Hitler's Axis established alliances with the
Japanese and with the Italians, both of whom Hitler
considered as racial inferiors. Furthermore there is
the pact the Nazis signed with the Russians one year
before all hell broke loose on the Easter Front.
What Wilkinson's new book does is to shed new
light on the growing links uniting terrorist acts
across the globe for example, the relationship be-
tween Al Fatah and the Swiss Nazi Party; the trial in
Yugoslavia in 1975 involving three West German
Nazis who were intercepted on their way to a PLO
training camp.
All of which is by way of urging responsible
Western leadership to quit proposing the Pales-
stinians as suitable partners for Israel in a new Mid-
dle East peace accord. Talk about the paradox in
Nazi marriages of convenience. It should not be for-
gotten that the Arabs, themselves, were pretty good
at ideological marriages of convenience in World War
II. They supported the Nazis full tilt.
Source of Good Humor a Myste
Jewish
of Greater Fort Laudardala
FRED K SMOCHET SUZANNE SMOCMETl
Editor and PubUanar Exacutiva Editor
PuMlahad Waakly Mtd-Saple'noar through Mid-May. Bl-Waakly balanca of yaar
Sacond Claai Poataoa Paid al Hallandala, Fla USPS 890420
Poatwaalar U*i Fan Wl retuma to Jawtati FlorMlan, P.O. Box 01-1673, Miami, Ft WO!
Advartlalng Suparvlaor: Abraham B. Halpam
Fort Laudardala-Hollywood Advartlalng Otflca: Am. Savings 2900 Bldg.
2900 E Hallandala ell Blvd., Suite 707-Q. Hallandala, Fla. 33008. Phona 454*468
Plant 120 NE Bin 8\, Miami, Fla. 33132 Phona 1-373-4605
MamOar JTA Savan Am, WNS. NEA, AJPA and FPA
Jawtari Floridian Doaa Not Ouarantaa Kaahruth ol Marchandlaa Advartlaad.
Greater Fort Lauderdala Nawa Off lea: 8360 W. Oakland Park Blvd., Fort Laudardala,
Fla 33321 Phona 748-820CH
Max Lavln*, Nawa Editor
SUBSCRIPTION RATES 2 Yaar Minimum $7.50 (Local Araa 13.95 Annual) or Oy mamoaratilp
.Marten Fadaratlon of Greater Fort Laudardala, Victor Qruman, Preaidant;
LMtte Gottlteb, Exacutiva Director 8360 W. Oakland Park Blvd.. Fort Laudardala, Fla. 33321
Two members of a team of six
Israelis who were in \ Washington
to meet with top Reagan
Administration officials on the
so-called Fahd peace plan
stopped by to chat the other day.
During our brief talk, their good
humor amazed me, and it amazes
me in retrospect even more.
The fact is that I just don't
know what it is they've got to be
good-humored about. As a child
of the World War II generation, I
grew up to believe in the virtue of
high motivation, especially in the
halls of democratic government.
I even spent the next twenty
years of my life after serving in
the armed, forces absolutely
believing that there were "good
wars" whose purpose it was to
change the course of history
away from the mischief of
devilish leaders like, say, Adolf
Hitler.
THE HITLERS among us
periodically managed to wrest
the wheel of the ship of state,
which they piloted toward the
destruction of civilization. Then
followed the "good wars," such
aa World War II\ I believed, to
cleanse humanity of those
psychotic pretenders to power
and bring us all one step closer
toward some fabulous, final
Utopia.
Perhaps I am gilding the lily a
bit to emphasize what was not
alone my personal naivete in a
much simpler, now forgotten
world. This belief in self-
correcting human integrity was
our view of the character of those
times aa we understood it.
The intervening years since
this age of innocence have shown
that nothing changes. We ex-
tracted a Hitler from our social
order in the same way that a
dentist extracts a bad tooth.
Then followed Mao and
Brezhnev, Khaddafy and Amin,
the IRA and the PLO, Castro and
the Son of Papa Doc. Evil is
endless. We fought a war to end
all warsalthough we should
have perceived in advance the
idiocy of such a cause when, after
all, we fought the war to end all
wars once before in 1917-18.
IT SEEMS now that our age of
innocence is over. In contrast
today, we are burdened by no
such illusions as buoyed our
spirits then, illusions having to
do with human perfection that is
just around the corner. The
current cry, "Better Red than
dead," tells us that newer
all wars, let alone with good
wars" which "better Red than
dead" suggests are, a pipe-dream
in the first place.
What I think the contrast
shows is that today's world
simply won't buy the notion that
there can be ethics in government
or in diplomacy. From Richard
Nixon to Richard Allen, from the
U.S. State Department to the
Quai d' Orsay and the Kremlin,
common notions of Jeffersonian
democracy are reckoned as
absurdities.
Since war is an instrument of
diplomacy, ergo there can be no
ethics in war eitherno high
purpose to be achieved in it,
except for the pursuit of power.
I AM willing to concede that
this is probably so. Our own
government, in my view, is the
principal antagonist of the
American people today. As
between our antagonists abroad,
the Soviets whom we
acknowledge as enemies and the
Ara.bs among whom we pretend
to have some "moderate" friends,
there is no choice so far as
morality is concerned. Either
way, we're goners.
But if our antagonists abroad
are about as iniquitous as they
can possibly be, our own govern-
mental antagonists at home may
well be even more iniquitous,
more detrimental to our best
interests today. That is why, for
example, they can talk about
"moderate Arab friends."
Come now these two Israelis,
two members of the Knesset,
Sarah Doron (Likud) and
Shlomo Hillel (Labor). Hillel
ingratiates himself in my eyes
immediately. He defines a
"moderate Arab" as one who will
sell you a barrel of oil for two
dollars less. The visitors sit in my
office over steaming cups of
coffee and exhibit a good if
somewhat sad sense of humor.
The sadness inhibits me from
redefining Hillel's definition of a
"moderate Arab." I would have
liked to remind him that our good
Saudi buddies did just the op-
positethey raised the price of
oil two dollars a barrel instantly
as the AW ACS issue successfully
passed the Senate vote.
I KEEP asking myself what
there is for them to be so good-
humored about. Once, when it did
not cost anybody much of any-
thing, the Israelis had just about
Friday, December 4, ltti
Volume 10
8KISLEV5742
Number 81
rKO
the whole Western world on lk
side. But these days, to be al
friend of Israel means to want to I
be self-sacrificial, and so every-
body is abandoning them.
Just watch the British. In dis-l
cussing the duplicity 0f|
diplomacy, one always refers to I
Machiavelli, or else tol
Clausewitz. But it is the British
practitioners, not these theoreti-
cians, who beat show us what al
sewer diplomacy is really all I
about even today, long after I
their decline.
Just watch how the British I
ride the Middle East derby to see|
why the Israelis have nothing |
really to be good-humored about!
Then watch the American about-
face. The British have never pre-1
tended about Israel and the
Israelis, whom they did their best
to sell out from Day No, 1. But I
America?
WELL NOW, what the,
Israeli mission was all about, two
of whom now sit before me, was a
typical schizophrenia reaction-
President Reagan saying one
thing about the Fahd peace plan,
including the President's stand
on Jerusalem; the State Depart-
ment saying another. And both [
meaning not a single word of I
what either one said, good or bad.
Or take the Egyptians. The
Israelis are committed to giving |
up the Sinai next April. Prime
Minister Begin has declared that
only a violation of the Camp
David agreement by Hosni
Mubarak's new regime will put a |
halt to the withdrawal.
Mubarak has let it be known he
will adhere to every last ink spot
on that agreement until next
April. After that, I don't give you
a plug nickel for his interest in I
continuing along the lines of I
Camp David. In a world all rac-l
ing toward an obscene embrace I
with Araby, including the leering
Uncle Sam, why of all peoples]
should the Egyptians be any dif-
ferent?
Shlomo Hillel, sipping his cof-
fee, looks up from the steam fog-
ging his glasses in an air-condi-
tioned office and says matter-of-
factly about prospects for peace
with Mubarak's Egypt after the]
Sinai withdrawal:
"There will be no immediate
change. It will be a question (af-
ter next April) of the gradual
denormalization of ties between j
Israel and Egypt today."
SAYS SARAH DORON of the I
mission's meetings with |
Secretary of State Alexander
Haig, National Security Adviser
Richard Allen, and Edwin Meese,
the President's personal adviser.
"They told us all the right]
things the things we wanted to
hear. But we were not assured.
We don't go home feeling any|
better."
Hanging in the balance, as I
see it, is the very survival of
Israel, a country which has its I
own unresolved moral dilemmas
these days in the form of what are
popularly called the Palestinians.
It is a dilemma no leas insoluble
than ours or the rest of the
West's. How do you balance the
self-interest of political power
with individual freedom?
But the Israeli failure to re-
solve it may well spell instant
doom. In the West, the baleful
end of its immorality is of a more
radual, Spenglerian sort. And so
wonder again and again at the
good humor of the two Iaraahs
seated before me. It ia a good
thing rooted, no doubt, in the
faith that the justice of their
cause must ultimately trunnPn;
If for no other reason, I am not
assured.


Friday, December^* 1981
The 'jewishJloridian o'fGreater Fort'Uuder'dale
Page*
HI AS Denies Charge
No Policy to Outflank Jewish Agency
Readers Write
NEW YORK (JTA) -
HI AS flatly denies a charge by
Jewish Agency Executive Chair-
man Leon Dulzin that it was ob-
structing the Agency's policy of
not rendering assistance to
Soviet Jewish emigres who
choose to settle in countries other
than Israel after reaching Vienna.
Dublin made the accusation in
a report to the Jewish Agency
Executive in Jerusalem last week
after a brief visit to the transit
facilities for Soviet Jews in
Vienna. He claimed that HIAS
was "violating the agreement" it
had with the Agency not to
extend its services to Soviet Jews
seeking to immigrate to the
United States unless they have
very close relatives in the U.S.
ACCORDING to a Jewish1
Agency spokesman, Dulzin
accused HIAS of "fighting not to
save Jews but to preserve its own
existence." He charged that the
century-old international im-
migrant aid agency was "strug-
gling wildly with the Rav Tov or-
ganization over the pitifully few
Jews currently leaving the Soviet
Union."
Dulzin characterized Rav Tov
as "agents of Satmar" and
"enemies of the State of Israel
and collaborators with its
enemies." The Sat mar is an anti-
Zionist Hasidic sect which
refuses to recognize the
legitimacy of Israel on religious
grounds.
In a statement to the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency, Edwin
Shapiro, president of HIAS, de-
clared: "The HIAS position with
reference to the new Jewish
Agency plan for Soviet Jewish
migrants was established by our
executive board on August 24
and confirmed by the HIAS
board on September 20.
"IT IS unfortunate that the
Jewish Agency action, presented
without notice on August 17, has
proven a failure. Though HIAS
found it repugnant to its 101
year-old tradition to deny assis-
tance to any Jewish migrant in
need, we have, through coopera-
tive counseling with the Jewish
Agency in Vienna, worked to
increase the flow to Israel.
"We, with a board of 202
American, Canadian and Mexic-
an Jewish leaders, regret the ac-
cusations of the executive officer
of the Jewish Agency. We cate-
gorically deny that we have
contributed to the plan's failure
or cooperated in any way with the
anti-Israel Rav Tov organization.
However, any time we can
prevent the success of an organi-
zation with such an anti-Israel
policy, we will do so. We feel that
through cooperation, the Jewish
Agency and the organized
American Jewish community can
have strength.
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"Through unfounded and often
malicious statements, we can
only reach an area of divisiveness
instead of the goals for the rescue
of our brethren in the USSR and
the strengthening of the State of
Israel."
DULZIN SAID in his report
that the Soviet authorities were
exploiting the situation in Vienna
to justify their closure of the
gates of emigration. He noted
that in recent days only "individ-
ual Jews" were reaching Vienna
from the USSR.
The Jewish Agency chairman
insisted that "We will not give
up" the struggle for immigration
to Israel and against HIAS. He
said a meeting of the Council of
Jewish Federations would con-
vene in the U.S. to discuss
"urgently" the HIAS issue.
Frank Strauss, director of
communications of the CJF in
New York, told the JTA today
that a meeting was held yester-
day on the situation in Vienna
but no conclusions were reached.
He said it was attended by Mor-
ton Mandel, president of the
CJF; Irving Bernstein, executive
vice chairman of the United
Jewish Appeal; Edwin Shapiro,
president of HIAS.
The Editor:
With reference to the only
Jewish Pipe band in the world by
J & B Whisky Distillers, it may
be of interest to you that the
Band referred to is the Band of
the Jewish Lads Brigade of
Glasgow, Scotland.
This organization is a Jewish
Cadet company, and was
originally commanded by Col.
Ben Strump, whose interest was
the Jewish youth in Scotland.
The aims were to uphold
Judaism, loyalty to country, and
to become better citizens.
The pipe band comprised of
about 16 boys, ages ranging from
10 to 18 years of age, the com-
plete company numbering around
100, all Jewish, with officers,
NCOs etc.
All officers held the King's
commission.
The writer was in charge of the
band for many years, as Drum
Major, and we competed and won
many medals against similar
units from all over Great Britain.
After the second World War,
old members of the Band joined
together to lead the London
armistice parade of 10,000 ex-
servicemen.
The Band was given pride of
place at the head of the con-
tingent, ahead of bands of the
Scots Guards, Royal Fusiliers,
Irish Guards and Royal Air
Force.
The writer is also a Founder
Member of the Old Comrades
Association which collects funds
to continue the work of the JLB
The writer has now retired and
living in Fort Lauderdale.
Harry Bernstein
Tamarac
Early Deadlines
All organization and syna-
gogue news for inclusion the Dec.
25 issue of the Jewish Floridian
must be received in the office of
the Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale, 8360 W. Oak-
land Park Blvd., Fort Lauderdale
33321, by 5 p.m Friday. Dec. II.
For the Jan. 1, 1962 issue, all
copy must be in the Federation
office by 5 p.m., Friday, Dec. 18.
Please note deadline dates hi
the following weeks are Thurs-
day, Dec. 24, and Thursday. Dec.
31.
Mail during December is some-
times delayed please MAIL
COPY EARLY!
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Vi cup chopped carrots
2 tablespoons butter or margarine
green beans, cooked and drained
1 can (15 Oz.) Chef Boy-ar-dee
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dash garlic salt
1 tablespoon chopped fresh
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W cup water
1. Saute onions and carrots in butter in medium-sized
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2. Add remaining ingredients; cover and simmer for
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Pa*. 2

Pag.-6
The Jewish FLtnAinm nffirm^tm- *?-* **-*'
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday/December-
Circle of Yiddish Clubs Includes 58 Groups
Jerusalem Daily Back On Press
Sunny Landsman of Tamarac,
coordinator of the Circle of Yid-
dish Clubs, sponsored by the
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale Central Agency
for Jewish Education, and Eunice
Gross of Lime Bay, librarian for
the Circle, took a census the other
day of the grdwing number of
clubs devoted to keeping mama-
loshen alive.
There are now 57 clubs within
the Circle which has an affiliation
with the Coordinating Council of
Yiddish Clubs in Miami Beach.
In North Broward, Yiddish
Clubs are active at the Bermuda
Club, Castle Garden, Colonnades,
Colony Club, six areas of Cypress
Chase, Deerfield's Century Vil-
lage, Courtyards. HiOcrest,
Holiday Springs, Inverrary 1 and
2, Inveron, Phases, 4, 5 and 7 of
Hawaiian Gardens, Lauderdale
Oaks, Lauderdale West, Lime
Bay.
Three phases of Mainlands of
Tamarac, Omega, Oakland Es-
tates, three phases of Oriole
Gardens, three phases of Oriole
Golf and Tennis Club, Palm-Aire,
Palm Springs 1 and 2, Paradise
Gardens, Ramblewood East,
Sabal Palms, Sands Point.
Somerset, Sunrise Club, three
phases of Sunrise Lakes, Spy
Glass, Wynmoor, Manors of In-
verrary, Coral Gate, Courtyards,
Greens of Inverrary 2, Oakbrook
Village, Las Vistas, Water
Bridge, Stonebridge Gardens,
also Kings Point and Century
Village of Boca Raton.
talk about Hanukah at the 12:30
p.m., Wednesday, Dec. 9,
meeting of the chapter in the
Bermuda Club Recreation Hall.
Program Chairman Gert Drilings
is directing a playlet "Hadassah-
rella," with the cast consisting of
chapter members, as a feature of
the meeting.
Art Theatre
Play at Tamarac
Tamarac Art Theatre will pre-
sent Arthur Miller's famous play,
The Price, with a professional
cast in three performances at the
Tamarac Jewish Center's 660-
seat social hall. Two perfor-
mances will be Sunday, Dec. 13,
matinee and evening, and again
on Wednesday evening. Dec. 16,
Tamarac Art Theatre at 722-0519
has ticket information.
BERMUDA CLUB
HADASSAH
Eve Werfel, chairman of Jew-
ish Affairs of the Bermuda Club
Herzl chapter of Hadassah, will
NEW BBW CHAPTER
Edie Kantor of Sunrise
reported that B'nai B'rith Wom-
en organized a new chapter this
week in the Pine Island Ridge
area. The meeting was last Mon-
day at the home of Sylvia
Kapleau.
BRANDEIS
INVERRARY-WOODLANDS
Dr. Ruth Bochner, a practicing
psychologist, author and lectur-
er, will talk about "Relationship
of People to People" at the noon
luncheon, Dec. 14, of the
Inverrary-Woodlands Chapter of
Brandeis University National
Women's Committee at the In-
verrary Country Club. Dr. Boch-
ner, a Vassar graduate, earned
her doctorate at Columbia Uni-
versity and is a member of Boca
Raton Brandeis Chapter.
Luncheon donation is $8.
^iiMiifMfniinmiiininmiwttHinn*fHanwiiinniiiniiniin.....iimHimjninnnmnmiinmiiuiaa
Women's Division of Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale offers
Beautiful Cards for Any Occasion
8 in a packet for $25.
CaH 748-8200
"
Remember Your Children
And Grandchildren
And Be Remembered
nnn By Them At Hanukah!
ESTABLISH A HISTADRUT HANUKAH GIFT TRUST
With a $1,250 Endowment to
the Israel Histadrut Foundation
Your Favorite Child And Grandchild Receives:
A Hanukah Gift Certificate.
A Happy Hanukah Greeting Card for 20 Yean.
A Hanukah Gift Check for $100 each year for 20 Years.
YOU RECEIVE:
A Hanukah Gift Trust Contract
... And The Satisfaction ...
That You Will Be Remembered
For Your Love
To Your Children
And Grandchildren
And Your Deep Feeling
For Jewish Tradition and Israel.
REMEMBER YOUR LOVED ONES
AND BE REMEMBERED BY THEM
EACH YEAR AT HANUKAH TIME
with the
HISTADRUT HANUKAH GIFT
I
L
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CALL OR WRITE:
Lewia Alpert, Exerotlve Director
Israel HiaUdrut Foundation, 420 Lincoln Rd., M. Beach. Fla. 33139
Phone: 531-8702 No. Dodo 946-2248
Name_________________________________
Address_______________________________t
-------------------------- P _________
HADASSAH BAT YAM
Anna Tulin Elyacher, chair-
man of Hadassah's oral history,
its Medical Organization (HMO),
and its Medical Center Building
at which she was chairman in
1960 of the official dedication of
the Center at Ein Keren, will be
the speaker at Bat Yam Chap-
ter's third annual brunch for
HMO at 11 a.m., Sunday, Dec. 6,
in the Venetian Ballroom of Pier
66, 17th St., Causeway, Fort
Lauderdale.
Entertainment will be provided
by Danny Tadmore. Jean Seifer
has information on tickets.
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The East Jerusalem daily At-
Fajr, has resumed publication.
The paper was closed last week
by orders of the military censor.
An agreement to reopen it was
reached at the initiative of the
High Court of Justice.
The agreement was reached as
a compromise deal as the court
heard an appeal by the publishers
against the closure order. Under
the compromise, the paper un-
dertook to submit to the military
censor any material "which is
reasonable likely to harm the
peace of the public or the public
order."
JWVPost Visits VA Hospital
For Hanukah Party Dec. 25
The Pompano Beach Jewish
War Veterans Post and its Auxil-
iary will hold its annual Hanukah
party at 10:45 a.m., Friday, Dec.
25, at the chapel of the Veterans
Administration Hospital in
Miami.
Post Commander Pat M. Fine
and Milton Weinberg, chairman
of the Post's Hospital Volunteer
Service Committee, will bring
plenty of food to the party, in-
cluding several boxes of apples
donated by Fine. Gifts will be
distributed to disabled men and
women veterans hospitalized at
the VA facility.
Meanwhile the Post's members
are eagerly anticipating this
month's scheduled opening of a
VA Outpatient Clinic in the Fort
Lauderdale area.
Adjutant Max Krasner ex-
tends an invitation for member-
ship in the Post which meets the
third Thursday of the month at
Pompano's Recreation Bldg.,
1801 NE6thSt.
This is a change from the t
sor's exciting policy toward _
paper, asking that any material]
censorable. It was agreed thj
within three weeks the pai
would submit yet another appa
against this demand. Until t3
new appeal is heard by the courj
the present compromise will be I
effect.
Glider Raider
Sentenced
TEL AVIV- JTAr-A
year-old Syrian who flew _
Israel by powered hang aft]
some ejght months ago but maJ
a forced landing after dropping!
homemade bomb harmlessly w7
sentenced Monday to 12 years I
prison by a military court
Haifa.
PLANNING A TRIP
[ Travel with National Council ..
(Jewish Women. For now 19i
[Brochure describing sen]
| sational tours to ISRAEL, witrj
[extensions to EGYPT, SWlTZERl
LAND. GREECE, EAST AFRICA]
[ Highlights In Europe, Chlni and
| the Orient, Colombia Highlights
[ and the Canadian Rockies.
Picas* call Lillian Schullz
742-3531 or Elsie Forman
741-4053
Maxwell Home" Coffee
Is After Shopping Relaxation.
Phone
J
Shopping for a "good buy" has be-
come one of America's favorite pas-
times. Its always fun to find new
things, see the new fashions and
perhaps pick up something new for
the house or family.
Another favorite pastime is to come
home from shopping, kick off the
shoes and relax with a good cup of
coffee. Maxwell House* Coffee. The
full-pleasant aroma and great-
tasting, satisfying flavor is
the perfect ending
to a busy shop-
ping day. Espe-
cially when
relaxing with
a close friend. The good talk. The
good feelings. The warmth are some
of the things that go along with
Maxwell House" Perhaps that's why
many Jewish housewives don't shop'
for Maxwell House* They simply
buy it. It's the "smart buy" as any
balabusta knows!
So, no matter what your prefer-
enceinstant or ground when
you pour Maxwell Housef you pour
relaxation. At its best.. .consis-
tently cup after cup after cup.
Maxweu
HOUSi
K Certified Koaher
G>l9HO.
^living tradition in Jewish homes far over half a century.


Friday, December 4,1981
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 7

Buynow
before the
prices take off.
New York City or
Washington,!).!;.
Prices are going
up December 9tE
Buy before then,
and we'll guar-
antee your fare through
January31st,1982.
^RESTRICTED
Airfares to New York and Washington, D.C. generally
skyrocket in December.
This is the year you can do something about it. Buy your
Pan Am tickets before December 9. Well freeze your fare
at the $124 one-way price to New York City or Washington,
D.C, and you can use your ticketsat that priceclear
through January 31.1982.
Starting December 9, our fares, and the fares of most
airlines, will go to $135 each way to New York Monday
through Thursday and $149 each way Friday through
Sunday. If you're planning to fly to Washington, D.C, the
fares will be $149each way every day of the week. So, if two
of you are flying, that means you can save as much as $100
by buying now. (And $100 saved around the holidays is an
important $100!)
You get the bonus of flying Pan Am.
Forget your hassles, settle back, have a cocktail. Well
give you the same care and attention we give our cus-
tomers on our international flights. The relaxation of your
trip starts the moment you step on the plane. Well see to it,
or our name isn't Pan Am.
A note to you who wish to indulge in Pan Am's First
Class. Our one-way First Class fares are only $149 on all
flights, all days, if you buy your tickets before December 9.
Starting December 9, the First Class fare will be $174 on all
flights, all days.
How to go about going.
For reservations, call your Travel Agent, Corporate
Travel Department, or Pan Am at (305) 462-6600. Fares
and schedules are subject to change without notice.
To
NewYorkCity
Leave
8:30am
1:05pm
4:15pm
Arrive
10:59am
3:57pm
6:59pm
Plane
727
727
727
Airport
LaGuardia
LaGuardia
LaGuardia
To
Washington, D.C.
11:00am* 2:05pm 727 National
3:00pm* 5:59pm 727 National
onestop_________Schedules effective December 9
Call now for reservations. Seats may already be
unavailable to Florida 12/21-26. from Florida 1/1-5.


Pae8
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, December 4,
1981
KC
JWTCH
COMMUNITY
CENTER
Of GREATER
fOl IAUOEROAIE
Art Show and Sale Dec 5 and 6
A major "Art Show and Sale of Contemporary
Masters," featuring original works of such greats as
Miro, Chagall, Picasso, Appel, Agam, Jenkins, Matta
and Natkin, ameng many others, will take place at the
Jewish Community Center of Greater Fort Lauderdale,
6601 W. Sunrise Boulevard, on Saturday night, Dec. 5
and Sunday afternoon, Dec. 6.
A special "by invitation only" reception and preview
will open the Art Show on Saturday, at 8 p.m. Guests
will have hors d'oeuvres.an open bar, and will hear a
brief discussion on contemporary art by George Bolge,
Jackowitz Youth
Lounge Dedicated
the distinguished director of the Museum of Art of Fort
Lauderdale. For this reception there is a charge of
$12.50 per person. Invitations may be obtained by
calling Ruth Pine, Cultural Arts Director at, 792-6700.
On Sunday, Dec. 6, the Art Show and Sale will be
open to the public, at no charge, from noon through 5
p.m.
Lynn Kopelowitz, chairperson of the Art Show and
Sale, noted "this will be a most significant art event,
because the oils, watercolors, sculptures, tapestries,
etching and lithographs exhibited are all works of the
contemporary masters and of museum quality." She
added: "Those seeking to invest and those who love
and appreciate fine contemporary art will enjoy this
exciting exhibition."
Other members of the Art Show and Sale Committee
are Alvera Ackerberg, Ruth Baker, Karen Bussell
Faye Geronemus, Rachel Herbert, Pearl Reinstein and
Susan Weinberg. The program has been planned in
conjunction with International Fine Arts, Ltd., Mark
Steingard, director.
SQHHMSDOMW
momr
Newest addition to the facili-
ties at the Jewish Community
Center of Greater For Lauderdale
at 6501 W. Sunrise Blvd., Plan-
tation, is the Youth Lounge made
possible by the generosity of the
Sondra and David Jackowitz
family pictured here on Nov. 22
when the plaque was unveiled as
part of the weekend dedication
program for Tweens and Teens.
The Jackowitzes are pictured
with their children Lawrence and
Hillary.
Officers Elected by
Association of Deaf
JCC Association for the Deafl
(JCCAD) elected Morton Rosen-
feld, president; Abe Cohen, vice
president; David Heine, treasur-
er, and for the third year, Estelle
Reiferson was re-elected record-
ing secretary.
Julius Fershleiaer, who had
served as president, and treasur-
er, was chosen by the board and
members to receive the National
Congress of Jewish Deaf Award
of Merit at the annual convention
next May. Other retiring officers.
Meyer Rindner and Ralph Chap-
Ian, were also accorded thanks
and appreciation for their work
during the past year.
Andrea Wilson, a hearing-
impaired member of JCC, re-
ported that East Regional
Branch Library at 1300 E. Sun-
rise Blvd., where she is employed
has installed a TTY which re
ceives and transmits typewritten
telephone messages from the deaf
using similar equipment. The
public library's TTY number is
765-4268.
Plans were completed for the
group's Saturday social. Dec 19.
Toddler
Workshop
Expanding
Singles Worker Appointed,
Programs Planned
Emily Samuels, a social worker
at Henderson Clinic with BA in
social welfare from Florida
Atlantic University, has bean
named to the staff of the Jewish
Community Center part-time
to coordinate activities for Center
Singles.
She may be reached at the
Center 7924700 Tuesday and
Thursday evenings. Messages for
her may be left at the Center
switchboard.
Among activities planned for
singles on various age groups
enrolled at the Center are the fol-
lowing:
A get together for 55-Plus at 8
p.m., Thursday, Dec. 8, with
coffee and cake to discuss future
programs;
Brunch for 18-36 Singles, JCC'
members 81.60, others 83, at 11
a.m., Sunday, Dec. 20, with Nina
Rothstien, psychologist at
Broward Community College's
Women's Center, discussing
"Assertive Communication."
For the 36-66 and the 56-Plus
group, JCC has tickets for Yul
Brynner in The King and I at 8
p.m., Saturday, Dec. 19, at the
Sunrise Musical Theatre, JCC
members tab will be 823.60, non-
member guests 824.60, includes
ticket and parking. Following the
performance, participants will go
out together for coffee. Registra-
tion deadline is Monday, Dec. 7.
Jai Lai Saturday evenings are
planned for the 18-35 group on
Jan. 9, and for the 36-65 group on
Jan. 16. Each of the evenings will
cost JCC members 811.60, with a
812 tab for non-member guests.
The tab includes dinner, tip,
program and reserved seating.
Registration deadline is Tuesday,
Dec. 29. '
For the 18-36 group, arrange-
ments have been made for
Dancin' at the Parker Playhouse,
8 p.m., Saturday, Feb. 6, with
tickets at 820.60 for JCC
members who may bring one non-
member guest each. Following
the show, there will be a coffee
hour for the participants. This
registration deadline is also Dec.
29.
Tweens Go Gowning,
A down makeup workshop
has been scheduled for Tweens at
their meeting Wednesday, Dec. 9,
at the Center. Also on tap this
month is an ice skating get-
together Saturday, Dec. 19. Scott
Snyder has details on these
events.
The Tweens took part in a
variety of programs in Novem-
ber, including a sports night with
tweens from Temple Beth Orr in
Coral Springs, bowling another
Saturday night, attending the
dedication of the Jackowitz
Youth Lounge, and disco dance
with Harvey Gittleman as the
DJ.
With waiting list for parents
wanting their two and three-year-
old toddlers to take part in JCC's
Toddler Workshop, the Center is
expanding the facilities for the
morning sessions and offering a
special afternoon Toddler Class.
The Toddler Workshop classes
emphasize high teacher-student
ratio with a wide variety of pro-
grams. There must a saJnfojBB
enrollment of six, while each class
will be limited to no more than 16
students with two instructors.
Rgistration details for the pro-
gram is as follows:
Semester dates: Jan. 4,
1982-June 4,1962. N
Fees: Five Days Per Week (101
class days) 875 per month; three
Days Per Week (60 class days) -
855 per month; Two Days Per
Week (41 class days) 840 per
month.
A child is registered upon
receipt of the first and last
month's fees. The following
information from a physician is
needed: physical examination
immunization record, and tuber-
culosis test.
Call Ed Basan, Health and
Physical Education Director, for
further information.
Variety of Activities For Senior Adults
Sol Brenner, Senior Adult Club
president, reported that last
month's three-day weekend in
West Palm Beach was enjoyed by
96 members. He and his wife, Lil,
and Nat and Ida Wofson,
received the commendation of all
who took part in the dance
weekend.
The Senior Adult Club will
meet at 1 p.m., Tuesday, Dec. 10,
with Lillian llahn, singer and
composer, entertaining with a
program titled "Listen World,"
narration, music and songs about
Israel.
Other programs listed at JCC
for Senior Adults this month in-
clude:
For members only without
charge, at 10 a.m., Tuesday, Dec.
8, Lou Silverman leads an eight-
week every Tuesday course on
"Self Discovery Through the Hu-
manities," and at 10 a.m., Thurs-
day, Dec. 10, he will lead another
eight-week course every Thurs-
day, on "Issues Without
Answers."
In cooperation with AARP, the
Defensive Driving Course will be
conducted from 1 to 5 p.m. Tues-
day and Wednesday, Dec. 15 and
16. The fee for this course is S5.
Registration must be made bv
Dec. 8. '
A special program is planned
for the eighth day of Hanukah. at
12:30 p.m., Monday, Dec. 28.
sponsored by the Senior Adult
Club and the National Council of
Jewish Women with the price of
admission to be a 81.50-value
grab bag gift with men present-
ing a gift for a man, women for a
woman to get a ticket for the
event. This event, complete with
singing, dancing and refresh-
ments, will be highlighted by a
creative and original Hanukah
presentation of lights, music and
dance, directed by Rae and Jack
Fishman. Tickets must be
secured by Dec. 14 at the JCC
office, 6501 W. Sunrise Blvd.,
Plantation.
Hanukah Celebration Dec 20
A special family celebration of
Hanukah will take place from
3:30 to 6 p.m., Sunday, Dec. 20,
the eve of Hanukah and the
lighting of the first candle of the
eight-day festival.
The activities will include a
film, arts and crafts for 3 to nine-
year-olds, gym activities for older
children, holiday singing, grab
bag exchange, the candle lighting
ceremony, and a light supper.
Families are encouraged to
bring their own Menorah for the
candlelighting.
All children are urged to bring
a grab bag item of about SI in
value for the exchange.
The film to be shown will be
Zlateh the Goat, based on an
Isaac Bashevis Singer story.
The cost for the day's activities
is 810 for JCC member families
and 815 for non-member families.
JCC's Family Programming
Committee, sponsoring the
Hanukah celebration, has set
Tuesday, Dec. 16, as the deadline
for registration.
CAMPMACCABEA
REUNION
Friday, Dec. 11, is the deadline
for registration for the special
overnight reunion for campers in
JCC's 1981 summer sports camp.
The overnighter will take place
from 3:30 Wednesday, Dec. 23, to
11:80 a-m., Thursday, Dec. 24.
Included in the program will be
a feature film, bowling, games,
dinner and breakfast.
Ed Basan has urged all 1981
wmp Maccabea members to
attend and extended an in-
vitation to JCC members whose
children are interested in at-
tending n#xt summer's sports
camp. Registration fee is 812.60
per camper.
ART HISTORY
WEDNESDAYS
Hal Rackin, art historian, art.
t and world traveler, started a
15-week Art History class this
week open at no charge to JCC
ww& U continu"' every
m!^ at Pm- Hi8 lectu"
Activities
on "The World of Art" began
with a projection of 80 slides
titled "In the Beginning,'' and
the showing of a fum, History of
Western Art in Six Minute*.
TEENS MEET DEC. 7
Elaine Allan will lead an ESP
program, "Echoes of the Mind,"
at a special "Teen Nite," Mot
day, Dec. 7, according to the
Teen Activities Board (TAB)
which reported that more than
100 teens from the Greater Fort
Lauderdale area attended the
dance held as part of the Jacko-
witz Youth Lounge Dedication.
TAB which meets the first and
third Mondays at 6 p.m. and to
which all JCC members are wel-
come to attend will be joining
another teen group on Sunday,
Dec. 18, at 4 p.m. for horseback
riding and a barbecue at the Bar-
B Ranch in Davie. Scott Snyder
Teen advisor, says it will be a Jot
of fun and a great way to meet
new people. He urges early sign-
up.




Friday, December 4,1981
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 9
Kittani Elected President
BY
DR. WILLIAM KOREY
UN degeneration was never so
shockingly bared as with the
election of the Iraqi delegate, Is-
mat Kittani, as president of the
General Assembly. The UN is
supposed to be committed to
peace, but Iraq has a penchant
for aggression and war.
- Iraq is the only country in the
world which is currently engaged
in two wars. She is still at war
with Israel and, strikingly, she is
the only Arab combatant which
has refused even to sign an ar-
mistice with the Jewish State.
Indeed, Iraq rejects the very
existence of Israel and regards
the letter's name as anathema.
Israel is never referred to by Iraqi
authorities except in the con-
_vmptuous form of the "Zionist
entity."
Last autumn, Iraq unleashed
an invasion of Iran and is still en-
gaged in striving to destroy the
Iranian military and to carve out
a colonial area for herself, includ-
ing oil refineries.
TO SELECT the Iraqi delegate
as president of the General
Assembly is like choosing Mus-
solini's representative to head the
League of Nations after fascist
Italy's conquest of Ethiopia.
Some have tried to minimize the
parallel by pointing to Kittani's
charm, intelligence and sophisti-
cation.
Kittani himself, however, un-
dercut the apologetics and sharp-
ty illuminated the spreading cor-
ruption that gnaws at the UN
core. He boldly announced that
his election "speaks well for the
reputation and the standing of
the Government of Iraq and what
it stands for in the international
community."
What compounds the gross ob-
scenity is the fact that the
General Assembly over which
kittani is presiding will probably
go down in UN annals for its ex-
pected anti-Israel tirades. On the
current agenda is an Iraq-
backed resolution censuring Is-
rael for the destruction of Bagh-
dad's nuclear reactor. That oc-
cured incidentally, Nov. 11.
If others welcomed the elimina-
tion of the reactor as a Middle
East Holocaust rescue operation,
the UN resolution calls for .he
application of sanctions by the
Security Council.
Expulsion of Israel from the
General Assembly was first
seriously proposed in the summer
of 1979 at a conference of the non-
aligned, comprising 92 members,
held in Havana. With the PLO
cting as the driving force, the
"walled "Final Declaration" of
Havana formally called for
Israel's "exclusion from the in-
ternational community."
ON THE eve of the General
$*Mmbly Ust year (Sep. 20,
TOO), the 42-member Islamic
conference meeting in Fee,
Morocco, resolved to press for
Israel's removal from the UN.
But the split in Arab ranks flow-
>Qg from the Iraq-Iran war made
the decision "premature," in the
Polite language of Islamic diplo-
mats.
In January, 1981, the anti-
jnael drive was resumed with the
**mic summit conference in
fuf, Saudi Arabia, demanding a
Mad (holy war) against the Jew-
f State. General tactical guide-
were advanced in February
meeting of the non-aligned in
" Delhi, India. Thenon-
"igned communique on Feb. 13
urged member states to vote
*pmt accepting the credentials
Israeli delegation to the
Tnat the UN expulsion
Dr. Korey is president of B'nai
U nth International and in this
London Chronicle Syndicate arti-
cle examines the implications of
the election of Ismat Kittani as
president of the United Nations
General Assembly.
initiative is more than merely
theoretical was indicated in April
when a UN African refugee con-
ference was scheduled for
Geneva. Syria, Libya and Algeria
joined in a maneuver to prevent
the seating of the Israeli delega-
tion.
U.S. Ambassador Jeane
Kirkpatrick took an adamant and
principled stand: should Israel's
credentials not be accepted, she
and her staff would take the next
plane home. With the U.S. ex-
pected to pledge about 60 percent
of the total S470 million re-
quested for African refugees, her
warning could not but exert an
abortive effect upon the Arab
initiative.
IN JULY, the Islamic con-
ference meeting in Baghdad
chose a five-member committee
to develop a strategy for Israel's
suspension. When the New Delhi
non-aligned communique was an-
nounced last February, the State
Department formally declared
"that any challenge to Israel's
credentials in the UN General
Assembly would be illegal" and
would be opposed by the US "in
the firmest and most vigorous
way."
The statement carried a ring-
ing cautionary warning: "Such
action, if it is pressed, would have
the gravest consequences for
U.S. participation in the General
Assembly and for the future of
the UN itself."
General Assembly Raps
Israel for Iraq Raid
UNITED NATIONS (JTA)
The General Assembly has
adopted a resolution strongly
condemning Israel for its raid on
Iraq's nuclear reactor last June 7
and called on all states to stop
the shipment of arms to Israel.
The vote was 109-2 and 34 abs-
tentions. Israel and the United
States opposed the resolution.
Among those abstaining were the
European Economic Community
countries, except Greece.
The resolution, which was
sponsored by Iraq and 29 other
Arab and Third World Countries,
declared that it "strongly con-
demns Israel for its premediated
and unprecedented act of aggres-
sion in violation of the Charter of
the United Nations and the
norms of international conduct,
which constitutes a new and
dangerous escalation in the
threat to international peace and
security."
The resolution also called on all
states to stop shipment of arms
and related material to Israel, re-
quests the Security Council to in-
vestigate Israel's nuclear activi-
ties, and demanded that Israel
pay compensation "for the mate-
rial damage and loss of life as a
result of the attack."
The resolution, in its preamble,
also expressed concern over the
United States-supplied aircraft
and weapons by Israel in its
actions against Arab countries.
Oceanside
Office Open
Edmund Entin. Region
East chairman of the 1982
United Jewish Appeal of the
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale, announced
the re-opening of the Fed-
eration's satellite office
which covers the Oceanside
area from Point of America
to the Palm Beach County
line.
Arthur Konvitz and Regi-
na Wermiel have been
named campaign associates
and they extend a welcome
to Oceanside residents to
stop in and visit them, catch
up on Middle East news, and
update information on the
Federation and the UJA
campaign.
The office is located at
3356 NE 34 St., in the
American Savings Plaza,
just a few doors in from
A1A. The telephone is 563-
5202.
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65
4
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Southern Bell



Pagt-2
Page 10
Tk* .r-mi.L MTU-TJ
.'."
T _-. J
Tfce Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, December 4,1981
Plantation's Omega Makes Donation* Two Sessions Set
for Religious
Teachers
Teachers in North Broward's
Hebrew religious schools have
been invited to take part in twt
in-service sessions with credits tc
be given towards Professional
Incentive Program (PIP) Grants.
Both sessions, Wednesday after-
noon, Dec. 9, and Tuesday after-
noon, Dec. 15, from 12:30 to 2
o'clock, will be held in the board
room of the Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale, sponsor
of the sessions in cooperation
with the Central Agency for Jew-
ish Education and the Federa-
tion's Education Committee.
Danny Siegel, author, lecturer,
teacher and poet, will lead the
Dec. 9 session devoted the
'Teaching of Tzedakah
(Righteousness)."
Rabbi Dr. Daniel Levine, na-
tional education director of the
American Zionist Youth Founda-
tion, will lead the Dec. 15 session
involving "The Teaching of
Israel."
Omega community residents in
Plantation have a religious com-
mittee which raises funds for dis-
tribution in furtherance of educa-
tional projects. The first of this
season's contributions went to
the Jewish Community Center.
Three members of the committee
are pictured presenting the check
to Philip Cofman (second from
left), JCC's executive director.
From left they are Jerry Kaye,
Abe Semelmacher, the com-
mittee's chairman, and Max
Finkelstein.
The committee's other mem-
bers, Murray Rosenberg, Mike
Tisser and Mitch Zelkind, joined
them in making contributions to
the Hebrew Day School and to
the Central Agency for Jewish
Education of the Jewish Federa-
tion of Greater Fort Lauderdale.
Anita Perlman Speaks Dec. 8
Anita Perlman, who received
the Torch of Liberty on Nov. 22
presented by the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith as another of the many
honors accorded for her humanit-
arian service to B'nai B'rith and
Judaism, will be the speaker at
the Dec. 8 Hanukah luncheon
meeting of the B'nai B'rith
Women Ocean chapter at Jarvis
Hall, 4501 N. Ocean Blvd., Lau-
derdale by-the-Sea.
Esther Henry, Ocean chapter
president, expressed her delight
that Mrs. Perlman, founder of the
Ocean chapter, a past president
of the International BBW, past
president of the Jewish Commu-
nity Center, and active and
honored by many organizations,
will be the speaker.
Art Auction at Boca
William Haber will conduct an
auction of art by leading artists
Sunday, Dec. 13 at Temple Beth
El in Boca Raton under the spon-
sorship of the Temple Brother-
hood headed by Mortimer Heut-
linger and Art Auction Chairman
Augusta Drill.
A preview from 6 to 7:30 p.m.
during which wine and cheese will
be served will precede the 8 p.m.
auction. Admission is free.
Say It With Cards

Send this colorful Tribute Card as a memorial remembrance,
or
In honor of a birthday, an anniversary, a mazel tov for any occasion,
to a Bar or Bat Mitzvah celebrant, .
as a holiday greeting, a get well note, to new parents.
A contribution of $5 to the TRIBUTE FUND, sponsored by the Women's Division of the
Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale, sends the card on its way... OR for a
contribution of $25 a packet of eight cards (four "in memory of," four "in honor of") is
available.
Contributions to the Tribute Fund support the life-saving humanitarian programs for
the people of Israel and for Jews in need throughout the world.
I Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale
8360 W. Oakland Park Blvd.
Fort Lauderdale, Fl. 33321
748-8200
Browsitt9 thru
roward
with max levine
Tickets for From Old Russia
with Love, a dance and song pro-
duction scheduled for Sunday
evening, Dec. 13, at Bailey Con-
cert Hall, Broward Community
College, sold out so rapidly, a
2:15 p.m. performance for the
same day has been arranged by
the Russian emigres now living in
the United States This
Sunday, Dec. 6, at 7, Lauderdale
West community will hear about
the emerging economic and poli-
tical powers of Arab nations at
the UJA meeting in the com-
munity's clubhouse. Speaker is
Dr. Clifford Joseph son. acknowl-
edged expert in the field of Arab
techniques Also this Sunday
from 10 to 3 p.m., Hebrew Day
School has its Hanukah
boutique, with items as low as SI
on sale, in Building C on Jewish
Community Center Perlman
Campus, 6501 W. Sunrise Blvd.
Col. David Marcus Chapter of
Red Magen David meets at 11:30
a.m.. Thursday, Dec. 17, at
Whiting Hall Women's Divi-
sion, North Broward chapter of
Technion Institute of Israel, cele-
brated Hanukah early: this week
at its meeting in Margate's
David Park Pavilion North
Broward Section of National
Council for Jewish Women
honored its life members at this
week's Paid-Up Membership
luncheon. Plans have been made
for section's cocktail party and
dance March 14, and the Donor
Lunchon May 12 at Inverrary
Country Club.
Total cost of Israel's military
Dullback from the Sinai and re-
deployment of men and equip-
mer* to the Negev is expected to
oe $5 billion. Only 50 to 60 per-
cent of the direct costs will be
covered by a U.S. aid package of
S3 billion three quarters of
that amount as a 30-year loan,
boosting Israel's massive foreign
debt to more than S15 billion .
Joseph J. Schagrin, chairman of
the Schagrin corporation, opened
its sixth store in Dade County's
Cutler Ridge Shopping center .
Alan King is listed as host for
Woodmonts Dec. 29 Tennis Fes-
tival. Proceeds go to End World
Hunger project.
Hiram Stinvil, the 83-year-old
Haitian who serves as the Senior
AIDE in doing the kitchen work
and other chores at the Jewish
Federationsupported Kosher
Nutrition site at the Shoppes of
Oriole, Lauderdale Lakes, was
the subject of an illustrated story
in a recent issue of The Miami
Herald Lime Bay UJA
Chairman David Favea and his
co-chairmen Joe Miletein and
Minnie Belitaky happily reported
to their committee that for the
first time they'll be holding their
UJA event at the Lime Bay club-
house it's set for Jan. 31 .
Once again Rae and Jack Fish-
man have a sell-out for their
Ttinderella production Dec. 12
and 13 at the JCC. He's planning
a special Hanukah show Dec. 23
at the Lauderdale West club-
house.
Loren A. Mintz of Cleveland,
with his brother-in-law Dr. Stan-
ley Margulies, chief of the radio-
logy department at Hollywood
Memorial Hospital, and Sen. Ken
Jenne and Broward Property Ap-
praiser William Markham are
opening the newest savings and
loan in the county later this
month: Cypress Savings Assn. in
Plantation across from the Brow-
ard Mall David Singer, 27-
year-old Davie attorney, was
elected president of Central
Broward Young Democrats. Oth-
er officers include Ivy Cowan,
also of Davie: Barry Scholnik,
Sharon Sabel. Dec. 15 is dead-
line for art work to be submitted
for Jewish National Fund's Art
Festival. Students from first
grade through high school have
been invited to submit entries.
mm.
mnn: mxs ever.
Hedges arc not enough.
We need people. We need you.
To meet growing needs ut home, in Israel,
around the world.
This year we need to reach out to more people
than ever. To bring in more pledges than ever.
Come work with some of the best people
you'll ever meet. Any hour Monday through
Friday.
Lend us your
Strength.
JEWISH FEDERATION
of Greater Fort Lauderdale
UNITED JEWISH APPEAL
CAMPAIGN 1982
748-8200


^1
Friday, December 4,1981

The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdal*
Page 11
Closing Generation Gap
During the 1980-81 Broward
Community College semester on
the North Campus, a two-hour
Community Services Senior En-
richment Experiences (SEE) pro-
gram proved so popular that the
students, who participated, and
their professor, Richard Levine,
of the Dept. of Sociology, asked
for a return engagement by the
participants.
Sunny Landsman of Tamarac,
who took part in the original pro-
gram devoted to discussion about
the gap between generations, was
back at the college last month for
another SEE happening with
professors and students taking
part.
The students are working on
term papers on the subject of
each generation understanding
and learning from each other.
The consensus after the pre-
liminary discussion and the rap
sessions when the audience and
students met in smaller groups
indicated that the generations
needed each other mutually. The
need, it was determined, was that
elders and young should listen to
each other and the need to care,
cherish and communicate is
crucial.
Mrs. Landsman reported that
among the immediate results
noted was that of a retired math
teacher volunteering to help a
student teacher having problems
with math; student nurse will be
aided by a man knowledgeable
about health and nursing care,
and young mother being adopted
by a grandmother.
Family Mission To Israel
Sponsored by Jewish Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale.
Be a guest of the Israeli Government. 12 DAYS IN
ISRAEL leaving June 20,1982.
CALL MISSION DESK AT THE FEDERATION
748-8200.
Brandeis 'University on
Wheels' Here Jan. 13
Seven of the 21 chapters in the
I Florida Region of the Brandeis
lUrmersity National Women's
K'ommittee, supporting the un-
iversity's libraries in Waltham,
IMass., are sponsoring a joint
I niversity on Wheels" program
Wednesday, Jan. 13, at Bailey
Hull. Broward Community
I College.
The day's activities, devoted to
Ithe "Perspective on the Ameri-
lean Dream," will begin at 10 a.m.
1 In this once a vear program with
We do business
the right wa>
1700 W Oakland Part Blw
Fl Laudantafct. Fla. 33311
Phona 734-1330
OAKLAND TOYOTA
the university "going to tne
grass roots," three Brandeis
professors will participate: Jacob
Cohen of the Dept. of American
Studies will discuss the future
tense of America, Lawrence Pul-
ley of the Dept. of Economics will
detail the economic conflicts of
the 80s. and Jonathan Woocher
of the Dept. of Jewish Communal
services will list the challenges to
American Jewry in the 80s.
The all-day program is open to
all. The charge is $7.50. A
donation of S30 to the Univer-
sity's Library Trust, plus cost of
lunch, will permit those donors to
admission and "Lunch with the
Professors."
Belle Grusky, president of the
Florida Region, and Elaine
Stone, chairperson of the day,
report ticket information is avail-
able at these chapters: Fort Lau-
derdale- Pompano. Hills, Coral
Springs. Greater Hollywood,
Inverrary-Woodlands, West
I Broward, North Dade.
STATE OF
ISRAEL BONDS
BOUGHT AND SOLD
Invest in
Israel Securities
WE'RE SPECIALISTS IN
ISRAEL SECURITIES.
'
TRANSACTIONS DAILY VIA TELEX
TO ISRAEL STOCK EXCHANGE.
Leumi
I Ban* Laumi ( Itraal B M
18 East 48tri Street
New York NY 10017
Securities (21217591310
Corporation Toll Free (800) 221 4818
Broward'8 Director of Aging Attends Conference
Candy Rechtschaffer, a mem-
ber of the Ahavah chapter of
B'nai B'rith Women, was among
the active participants in the re-
cent Broward county version of
the White House Conference on
Aging. She was there in her
capacity as executive director of
the ARea Agency on Aging of
Broward County, a position she
has held since succeeding the late
Dr. nan S. Hutchison last
August. And she was an observer
at the Washington conference
this week.
Previously she had served as
assistant director of the planning
body since the summer of 1978.
Mrs. Rechtschaffer, who lives
in Sunrise with her husband
Michael who teaches in Ramble-
wood Middle School in Coral
Springs, is head of the Agency
whicn plans, coordinates, pools
resources, evaluated, funds
programs, and is the prime advo-
cate for Broward residents over
60 years of age.
A Florida native and graduate
of Barry College's master's
program in social work adminis-
tration, she was in the employ of
the State Department of Health
and Rehabilitative Services for 10
years before joining the Broward
Agency. She was elected Brow-
ard Social Worker of the Year in
1978. She is a member of the Na-
tional Committee on Aging and
holds membership in several pro-
fessional organizations.
Israel Moves to Defuse Unstable Situation in Lebanon
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Israel has moved to defuse the
tension that flared in south
Lebanon after three members of
the Christian militia were killed
when their vehicle struck a mine
apparently planted by Palestine
Liberation Organization infil-
trators.
Premier Menachem Begin told
U.S. Ambassador Samuel Lewis
at a meeting that Israel was in-
terested in maintaining the cease-
fire in Lebanon "indefinitely."
ISRAELI SOURCES said the
U.S. envoy was "gratified" by
the statement which Begin asked
him to convey to Secretary of
State Alexander Haig. The
sources denied that special high-
level messages were transmitted
from Washington to Jerusalem in
recent days demanding restraint
on Israel's part.
They said thai the stituation in
Lebanon was not the main sub-
ject of Begins meeting with
Lewis. The source said it was one
of "periodic" meetings and dealt
mainly with the recent round of
autonomy talks in Cairo where
Lewis and Alfred Atherton, the
American Ambassador to Egypt,
represented the U.S.
Tension rose in south Lebanon
after the land mine incident over
the weekend. Maj. Saad Haddad,
commander of the militia, imme-
diately blocked key roads, cut-
ting off the transportation of
supplies to a number of posts
maintained by the United Na-
tions Interim Force in Lebanon
(UNIFIL). Talks are going on
between Haddad and UNIFIL
officers to have the road blocks
lifted.
Meanwhile, Israel sources have
urged reporters to moderate the
tone of reports on the situation to
south Lebanon which gave an
impression of a near crises emer-
gency.
THE SOURCES also said that
Lewis made no references to re-
cent harsh punitive measures by
Israeli authorities on the West
Bank at his meeting with Begin.
The measures included the
demolition of four houses whose
inhabitants threw Molotov cock-
tails at Israel Defense Force
patrols and the shooting of a 15-
year-old boy for throwing rocks
at an IDF patrol. The boy was in-
jured and released from the
hospital after being treated.
My 3on,
The Knight!
Jewish mothers (and fathers) have traditionally boasted, and justifi-
ably so, about their children's professional achievements. But in how many
parts of the world can a Jewish parent proudly proclaim: "Meet my son, THE
KNIGHT!"
Certainly Scotland must stand in the forefront. In recent
years Scotland produced three Jewish Knights, two Jewish Mem-
bers of Parliament, a Lord Provost (mayor), and the only Jewish
pipe-band in the entire world!
Of course Scotland's most famous product is scotch whisky.
And America's favorite scotch is J&B. We carefully select the finf-
est scotches and blend them for smoothness and subtlety. The
result is why we say that J&B whispers.
Incidentally, you don't have to wait until your son becomes
a Knight or your daughter a Dame in order to enjoy J&B. Any
'simcha'will do! l.fj f 1 >
J&Ji It whispers.
86 Proof Blended Scotch Whisky. 01960 The Paddtogion Corp.. NY



- **
age 14
Pain; 2
The JewisftYlond\an ofT7reWtef@rTLa~udefdale
Friday, December 4, 1981
Says Weinberger
*&m0b&**A^>
4 Jewish Lobby' Talk
Rang 'Ugly Tone'
By KEVIN FREEMAN
NEW YORK (JTA) Sec-
retary of Defense Caspar
Weinberger described the
injection of criticism of the
"Jewish lobby" in the de-
bate on the sale of AW ACS
reconnaissance aircraft and
other sophisticated weap-
onry to Saudi Arabia as an
"ugly tone" and at the
same time reaffirmed Presi-
dent Reagan's commitment
to the State of Israel.
Weinberger also said the Unit-
ed States would require any pro-
posal for peace in the Mideast to
contain "explicit recognition" of
Israel, although he admitted that
"bits and pieces" of any proposal
by Israel's neighbors could be
used to supplement the Camp
David process.
"THE ONLY plan that meets
this basic condition is the Camp
David negotiating process,
Weinberger said, adding that the
Administration "remains as
committed as ever to that
process." He said that the U.S.
would not be "pressured" into
accepting any other approach. "I
think that is something every one
in the world should understand,"
he said.
Weinberger's remarks on
Middle East foreign policy were
part of his address to 60J people
at the Anti- Defamation League
of B'nai B'rith "Man of the Year
Award" dinner at the Plaza Hotel
here. It was Weinberger's first
address to a Jewish group since
Senate approval last month of
the $8.5 billion arms sale to Saudi
Arabia.
Weinberger spoke after the
ADL'a national director, Nathan
Perhnutter, challenged "persons
of high responsibility" to
"categorically repudiate the in-
jection of anti-Semitism and its
crony, dual loyalty" into the
Middle East debate. Perhnutter
suggested this should be done
just as former President Dwight
Eisenhower publicly denounced
"McCarthyism."
Perhnutter said in his opening
remarks that Eisenhower's de-
nunciation has dealt McCarthy-
ism "a severe blow from which it
never recovered."
"The President scored for
Americanism, scored against
bigotry," Perhnutter said. "I
command his example for emu-
lation today."
"LET ME say quickly but
firmly: a vote against AW ACS
and enhancements was no less an
expression of Americanism than
a vote for the AW ACS. And a
Secretary Weinberger
vote for AWACS and enhance-
ments had no more resonance as
being anti-Israel or anti-Jewish
than a vote against the package,"
the ADL leader declared.
He continued, "What
disturbed us, however, was the
injection into the debate of non-
relevant, even mean-spirited in-
nuendo. When a former President
of the United States," a reference
to former President Richard
Nixon, attributes opposition to
the Prime Minister (of Israel) and
American Jews, "this tack,
plainly said, pulls the cork, lets
loose the genie of anti-Semitism,
its crony, 'dual loyalty.' "
Declaring that a speech to a
Jewish group on Israel-U.S. re-
lations demanded "special
seriousness at this time," Wein-
berger emphasized that the two
nations' long-term friendship was
based on "shared values. He
said that when these values are
called into question, it does not
mean a change in U.S. policy. He
noted that there was room for
disagreements, "but it is not the
sign of any policy reversal."
THE DEFENSE Secretary
said that just as "explicit recog-
nition" of Israel was part of the
Administration's policy so, too,
was the issue of Israel's "non-
negotiable security." The Ad-
ministration, Weinberger said,
would not embark on any actions
in the Mideast that risk the
security of Israel or its capacity
for self-defense.
But he added that U.S. at-
tempts "to break out of the stale-
mate" in the Mideast may
require the U.S. and its allies to
take risks. He did not say what
risks U.S. allies in the region
would have to take.
Weinberger said it is important
for the Israelis to understand this
position as to avoid any "drastic
action" by the Jewish State. He
said this also holds true to other
U.S. allies in the Mideast. Wein-
berger concluded by citing Rea-
gan as an "underestimated"
man, who holds a deep "emotion-
al commitment" and desire for
peace.
Luns Affirms Camp David
As Best Means for Mideast Peace
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
West European countries sup-
port the United States in the be-
lief that the Camp David process
still is the best means of achiev-
ing peace in the Middle East,
Joseph. Luns, Secretary General
of the North Atlantic Treaty
Organization (NATO), said.
Luns, who spoke with re-
porters at the State Department
after a meeting with Secretary of
State Alexander Haig, said that
the U.S. "rightly" believes that
the Camp David process is the
only basis for negotiating a Mid-
east peace.
He said that some West Euro-
pean countries may have given
the "impression" that they
wanted to substitute the eight-
point plan proposed by Crown
Prince Fahd of Saudi Arabia for
Camp David. He said that while
the Europeans see "merits" in
the Fahd plan, they have now
come to the "better perception"
that the Camp David process
should be the only means for
working toward peace.
LUNS, who said he discussed a
variety of U.S.-European issues
with Haig, said the Mideast was
among the topics discussed. He
said he believed the European
countries were moving toward
participation in the multinational
force that will patrol the Sinai
when Israel completes its final
withdrawal in April.
Britain, France, Italy and The
Netherlands have indicated their
willingness to participate in the
force. But this participation suf-
fered a setback after British
Foreign Secretary Lord Carring-
ton attacked the Camp David
process and supported the Fahd
plan while on a visit to Saudi
Arabia. Israeli Premier Mena-
chem Begin said that Israel,
which like Egypt has a veto on
participants, would not allow any
country to join the force if in do-
ing so, it said it supported any
other means but the Camp David
process.
'Don't Lecture Me,'Begin to Settlers
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) Premier
Menachem Begin has had a stormy
meeting in his office with three Yamit
settlers who are demanding that Israel
refuse to complete its withdrawal from
Sinai next April as it is required to do
under the terms of the Egyptian-Israeli
peace treaty.
Begin agreed to receive the protes-
tors. One of them, Mischa Mishcon, has
been on a liquid diet for 40 days to pro-
test against the impending pull-out.
HE WAS CARRIED into the
Premier's office on a stretcher, ac-
companied by two sympathizers. One of
the latter, Moshe Aharon, was ordered
to leave the room after he angrily ac-
cused Begin of "betraying the people of
Israel."
Begin reportedly told the three men
that he would "not be lectured by you
about love of Eretz Israel." He also
made it clear that he would not permit
government policy to be influenced by
hunger strikers, whatever their political
persuasion. Mishcon demanded that
Begin submit the Sinai withdrawal to a
national referendum.
Begin asked Mishcon to end his
fast, but he refused. Following the meet-
ing he was taken to a local hospital for an
infusion of glucose.
Theree been a slight mistake, can you reveree?"
The Argus
KKK Militants
Plan 'Drastic Action'
NEW YORK- A signifi-
cant number of militant Ku
Klux Klan activists have i
broken away from the main
bodies and, joined by
known Nazis, are planning
more drastic action than
the standard Klan cross
burnings and rallies.
That is one of the findings of a
six-month long investigation by
the American Jewish Committee
into current Klan activities. Also
reported were:
Dissatisfaction with
moderate" Klan leadership,
leading in one instance, to a
suspected attempt to bomb The
Temple, Nashville's largest Re-
form congregation, as well as to a
plot to bomb a transmission
tower belonging to a TV station
supposedly Jewish-owned.
Several Nashville Jewish
businessmen were threatened
with violence.
Increasing joint ventures
with Nazi groups, one of which
led to a charge that six Klansmen
and Nazis had murdered five
Communist Party workers.
The emergence of women in
Ku Klux Klan activities. Initial-
ly, their presence was detected
when a 50-year-old woman was
taken into custody in Nashville,
and another was discovered in a
prominent role among Alabama
terrorists.
Intensificationbf Klan efforts
in West Germany.
THE BREAKING off of
militant activists from
established Klan groups does not
appear to be an" isolated
phenomenon, according to the
American Jewish Committee's
Trends Analyses unit. In Catons-
ville. MD, Klansmen, unhappy
with lack of militancy in the local
Klan unit, formed their own
group, the ieadersip of which was
taken into custody and charged
with intent to bomb the residence
of the local NAACP official.
Reports from informed
sources, the Committee asserts,
indicate that a similar situation is
developing in Alabama, where
Klansmen contemplate forming
an independent group also com-
mitted to violence.
Recently, according to the
Committee, law enforcement offi-
cials in the Federal Republic of
Germany have expressed concern
over the sharp increase in Invisi-
ble Empire Knights of Ku Klux
Klan activity in West Germany,
where the Klan is attempting to
recruit resident German neo-
Nazis to their ranks in areas sur-
rounding U.S. military bases.
Britons, Germans Disappointed
By EEC's Lack of Unity
By DAVID KANTOR
BONN (JTA) British
and German officials have ex-
pressed deep disappointment
over the failure so far of the 10
member states of the European
Economic Community (EEC) to
agree on the text of a declaration
approving the participation by
member states in the Multina-
tional Force and Observers
(MFO) which is to patrol Sinai
after Israel completes its with-
drawal next April. The U.S. will
provide the bulk of the 2,500-man
force.
The declaration requires
unanimity. But Greece, the new-
est member of the EEC, remains
opposed to the formula proposed
by the other nine EEC partners
which would refer to the Camp
David agreements in one part
and to other documents, such as
the EEC's 1980 Venice Declara-
tion on the Mideast, in another.
THE NEW Greek government
headed by Socialist Premier
Andreas Papandreou supports
the Venice Declaration but is op-
posed to the Camp David ac-
cords. The Venice Declaration
calls for the association of the
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
tion in the peace process.
Israel has said ft would dis-
qualify any country from partici-
pation in the MFO that does so
on the basis of any formula other
than Camp David. Britain,
France. Italy and Holland have
indicated a willingness to provide
units for the Sinai force but offi-
cial commitments depend on
EEC approval.
British and German officials,
meeting here in the course of the
regular Anglo-German consulta-
tions, said a new round of consul-
tations with Israel and the U.S.
would be necessary if Greece does
not drop its opposition. They said
another attempt would be made
to convince the Greeks to accept
a formula containing references
to Camp David. "If this does not
produce the desired results, new
ways will be explored," a British
diplomat said.
PRIME MINISTER Mar-
garet Thatcher of Britain and
Chancellor Helmut Schmidt of
West Germany conferred on the
matter. Both leaders were said to
strongly support European parti-
cipation in the MFO although
West Germany itself would not
send troops to the region for his-
torical and constitutional
reasons.
Schmidt praised British
Foreign Secretary Lord Carring-
ton for his initiatives in various
parts of the world, iwhwiiwg- the
Middle East. Carrington sup-
ports Saudi Arabia'a eight-point
plan which Israel has categorical-
ly rejected.


Friday. DecemberT, 1981
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 13
Community Calendar
THURSDAY, DEC. 3
Ijewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale-Women's
iDivnsion: Board meeting.
IJewish National Fund: Execu-
tive Committee meeting, after-
|noon.
Jrandeis-Weat Broward Chap-
er: Board meeting, a.m., Ameri-
Savings Bank, Commercial
Hvd., & State Rd. 7.
NAIBRITH:
Lakes Chapter: Board
aeeting.
Sunrise Chapter: General
aeeting, 11:30 a.m., Nob Hill
creation Center. Sunset Strip,
sgram: Las Vistas. Choral
}roup, mini lunch.
Tamarac Chapter: Board
aeeting, Tamarac Jewish Center,
>:30 a.m. noon.
Hope Chapter: Luncheon at
arlone's.
Plantation Lodge: General
aeeting, 7:30 p.m., Deicke Au-
litorium, Program, Soprano
iia King, door prizes;
ospective members and wives
ovited.
)RT-No. Broward Section:
ard meeting, 10 a.m., I^auder-
,ie Lakes City Hail, 4300 N.W.
.St.
IAD ASS AH:
Deerfleld Scopus Chapter:
IM0 Luncheon, Crystal Lago
titry Club, for reservations,
E. Berey, E. Tischler, or A.
tendell.
Blyma Chapter: Brunch and
rd Party, 10:30 a.m., Teen
oter, David Park, Margate,
aission, $3.50, for tickets and
formation, call Shirley Mark-
Eud
Pompano Beach Chai Chapter:
"(0 Luncheon, noon, Henry's
testaurant, Cove Shopping Cen-
r, Donation $7.60, reservations,
fary Newburger; Entertainment
1 door prizes.
FRIDAY, DEC. 4
ladassah: Blyma and Oriole
pus Chapters: Oneg Shabbat
D.m., Congregation Beth Hillel
34 Margate Blvd., Speaker
Bther Cannon, Regional Chair
of Zionist Affairs, Refresh
ents, members and friends wel
Mat,
SATURDAY, DEC. 5
ewiah Community Center: Art
Je, p.m.
ladaaaah-Bat Yam Gait Chap-
Big Gifts Cocktail Party,
, Home of Dr. and Mrs. Ben
SUNDAY, DEC. 6
|RT Woodlands No. Chapter:
ser Dance, p.m.. Tower Club,
emple Sholom Sisterhood-
upano: Hanukah Bazaar, 11
3 p.m.
^wish Community Center: Art
Je, 11 a.m. 4 p.m.
dasaah-Bat Yam Gait Chap-
HMO Brunch, 11 ajn.. Pier
iple Kol Ami: Games, 6:30
nple Beth Torah: Games, 7
>ai B nth Sands Point Lodge:
a.m. Breakfast meeting,
eial youth program, Tamarac
iah Center.
MONDAY, DEC. 7
orkmen's Circle: Executive
nmittee Meeting, 7:30 p.m.,
121. Loft Mail, 6460 N.
State Rd. 7 at Prospect Rd.
Temple Emanu-EI Couples Club:
Meeting, pjn.
Temple Emanu-EI: Games, 7:15
p.m.
Temple Kol Ami Sisterhood:
Board meeting, 8 p.m.
ORT Woodlands No. Chapter:
Board, meeting.
monday, dec. 7
NATIONAL COUNCIL OF
JEWISH WOMEN:
Plantation Section:
Nominating Committee meeting.
Gold Coast Section: General
meeting, 12:30 p.m., Coconut
Creek Recreation Center.
HADASSAH:
Rayus Tamarac Chapter:
HMO Luncheon, noon, Holiday
Inn, Plantation.
Armon Castle Chapter: Gen-
eral meeting, noon, Elsa Marx
reviews LB. Singer's Lost in
America, Castle Recreation Hall.
Sunrise Shalom Chapter:
Board meeting, 10 a.m., Broward
Federal, University Dr.
Masada Margate Chapter:
Board meeting, 10 a.m., Boca
Raton Bank, Basics Plaza, State
Rd. 7 and Coconut Creek Pkwy.
Bat Ami Tamarac Chapter:
General meeting, 11:30 a.m.,
Tamarac Jewish Center,
Boutique-11:30-1 p.m., mini
lunch, Report on upcoming HMO
Luncheon, film "For The Good of
AU."
B'NAI BRITH:
Ocean Chapter: Board
meeting.
Lauderdale Lakes Lodge:
Board meeting, 10 a.m., Broward
Federal, University Dr.
Lauderhill Lodge: Board
meeting. 10 a.m., Men's Card
Room, Castle Gardens Rec-
reation Hall.
Deerfleld Beach Chapter:
Board meeting.
TUESDAY, DEC. 8
HADASSAH:
Rayus Tamarac Chapter:
Board meeting, noon, Tamarac
Jewish Center.
Sunrise Shalom Chapter:
HMO Luncheon, noon, Holiday
Inn, Plantation.
Deerfield Scopus Chapter:
Disney World and Sea World
Trip, Dec. 8-10. Call M. Jaffe or
A. Mendell. One-day trips,
planned for Dec. 15, March 3,
May 11.
Jewish National Fund: Board
meeting, p.m.
B'nai B'rith-Ocean Chapter:
General meeting, noon, Jarvis
Hall, 4501 No. Ocean Blvd.,
Broward Community College
Hillel Program. Everyone
welcome, speaker Anita Perlman.
Hebrew Day School of Fort Lau-
derdale: Board meeting.
Temple Beth Torah Sisterhood:
Games, 12:15 p.m.
WEDNESDAY, DEC. 9
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale-Women's
Division: City wide LIONs
Division Function. Call 748-8200.
HADASSAH:
Pompano Chai Chapter: Board
meeting, 10 a.m. noon, Pom-
pano Recreation Center, 1801
N.E. 6 St.
Bermuda Club Herzl: General
meeting, 12:30 p.m., Bermuda
Chib Recreation Hall, Eve Werfel
will talk on Hanukah; also, a
Quote to Remember
Wesivebut nolimou"h;
we shoutbut not loud enough;
we are willing to go for
but not far enough; we do much
but not what is needed!'
Elic Wicscl
playlet 'Hadassahreila-' by
members, Refreshments.
Hatikvah Cypreaa Chaae
Chapter: General meeting, 12:30
p.m., Lauderdale Lakes City
Hall, Safety Bldg.
Oriole Scopus Chapter: Board
meeting, 10 a.m., Boca Raton
Bank, 1334 N. State Rd. 7, Mar-
gate
L'Chayim Chapter: HMO
Luncheon, 11:30 a.m., Ed-
wardo's, 2400 E. Las Olas Blvd.,
Entertainment
Brandeis-West Broward
Chapter: General meeting,
Deicke Auditorium.
ORT-Woodlands No. Chapter:
General meeting, Section Club
House.
Pioneer Women- Ayanot Chapter:
Meeting, 9:30 a.m., Rabbi
Samuel April, Temple Sholom,
Pompano. sneaker: "Modern Life
and Responsibility of a Jewish
Housewife."
B'nai B'rith Lakes Chapter:
General meeting, Lauderdale
Lakes City Hall.
ORT Inven-ary Chapter: General
meeting, 11:30 a.m., Inverrary
Country Club.
THURSDAY, DEC. 10
Temple Emanu-EI: Executive
Committee meeting, p.m.
ORT:
Sunrise Village Chapter-No.
Broward Section: General
meeting, Nob Hill Recreation
Center.
Wynmoor Chapter: General
meeting, 12:30 p.m., Coconut
Creek Community Center, 900
N.W. 43 Ave.
HADASSAH:
Blyma Margate: Board
meeting, Southern Federal, State
MJ.
Fort Lauderdale Tamar: HMO
Luncheon, noon. Holiday Inn,
Plantation.
Snnriae Shalom: General
meeting, 11:30 a.m., Tamarac
Jewish Center.
Bat Yam Gait: Hanukah
meeting, 12:15 p.m., Jarvis Hall.
Boca Raton Aviva: HMO
Luncheon, 11:30 a.m., Boca Lago
Country Club, $18, Reservations,
call Mrs. Theodore Knee, Mrs.
Ben Applebaum, Mrs. Belle
Rubinoff.
Deerfield Scopus: Board
meeting, 10:30 a.m., Broward
Federal. Community Room.
Plantation-Polynesian Gar-
dens: HMO "Chai" Luncheon,
noon, Hobday Inn, Plantation.
B'nai B'rith-Hope Chapter:
Board meeting, 10 a.m., Deicke
Auditorium.
Temple Kol Ami: Board meeting,
8 p.m., Temple.
Temple Beth Israel Deerfield
Beach Sisterhood: General
meeting, 12:30 p.m.

Reach Out
And Touch
Someone On
SUNDAY
January 17,1982
Hundreds of Jewish families throughout North Broward will be called to
make their commitments to the 1982 United Jewish Appeal. We are joining
cities throughout America for this massive one-day happening on behalf of
our fellow Jews in need in Israel, elsewhere in the world, and right here at
home.
UJA NEEDS YOU
Give us one hour or more of your time on this important day and
YOU'LL FEEL SUPER!
SUPER SUNDAY
January 17,1982 9 AM-9 PM
SUPER SUNDAY CHAIRMEN
Alfred Golden and Israel Resnikoff
Want You at Super Sunday Headquarters
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER
Temple Beth Torah
9101 Northwest 57th St., Tamarac
Kosher refreshments all day... Celebrate Super Sunday with your friends.
Jewish Federation Super Sunday 748-8200
8360 W. Oakland Park Blvd.
Fort Lauderdale, Fl. 33321
I want to help on SUPER SUNDAY 1982
Please reserve one of the 40 phones In my neme for.
List one hour between 9 a.m. and 9 p.m.
NAME _
ADDRESS.
PHONE_


.~*rr*
Temple Beth Am Erects Tree of Life RtMi Wanlud 8Peaks Coconut Creek
Henry Kessler (left), a past
president of Margate's Temple
Beth Am and co-chairman of the
"*| Tree of Life Committee, is pic-
tured in front of the bronze ar-
tifact with Past President Sam
Singer, Rabbi Dr. Solomon Geld,
and Beth Am's President Harry
Hirsch.
The Tree of Life, donated by Al
Schechter, a dedicated member of
the congregation, has leaves and
branches emanating from a solid
trunk, strengthened by three
groupings of stones at the base.
The art work was erected at the
entrance to the main sanctuary.
Donations were made by Mr. and
Mrs. Harry Hirsch for the
grouping of three stones at the
left of the base; by Mr. and Mrs.
Jules Lustig for the set of four
stones, and Mrs. Besse J. Mas-
over for grouping of five stones.
Paul Risch is serving with
Kessler as co-chairman of the
committee which includes Lau-
retta Ellner, Herman Marksheid,
Elsie Risch, Dr. and Mr. Stanley
Steinik. The committee an-
nounces leaves are available for
honoring a person or commemo-
rating a joyous event. Details are
available the Temple office 974-
8650.
Beth Israel Salutes JNF Members
The Men's Club and Sister-
hood of Temple Beth Israel, 7100
W. Oakland Park Blvd., will
extend their appreciation to their
Temple members who are closely
associated with the Jewish Na-
tional Fund at a brunch at 11
a.m., Sunday, Dec. 6, in the Tem-
ple social hall.
The program will honor the fol-
lowing who have been active in
many ways for JNF: Beth Isra-
el's Rabbi Phillip Labowitz and
his wife, Shoni; Peggy and Jacob
Brodzki, Philip Halle, Louis Col-
ker, Libo Fineberg, Dorothy and
Bernard Oshinsky, Paul Frieser,
Victor Gruman, Sylvia Plafker,
Jack Zomlefer.
TEMPLE BETH AM
On Sunday, Dec. 6 at 9:30 a.m.
the Men's Club will hold their
monthly breakfast and meeting.
Roger Kahn will sing and enter-
MRMMNMMNMHI
tain, accompanied by an accord-
ionist. A new slate of officers will
be elected for 1982.
The Sisterhood will hold then-
monthly meeting on Tuesday,
Dec. 8 at 12 noon. An original
Chanukah skit, written by
Natalie Footnick, will be per-
formed.
The Judaica Shoppe has on
display a variety of Chanukah
items, such as candles, electric
Menorahs imported from Israel,
books and many useful and at-
tractive gift articles. It is open
daily except Saturday from 9
a.m. to 1 p.m. For special orders,
please call Julia Auerbach.
On Sunday, Dec. 20 at 6:30
p.m. a gala Dinner and Dance will
be held to celebrate Temple Beth
Am's first anniversary at its
present site. It will be catered by
^kmum

Palm Caterers with a full hour of
hors d'oeuvres and open bar. En-
tertainment will be provided by
Lee Wagman and his Orchestra.
A souvenir Journal is being pre-
pared in conjunction with this
banquet. A 10 percent credit on
ads will be given toward purchase
of tickets to the banquet. For
ads, contract forms and tickets,
call the office 974-8650.
EMANU-EL
While Rabbi Jeffrey L. Ballon
is attending this week-end's
biennial convention of the Union
of American Hebrew
Congregations and Sisterhoods
in Boston, his place on the Bimah
at tonight's Friday, Dec. 4, serv-
ice at the 3245 W. Oakland Park
Blvd. Temple will be taken by
Rabbi Meyer M. Abramowitz,
rabbi emeritus of Temple B'rith
Sholom in Springfield, 111. Cantor
Jerome Klement will assist in the
service.
Candlelighting Time
Friday, Dec. 45:11
Friday, Dec. 11-5:13
Friday, Dec. 185:15
Friday, Dec. 25-5:19
t v "I : : it :
Ba-ruch A-tah Ado-nye. Elo-haynu Melech Ha-olam,
Asher kid'shanu B'mitz-vo-tav, V'tzee-va-nu
L'had-leek Nayr shel Shabbat.
Blessed art Thou, O Lord our God, King of the Universe,
Who has sanctified us with Thy commandments
And commanded us to kindle the Sabbath lights.
Also attending the UAHC-
NFTS convention are Mrs. Bal-
lon, Emanu-El's President
Frances Smith and Estelle Wag-
ner representing the Sisterhood.
Nursery School
December registration is going
on for Emanu-El's Nursery
School for children two and a half
to four years of age. Transporta-
tion is available to and from the
school which has three and five-
day programs with a good
student-teacher ratio for art,
music, creative movement, and
outdoor activities. Call the Tem-
ple office 731-2310.
Rabbi Bruce Warshal, execu-
tive director of the Jewish Feder-
ation of South County (Boca),
will be the speaker at the 8 p.m.,
Friday, Dec. 11, service of the
Liberal Jewish Temple of Coco-
nut Creek. The Temple's services
are held in the sanctuary of
Calvary Presbyterian church
across from Wynmoor Village.
Rabbi Warshal, who was
among those from South Florida
participating in the recent United
Jewish Appeal Educational
Mission, will talk about the
mission and the many facets of
life he experienced on this special
mission. In preview comments,
he noted that the participants
saw slum areas being re-
developed through UJA Project
Renewal fund with the aid of the
Jewish Agency in Israel; heard
Knesset Member Mordecai Gur
talk about Israel's political,
economic, and military problems,
and the progress being made in
solar energy facilities that will
reduce the amount of oil Israel
has to import.
Use Strauss is chairperson for
the Oneg Shabbat that will follow
the service.
Members of the Temple joined
with Calvary's congregation for
an interfaith Thanksgiving Eve
service with Temple's Rabbi Bob
Ilson and Calvary's Rev. Edward
Peachey sharing the pulpit.
Ramat Shalom
Raising Funds
Members of Ramat Shalom,
7473 NW 4th St., Plantation, are
having a busy weekend on Fri-
day, Dec. 4, volunteers will be
manning the Synagogue Gift
Shop's booth at The Plantation
Towne Mall's Community
Bazaar. Among the items avail-

Synagogue Directory
ORTHODOX
Temple Ohel B'nai Raphael (735-9738). 4351 W. Oakland Park Blvd.,
Lauderdale Lakes 33313.
Services: Daily 8 a.m.. 6:30 p.m.. Saturday 8:46 a.m.
Traditional Synagogue of Inverrary (742-9244), 4231 NW 75th Ter..
La uder hill 33313
Services: Saturday 9 a.m.
Rabbi: A. Lieberman
Yonng Israel Synagogue of Deerfleld Beach (428-5918), 1640 Hillsboro
Blvd. 33441.
Services: Daily 8:16 a.m.. & Sundown. Fridays 5 p.m.. Saturdays 8:45
a.m.
President: Abraham Wosk.
CONSERVATIVE
Temple Beth Israel (742-4040). 7100 W. Oakland Park Blvd..
Sunrise 33313
Services: Daily 8 a.m. 6 p.m.; Fridays, 6:30 p.m. Minyan; also
8 p.m.; Saturdays, 8:45 a.m. and at sunset; Sundays 9 a.m.
Rabbi: Phillip A. Labowitz, Cantor: Maurice Neu.
Temple Beth Am (974-8660). 7205 Royal Palm Blvd.. Margate 33063.
Services Daily 8:30 a.m.. 6:30 p.m.; Fridays 8 p.m.. Saturdays, 9 a.m,
Sundays 8 a.m.
Rabbi: Dr. Solomon Geld, Cantor Mario Botoshansky.
Sunrise Jewish Center (741-0295). 8049 W. Oakland Park Blvd..
Sunrise 33321.
Services: Daily 8 a.m., Fridays 8 p.m., Saturdays, 9 a.m.
Rabbi: Albert N. Troy. Cantor: Jack Merchant.
Congregation Beth Hillel (974-3090). 7640 Margate Blvd..
Margate 33063
Services: Daily 8:15 a.m.. 5:30 p.m.; Fridays 8 p.m. Saturdays 8:46 a.m
Rabbi: Joseph Berglas.
Temple Sholom (942-6410). 132 SE 11th Ave., Pompano Beach 33060
Services: Daily 8:45 a.m.; Fridays 8 p.m., Saturdays 9 a.m..
Sundays 9 a.m.
Rabbi: Samuel April, Cantor: Jacob J. Renzer.
Temple Beth Torah (721-7660). 9101 NW 57th St., Tamarac 33321
Services: Daily 8:30 a.m.. 6 p.m.; Fridays 8 pjn., Family service;
Saturdays and Sundays, 8:30 a.m.
Rabbi: Israel Zimmerman, Cantor: Henry Belasco.
Temple Beth Israel (421-7060). 200 S. Century Blvd.,
Deerfield Beach 33441
Services: Daily and Sundays 8:30 a.m, 6 p.m.; Friday late service 8
p.m, Saturdays 8:45 a.m., evening, candle-lighting time.
Rabbi Leon Mirsky, Cantor Joseph Schroeder.
Hebrew Congregation of Lauderhill (733-9560). 2048 NW 49th Ave.,
Lauder hill 33313.
Services: Dairy 8 a.m.. sundown; Fridays, sundown, Saturdays 8:46 am.
President: Maxwell Gilbert
Hebrew Congregation of North Lauderdale (for information: 721-7162).
Services at Western School, Room 3,8200 SW 17th St., North
Lauderdale, Fridays 6:46p.m. Saturdays 9 a.m
President: Murray Hendler
Temple Israel of Gait Ocean Mile (for information: 566-0954).
Services to be resumed sometime in November.
Rabbi: David Matzner.
REFORM
Temple Emanu-El (731-2310). 3246 W. Oakland Park Blvd.. Lauderdale
Lakes 33311
Services: Fridays 8:16 p.m (Once a month family service 7:46 p.m).
Saturday services only on holidays or celebration of Bar-Bat Mitzvah
Rabbi: Jeffrey Ballon, Cantor: Jerome Klement.
Temple Kol Ami (472-1988), 8000 Peters Rd.. Plantation 33324.
Services: Fridays 8:15 p.m; Saturdays 10:30 a.m.
Rabbi: Sheldon Harr, Cantor Gene Corburn.
Temple Beth Orr (763-3232). 2161 Riverside Dr.. Coral Springs 33066
Services: Minyan Sundays, 8:16 a.m., Tuesdays and Thursdays 7:30
a.m.; Fridays8 p.m, Saturdays 10:30a.m.
Rabbi: Donald R. Gerber.
RECONSTRUCTIONIST
Ramat Shalom (583-7770). 7478 NW 4th St., Plantation 33324
Services: Fridays 8:16 p.m Saturdays only for Bar-Bat Mitzvah 10 am
Rabbi: Robert A. Jacobs.
LIBERAL
Liberal Temple of Coconut Creek (for information: 971-9729 or P 0
Box 4384. Margate 33063)
Services at Calvary Presbyterian Church. Coconut Creek Blvd., twice a
month Fridays 8 p.m.
Rabbi: A. Robert Ilson.
West Broward Jewish Congregation (for information: 741-0121 or P O
Box 17440. Plantation 33318). 7473 NW 4th St.. Plantation.
Services: Fridays 8:16 p.m; Saturdays only for Bar-Bat Mitzvah
President: Don Workman
Keter Tlkvah Synagogue (for information: 762-3771 or P.O. Box
8126, Coral Springs 33066)
Services: Fridays 8 p.m at Bank of Coral Springs AnHitiwhim,
3300 University Dr., Coral Springs ^^ ionum.
Rabbi: Leonard ZolL I
C


December 4,1981
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lander dale
Page 15
0T purchase will be baked
and hand made craft
suitable for use in the
lunday, Dec. 6, the Syna-
rill be holding its monthly
Sunday Brunch." This
,t 10 a.m. and will focus on
crafts in the home. Those
at
attending will be given an oppor-
tunity to personalize Hanukah
through a "make and take"
family experience.
Also on Dec. 6 member volun-
teers will be manning stalls at the
Thunderbird Flea Market as part
of the Synagogue's fund raising
program.
nsecration Service at Beth Israel
Bnners of the Aleph classes
Ct Lauderdale's Temple
[Israel's Abraham Haber
I School will participate in a
1 Consecration service at 8
Friday. Dec. 11. offering a
Torah-Orah" and beine
presented with miniature Torah
scrolls and certificates.
The service will be conducted
by students of Roslyn Troy's and
Deanna Kletzel's Gimel classes.
In addition to the consecration
program, the School will honor
-El Honors LOUple Esther Cohen for her nine years
of devoted service as an out-
standing religious teacher and
educator. The Kiddush Club and
the Temple's Parent Assn. are
sponsoring the Oneg Shabbat.
blyn
and Lee Shainman, for
nany years of selfless dedi-
I will be honored at the
pal service, Friday, Dec. 18,
tmple Kmanu-EI. 3245 W.
nd Park Blvd. The Com-
E, planning the special eve-
is issuing invitations for it,
sts those desiring to show
nation to the Shainmans
eir devotion to the Temple
Jwish to contribute to the
lie Heautification or
vment Fund.
D'not Mitzvah
EMANUEL
Stephen Smith, son of Harriet
ind Marvin Smith of Sunrise,
will become a Bar Mitzvah at the
d-.'iO p.m., Saturday, Dec. 5,
Havdalah service at Temple
I Miianu KI, Fort Lauderdale.
RAMAT SHALOM
Craig Lane, son of Dr. and
Mrs. Leon Lane, an eighth grade
studnet at Pine Crest School, a
graduate of the synagogue's
Torah school now attending
Federation-sponsored Judaica
High School, will become a Bar
Mitzvah during the 10 a.m., Sat-
urday, Dec. 5, service at Ramat
Shalom, Plantation.
rynmoor Village Supports Bonds
dents of Wynmoor Village
alher in support of the State
pel lionds Organization at a
Chanukah Brunch to be
jnday, Dec. 20, 10 a.m. at
I'stal Lago Country Club.
that time Abe Golding will
i recipient of the State of Is-
fily of Peace Award, recog-
him for many years of ac-
parlicipation in numerous
philanthropic and service
Izations.
iirman Ben Dinkes said
Holding is richly deserving
I honor to be bestowed upon
rile is a man who had dedi-
| himself to many organize
mil causes and we are all
that he will receive the
I Award," he noted.
Golding has been active in the
Zionist Organization of America
and has held numerous leader-
ship positions in that or-
ganization. He served as presi-
dent and currently is a Director
of Victoria Village B Condo
Association and was a founder,
first president and is now sec-
retary of Victoria Village Fed-
eration.
Special guest for the Brunch
will be Eddie Schaffer, celebrated
humorist, singer and raconteur.
The Brunch will be sponsored by
B'nai B'rith Wynmoor Lodge.
Honorary Chairmen are Judge
Leo Brown and Arthur Hiller.
Harold Rubine is chairman of the
ticket committee.
Joderate Arabs Condemn Murder
Friendly West Bank Leader
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
ate Arab leaders on the
lank h ave condemned the
of Khazem Al-Khatib, 23
tie wounding of his father.
}f Al-Khatib, 60, in an
nation attempt for which
ilestine Liberation Organi-
reportedly has taken
| father and son came under
while driving to Ramal-
ie elder Al-Khatib is chair-
the Ramallah Region
^rs Association which co-
i's with the Israeli military
iment.
JTATEMENT publishedin
Braeli Arab-language daily
bba said the two men were
death sentence by the PLO
"for collaborating with the
enemy." It warned that violence
between Arabs on the West Bank
could bring a repetition of the
tragedy of 1937 when hundreds of
Arabs in Palestine were mur-
dered by rival factions.
The statement was published
by the Hebron Region Farmers
Association, a group headed by
Mustapha Doudin, a former Jor-
danian government minister who
has received death threats from
local PLO supporters. Mean-
while, the Palestine News Agen-
cy in Beirut said that the PLO
would execute all collaborators
with the "Zionist enemy every-
where in the Holy Land."
LEVITT-WEINSTEIN
HwwW Oaaew
JEWISH FUNERAL OIHECTORS
Local and Out o( State Arrai9emenls
PRE PAID FUNERALS AVAILABLE THROUGH
OUR OUARANTEEO "SECURITY PLAN"
North aKeml ktc*
1M40 W D."* *"*
MMN
Robert Segal
Roger Baldwin's Death Felt Deeply
Here was a useful American
who had the trust and admiration
of Gen. Douglas Mac Arthur in
the same season that he drew the
distrust and contempt of Sen. Joe
McCarthy.
He was Roger N. Baldwin,
tracing his < maternal and pater-
nal ancestry back to passengers
on the Mayflower, seeking free-
dom in a new land. When he died
recently at 97, he left a heritage
of shining devotion to the
onerous and often unpopular task
of fighting to maintain the
strength and sanctity of the Bill
of Rights. If we forget his exam-
ple of patriotism, we diminish the
nobler side of this nation's his-
tory.
REFUGEES from the Hitler
horror, when they founded the
International League for the
Rights of Man in New York in
1942, honored Baldwin by nam-
ing him chairman. In recent
times, frightened people have
dishonored him for defending the
rights of extremists, including
Ku Klux Klansmen and members
of the American Nazi Party, to
prance around in masks and
nightshirts and to flaunt the
hated swastika in Skokie, Illi-
nois.
Baldwin's creed was epito-
mized by his declaration that
"our nation's security lies in our
liberties; and if we sacrifice our
liberties, then what do we have to
fight for?" When he founded the
American Civil Liberties Bureau
(now Union) in 1917, he was a
prime champion of pacifism who
served nine months in jail for re-
fusing to register for the draft.
How closely he hewed to the
line of protecting the rights of all
was illustrated when he was busy
simultaneously to defend Klans-
men daring to assembly in
Catholic Boston while working to
convince doubters that Catholics
had the right to teach in the
public schools of Akron, Ohio.
HE CELEBRATED the indi
visibility of our protected liber-
ties. The guarantee of these liber-
ties, chiseled into the Bill of
Rights, assures rich and poor,
fanatics and sane Americans,
newcomers and old settlers the
freedom to speak and print
opinions, to assemble un-
molested, to petition for the
redress of grievances, and to en-
joy privacy in religious choice.
These threads constitute a seam-
less web; once unraveled, we be-
gin to march lock-step towards
the police state.
"I like the organization of the
American government," Jeffer-
son said in the days of our emer-
gence from revolution. "But I
will tell you what I do not like:
the omission of a Bill of Rights,
providing clearly for freedom of
religions, freedom of the press,
and trial by jury. Let me add that
a Bill of Rights is what the people
are entitled to against every
government on earth."
NOW WE come to a testing
time when the wise president of
Yale, A Bartlett Giamatti, taking
aim at those he defines as "ped-
dlers of coercion," warns against
a new radical assault on
pluralism and political and reli-
gious freedom in America. He
speaks of "a native blend of old
intimidation and the new (elec-
tronic) technology now used to
threaten American values" and
decries "the cult of those who are
peddling absolutism in
morality."
This danger signal needs to be
raised when we behold the antics
of the so-called Moral Manority
and hear members of Young
Americans for Freedom demon-
strating their contempt for much
that freedom has long meant to
most Americans by singing such
nonsense as this at their recent
convention: "Wield we now our
sharp stilletti; carve the pinks in-
to confetti."
We lost a giant inlOger Bald-
win. We shall need new giants in
the days approaching.
A Seven Arts Feature
PHILIP WEINSTEIN
Jewish Funeral Director
YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD
FUNERAL DIRECTOR
SERVING THE JEWISH COMMUNITY
OF SOUTH FLORIDA FOR 15 YEARS.
ft
Providing the finest Jewish funeral service with the use of the seven conveniently
located Kraeer Funeral home*.
POMPANO BEACH FT. LAUOEROALE POMPANO BEACH MARGATE
1199 Sample Rd. 40S1 H. Federal Hwjr. 200 N Federal Hwy 1 N State Road 7
BOCA RATON CORAL SPRINGS DCERFhXLD BEACH
1JS3N Federal Hwy 1955 University Drive 217 E. HBMBSfS BNd.
S Brow 920-6966 N 4 Cent Brow 941-6466 S Palm Bch 276-6466
"WfeVe discovered
THE MENQRAH
PRE NEED PLAN.
And all the satisfaction,
thoughtfulness
and financial value
of pit need planning"
"Pre-need arrangements have given us peace of mind, the right to make
our own choices and a cost set at today's prices. And at Menorah, the
traditions of our faith will be upheld.
The Menorah Pre-Need Plan offers these guarantees;
ALL PAYMENTS are held in trust and are TOTALLY REFUNDABLE
ALL CONTRACT FORMS are APPROVED BY the office of the
FLORIDA INSURANCE COMMISSIONER
Interest free payments for up to five years
Funds may be used toward funeral expenses both locally and
out-of-state
Only the purchaser can cancel for reasons other than non-payment
To learn more about the Menorah Pre-Need Plan, just fill out and
' return this coupon to:
1
I
I Menorah Chapels, 6800 W. Oakland Park Boulevard,
| Fort Lauderdale, FL 33313. Attn: Pre-Need Director. |
| I WOULD LIKE MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THE MENORAH |
PRE-NEED PLAN. I UNDERSTAND IT IS AT ABSOLUTELY NO
JF I
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NAME_____________________
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STATE.
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The Menorah
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Serving chapels throughout the U.S. and Canada.
In Broward, 742-6000. In Dade, 945-3939.
In Palm Beach, 833-0887.
And coming soon to North Miami Beach.
Menorah Chapels Cemetery Counseling Service is available at no charge.


,v -<
i nk.ipwisn pmnman01 unaierrunuaua^mu^
Buy tickets bv Dec 8 for low winter fares
Thiswinter,enjoy
the warmth of New\brk
$114onTWA.

There's no lower fare to New York.
Smell chestnuts roasting on an open fire.
Stroll down bustling city sidewalks. Hear
the warm applause of a Broadway musical.
See couples skating along the ice at Rocke-
feller Center. It's all a part of the warmth of
New York City
And you can warm up to TWA's $114
midweek fare Monday through Thursday
Friday through Sunday the fare is $124 one
way There's no lower fare from Ft Lauder-
dale to New York. With the money you save,
you can bring the whole family to share the
warmth of New York this winter
This low fare is good now through
January 31,1982* Just buy your tickets by
December 8,1981.
Starting in early December, we're mak-
ing flying to New \ork easier. Because in
addition to flying to Kennedy Airport, we've
added a flight to dose-in La Guardia.
So this winter feel a different kind of
warmth. The warmth of New York: And
the warmth of an airline that cares about
saving you money-TWA. Call your
travel agent or TWA at
800-325-410Q
You're going to like us
r
Setvfc* from Ft Lauderdak Airport Fare* subject to change
* Fare* $175 one way to New York between January IS
Abo, $175 from New York to Ft Lauderdale between December 19-25.
Thaw will be a $10 charge on completely unused tickets submitted for refund


Full Text
^
11,1981
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 11
ael Bonds Honorees at (Jentury Village and Hawaiian Gardens IV
["Salute to Israel" at Cen-
_ and a "Night for Is-
Hawaiian Gardens IV,
el Bonds Organization
awards to honorees
jpport pledged for Is
pnomic development.
at Century Village
left are Emily Rantz
the City of Peace
Bernard and Anita
[id Abe Rosenblatt who
the award to Herbert
i Lyon. Next to them
Hawaiian Gardens
with Hannah L. Spital-
senting the Scroll of
Solomon A. Shaloum.
i is his wife.
ance Deplores Arab Summit Breakup
EDWIN EYTAN
llS (JTA) -
has deplored the
| breakup of the Arab
meeting in Fez,
and stressed that
believed the eight-
Saudi plan was "a
sis" for future
legotiations in the
I East.
ii d'Orsay spokesman
however, that "France
accept all the points in
idi plan but remains
that the project can
useful start for future
foreign Minister Claude
i, who is to go to Israel
a two-day official visit,
)rtedly make this view
in "will not stress it" be-
ll sraeli objections.
THE FRENCH had been
hoping, against all odds, that the
Fez summit would endorse the
Saudi plan which most West
European countries view as "a
positive step" towards a global
solution in the Middle East.
Morocco's King Hassan
abruptly declared the Arab
summit closed only hours after it
opened, in the face of deep splits
between the participating states.
After the meeting broke up, the
head of the Saudi delegation,
Prince Fahd, said his government
would continue to back their pro-
posed peace plan.
Earlier, Foreign Secretary
Lord Carrington called on Arab
leaders meeting in Fez to approve
the eight-point plan proposed by
Crown Prince Fahd of Saudi
Arabia.
Speaking on the BBC's World
Service, Carrington said that by
backing the Saudi plan the other
Arab leaders would be saying
that they want peace and that
they are ready to recognize Is-
rael. If they did so, he added, it
would have a good effect and
should be welcomed by all Middle
East states, including Israel.
HE DENIED that there were
any differences between the
Americans and British over the
Saudi principles, claiming that
President Reagan, like Carring-
ton himself, had given them "a
cautious welcome."
Asked about the Sinai Multi-
national Force and Observers
(MFO), in which the European
Economic Community (EEC)
agreed to participate, Carrington
said he very much hoped that it
would not be too long before the
force was placed under the aus-
pices of the United Nations,
where it had earlier been vetoed.
tt to Buy Billions in French Aircraft
- (JTA) Egypt will
al billion dollars worth
ury aircraft and other
equipment in Western
luring the next few years
^urse of a major rear ma -
Dgram in which France
reportedly will be the principal
supplier.
Negotiations are underway for
the sale to Egypt of 60 Mirage
2,000 combat planes grth close to
$2.5 billion, aircraft described as
faster and more powerful than
Abu Faces Ten
Counts of Fraud
)y GIL SEDAN
5ALEM (JTA) -
l-Hatzeira, the Min-
Ibsorption and Welfare,
guilty in Tel Aviv
court at the opening of
for alleged embezzlement
plea was entered by
endant and former aide,
Jabay. The trial is ex-
i last until the end of the
Iring which time the
ion intends to call about
B8.
ATTORNEY Gavriel
at the opening session
would prove that Abu-
had misappropriated
inds amounting to mil-
Pounds between the
731977 when he served
of Ramie. He allegedly
[money from a charitable
had received it from
ar Ministry to establish
ips for yeshiva and oth-
Israel's
er students among
Sephardic community.
Abu-HaUeira was administra-
tor of the fund set up in the name
of his late tether who had been
Chief Rabbi of Morocco.
The Welfare Minister, who
heads the Tami faction, a coa-
lition partner in Premier Mena-
chem Begin's Likud-led govern-
ment, took a leave of absence
from his Cabinet duties after
trying in vain to have the trial
postponed.
ABU HATZEIRA was ac-
quitted of charges of bribe-taking
m a trial held earlier this year.
Those charges stemmed from
alleged wrong-doings when he
served as Religious Affairs Min-
ister in the first Begin govern-
ment. At that time he was a
member of the National Religious
Party. He is currently charged on
10 counts of fraud, betrayal of
trust and conspiracy to commit a
crime.
Local and New York Cemeteries
|Bfllrmi Call Collect
H :v *> a ft
U.S. 'Warmly Welcomes'
Four EEC Nations'
Decision to Join MFO
the American F-16. Egypt also
plans to buy a dozen naval units
in Britain and electronic eauip-
ment in Italy. French Defense
Minister Charles Hernu, who is
scheduled to visit Egypt next
month, will meet there with
President Hosni Mubarak and
Defense Minister Mohammed
Abughazala for extensive arms
negotiations.
IN ADDITION to the Mirage
jets, Egypt is said to want to buy
France's new Matra "Super 530"
air-to-air missiles and laser-
guides Durandal bombs for
attacks on military airports and
landing strips. Formal nego-
tiations began when Gen.
Jacques Mitterrand, head of
France's largest aeronautical
company, Aerospatials, met with
Mubarak in Cairo. He is the
younger brother of French Presi-
dent Francois Mitterrand.
Earlier this year, Egypt
bought 30 Alpha jet ground sup-
port planes from France, 28
Mirage-3 fighter-bombers and 14
Mirage F-l interceptors. The
fighter-bombers were paid for by
Saudi Arabia before the two
countries severed diplomatic
relations over the Egyptian-Is-
raeli peace treaty. Egypt has also
acquired 40 F-16 combat planes
in the United States, delivery of
which begins next spring; French
Gazelle helicopters equipped with '
Matra anti-tank missiles; and j
land-to-sea Matra "Otomat"
missiles.
NJ. Police Patrol
Activity on Rise
FAIR LAWN, N.J. (JTA)
Police patrols have bean in-
creased at all the six synagogues
in this middle class community
following the desecration of two
synagogues several days ago.
Swastikas and anti-Semitic
slogans were spraypainted on
Shomrei Torah and Temple Beth
Sholom.
In addition, vandals also
daubed anti-Semitic epithets and
swastikas on the Fair Lawn Jew-
ish Center, the community's
water tower and the door of an
auto shop at the high school.
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) The United States
said that it "warmly wel-
comes" the decision by four
Western European coun-
tries to join the peacekeep-
ing force that will patrol
Sinai after Israel's final
withdrawal next April.
Britain, France, Italy and The
Netherlands announced in a joint
statement released from their
respective capitals that they will
participate in the Multinational
Force and Observers (MFO).
BUT AT the same time, the
four members of the European
Economic Community (EEC)
stressed that they still support
the EEC's Venice Declaration of
1980 which calls for the Palestine
Liberation Organization to be as-
sociated with Middle East peace
negotiations.
The State Department issued a
statement which said that the
U.S. views the Egyptian-Israeli
peace treaty "as the first step
i toward a broader just and dura-
ble peace in the Middle East and
remains convinced that negotia-
tions based on the framework
agreed to at Camp David can
help realize that goal. The parti-
cipation of four of our European
allies in the MFO will inevitably
strengthen that organization and
will enhance its ability to carry
out its functions us agreed be-
tween Egypt and Israel."
A Department spokesperson
noted that both Israel and
Egypt, which can veto any mem-
ber of the MFO, agreed earlier on
the participation of the European
countries. But she had no com-
ment as to whether Israel may
now bar the Europeans because
of their reaffirmation of the
Venice declaration.
Inverrary for
Israel Bonds


The State of Israel Bonds Or-
ganization and the Inverrary
community will celebrate a Night
for Israel on Thursday, Dec. 17,8
p.m., in order to bolster and sup-
port the economic development of
the Jewish state.
Appointed chairmen of the e-
vent are Jack Orenstein, Selig
Marko, Joseph Kaplan and
Martin Klein. The chairmen
noted that residents of Inverrary
have always been staunch
backers of the Israel Bonds Or-
ganization and "are dedicated to
building the Jewish state into a
atrongerdemocracy m-theMiddle-'
East. '"" StsawlKna r#Tiu>
Special feature at the Night for
Israel will be a Passport to Israel
drawing.
Eddie Schalfer, noted humorist
and song stylist, will be the guest
entertainer. Schaffer has ap- <
peared in night clubs throughout
the world and is well known for
his light-hearted humor and
showmanship.
i-i
Candlelighting Time
Friday Dec 11-5:13
Friday, Dec 185:15
Friday, Dec 25-6:19
Friday, Jan. 1-5:23
T ~ '
Ba-ruch A-tah Ado-nye, Elo-haynu Melech Ha-olam,
Asher kidshanu B'mitz-vo-tav, V'tzee-va-nu
L'had-leek Nayr shel Shabbat.
Blessed art Thou, O Lord our God, King of the Universe,
Who has sanctified us with Thy commandments
And commanded us to kindle the Sabbath lights.


Page 6
i ne Jewish r tot
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, December 11,1981
*/
Browsin* thru
roward
with max levinc
Come up and see us sometime.
These Federation staffers moved
upstairs to Room 305, 8360 W.
Oakland Park Blvd.: Rabbi Al-
bert B. Schwartz, Chaplaincy
Commission; Larry Schuval,
Community Relations Commit-
tee, Social Planning; David
Sandier, Foundation of Jewish
Philanthropies; Max Levine.
Federation public relations, Jew-
ish Floridian of Greater Fort
Lauderdale news office; Stan
Liedeker, Central Agency for
Jewish Education Judaica High
School; Helen Weisberg, CAJE
Midrasha for Adult Education
. Plus Secretaries Nettie Ber-
man and Helen Steigman .
And the room was carved up to
make space for all by Nicholas
Repanis and Socrates Siouperis
of the building's maintenance
force.
Congressional notes: Rep. E.
Clay Shaw of Fort Lauderdale
was one of 40 Congressmen who
signed a letter addressed to
Anatoly Dobrynin, USSR Am-
bassador to the U.S., requesting
that Soviet Jews be permitted to
conduct memorial services for
those who were murdered at Babi
Yar 40 years ago Rep. Dan
Mica of Broward and Palm Beach
County returned last week from a
trip to Israel, Egypt and Saudi
Arabia with other members of the
House Foreign Affairs Commit-
tee. It was a working trip, meet-
ing with leaders in those coon-
tries Rep. Mario Biaggi of
New York City is *ia*Vmg
elimination of Custom Service-
required labeling of goods im-
ported from Judea and Samaria
now tagged: "Made in Israeli-
Occupied West Bank" ... And
Sea. Daniel Patrick Moyaihan
wants the Democratic Party to
make sure caucuses and
primaries to select Presidential
convention delegates an not held
on Saturdays.
Fort LauderdakVa Temple
Beth Israel has a Jewish Singles
group planning a Hanukah party
at the 7100 W. Oakland Park
Blvd. synagogue at 8 p.m., Sun-
day, Dec. 13. Tab is S10. Reser-
vations a must .. Temple
Emsnu-El is holding this week's
Shabbat service at 5:30 D.m..
Friday, Dec. 11, at Gah Ocean
Mile Hotel Broward County
Library System has Hanukah
films scheduled next week at
three branches: Monday,Dec. 14\
at Margate library, at 4:15 p.m.;
Dec. 15 at 3 p.m. at Sunrise li-
brary, and Dec. 16, at 4 p.m., at
Coral Springs for all ages.
Don Steigman, son of Helen
and Panl Steigman of Lauderdale
Lakes, who served an adminis-
trative residency at Palmetto
General Hospital and then served
at health care facilities in Con-
necticut, Washington, D.C., and
San Antonio, Tex., has returned
to Palmetto as assistant vice
president Final film of the
current Federation-Midrasha
Yiddish Film Festival will b
shown at 7:30 p.m., Thursday
Dec. 17, at Temple Beth Torah
Tamarac Jewish Center, It's The
Power of Life starring Michael
Michalesko. And a program of
Russian music, dance, comedy
and songs featuring Soviet
emigres in From Old Russia with
Love will be performed at 2:15
p.m., and 8:15 p.m., this Sunday,
Dec. 13, at BCC's Bailey Concert
Hall. The evening performance is
sold out.
West Broward Jewish Congre-
gation which has been holding its
Sabbath services at 7420 NW 5th
St., Plantation, will officially
dedicate its sanctuary there at 2
p.m., this Sunday, Dec. tB ...
Next Saturday evening at Mul-
lins Park in Coral Springs for the
benefit of press photographers
and others Stan Oraolek of Tem-
ple Beth Orr will provide a pre-
view of the Torch Run hell do for
the following evening (Dec 20)
official opening of Festival of
Freedom-Hanukah sponsored by
the area's Coalition of Jewish Or-
ganizations .. Jules Brassier,
who missed out becoming a Bar
Mitzvah 60 years ago in New
York's Washington Heights,
made up for it last Saturday.
After long study with Rabbi Is-
rael Zimmerman of Temple Beth
Torah, the Tamarac resident was
the center of attention as he cele- '
brated the occasion of being
called to the Torah.
Family Hanukah
Program Dec. 20 at JCC
A candlriighting ceremony for
the first candle of Hanukah, Sun-
day, Dec 20, and a light supper
will riiiM* the aJWCWl family
Hanukah program that begins
that day at S p.m and continues
to 6 p.m. at the Jewish Com-
munity Center, 6501 W. Sunrise
Blvd., Plantation.
Other features of the three-
hour event planned by the Cen-
ter's Family Programming Com-
mittee include the showing of the
film, Zlateh the Goat, based on
Isaac Bashevis Singer's story;
arts and crafts for children, three i
to nine years of age; gym activi '
ties for older children; holiday
singing, and a grab bag ex
change. AD children are urged to
bring a grab bag item of about $1
in value. Families are encouraged
to bring their Hanukiyot to light
the first candle.
Cost of the program is $10 for
JCC member families, and $15 for
non-member families. Registra-
tion deadline at JCC 792-6700 is
Tuesday, Dec 16.
Family Mission To Israel
Sponsored by Jewish Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale.,
Be a guest of the Israeli Government. 12 DAYS IN
ISRAEL leaving June 20,1982.
CALL MISSION DESK AT THE FEDERATION
748-8200.
See and Hear Hanukah on TV 4 Dec. 21
The fifth graders (Bet Class) of Temple Beth
Am Religious School in Margate heard the clarion
calls of "quiet, lights, action.'" as a camera crew
from PM Magazine, program of WTVJ-Ch. 4,
Miami, began videotaping their Hanukah lesson
in their own classrooms. Pictured with Shari
Agnes (in white dress) and Bet Class Teacher
Nancy Stenik are the cameraman, the audio tech-
nician, and the students gathered around the
table where the candles were placed on a
Menorah. The segment, that took more than two
hours of staging and taping, will be edited to six
minutes for airing during the PM Magazine pro-
gram at 7:30 p.m., Monday, Dec. 21, the first day
of Hanukah and the night of the second candle
The TV crew took scenes of the children in the
class, learning about Hanukah, the festival of
religious freedom, from the teacher, offering the
blessings for the lighting of the candles, and
winding up with eating latkes (potato pancakes),
and playing with dreidels (spintops with Hebrew
letters for a "put-and-take" game).
,' RAVIOLI SAUTE SPECIAL V-------------------------
The Jewish Homemaker's Guide to Delicious Italian Cooking
Makes the Most of Chef Boy-ar-dee Cheese Ravioli,
M cup chopped or whole small
onions
vi cup chopped carrots
2 tablespoons butter or margarine
\*i package (10 oz.) frozen whole
green beans, cooked and drained
1 can (15 Oz.) Chef Boy-ar-dee
Cheese Ravioli in Tomato Sauce
dash garlic salt
1 tablespoon chopped fresh
parsley
Vj cup water
1. Saute onions and carrots in butter in medium-sized
saucepan.
2. Add remaining ingredients; cover and simmer for
15 minutes. Serves 4.

Chex Ruty Mix
People love it no end!
Crisp eranrhy, good 'n munch) Che* Party Mi*
ha* Bcea a big part of I he holiday > for 24 yeara.
TRADITIONAL CHEX* PARTY MIX
The recipe lhal't bee* a favorite for yeara
l/l cap baiter or margarine
1 '4 teaspoons seasoned sail
A'/i Iratpooni orretlrrmhirr sauce
2 caps Cora Chea cereal
2 caps Rice Che cereal
2 cap* Bran Chex cereal
2 caps Wheat Chea cereal
1 cap sailed mixed aals
Preheat oven lo 250. Heat bailer in large shallow
roasting pan (about IS a 19 a 2 inches) ia oven
until melted. Remove. Stir ia seasoned sail and
* orrestcrshire saace. Add Chea aad nuls. Mia
until all pieeea are coated. Heal ia oven I hoar.
Stir every IS minutes. Spread oa absorbent paper
lo cool.
Makes about 9 cap*.
Part) Mixauy be f roaea. so make a double batch.
Thaw at room temperature ia container in which
it was stored.
FREE! Chex Party Mix Decorative Tin offer:
See specially-marked Chex packages.
01960. R P Co
K Certified Kosher


TageTO
r*age iZ
The^TewishFloridi^
inejewisn r tuniuun u/ u'tum **
Friday. DNktr 11,1961 i
X_/l !*<-- >*-
i
I
Federation's Endowment Fund Questions Answered
substantial charitable gift
without losing any income, and in
addition receive a significant tax
deduction immediately upon es-
tablishing the trust. Moreover,
the donor avoids paying a capital
gains tax on appreciated assets
donated to the trust.
la a house or condominium an
acceptable gift?
In most cases they are. The
.. The Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale has a special
endowment fund with over $500,000 in assets. Income from these
assets provide the Federation with an additional source of funding in
order to carry out its activities. Furthermore the principal could be
used in times of emergency. Nationally, Federation endowment funds
are very close to reaching $1 billion in assets. Below are the answers to
many of the questions received concerning the Foundation of Jewish
Philanthropies of the Jewish Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale.
What is tht Foundation of Jew
ish Philanthropies and when did
it begin?
In 1979, far-sighted leaders es-
tablished the Foundation of
Jewish Philanthropies as the
Endowment Program of the
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale. They realized
that all social, humanitarian,
health, educational and cultural
needs of the Jewish community
could not be fully met through
the efforts of the Federation's
annual campaign. They also
realized that there were members
of the Jewish community whose
philanthropic interests were not
limited solely to their annual
gifts to the Federation. By
creating the Foundation, donors
would be given a variety of
methods to contribute, each
having substantial tax advan-
tages.
What is the Foundation's rela-
tionship with the Jewish Federa-
tion?
The Foundation of Jewish
Philanthropies operates in-
dependently and has its own
Board of Trustees. It is empow-
ered and authorized by the
Jewish Federation to receive
funds, assets, securities and
property, and to distribute funds
in the forms of grants to agencies
and organizations locally, nation-
ally, and throughout the world.
Why have an endowment
program?
The financial facts of Federa-
tion life are rapidly becoming
apparent. There cannot be total
reliance on the annual campaign
to finance the inflationary assets
of our agencys' requirements.
Furthermore, there may be emer-
gencies to meet and special
projects to be undertaken.
How can an individual partici-
pate in the Foundation?
Gifts may be in the form of
cash, personal property, real es-
tate, securities, or life insurance.
Such gifts may be made during
the lifetime of the donor or under
the terms of a will. Furthermore,
they may be made either outright
or in trust, designated or undes-
ignated, restricted or unrestric-
ted. Usually, they carry current
income tax or estate tax benefits
with them.
What is the most popular en-
dowment gift?
Outright bequests have been
the most utilized form of endow-
ment giving. Through a will, an
individual leaves cash, securities
or other property to the Founda-
tion. Federations throughout
North America have received
millions of dollars through such
bequests, with dramatic benefits
to the well being of the Jewish
community and to Israel.
Can an individual create his
own philanthropic fund in his
own name within theFoundation?
Yes. A donor may establish in
his own name, or in the name of a
loved one, a Philanthropic Fund.
This arrangement allows the
donor to make recommendations
for the distribution of the income
or the principal of the fund for
grants for charitable purpose.
The recipient of the grant re-
ceives a notice from the Founda-
tion that the grant was a gift
from the specific Philanthropic
Fund. Such funds can be started
modestly, then added to through-
out the life of the donor.
How does charitable
remainder trust work?
This method of giving allows
the individual to keep the income
from the donated assets for life,
but permits him to take an imme-
diate tax deduction for those
donated assets. This method per-
mits the individual to make a
donor may be eligible to receive
an immediate tax benefit by
giving such a gift to the Founda-
tion although he does not give up
the property until his death and
the death of his spouse.
What about life insurance?
The Foundation may be named
as a beneficiary of either a new or
existing life insurance policy. If
the policy is irrevocably assigned
to the Federation, the annual
premiums may be deducted as a
charitable contribution. In the
case of assignment of an existing
policy, the cash surrender value
is tax deductible as a charitable
contribution, within applicable
limits.
If a family has already estab-
lished a private foundation, is
there any advantage to transfer it
to the Foundation of Jewish Phil-
anthropies?
With the passage of certain tax
laws, it has now become more
beneficial than ever for persons
having private foundations to
transfer them to public charities
like the Foundation of Jewish
Philanthropies. Private founda-
tions are subject to taxes,
restrictions, and complex
procedures, which tend to
hamper their usefulness. Con-
sequently, many individuals have
transferred the assets of their
private foundations to the
Foundation of Jewish Philan-
thropies which has fewer
Organizations In The News
Zionist Leader Speaks Dec. 15 at Tamarac
Jacques Torczyner, a leading
Zionist advocate since his arrival
in the U.S. in 1940, will be the
speaker at an open meeting at
7:30 p.m., Tuesday, Dec. 15, at
the Tamarac Jewish Center.
The meeting, sponsored by the
Zionist Organization of America,
Fort Lauderdale district, will
hear from the man who has been
president of the ZOA for five
consecutive terms on the prob-
lems of the United States and the
Middle East.
Harold Rose, who announced
the meeting, said that Torczyner
speaks not as an observer but as
one who plays an active role in
the shaping of events. He
recently returned from Israel
where he spoke with many Israeli
leaders.
ZOA office (566-0402) extended
an open invitation to the com-
munity to attend the meeting at
the Tamarac Jewish Center, 9101
NW 57th St.
JNF Brunch at
Beth Israel
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz of
Temple Menorah, Miami Beach,
was the guest speaker at the Dec.
6 brunch at Temple Beth Israel,
7100 W. Oakland Park Blvd.,
honoring the congregation's
members who are members of the
Jewish National Fund board.
This was another in a series of
community events celebrating
the 80th anniversary of JNF, the
oldest agency that works with
the State of Israel in the Re-
forestation, Reclamation and
Preparation of the land for
settlement.
The program, sponsored by the
Temple's Men's Club and the
Sisterhood, included Cantor
Eddie Klein, and the Sunrise Sin-
gers. Dr. Jack Zomlefer was
master of ceremonies. Brunch co-
chairmen from Beth Israel were
Ben Bergman and Bernard Osh-
insky.
BRANDEIS CHAPTER
I nverrary-Woodlands Chapter
of Brandeis University National
Women's Committee will have
Dr. Ruth Bochner. a practicing
psychologist, author and lectur-
er, as guest speaker at its noon
Dec. 14 luncheon meeting at the
Inverrary Country Club.
Dr. Bochner's will discuss
"Relationship of People to
People." A Vassar graduate, Dr.
Bochner, with a doctorate from
Columbia University, is a
member of the Boca Raton Bran-
deis Chapter.
Hanukah Giving
Bat Ami-Tamarac chapter has
joined Rayus-Tamarac chapter of
Hadassah in collecting and dis-
tributing non-perishable foods to
families for Hanukah.
These are packed together with
perishable foods by volunteers of
the WECARE program of the
Jewish Federation-Jewish Com-
munity Center of Greater Fort
Lauderdale. The baskets are then
delivered by volunteers in time
for the holiday.
B'NAI B'RITH
SUNRISE
B'nai B'rith Sunrise Lodge is
sponsoring the Ralph Robinson
Ballet at Bailey Hall at 8 p.m.,
Sunday, Jan. 10. The proceeds
derived from this performance
will be used to support Hillel and
BBYO. For tickets and informa-
tion call Murray Perrin or Jack
Rosenberg.
Show at Sunrise JC
The Men's Club of Sunrise
Jewish Center, 8049 W. Oakland
Park Blvd., is presenting a three-
act show at 8 p.m., Saturday,
Dec. 12, at the Center. Featured
are Lou Deh-in, harmonica player
of Harmonica Rascals fame;
Miriam Breitman, singing star;
Gina Wilson, versatile comic.
Donation of $3 is required for
reserved seating at this show.
EMANUEL
SISTERHOOD
The Sisterhood of Temple
Emanu-El will hold its annual
Hanukah dinner at 6:30 p.m.,
Sunday, Dec. 20, at the Temple,
3245 W. Oakland Park Blvd. Call
the Temple office 731-2310 for for
reservations.
HATIKVAH WOMEN'S
LEAGUE FOR ISRAEL
Hatikvah chapter of Women's
League for Israel will serve a
mini-lunch at 12:30 p.m.. Mon-
day, Dec. 21, at its general meet-
ing at Broward Federal, 3000 N.
University Dr.
restrictions, greater flexibj|
and provides more advantage^
the contributor.
What is a Letter of Intent?
Participation in the ofo
ment program usually b-^
with the signing of a Letter^
Intent. This document carriaH
legal obligation. It merely st^
that the signer intends to prwjj,
for the community through jfl
time gift or bequest to the Fo
dation. The signer then mik,
the appropriate arrangement!
How is the Foundation J i
Great care and the attention I
the best legal and profess*
resources this community ha)
offer is exercised in handling*
tnbutions. A Board of Trui*
consisting of the most respeaj
and highly trained individual
our Jewish community ops*
the Foundation and have uj
responsibility for its mania
ment. Furthermore, a legal m1
tax committee has been estfc
lished to provide profession!
guidance to anyone who b aw
templating making a c
tnbution. These individuals 3
also willing to meet with oi
legal and tax advisors to anta-
their questions.
What will the effect of the Eo>
nomic Recovery Act be on gift,
to the Foundation?
The Economic Recovery Actof
1981 makes changes in tai In
beginning January 1, 19&
Consequently, it may bebetterto
establish a charitable trust, for
example, before the end of Uua
year. The Foundation
prepared a fact sheet on the on
law and its effects on chahtablt
JCC Book Club MeetS giving. For copies or any
m tional information, please coo-
Sophie Wolf wul lead the dis-
cussion on Peter HeUman's
Avenue of the Righteous at the
meeting of the Jewish Com-
munity Center's Book Club at 8
p.m., Wednesday, Dec. 16, at the
Center, 6501 W. Sunrise Blvd.,
Plantation.
tional
tact:
David Sandier, Director,
Foundation of Jewish Phik>
thropies, Jewish Federation
Greater Fort Lauderdale, 83d
West Oakland Park Blvd., Fort
Lauderdale, Florida 33321 -
Telephone (305) 748-8200.
AMC's Marina 8 Theatres
proudly presents
The Exclusive South Florida Showing of
The 1939 Yiddish Film Classic
TEVYE
directed by and starring
MAURICE SCHWARTZ
STARTS FRIDAY!
December 11th.
MARINA 8


OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE
Volume 10 Number 32
Fort Lauderdale, Florida Friday, December 11,1981
flMSMCMf
Price 35 Cents
$1,001,000 Dinner Sparks UJA Start
Sparked by remarks by ABC Television's
outstanding news commentator, Ted
Koppel, about the crucial situation con-
fronting Israel during these times, the more
than 100 persons in attendance at the Dec. 3
Initial Gifts dinner of the Federation's
United Jewish Appeal pledged more than a
million dollars to the 1962 UJ A campaign.
It was a dramatic start for the first stage
of the campaign with the total representing
a sizeable increase over the amount raised
at the 1981 Initial Gifts dinner.
The response was gratifying to Fed-
eration UJA 1982 General Campaign Chair-
man Richard Romanoff, who welcomed the
group, and Co-Chairman Ethel Waldman
who introduced Koppel, the ABC News
Nightline anchorman, who gave a crisp, reason we're here, I'll get serious and then
illuminating analysis of the Middle East I'll answer questions."
situation. ^j after gjnugjjjg storiea about worW
The suave, worldly newsman charmed his famous notables, imitating their voices with
audience immediately after Mrs. Wald- droll impersonations, and even singing a
man's introduction by saying: "I'll enter- song ("although," he said, "I don't sing in
tain you for a bit with some stories, then af- public") he and another correspondent
ter you make your pledges, which is the wrote about China's Great Wall while
Interviewer Ted Koppel had the tables switched as
reporters interview him. The Miami Herald. Fort
Lauderdale News, Sun-Sentinel, WINZ and WPEC
TV 12 were among those present.
Richard Nixon's
covering Kichard Nixon's visit there in
1972, Victor Gruman, president of the Jew-
ish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale,
led the roll call of pledges with the declara-
Initial Gifts start of the 1982 UJA Cam-
paign.
(More details and pictures will be forth-
coming in the next issue of The Jewish
Floridian.)
Others who spoke or were introduced in-
cluded Federation President Victor Gru-
man, Past Presidents Allan Baer, Jacob
Brodzki, Leo Goodman, Alvin Gross, and
Milton Keiner; also the regional chairmen
of the campaign: Sidney Spewak, Edmund
Entin and Joel Reinstein.
Others accorded recognition included
Gladys Daren, president of Federation's
Women's Division: Jean Shapiro, Women's
Division executive vice president of cam-
paign: Felice Sincoff, 1982 Women's Divi-
sion UJA campaign chairman: Michael
Weinberg, president of the Jewish Com-
munity Center of Fort Lauderdale: JCC
Past President Anita Perlman who was a
tion: "We give money, others gave their national delegate to the White Conference
lives to insure Israel s independence and on Aging.
survival."
,. ... Rabbi Donald R. Gerber of Temple Beth
Within a short space of time, the eve- Orr, Coral Springs, offered the invocation
ninKs tabulation was $1,001,000 for the and the benediction.
U.S. Offers 'Strategic Cooperation' to Israel
Israel's Defense Minister Ariel
Sharon brought back to Israel
last week a "strategic coopera-
tion" agreement he had signed
with U.S. Defense Secretary
Caspar Weinberger.
Full details of the agreement,
which presumably provides for
Israel's military needs and aid in
countering Soviet threats
"through other states in the Mid-
east."
The Reagan Administration
has been careful to emphasize the
anti-Soviet nature of the agree-
ment in order to avoid damaging
American interests in Arab
states who might think the pact
is aimed at them.
The agreement provoked de-
bate and controversy in Israel
where the Begin coalition had to
defeat four "no confidence" votes
sponsored by the opposition
parties, and also in Syria and the
Soviet Union.
In Syria's capital, Damascus,
the Syrian Foreign Minister
Khaddam met U.S. envoy Philip
Habib who is back in the Middle
East seeking to settle the
Lebanese crisis and the batteries
of missiles the Syrians have
placed in Lebanon. Khaddam
said the "strategic cooperation"
agreement between the U.S. and
Israel "barred the U.S. from
mediating in the Middle East."
In Moscow, the official news
agency Tass said the new agree-
ment between Israel and the U.S.
is directed against the Arab
world and designed to expand the
U.S. military presence in the
Middle East.
Syndicated Columnist Joseph
Kraft noted that the collapse of
the Arab summit m.ig in
Morocco last month dealt "a hard
blow to the Reagan Administra-
tion and its chosen instrument in
the Middle East, Saudi Arabia."
And the news out of Riyadh,
Saudi Arabia, pointed up this be-
lief with the Saudis and other
Persian Gulf Arab states offering
the Sultanate of Oman SI.2 bil-
lion in aid if it agrees to cancel an
agreement allowing U.S. access
to Oman's military facilities.
Syndicated Columnist George
Will has also faulted the Ad-
ministration on its foreign policy.
Kraft expressed it this way: "The
Egyptian-Israeli accord estab-
lished at Camp David presents
the only available approach to
settlement, and the immediate
requirement for American diplo-
macy is to deepen and steady the
Camp David process."
Woodlands Honors David Miller at UJA Dinner Dec. 17
A man so modest that he preferred to remain in the
background through many years of charitable en-
deavors for Jewish causes finally relented when the men
of the Woodlands community designated him as their
honoree for the 1982 United Jewish Appeal dinner mee-
ting Thursday, Dec. 17, at the Woodlands Country
Club in Tamarac.
That man is David Miller who relented because of the
"big goal" that the Woodlands UJA Committee has set
for the 1982 campaign seeking funds for Israel, for Jews
elsewhere in the world, and in North Broward. To tell
that latter part of story and to provide an insight into
the troubled Middle East problems, the men attending
the dinner will hear from a foreign correspondent,
author and gifted lecturer, Dr. Ruth Gruber, recently
returned from Israel.
From his earliest days in the Northeast, and as a
manufacturer of wearing apparel in the New York City
Garment District," David Miller has supported Jew-
ish causes and Jewish institutions, leading drives in the
district and at the Harrison Country Club. He built his
home in Woodlands in 1971 and he and his wife,
Blanche, settled down permanently here six years ago.
His activity remains undiminished despite the loss of
sight following an operation last January. He continues
active in the UJA, in Anti-Defamation League of B'nai
H nth, and Bonds for Israel.
He and his wife have two daughters, four grand-
daughters and two grandsons, all living in the North-
t'HNl,.
Chairman of the Woodlands UJA is Dan Klein who
notes that the speaker. Dr. Gruber, is of the same cali-
ber as last week's speaker at the Initial Gifts dinner
meeting of the Federation's 1982 UJA campaign, Ted
Koppel. anchorman of the top-rated TV news show,
ABC News Nightline.
Dan Klein is also a long-time advocate and prac-
titioner of Judaism. Former Manhasset. N.Y., resident
where he served as president of Temple Judea. was a'
New York UJA honoree. and where his late wife Svl
via was president of the Sisterhood, he is a member of
Port Lauderdale s Temple Emanu-El and one of the
Uudt-dale Communit>' Center of Port
Serving as chairman of the dinner is Manny Lax who
was the Woodlands UJA chairman for the 1981 cam
paign He anticipates a fuU house for the Dec. 17 din-
E*2Zfn2* t^eJcommittee is Federation's UJA
Regional Chairman Sidney Spewak whose area covers
the central portion of North Broward County
Have Ark, Will Travel
Rabbi Phillip L. Labowitz (left) of Temple Beth
Israel, 7100 W. Oakland Park Blvd., presents a
nuruature, portable ARK to Alfred Golden, chairman
oi the Chaplaincy Commission of the Jewish Fed-
eration of Greater Fort Lauderdale. Looking on is
B/ScJjfi"*' Conuntoion/s director. Rabbi Albert
Both Golden and Schwartz expressed their appre-
ciation for the gift which will be used at services in
nursing homes and elsewhere conducted by the
v-napiaincy Commission and its corps of volunteer
^Plains, consisting of synagogue and retired
kwVBW by c*1110" volunteering their serv-
wk! ue! Schwar* has two miniature Torahs
wnich fit into theivelvet-draped Ark.


I*'
*Mfesartft&
1981
fflfeiftW-*frHrtti ^mM*WrmtMOt
.'.
Computers Update Data Quickly

Women's Division Board
Meeting Monday, Open to All
Marilynn Levine Heft), head bookkeeper for the
Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale,
and two of her co-workers. Gene Scaramell and
Helen Lee Sue are pictured typing information to
be fed into the Federation's in-office computers.
The newly-installed equipment, given the proper
messages from the keyboards, updates infor-
mation on pledges, statements, changes of ad-
dress and much more among other things, the
computer provides The Jewish Floridian of
Greater Fort Lauderdale with more than 16,000
address labels every week to be placed on the
copies mailed to that many families. Any discrep-
ancy in name, address, or on statements recor-
ding pledge information should be referred to
bookkeeping at the Federation 748-8200 for
immediate correction.
Attended National Pioneer Meeting
Gladys Daren, president of the
Women's Division of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale, has extended an in-
vitation to women to "please join
us for 'coffee and,' plus good
talk" at the open Board and
Campaign Cabcnet meeting at
9:30 a.m., Monday, Dec. 14, in
the second floor board room of
the Jewish Federation at 8360 W.
Oakland Park Blvd.
Joining in the invitation to
women of the community, par-
ticularly, leaders and workers in
the various communities
throughout North Broward, were
Jean Shapiro, executive vice
president, and Felice Sincoff,
Women's Division 1982 UJA
campaign chairman.
On the agenda for an informa-
tive morning session will be the
Federation Story, the ABCs of
United Jewish Appeal, and "How
to Be a Good Neighbor." Mrs.
Daren said that education and
planning are the necessary tools
for a successful Federation-UJA
campaign for 1982, the year of
Israel's 34th anniversary as a
state in the world of nations.
Masada Division
The Women's Division an-
nounced the newly-named
Masada Division (limited to
women making a minimum com-
mitment of $1,000 to the 1982
UJA campaign) will have its
committee and assignment meet-
ing at 10:30 a.m., Dec. 16, at the
home of Chairman Roslyn Entin
in Woodlands. She and Co-Chair-
man Anne Monarch are planning
an outstanding luncheon. Jean
Steinberg of the Woodlands has
graciously offered to host the
Masada Division luncheon in her
name.
Bebee Pullman (left! of Fort
Lauderdale. Gert Aaron of
Hallandale and Sylvia Snyder of
Delray Beach, members of the
national board of Pioneer
Women-Na'amat. the 50,000-
member Women's Labor Zionist
Organization of America, were a-
mong those in attendance at last
month's three-day national board
meeting in New York City.
Pullman, member of the
Diinona Beth Club; Aaron, mem-
ber of the Shalom Club, and Sny-
der. member of the Beersheba
Club, joined in declaring its sup-
port for the Supreme Court deci-
sions securing women's right to
an abortion, and for Sen. Lowell
Weicker's filibuster against an
amendment to a bill seeking to
encourage public qchools to all
the sort of organized worship
that has been outlawed since
1961 as unconstitutional by the
Supreme Court.
Pioneer Women-Na'amat,
founded in 1925, has 500 clubs in
the U.S., and in cooperation with
Na'amat. its sister organization
in Israel, it helps support faci-
lities that provide educational,
vocational and other social serv-
ices, mainly on behalf of women
and children.
-*
mm.
MOKE I1LW EVER.
Hedges are not enough.
We need people. We need you.
To meet growing needs ut home, in Israel,
around the world.
This year we need to reach out to more people
than ever. To bring in more pledges than ever.
Come work with some of the best people
you'll ever meet. Any hour Monday through
Friday.
Lend us your
Strength.
JEWISH FEDERATION
of Greater Fort Lauderdale
UNITED JEWISH APPEAL
CAMPAIGN 1982
748-8200
CRC Hears About Adult Cults
Yisroel Ber Kaplan, program
coordinator for the Chabad
House in North Miami Beach,
addressed the Community Rela-
tions Committee (CRC) of the
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale last Wednesday.
He spoke about the prolifera-
tion of cults in South Florida,
particularly on college campuses.
He was concerned that people are
uneducated about Messianic
groups claiming to be Jewish.
Such groups include Temple
Aron Kodesh in Lauderhill and
Beth Yeshua in Miami. These
groups actively seek Jewish par-
ticipation and go so far as to offer
free tickets for high holy day
services, never telling anybody
that they really are not Jewish.
One group even runs a cheder
(school). Their leaders are called
rabbis in many cases. However,
they are far from being deserving
of such a title, he said.
Ber Kaplan is available to
speak to other groups about cults
and has information available
about deprogramming of individ-
uals who have been persuaded to
join cults. If further information
is required from Ber Kaplan,
contact Lawrence Schuval, Jew-
ish Federation, 748-8200.
/2
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Chicken. Whether it's a roaster,
fryer or broiler, you'll taste our
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The next time you shop, buy a real quality
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Empire


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mwj ewisn r wnuuin oj ureotgrrwn^
Buy tickets by Dec 8 for low winter fares
*' ~
This winter, enjoy
the warmth of New\ork
$UnTWA.
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There's no lower fare to New York.
Smell chestnuts roasting on an open fire.
Stroll down bustling city sidewalks. Hear
the warm applause of a Broadway musical.
See couples skating along the ice at Rocke-
feller Center. It's all a part of the warmth of
New York City
And you can warm up to TWA's $114
midweek fare Monday through Thursday
Friday through Sunday the fare is $124 one
way There's no lower fare from Ft Lauder-
dale to New York. With the money you save,
you can bring the whole family to share the
warmth of New York this winter.
This low fare is good now through
January 31,1982* Just buy your tickets by
December 8,1981.
Starting in early December, we're mak-
ing flying to New \brk easier. Because in
addition to frying to Kennedy Airport, we've
added a flight to close-in La Guardia.
So this winter feel a different kind of
warmth. The warmth of New York And
the warmth of an airline that cares about
saving you moneyTWA. Call your
travel agent or TWA at
800-325-410Q
You're going to like us
Service from Ft Lauderdale Airport Fares subject to change.
Fare Is $175 one way to New York between January 1-5
Also, $175 from New York to Ft Lauderdale between December 19-25.
There win be a $10 charge on completely unused tickets submitted for refund


Friday, December H. 1981
The Jewish Florididn of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 3
Countdown Begins for 2nd Annual Super Sunday
The Jewish Federation of steam for the United Jewish"Ap- Jan. 17.
Greater Fort Lauderdale joined peal's second annual National Hundreds have already eaked
...heroomntunUirainpktowuoSu^ Sunday IWA-lta, ,.Ka^re^A"h,m
Oakbrook Village Plans UJA Drive
J3K Sum
%
PHONEiAITHON
Sam Miller, chairman of the Oakbrook Village
United Jewish Appeal of the Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale. met with his committee
pictured here to initiate plans for a rally that will
be held Fab. 12 in the community clubhouse
located in North Lauderdale for the benefit of the
1982 UJA campaign.
Serving with Miller as associate chairmen an
Mort Horowitz. Men s Club president: Anne Sch-
wartz. Women's Club prvsident: Irving Sand-
berg. president of t he Village Assn.. and Blanche
Fyier. Other members of the commit tiv are Fred
Mink's. Hoye IVrger, Jules llrettner. Henrietta
Fckl. Oeorge Priedtand. teouis Ooldberg, Milli
Holler. Frank Joseph. Mas Kushncr. Norman
lA'viss. Harry l.iel). I-ester Mihlslin, Jerry Res-
nick. George Hugg, Mitchell Schwartz. Irving
Tanhauser and Sam White.
Margate UJA Holds 1st Citywide Meeting
Greater Margate UJA Com-
mittee held its first citywide
meeting at Temple Beth Am last
month. It was conducted by co-
chairmen William Kauberg and
Harry Glugover. In attendance
were leadirs and volunteers from
at least a dozen condominiums
and residential areas. Each leader
will try to enlist as many workers
as possible to conduct a cam-
paign that will increase last
year's receipts by at least 25 per-
cent.
They will also initiate plans for
their annual UJA fund raising
meetings. Margate is one of the
few cities where separate func-
tions, instead of a single com-
bined one is held. That approach
may partially account for Ha
successes in past years.
Israel Resnikoff. co-chairman
with Al Golden for the Super
Sunday Phone-a-Thon Sunday.
Jan. 17, asked for volunteers to
man the phones at the Tamarac
Jewish Center. The plan is to
have at least 1,000 volunteers call
thousands of people in Broward
for a goal of $200,000. Sol Shut-
man is contributing the refresh-
ments.
The next citywide Margate
UJA meeting will be held on
Tuesday, Dec. 22 at 10 a.m. at
Congregation Beth Hillel. Area
chairpersons are urged to bring
as many assistants as possible
and dress appropriately for
separate picture taking of each
during the 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. reach-
ing out that will take place at
Super Sunday Central at
Tamarac Jewish Center where 35
telephones are being installed
and at Federation's Oceanside of-
fice where five phones will be
utilized.
Co-chairmen Israel Resnikoff
and Alfred Golden noted that
only five weeks remain before
Super Sunday and scores more
volunteers are needed for the big
happening that day.
Their comments were echoed
by Jerome J. Dirk of Washing-
ton. UJA National Super Sunday
chairman. He said that Super
Sunday 82 marks the opening of
the general phase of the cam-
paign in many areas.
"Super Sunday 'Ml was an
overwhelming success." said
Dick, who was also chairman of
the first national Phone-a-Thon
last January. "More than 25.000
volunteers from approximately
100 communities raised over
919.1 million to meet Jewish
needs in Israel, around the world
and in their own communities.
That was a record for a mass ap-
peal in peacetime.
"Our goal for Super Sunday
'82." he went on. "is to involve
150 communities and raise $25
million. Many first-time com-
munities have begun planning for
it. still others huve expressed in-
terest, and momentum is grow-
ing."
Among Super Sunday's cam-
paign benefits. Dirk indicated, is
it s effectiveness in reaching out
to potential new volunteers and
new givers and in creating com-
munity-wide involvement.
"Thousands of people who have
not participated in past UJA
<-mi.|Niigns will huve the oppor-
tunity to make u significant con-
tribution to a vital cause that is
an important element in the lives
of millions of Americans," he
said. "Jewish need is the reason
for Super Sunday. The vitality of
today's Jewish community, so
vividly symbolized and expressed
by Super Sunday, will determine
the strength of the Jewish fu-
ture."
Woman's Division of Jewish Federation of
Greater Port lauderdale offers
Beautiful Cards for Any Occasion
8 in a packet for $25.
Call 748-8200
Sunrise UJA Dec. 13
Rsbbi Albert B. Schwartz, di-
rector of the Chaplaincy Com-
mission of the Jewish Federation
of Greater Fort Lauderdale, will
be the speaker at the 10 a.m.
Sunday breakfast, Dec. 13, at
Sunrise Jewish Center, for the
members of the Center, for resi-
dents of Sunrise Lakes Phase II
and Gold Key Homes.
The breakfast meeting, in cele-
bration of the 34th anniversary of
the State of Israel through sup-
port of the Federation's 1982
United Jewish Appeal campaign,
will be highlighted by the honor
that will be bestowed on Elsie
and Hy Silverman for their dedi-
cation and commitment to Juda-
ism.
Complimentary breakfast will
be served. The committee has ex-
tended an invitation to the Sun-
rise Jewish Center, Phase II of
Sunrise Lakes and Gold Key
Homes.
Mark Steingard Heads
Coral Springs UJA
Mark Steingard, recipient of
the 1981 Outstanding Young
Leadership Award presented by
the Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale, has been named
chairman of the Coral Springs
Community 1982 Untied Jewish
Appeal campaign.
Mark and his wife, Carole, at-
tended the 50th Anniversary
General Assembly (GA) of the
Council of Jewish Federations
last month in St Louis. It was
the first time for them at a GA
but won't be their last, said
Mark, who thoroughly enjoyed
the sessions where more than
2,000 community leaders from
the U.S. and Canada were in at-
tendance. He was very en-
thusiastic about the forums and
workshops they attended.
He is planning to imbue that
enthusiasm among the people
who are being recruited to serve
with him on the Coral Springs
UJA committee. He has been in-
volved in UJA campaigns in the
community, as well as serving as
a member of Federation's board
of directors, chairing Federa-
tion's Planning Committee, and
has been active in B'nai B'rith
and the internatinal organiza-
tion's Youth Organization as well
as the Hillel Foundation.
Mark Steingard is an art
wholesaler. He heads the Inter-
national Fine Arts gallery which
provided works of art which were
exhibited and sold at last week's
Jewish Community Center Art
Exhibition and Sale.
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"*#**
r
Community Calendar istt
^ Ot..-afa
- -----------------------------------------------------------------
FRIDAY,DEC.ll
Aviva
"Hadasaah Night." 8
B'nai Torah Coogregatbn.
' i and neighbor* welcome
SATURDAY, DEC. 12
^orkanen's CMe-Breward Palm
j: Annual Luncheon.
_j CM Hy Center: The
) Guild Presentation "The
ippy Time," 8 p.m.
SUNDAY. DEC. 13
_ Community Center: The-
_ Guild Presentation "The
ppy Time." 8 p.m.
ile Emanu-EI: Israel Bond
Ifair. p.m.
iple Beth Am-Margate: Gen-
meeting. 10 a.m.
iple Kol Ami: Games. 6:30
nple Beth
lies, 7 p.m
Torah-Tamarac:
MONDAY. DEC. 14
nple Emanu-EI: Games. 7:15
kDASSAH:
Wiva Oakland Estates Chap-
Board meeting. Lauderdale
kes City Hall.
Port Lauderdale Tamar Chap-
Boutique 11 a.m.: mini-lunch
an. meeting 12:45 p.m.. Public
fety Bldg.. 4300 NW 36th St.
vadimah Deerfield Chapter:
ard meeting. 9:30 a.m..
oward Federal. Phase II. Cen-
to Plaza.
pneer Women-Debra Club:
ard meeting, noon. Broward
deral, University Dr. and Sun-
Lake.
>neer Women-Na'amat-
nara Chapter: noon, Roarke
creation Center, Sunrise.
tinnal Council of Jewish
omen-Plantation Section:
iinese Auction and Luncheon.
Haverim Lodge: Board
eiing. 10 a.m.. No. Beach
spital. 2835 N. Ocean Blvd.
TUESDAY. DEC. IS
hnple Emanu-EI Sisterhood:
pneral meeting, 11 a .m
nple Beth Am-Margate:
ird meeting, 7 p.m.
Dneer Women Hatikvah Chap
Board meeting, 9:30-11:30
... Broward Federal, 3000 N.
piversity Dr.
nple Sholom Sisterhood:
n, at the Temple, Pompano
ach, Ballet by Magda Ounion,
9i, five to 18 years of age.
age.
nai B'rith Fort Lauderdale
: 8 p.m., Rabbi Isadora
enfeld speaker, "Hanukah,"
uderdale Lakes Public Safety
OK-
) ASS AH:
omeraet Shoahana Chapter:
ard meeting, 10 a.m., Recrea-
i Hall, Somerset. Phase I.
Chayun Chapter: General
"ting, 1 p.m.. Deicke Auditori-
Boutique. 11:30 ajn., Re-
Bhments at noon. Irving Katz
1 entertain with songs,
t Ami-Tamarac and Ramaz-
al Springs Chapters: HMO
ncheon. noon, Justin's, Enter-
unent by Sherry Mann,
nedian and Songstress;
ker, Charlotte WoLpe, Na-
I Hadasaah Board.
B'rith Women-Margate:
fashion show by Phyllis
Unions, Temple Beth Am, 7205
Royal Palm Blvd.
WEDNESDAY, DEC. 16
Tempi* Ohel B nai Raphael Sis-
terhood: 12:30 p.m at the Tem-
ple, bring wrapped grab bag
prize; Speaker. Rabbi Isadora
Roaenfeld. "Hanukah."
National Council of Jewish
Women-No. Broward Section:
General meeting 12:30 p.m.,
Lauderdale Lakes City Hall. 4300
NW. 36th St.
Pioneer Women-Natanya: noon,
Hanukah meeting, Boca Raton
Federal. Margate.
Kol Haverim Lodge: General
meeting. 8 p.m.. Jarvis Hall.
Ocean Blvd.
Yiddish Culture Club: Meeting,
10 a.m.. Sunrise Lakes. Phase I,
Satellite 15. Jewish History.'
Judaism Lecture. Yiddish Folk
Songs.
B'nai B'rith-Hope Chapter: Gen
eral meeting, noon. Deicke Audi-
torium. Program. Jeanne Max -
One-Woman Show "Up With
Women." Refreshments.
Sunrise Jewish Center Sister-
hood: noon. Temple. Slides of
Masada to be shown by Seven
Seas Travel Bureau. Refresh-
ments.
HADASSAH:
Inverrary Gflah Chapter: Gen-
eral meeting. 11:30 a.m.. Inver-
rary Country Club.
Hatikvah Cypress Chase
Chapter: Boaid meeting, 10:30
a.m.
Gold Meir Chapter: General
meeting. 12:30 p.m.. Palm Aire
Clubhouse.
Oriole Scopus Chapter: Gen-
eral meeting, noon, Congregation
Beth Hillel, Margate Square.
Margate.
Boca Raton Aviva Chapter:
General meeting, 12:30 p.m..
B'nai Torah Congregation, Pro-
gram, "From Adam's Rib to
Women's Lib," presented by
Mrs. Shirley Borne, Winter resi-
dents welcome.
Ramblewood East Chapter:
noon, Paid-up Membership
Luncheon, Hanukah party, Ram-
blewood East Recreation Hall.
THURSDAY, DEC. 17
HADASSAH:
Blyma Margate Chapter:
General meeting, congregation
Beth Hillel. Margate Blvd.
liana Hawaiian Gardens Chap-
ter: 12:45 p.m. Lauderdale Lakes
Public Safety Bldg., general
meeting.
Bat Yam Gait Chapter: Board
meeting, 10 a.m.
Pior.eer Women-Na'amat
Brr ward Council: 10 a.m. meet-
ing, Club rooms, 1307 N. State
Rd. 7, Margate.
B'NAI B'RITH:
Lauderdale Lakes Lodge:
General meeting, 7:30 p.m., Lau-
derdale Lakes City Hall, Lakes
Choral Group, directed by Carrie
Klotz. entertains.
Tamarac Chapter: noon-3 p.m.,
Tamarac Jewish Center, Sunrise.
Chapter 346: General meeting,
12:30 p.m., Roarke Recreation
Center, 1720 N.W. 60th Avc.,
Sunrise.
American Mogen David for
Israel :General meeting, 11:30
a.m., Whiting Hall, Sunrise
Lakes, mini-lunch.
rf laroat-Fert
- l-4: Regular i__
7:30 p.m.. Whking Hall. Sunns*,
J&nfmS,nt H Jjfraanmtnta.
ORT No. Broward Section: Gen-
eral meeting. 10 a.m.. Lauderdale
Lakes City Hall 4300 N.W. 36th
St.
ORT-Uuoerdale Went Chapter:
6:30 p.m.. Deicke Auditorium:
Fourth Annual Kosher Hanukah
Dinner Dance, music by Sammy
Fields, donation $7.50. Reserva-
tions, call Yetta Cowan.
FRIDAY. DEC. 18
Temple Emanu-EI: Special Oneg
Shabbat Services.
HADASSAH:
Boca Raton Aviva Chapter:
"Hadasaah Night," 8 p.m.. Tem-
ple Beth El. friends and neigh-
bors welcome.
Deerfield Scopus Chapter and
two other Chapters: Oneg Shab-
bat. 8 p.m.. Temple Beth Israel.
Be a hostess, earn full donor
credit, also, for name embroi-
dered on tablecloth. For informa-
tion, call M. Jaffe. R. Gershowitz.
Cards and Certificates. B. Wax-
man or S. Weiss. Join Hadassah
70 Club, call M.Klein.
Workmen's Circle-Greater Lau-
derdale Branch: 1 p.m.. Lauder-
dale Lakes Public Safety Bldg..
Hanukah Festival, Elections.
B'nai B'rith
Honors Rep. Shaw
U.S. Rep. E. Clay Shaw. Jr.. of
Fort lauderdale (center), is
presented the B'nai B'rith
Foundation's "Great American
Tradition Award" at a testi-
monial dinner last month.
Presenting the award are David
H. Rush (left) and Malcolm H.
Promberg (right), an interna-
tional vice president of the B'nai
B'rith Foundation of the United
States. Shaw is one of six men.
including former President
(ierald R. Ford, to be thus
honored by B'nai B'rith in 1981.
Who says \
ias to weigh
s egg noodles make
deliriously light!
A kugel doesn't have to lie like lead in
your stomach.
Wilh Muellers light-lasting egg noodles
you ean ereate a perfect holiday kugcl.
Light.Tender. Delicious.
And Mueller's quality egg noodles have
been u Jewish tradition for generations
because they're so light.(Your grandmother
might have used them in her own kugcl!)
For a delicately delicious holiday kugcl
your family will lovc-and for loads ol other
holiday dishes-just remember the red,
while and blue colors that say Mueller's
egg noodles.
PS. Remember to try light Mueller's
spaghetti and macaroni, too!
Crusty-Topped
2nd Graders In Kol Ami Service
IA Shabbat supper for the 62
Jenta of Grade 2 of Temple
Anil's Religious School will
de tonight's (Dec. 11) 8:15
* at the 8200 Peters Rd.,
ntation, synagogue.
fix of the students in the
Pes taught by Marlene
sker and Shirley Stateman
! jom Rabbi Sheldon J. Harr in
ri*>g readings during the
service. The entire group ot
second graders will sing under
the direction of the school's
music teacher, Arlene Solomon.
Kol Ami's educational director is
Moshe Ezry.
The Temple's Sisterhood will
have numerous items on sale at
its Hanukah boutique beginning
at 9 a.m.. Sunday, Dec. 13. at the
Temple.
I
I
I
I
I
I
Noodle Kugel
I package (8 ounces) cream
cheese, -. A11nc-.l
to tup parvc margarine.
softened
m cupssugar
8 eggs, well beaten
4to tups milk
2 leaspoons vanilla
I teaspoon lemon |unc
Dash sail
8 ounces Mueller's egg
W
I
noodles
cup graham cracker
numbs
teaspoon t innamon
Vto cup
_JEL
Upside-Down 1
Beat together cream cheese and margarine: add sugar; mis well
Blend in eggs Stir in not lour ingredients Meanwhile, cook
noodles as dnected. drain; combine with cheese mixture, pour
into I|*b9"bI* baking dish. Mis graham tracker trumhs and
cinnamon, spi inkle on lop of noodles Bake at ISO* F about Its
hours or until browned and crusty on lop. Allow to cool at least
I
I
Noodle Kugel
to teaspoon cinnamon
I tablespoon lemon juice
to teaspoon grated
lemon rind
ounces Mueller's egg
noodles
v. cup finely cut dried fruits
(apricot s. prunes. date*)
to cup raisins
VI cup chopped nuts
Coat a 9 square pan wilh margarine; sprinkle with brown
sugar Cut pineapple slices in half; place on sugar mixture In
large bowl, beat eggs and oil w.ih neat five ingredient* Mean
while, took noodles as directed, drain, stir into egg mixture
Add remaining ingredients; loss well Spoon into pan Bake
10 to SO minutes at JSCTr until set and golden brown Lei
parvc margarine.
softened
to cup light brown sugar
8 slices canned pineapple.
well drained
to cup cooking oil or melted
parve margarine
to cup sugar
to teaspoon sail
I
I
I
V30 minutes, cut in squares to serve. 10 to 12 servings 0 to SO minutes at 3S0*F until set and golden hmv.nl.ei
sA Va"d s""tc- .loosen with spatula and invert ovei scrvino M
________________________________ ^^lllOllyiiiii,., ^m
All Mueller I products have t ho seal of approval of the Union of Orthodox Jewish Congregations ol America
aJL>


Yiday, December 11,1981
Adult Education Schedules 2nd Annual Lecture Series
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 7
Meeting last month, the Adult
Education Committee of the
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale's North Brow-
grd Midrasha (institute)
scheduled six lectures over the
iext three months for the Second
\nnual Community-Sponsored
Lecture Series in cooperation
with participating synagogues.
In attendance at the meeting,
pictured seated from left, were
Henry Karp, Federation'
Central Agency for Jewish Edu-
cation Midrasha Coordinator
Helen Weisberg, Federation's
Community Relations Director
Larry Schuval, Heine Goldwin,
Ruth Mantell, Berte Resnikoff,
standing from left): Abe Melt-
zer, Stanley Cohen, Helen
Stoopack, Sunny Landsman, Ben
Cohen, Jerry Kaye, Jack Salz.
Nationally-known lecturers
have agreed to participate in the
"Contemporary Issues of Jewish
Life" series with the meetings to
be hosted at five synagogues and
the Jewish Community Center of
Greater Fort Lauderdale.
Lead-off speaker at 8 p.m.,
Monday, Jan. 11, will be Dr.
Bernard Reisman, Brandeis
University associate professor in
American Jewish Communal
Studies and director of Hornstein
program in Jewish Communal
Service since 1973. His topic will
be "The Jewish Family." This
first session will be held at Tem-
ple Kol Ami, Plantation.
He will be followed by Rabbi
Yaacov Rosenberg, vice-chancel-
lor of Jewish Theological
Seminary, discussing "Jewish
Religious Pluralism in America
and Israel," at Temple Beth Is-
rael, Fort Lauderdale, in the first
of two sessions in Feb. The
other February speaker will be
Blu Greenberg, wife of Rabbi
Irving Greenberg, and a distin-
guished lecturer in her own right
with numerous awards, member-
ship in various boards, and on the
faculty of Institute of Women
Today. Her topic at Margate's
Temple Beth Am will be
"Women's Lib: Is It Good for the
Jews?"
Three lectures have been
scheduled for March with Egon
Mayer, associate professor and
deputy chairman of the Sociology
Department at Brooklyn College,
discussing "Children of Inter-
marriage" at Pompano's Temple
Sholom; Dr. Ronald Brauner,
dean of Philadelphia's Recon-
structionist Rabbinical College,
doing a "Retrospect and Pros-
pect of Rabbi Mordecai Kaplan at
100 Years of Age" at JCC; and
Dr. Leon Jick, associate profes-
sor of Judaic Studies at Brandeis
University, closing out the series
with a talk on "American Jewry
and Israel: The Dynamics and
Tensions" at Tamarac's Temple
Beth Torah.
Other congregations joining in
sponsoring the lecture series co-
ordinated by the Jewish Federa-
tion of Greater Fort Lauderdale-
Central Agency for Jewish
Education are Temple Emanu-El
and Ramat Shalom, and also co-
operating is the Florida State
B'nai B'rith lodges.
Persons affiliated with the
sponsoring institutions can get
tickets for the entire six-lecture
series at $7.50 each. Admission
for individual lectures will be $3
at the door for members. For non-
members the fees are $15 for the
series, $4 for individual lectures.
The Adult Education Committee
is also seeking sponsors who, for
a $25 contribution, get two series
tickets and enjoy refreshments
with the lecturers for an hour
before the 8 p.m. start of the
lectures.
Tickets are available at the
participating institutions and at
the Jewish Federation, 8360 W.
Oakland Park Blvd., telephone
748-8200. Checks are to be made
payable to CAJE, the acronym
for Central Agency for Jewish
Education.
Torch Run Highlights
Coral Springs Festival
Jack Salz:
Man of Many Judaic Interests
One of the area's most produc-
tive exponents of topics of inter-
est and concern for the Jewish
community is Jack Salz, chair-
nan of Adult Jewish Education
committee of the Florida State
Assn. of B'nai B'rith Lodges.
The lean and wiry Lauderhill
esident roams the state to tell
us" audiences whether "Jeru-
salem Can Survive," or how to
HELP WANTED
Person needed to babysit for
1 yr. old in our West Sunrise
home. 8:30-5:00 5 days.
References are required. Call
after 6.741-0030.
"Confront the Missionaries," or
about 'The Jewish Experience in
America," or whatever subject is
topical and of interest to a parti-
cular group.
During November, Jack Salz
went to Boca Raton to talk to the
Jewish War Veterans, to Mar-
gate to meet with residents of
Palm Springs Phase 3, to Hallan-
dale for a meeting with the Harry
S. Truman B'nai B'rith Lodge,
and adding some mamaloshen to
his talk at the Cypress Chase
Yiddish Club in Lauderdale
Lakes, and then on to Tamarac
for a session with the Blue Star
B'nai B'rith lodge.
His efforts also brought him
into the Midrasha (institute) for
Adult Education of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort Lau-
derdale's Central Agency for
Jewish Education. He says "it
does widen the area of mutual
assistance between B'nai B'rith
and Federation but also helps me
enlarge the interest in and stimu-
lation for Jewish education a-
mong as many audiences as I can
physically reach."
A two-hour program packed
with activities that will culmin-
ate with the ending of a run
through the streets of Coral
Springs with the runner carrying
a lighted torch. The torch will
light the first Hanukah candle on
a huge Menorah in Mullins Park
in Coral Springs at 8 p.m.,
Sunday, Dec. 20.
Earlier, beginning at 6 p.m.,
the Coral Springs Area Coalition
of Jewish Organizations, spon-
sors of "Festival of Free-
dom-Hanukah in Coral Springs
1981-5742," will present na-
tionally-acclaimed teacher of Is-
raeli dancing, Yusi Yanich, Pro-
cer-Director Jerry Lay ton and his
45-member singing choir, and the
children's choir of Temple Beth
Orr in singing and dancing
numbers.
Games booths, arts and crafts
booths and special Jewish art and
artifact exhibit will also be high-
lighted.
Just before the torch lights the
St
Jp
5*1
Of
00
00
$
0
0
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%
0"^0
vo ov
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Co<'
first candle of Hanukah, a dra-
matic oration relating the story
of the Festival of Lights will be
presented.
The Coalition's president,
Janet Oppenheimer, indicates
that the program "is a gift for the
entire city to share. extending
hands in brotherhood and friend-
ship, and a sharing of ethnic
values and traditions of Hanukah
and Judaism."
Ten nMom why you should stay at our Brooklyn hotel.
1. You'll MM 40% -50% on
your hotel Mil.
2 You'll noU Manhattan's
notes, traffic and experwe.
3. You'll be mar Brooklyn
relative* and occasions
4. You'll be mu entertain-
ment. shopping, sMMMO
log and roslsurants.
5. You'll be only 30 subway
minute* from Manhattan.
l^arh J4ouAe
JU
IVcsiTltoMbojnglnthls
channsno. sjiimowmim.
7. You'll toM our burtoue
accommodations.
8 You'll toM our eumptu-
ous towatorto ims.
9. You'll sntoyour "f
nlngontortalnmontsnd
refreshment*.
10. You can do your own
COokIng because ssch
rtudteand suit, has Its
own kitchenette
1208 48th Street
Brooklyn, N.Y. 11219
(212) 871-8100
Ctll or writ* tor out brochur*
ROKEACH
1 REBATE
Now Get sl Back when you buy
any 6 cans of Rokeach soups
or Tomato Mushroom Sauce
Choose from any of the 16
VEGETARIAN varieties of hearty
soups with the flavor and aroma of home-
made goodness. Or, the delicious, tasty
tomato mushroom sauce. All are Kosher
and endorsed. Ask for them.
Available at your favor-
ite food store. Then send
the Universal Product
Code marks from any 6
cans and we'll send you
$1 by mail.
ROKEACH
To:
I. Rokeach a Sons
560 Sylvan Avo.
Engtowood Cliff, N J. 07632
Enclosed are 6 Universal Pro-
duct Code marks from any
Rokeach Vegetarian Soups or
Tomato Sauce.
NAME ________
(#) Print)
ADDRESS______
City _
STATE
ZIP
. und hr sure!
Offer expires Februxv 15.1962
* allow 6 wooka to racsiv* your chock
I
V


:~"Page 8*
.cr.'.i.x #< inn^uan
WSPflRlifP^T
ThJewish'Flaridion ofGreater Tort-Zaitderdale -*"' *"

Knitting Bees Provide Nursing Home Gifties'
Federation Hanukah
Program on TV
The message, the rituals, and
the joy of the Festival of Lights
and Freedom, Hanukah, dating
from the days of the Maccabees,
will be illustrated in words,
songs, chanting of the blessings
as the Hanukah lights are kin-
dled for the television audience
that tunes into Channel 25 of the
Selkirk Cable TV system.
The videotaped program will
be aired at 7:30 p.m., Tuesday,
Dec. 15, and again at 6 p.m.,
Thursday, Dec. 18, as another in
the series of TV programs
sponsored by the Chaplaincy
Commission of the Jewish Fed-
eration of Greater Fort Lauder-
dale.
Taking part in the program
will be Rabbi David Gordon of
Sunrise, a member of the Chap-
laincy Commission's Corps of
Volunteer Chaplains. Rabbi Gor-
don serves as the chaplain for
patients at North Ridge Hos-
pital, and he also serves at the
Broward County Jail, providing
religious and spiritual comfort to
Jewish inmates.
For the 30-minute Hanukah
program. Rabbi Gordon will have
the assistance of Cantor Ben-
jamin Hansel, also of Sunrise.
Two groups of women who
have been knitting booties, lap
robes, shawls and bingo bags for
distribution to residents of nurs-
ing homes in North Broward
brought some of their bountiful
handiwork to offices of the Jew-
ish Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale to show to Rabbi
Albert B. Schwartz, director oi
Federation's Chaplaincy Com-
mission, and Ruth Horowitz,
chairman of WECARE's nursing
home volunteers.
Rabbi Schwartz and Mrs.
'City of Peace'
Film at Deerfield
B'nai Brit h Lodge of Deerfield
Beach will hold a joint breakfast
with Century Village's Temple
Beth Israel Brotherhood on
Sunday morning Dec. 20 at 10
a.m. A film "Jerusalem-City of
Peace," narrated by Edward
Asner (Lou Grant) containing
interviews with Teddy Kollek,
Yigal Yadin, Moshe Oz, Isaac
Stern and Jacobo Timmerman
will be shown. This film shows
how Jews and Arabs can live at
peace in a united and open capital
city. Tickets at $2 are now on sale
from all officers. Because of
limited space, this is a men only
breakfast.
B'nai B'rith volunU^rs will be
on hand at the Clubhouse Party
Room for Blood Pressure Tests
on Thursday, Dec. 17.
Oceanside
Office Open
Edmund En tin. Region
East chairman of the 1982
United Jewish Appeal of the
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale, announced
the re-opening of the Fed-
eration's satellite office
which covers the Oceanside
area from Point of America
to the Palm Beach County
Mne.
Arthur Konvitz and Regi
na Wermiel have been
named campaign asaocJatei
and they extend a welcome
to Oceanside residents tc
top in and visit them, catch
up on Middle East news, and
update information on the
Federation and the UJA
campaign.
The office is located at
3356 NE 34 St., in the
American Savings Plaza,
just a few doors in from
AIA. The telephone is 563-
5202.
National Women's Cabinet
Names 3 Local Leaders -
haven 12, also in Tamarac, con-
Horowitz are pictured with the sists of Ruth Bruckner, Dorothy
Lime Bay Knitting Bees of Tessler and Rosell Greenberg,
Tamarac. From left the knitters left to right.
^"f11' Id/> Seiner The ^ft8 wiU ^ pre9ented
R2Sh 8e GUld "* part of the Hanukah distribution
Dinah Hyman. plang of ^ WECARE nursing
The other group from Green-
Gladys Daren, president of the
Women's Division of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort Lau-
derdale, and two of the members
of the Women's Division board,
Jean Shapiro and Florence
Straus, have been named to serve
on the Council of Jewish Fed-
erations (CJF) National
Women's Division Cabinet. The
appointments were announced by
Phyllis Freedman of Atlanta,
Women's Division chairman.
This cabinet will meet at CJF
spring and fall meetings as well
as the annual General Assembly.
The CJF Women's Division
serves to link local Federation
women's divisions throughout
North America, developing
collective policy and direction. It
functions as a clearing house and
initiator of innovative concepts in
leadership training, Jewish en-
richment and fund raising skills.
The CJF is the association of
200 Federations, Welfare Funds
and Community Councils which
serve nearly 800 communities
and embrace over 95 percent of
the Jewish population of the
United States and Canada.
home visitations.
A
Kasha Recipes and Nutrition Guide.
Gourmet eating
for only 25* a serving.
In these days when just about everything k going up in pri
\EKE vSjft e?un?yJand v^^-bargains like Wolff's Kasha.
mSTn-S8*? !*ftft* r*8*1 ^wheat kernels. Packed with
nutntion-buckwheatthe beat source of high-biological value
protons in the plant kingdom ^^
rii^^or^^0^^^^^^1^1*^
.n.JL081 SSS temP^1 di81*58 m our recipe folder and nutrition
^^JT^ fr fwbtUe f ? cente P* Pund **ed
8ervmg-a true bargain m these inflationary times.
bo expand your menus delicioualy without expanding your food
wSf K^T** f0ldCTTd Ttrition **** "3>
Wolffs Kasha boxtop or a card with the words Wolffs Kasha"
P^don it, along with your name and address. Mail for yours
The Birkett Mills, Perm Kan, N.Y. 14527
Oner expires July 31,1982


ridav. December 11.1981
!
Blum Cites Virulent
Anti-Semitism at UN
Synagogue News
NEW YORK (JTA) Am-
bassador Yehuda Blum of Israel
and Rabbi Joseph Sternstein,
president of the American Zionist
Federation, told the National
Board of the AZF that Jews
throughout the world are
aware" and "aroused" by the
emergence of international anti
Semitism.
Referring to the recent debaU
on the sale of AWACS to Saudi
Arabia and attacks on Israel,
Sternstein said that the assess-
ment and appraisal that Ameri-
can Jews are "angered and
aroused" is necessary "lest there
spread the notion that action.'
and decisions adverse to Israel
can be conceived and im-
plemented with the false confi
dene* that they will be unre
buffed by an alleged supine and
pliant American Jewish com-
munity/' Continuing, Stern-
stein declared:
"OUR WORDS are thus ad-
dressed to President Reagan.
Permit us to see you as a friend.
You- offered assurances that the
U.S. would stand by Israel. Let
not this assurance be eroded by
the gnawing teeth of burrowing
enemies of Israel. We look for
vpecjffc acts and deads, rather
than-words, as a test of American
polka*.. And sir, once and for all
rejetiand repudiate the insidious
and Scurrilous sniping at Israel's
friends and supporters in the
Noting that Israel and Premier
Meidkhem Benin himself are tar-
anti-Semitism and that
BETHTORAH
Temple Beth Torah in Tamarac
has inaugurated a membership
drive with a special offer of 975
dues through 1982 for full mem-
bership with a commitment of
$100 a year for five years to the
Temple s Building Fund. Details
are available at the Temple, 9101
NW 57th St.. Tamarac, 721-7660.
The Temple's Social Hall Is the
site for the finale of Federation
CAJE Yiddish Film Festival on
Thursday evening, Dec. 17, when
Tht Power of Lift, starring
Michael Michalesko, will be
shown.
And at 8:30 pjn., Saturday,
Dec. 19, the Temple's Men's Club
is sponsoring a three-act show.
Donation is 83.50, including re-
freshments.
""V
Ambassador Blum
international anti-Semitism is on
the rise, Blum said that "many of
us Tind it hard to accept that anti-
Semitism has not been banished
from the earth and we are not
suitably prepared for change in
the international climate," a
change which he stressed has oc-
cured.
Hlum cited "crude anti-Semitic
jokes" not only in United Na-
tions committees, but through-
out the world. He pointed to
"crude anti-Semitic statements"
in the UN debates, and violent
attacks on Jewish institutions in
Antwerp; Vienna, Paris and the
U.S.

RAM AT SHALOM
li Author Shahar Awarded
Prize tor Foreign Literature
Chassidic Night and Birthday
Night will be observed at Ramat
Shalom in Plantation at the 8:16
p.m. Friday services, Dec II.
President Richard Goldman is
optimistic that the synagogue
will be in its new home at W.
Broward Blvd. and Hiatus Road,
Plantation in time for the High
Holidays of 5743.
Construction has begun at the
two acre site and if no unseen
obstacles arise there is a possi-
bility that this coming June-Jury
may even be the completion time.
Visitors and unaffiliated area
families an always wekome to
attend services and participate in
the study period that is an in-
tegral part of Ramat Shalom's
Shabbati
PARIS David Shahar, a 56-
yeanold Israeli author, was
awarded here the Midicie Prise
for -fweigii Literature, one of
FrassMs best known literary
awaiest. The jury singled out one
of UKfbooks, "The Day of the
Couflpe," which has appeared
in French translation, to pay
tribUite to the literary quality and
poetk style of the Jeruaakan-
bonf writer.
The Day ci the Countess" is a
story of a group of Jews, Chris-
tiana and Moslems, all former
friends, caught in the turmoil of
the Arab riots of 1936 in Jeru-
salem. The story spans a week in
the lives of the group torn apart
by the events. Shahar, who
teaches literature at the Hebrew
University, has published 16
books, five of which have ap-
peared in English and French
BETH AM
The congregation of Temple
Bath Am, Margate, will hold its
quarterly meeting at 10 a.m.,
Sunday, Dec. 13, at the Temple.
Election of officers and other
matters are on the agenda.
The Temple's Men's Club has
arranged an SS Dolphin cruise to
Freeport and Nassau, May 3-7.
Jasper Samuels and Milt Braun-
stein have full details and are
taking reservations.
Immediate
Tax Deduction Available
Without Loss of Income:
By creating a Charitable Remainder Trust with the Foun-
dation of Jewish Philanthropies of the Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale you retain income on your donated
assets for life and receive a tax deduction this year.
Our attorneys and accountants show you you how without
fee or obligation.
Also, in many cases, those who create their own Foundation
or Special Fund within the Foundation of Jewish Philan-
thropies BY THE END OF THIS YEAR will be eligible for
significant tax benefits.
Tax Laws governing charitable gifts change January 1.
CALL TODAY748-8200
David Sandier, Director
Foundation of Jewish Philanthropies
i Goodman, Chairman
Sheldon Polish, Co-Chairman
Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale
8360 W. Oakland Park Blvd., Fort Lauderdale 33321
B'not Mitzvah
BETHTORAH
Jennifer Greraberf, daughter
of Mrs. LoretU Greenberg of
Sunrise, will become a Bat
Mitzvah at the 8 p.m.. Friday,
Dec. 11, service at Temple Beth
Torah, Tamarac.
The following week at the
Saturday morning service. Dec.
19, B'nai Mitzvah honors will be
conferred on Michael Cberaow,
son of Phyllis and Richard Cher
now of Sunrise, and David Slip*
koff. son of Gail and Joel Slipa-
koff of Coral Springs.
KOLAMI
B'nai Mitzvah honors will be
conferred at the Saturday
morning, Dec. 12, service at
Temple Kol Ami, Plantation.
upon Mark Moll, son of Linda
end Jim Moll, and Douglas
Gartenlanb, eon of Jay and
Margaret Gartenlaub. all of
Plantation.
EMANUEL
David Matheo. son of Steven
Matheo of Sunrise, will become a
Bar Mitzvah at the 11 s.m.,
Saturday. Dec 12, service at
Temple Emanu-EI, Fort
Lauderdale.
Synagog[U|y)irectory
Tttrr*- Okel Baal Raphael (735-9738). 4351 W. Oakland Park Blvd..
Lauderdsle Lakes 33313.
Services Daily 8 a.m.. 6 30 p.m.. Saturday 8:45 a.m.
Yeeag Israel ef Hollyweod-Ft La.i.ra.l. (966-7877). 3291 Stirling
Rd, Ft. Laoderdala33312.
Services: Dairy 7:30 a.m. and at sunset. Saturdays 9 u.
Rabbi-Edward Davis.
Traditional Syaaajagai ef feverrary I742-9244). 4331 NW 76th Tar..
Lauderhill 33313
Sarvicaa: Saturday 9 a.m.
Rabbi: A Lieberman
Yeas* Israel Svsmgeges of DeerffcM Beach (428-5918), 1640 Hillsboro
Blvd. 33441.
Services: Dairy 8:15 a.m.. ft Sundown. Fridays 5 pm. Saturdays 8:45
am.
President: Abraham Woak^
CONSERVATIVE
TesifJs Beth Israel <742-4O40. 7100 W. Oakland Park Blvd.
Sunrise 33313
Services: Daily 8 a.m. p.mT; Fridays. 5:30 pm. Minysn, also
8 p.m.; Saturdays. 8:45 am and st sunset; Sundays 9 am.
Rabbi: Phillip A. LabowiU. Cantor Maurice Neu.
TesspkBeth A- (97*8650). 7206 Royal Palm Blvd.. Margate 33063
Sarvicaa Daily 8:30 a.m.. 5:30 p.m.; Fridays 8 pax. Saturdays. 9 a.m.
Sundays 8 am.
RabbiDr. Solomon Gold. Cantor Mario Botoahanaky.
flasslsi Jewish Coats? (741-03961.8049 W. Oakland Park Bhrd.
Sunrise 33321.
Services. Daily 8 am.. Fridays 8 p.m.. Saturdays. 9 am.
Rabbi: Albert N.Troy. Cantor: Jack Merchant
Ceagrsgatiee Beth HOW (974-3090). 7640 Margate Blvd..
Margate 33063
Services: Dairy 8:16 s.m. 5:30 p.m; Fridays 8 pm. Saturdays 8:45 am
Rabbi: Joseph Bergiaa.
Temple ghelei (942-8410). 132 SE 11th A vs.. Pompano Beech 33060
Services: Dairy 8:46 am: Fridays 8 p.m. Saturdays 9 am,
Sundays 9 a.m.
Rabbi: Samuel April. Cantor Jacob J. Reiner.
Temple Bath Torah (721-76601.9101 NW 57th St.. Tamarac 33321
Services: Daily 8:30 am. 6 p.m; Fridays 8 p-m. Family service;
Saturdays and Sundays, 8:30 a.m
Rabbi: Israel Zimmerman. Cantor. Henry Balsam
Temple Beth Israel (421-7060). 200 S. Century Blvd..
DeerfieW Beach 33441
Services: Dairy and Sundays 8:30 a.m., 6 p.m.; Friday late service 8
p.m.. Saturdays 8:45 s.m. evening, candle-lighting time.
Rabbi Leon Mirsky. Cantor Joseph Schroeder.
Hebrew Coagregatioa of Underbill (733-9560). 2048 NW 40th A vs..
Laudarhill 33313.
Services: Daily 8 a.nv sundown; Fridays, sundown. Saturdays 8:45 a.m.
President: Maxwell Gilbert
Hebrew Csagrsgsthsa ef North Leader dais (for information: 721-7162).
Services at Weetern School, Room 3. 8200 SW 17th St.. North
Lauderdale. Fridays 6:45 p.m.. Saturdays 9 a.m.
President: Murray Headier.
Tesaple Israel of GeJt Ocean Mile (for information: 566-09641.
Servicee to be resumed sometime in November.
Rabbi David Matsnsr. _____
REFORM
Tssapes Eataaa H 0731-2310). 3246 W. Oakland Park Blvd.. Lauderdale
Lakes 33311
Services: Fridays 8:16 pjn. (Onces month family service 7:46 p.m.).
Saturday servicee only on holidays or celebration of Bar-Bat MiUvah
Rabbi: Jeffrey Ballon. Cantor Jerome Klement.
TaoipleKolAni (472 1988). 8000 Paters Rd.. Plantation 33324.
Services: Friday* 8=15 p.m.; Saturdays 10:30 s.m.
Rabbi: Sheldon Harr. Cantor Gene Cor burn.
Temple BetkOrr (753-3232). 2151 Riverside Dr.. Coral Springs 33065
Servicee: Minyan Sundays, 8:15 s.m, Tuesdays and Thursdays 7:30
am.; Fridays 8 pm, Saturdays 10:30 s.m.
Rabbi: Donald R. Gar bar.
REOON8TRUCTIONI8T
Raasst 8haloas (583-7770). 7479 NW 4th St., Plantation 33324
Services: Fridays 8:15 p.m Saturdays only for Bar-Bat Mttavah 10 am.
Rabbi: Robert A Jacobs. _________
LIBERAL
Liberal Tssspls ef Cecesmt Creak (for information: 971-9729 or P.O.
Box 4884. Margate 39068)
Services st Calvary Presbyterian Church, Coconut Creek Blvd.. twice s
month Fridays 8 p.m.
Rabbi: A. Robert Iksoa.
Wset Browsed Jewish Coagregatioa (for information: 741-0121 or P.O.
Box 17440. Plantation 33318), 7473 NW 4th St., Plantation.
Servicee: Fridays 8:16 p.m.; Saturdays only for Bar-Bat Mitxvsh
Preeident: Don Workman
Ester Tlkvak Syaagogae (for information: 752-3771 or P.O. Box
8126, Coral Springs 330661
Servicee: Fridays 8 p.m at Bank of Coral Spring! Auditorium,
3300 University Dr., Coral Springe
Rabbi: Leonard ZolL
\
r


WJeim,
Wiidliiai in
OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE
Volume 10 Number 32
Fort Lauderdale, Florida Friday, December 11,1981
. FndSfioch-
Price 35 Cents
$1,001,000 Dinner Sparks UJA Start
Sparked by remarks by ABC Television's
outstanding news commentator, Ted
Koppel, about the crucial situation con-
fronting Israel during these times, the more
than 100 persons in attendance at the Dec. 3
Initial Gifts dinner of the Federation's
United Jewish Appeal pledged more than a
million dollars to the 1982 UJ A campaign.
It was a dramatic start for the first stage
of the campaign with the total representing
a sizeable increase over the amount raised
at the 1981 Initial Gifts dinner.
The response was gratifying to Fed-
eration UJA 1982 General Campaign Chair-
man Richard Romanoff, who welcomed the
group, and Co-Chairman Ethel Waldman
who introduced Koppel, the ABC News
Nightline anchorman, who gave a crisp,
illuminating analysis of the Middle East
situation.
The suave, worldly newsman charmed his
audience immediately after Mrs. Wald-
man's introduction by saying: "I'll enter-
tain you for a bit with some stories, then af-
ter you make your pledges, which is the
Interviewer Ted Koppel had the tables switched as
reporters interview him. The Miami Herald, Fort
Lauderdale News, Sun-Sentinel, WINZ and WPEC
TV 12 were among those present.
,,,, covering Richard Nixon's
reason we re here, I 11 get serious and then
I'll answer questions."
And after amusing stories about world
famous notables, imitating their voices with
droll impersonations, and even singing a
song ("although," he said, "I don't sing in
public") he and another correspondent
wrote about China's Great Wall while
Initial Gifts start of the 1982 UJA Cam-
paign.
(More details and pictures will be forth-
coming in the next issue of The Jewish
Floridian.)
Others who spoke or were introduced in-
cluded Federation President Victor Gru-
man, Past Presidents Allan Baer, Jacob
Brodzki, Leo Goodman, Alvin Gross, and
Milton Keiner; also the regional chairmen
of the campaign: Sidney Spewak, Edmund
Entin and Joel Reinstein.
Others accorded recognition included
Gladys Daren, president of Federation's
Women's Division; Jean Shapiro, Women's
Division executive vice president of cam-
paign; Felice Sincoff, 1982 Women's Divi-
sion UJA campaign chairman; Michael
Weinberg, president of the Jewish Com-
munity Center of Fort Lauderdale; JCC
Past President Anita Perlman who was a
"We give money, others gave their national delegate to the White Conference
to insure Israel's independence and on Aging.
Rabbi Donald R. Gerber of Temple Beth
Within a short space of time, the eve- Orr, Coral Springs, offered the invocation
ninR's tabulation was $1,001,000 for the and the benediction.
covering Kichard Nixon's visit there in
1972, Victor Gruman, president of the Jew-
ish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale,
led the roll call of pledges with the declare
tion:
lives
survival."
a short space of time, I
for
US. Offers 'Strategic Cooperation' to Israel
Israel's Defense Minister Ariel
Sharon brought back to Israel
last week a "strategic coopera-
tion" agreement he had signed
with U.S. Defense Secretary
Caspar Weinberger.
Full details of the agreement,
which presumably provides for
Israel's military needs and aid in
countering Soviet threats
'through other states in the Mid-
east."
The Reagan Administration
has been careful to emphasize the
anti-Soviet nature of the agree-
ment in order to avoid damaging
American Interests in Arab
states who might think the pact
is aimed at them.
The agreement provoked de-
bate and controversy in Israel
where the Begin coalition had to
defeat four "no confidence" votes
sponsored by the opposition
parties, and also in Syria and the
Soviet Union.
In Syria's capital, Damascus,
the Syrian Foreign Minister
Khaddam met U.S. envoy Philip
Habib who is back in the Middle
East seeking to settle the
Lebanese crisis and the batteries
of missiles the Syrians have
placed in Lebanon. Khaddam
said the "strategic cooperation"
agreement between the U.S. and
Israel "barred the U.S. from
mediating in the Middle East."
In Moscow, the official news
agency Tass said the new agree-
ment between Israel and the U.S.
directed against the Arab
is
world and designed to expand the
U.S. military presence in the
Middle East.
Syndicated Columnist Joseph
Kraft noted that the collapse of
the Arab summit meeting in
Morocco last month dealt "a hard
blow to the Reagan Administra-
tion and its chosen instrument in
the Middle East, Saudi Arabia."
And the news out of Riyadh,
Saudi Arabia, pointed up this be-
lief with the Saudis and other
Persian Gulf Arab states offering
the Sultanate of Oman S1.2 bil-
lion in aid if it agrees to cancel an
agreement allowing U.S. access
to Oman's military facilities.
Syndicated Columnist George
Will has also faulted the Ad-
ministration on its foreign policy.
Kraft expressed it this way: "The
Egyptian-Israeli accord estab-
lished at Camp David presents
the only available approach to
settlement, and the immediate
requirement for American diplo-
macy is to deepen and steady the
Camp David process."
Woodlands Honors David Miller at UJA Dinner Dec
A man so modest that he preferred to remain in the
background through many years of charitable en-
deavors for Jewish causes finally relented when the men
of the Woodlands community designated him as their
honoree for the 1982 United Jewish Appeal dinner mee-
ting Thursday, Dec. 17, at the Woodlands Country
Club in Tamarac.
That man is David Miller who relented because of the
"big goal" that the Woodlands UJA Committee has set
for the 1982 campaign seeking funds for Israel, for Jews
elsewhere in the world, and in North Broward. To tell
that latter part of story and to provide an insight into
the troubled Middle East problems, the men attending
the dinner will hear from a foreign correspondent,
author and gifted lecturer, Dr. Ruth Gruber, recently
returned from Israel.
From his earliest days in the Northeast, and as a
manufacturer of wearing apparel in the New York City
"Garment District," David Miller has supported Jew-
ish causes and Jewish institutions, leading drives in the
district and at the Harrison Country Club. He built his
home in Woodlands in 1971 and he and his wife,
Blanche, settled down permanently here six years ago.
His activity remains undiminished despite the loss of
sight following an operation last January. He continues
active in the UJA, in Anti-Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith, and Bonds for Israel.
He and his wife have two daughters, four grand-
daughters and two grandsons, all living in the North-
east.
Chairman of the Woodlands UJA is Dan Klein who
notes that the speaker, Dr. Gruber, is of the same cali-
ber as last week's speaker at the Initial Gifts dinner
meeting of the Federation's 1982 UJA campaign, Ted
Koppel, anchorman of the top-rated TV news show,
ABC News Nightline.
Dan Klein is also a long-time advocate and prac-
titioner of Judaism. Former Manhasset, N.Y., resident,
where he served as president of Temple Judea, was a
New York UJA honoree, and where his late wife, Syl-
via, was president of the Sisterhood, he is a member of
Fort Lauderdale's Temple Emanu-El and one of the
founders of the Jewish Community Center of Fort
Lauderdale.
Serving as chairman of the dinner is Manny Lax who
was the Woodlands UJA chairman for the 1981 cam-
paign. He anticipates a full house for the Dec. 17 din-
ner. Working with the committee is Federation's UJA
Regional Chairman Sidney Spewak whose area covers
the central portion of North Broward County.
David Miller
Have Ark, Will Travel
Rabbi Phillip L. Labowitz (left) of Temple Beth
Israel, 7100 W. Oakland Park Blvd., presents a
miniature, portable ARK to Alfred Golden, chairman
of the Chaplaincy Commission of the Jewish Fed-
eration of Greater Fort Lauderdale. Looking on is
the Chaplaincy Commission's director, Rabbi Albert
B. Schwartx.
Both Golden and Schwartz expressed their appre-
ciation for the gift which will be used at services in
nursing homes and elsewhere conducted by the
Chaplaincy Commission and its corps of volunteer
chaplains, consisting of synagogue and retired
rabbis assisted by cantors volunteering their serv-
ices. Rabbi Schwartz has two miniature Torahs
which fit into the velvet-draped Ark.


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Robert Segal
Bad Penny Nixon Rolls On and On...
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Friday, December 11,1961
Volume 10
16KISLEV6742
Number32
How to Assure Failure
The American RDF self-delusion and the
double insult to Israel are related. Without a
doubt, Israel is the most powerful military
force in the Middle East today. From the
point of view of knowledge of successful
desert warfare, Israel outdistances Egypt by
a country mile. And everyone else into the
bargain. History tells the story.
Still, Israel was not invited to participate
in Operation Bright Star.
Furthermore, with respect to a strategic
relationship between Israel and the U.S., the
excuse that is offered on Capitol Hill is not
even clothed in the pretty garb of usual diplo-
matic mumbo-jumbo. The U.S. will not par-
ticipate in such a relationship because it
would anger our "moderate Arab friends."
Bear in mind: The major concern of the
Reagan Administration as defined by its Pen
tagon policies is Soviet encroachment any-
where and in the Persian Gulf primarily.
Bear in mind: Among choices for a Middle
East partner, Israel would be the most potent
of military forces. Bear in mind: Still, the
U.S. opts for an illusion (RFD) and fc weak
alliances (Egypt, Saudi Arabia), the Saudis
themselves being totally incapable of de-
fending their own oil fields, and so what kind
of an ally are they anyhow against the Soviet*
whose weapons they are now buying to help
arm the Syrians?
If the object is to embarrass Israel, that
has been done. But what else was ac-
complished?
He.
XOTIATIONS WITH THE
PLO ARE r"\ NECESSARY
TO ACHIEVE /h^k PEACE...
mr
Richard Nixon's moat recent
disparagement of Jews, hie anti-
Jewish slur in connection with
America's debate over the sale o\
AWACS to Saudi Arabia, cam*
soon after new Nixon tape revels
tions. A simultaneous look at
both Nixon capers is educational
In the course of the steaming
AWACS debate, the dehorsed ex
President put forth the crude
opinion that "if it were not for the
intense opposition of Prime
Minister Begin and parts of the
American Jewish community, the
AWACS sale would go through."
The tapes of a May 5, 1971,
talk between Mr. Nixon and his
White House Chief of Staff H.R-
Haldeman, newly accessible, dis-
close that Mr. Nixon wanted to
know if "the Chicago Seven," a
group of anti-Vietnam War pro-
testers were "all Jews."
Haldeman said half were. Tickled
with the proposal set forth in the
tape to engage thugs "to knock
the heads off" the protesters, the
President wondered out loud "if
Congress will really get a bellyful
of these people."
SURELY, we are justified in
wondering ourselves if the great
majority of Americans have by
now had a bellyful of Mr. Nixon.
His latest effort to elbow his way
back to the center of American
policy-making in a critical hour
has to make some of his diehard
supporters a little nauseous.
When they compare the Nixon
attack on Jews on the AWACS
matter with Senntoi"Chart-. H.
Percys rabuttal, they might
,tart to rethink their view.
For to the judgment of the
fl%d of the S*0*** Foreign
Relations Committee (Mr. Percy)
the criticism of the Ameri-
can Jewish community for lobby-
ing against the AWACS deal is
patently unfair." Jews, along
with all other Americans, Mr.
Percy opines, have not only the
right but the responsibility to
make their views known.
The history of Mr. Nixon's
hate affair with Jews is well doc-
umented. It surfaced in his suc-
cessful effort to defeat Helen
Gahagan Douglas in the 1950
California Senatorial battle. Al-
though he rejected Rev. Gerald
L.K. Smith's endorsement, em-
bracing the offer to help him "get
rid of the Jew-Communist," the
final days of the Nixon drive in-
cluded the work of a telephone
squad reminding voters that
Congresswoman Douglas was
married to a man whose original
name was Hesselberg (the late
actor, Melvyn Douglasl.
YEARS LATER, the man who
gave America the hijinx of
Watergate, which Sen. Percy has
termed "the darkest scandal in
American political history," at-
tributed his smear campaign
against Helen Douglas to the in-
nocence of youth.
Now his denigration of Jews
may well take a sordid place in
history alongside Charles A.
Lindbergh's 1941 brawn >od Hk.
astrous Des Moines indictment of
American Jews aa players of
lead role in forcing Americi into
war against the Nazis
The new Noon tapes also will
recall for many his boorish advice
to escorts of his daughters not to
let the Nixon children frequent
art museums inasmuch as Father
Nixon linked museums in his
mind with Jews. Henry
Kissinger, who prayed with and
for Mr. Nixon in the dark Water-
gate and impeachment times
concluded that the 37th Presi
dent of the United States fos
tered "a dangerous brand of anti-
Jewish prejudice born of ig-
no ranee."
The man who was twice elected
President got to that high office
with the help of many questiona-
ble artifices. Remember the
Checkers speech? "Pat's not a
quitter." he said of his wife. "Her
name was Patricia Ryan, and she
was l>ornon St. Patrick's Day."
TRUTH to tell. Mrs. Nixon's
first name was Thelma. her birth
day March 16. But the man who
showed up at Anwar Sadat's
funeral, then rode on to dine with
leaders of Arab nations arrayed
against Israel, is now admired by
some of the new functionaries in
the White House, one of them has
said that "a lot of people are im-'
pressed that he took this oppor-
tunity to rehabilitate himself."
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The first voucher is gxd for a
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6" *"*
M. .... ~A... I
Page 2
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort fjauderdale
Friday, December 11. iju
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Inverrary UJA Golf Classic Committee Meets
Judaica High School i
Completes
1st Semester
Pictured here are members of
the Inverrary United Jewish Ap-
peal Golf Classic Committee
which completed plans for the
golf classic Wednesday, Jan. 13,
beginning with the first tee off at
8 a.m. at the Inverrary Country
Club. The classic will have 144
Inverrary men taking part in the
day's outdoor activities which
will be followed by a dinner for
men-golfers and non-golfer:
alikeat the club.
Michael Bloom is chairman of
the Golf Classic committee which
has designed the event to benefit
the 1982 UJA Campaign of the
Jewish Federation of Greater
Port Lauderdale. His co-chair-
man is Selig Marko.
Joseph Kaplan is chairman of
the Inverrary UJA Campaign
Committee. He announced that
the men attending the dinner will
be privileged to hear a message
from the Rev. John Stanley
Grauel, a legend in bis own time.
He was aboard the "Haganah
Exodus" ship in 1947 bringing
4.500 Jews to Palestine. Enter-
tainment will be featured along
with distribution of prizes to the
winning golfers.
Members of the Golf Classic
committee include:
Monroe Adler, Morris Berell,
Al Bloomberg, Sam Davidson,
Murray Feiner, Al Friedlander,
Saul Gelman, Murray Granat,
Bob Green, Mickey Harris, Larry
Herbst, Charles Hill, Ed Kabat.
Jack Kertz, Jack Kleban, Lou
Kogan, Nat Markowitz, Sol
Mehlman, Bernard Oolie, Phil
Rayman, martin Rosen, Nat
Rosenstein, Paul Rouslin, Joe
Rudolph, Mike Salomon, Abe
Singer, Harold Slater, Ben
Solomon, Ben Strassner, Harry
Sunness, Al Tucci, Harry Weil,
Art Westrich.
The Judaica High School of the
Jewish Federation and Central
Agency for Jewish Education,
which meets on Tuesday eve-
nings at the Jewish Community
Center, and its northern branch
which currently is meeting in
Coral Springs at Temple Beth
Orr, completed the first of its
three semesters this week.
Over 160 students from grades
7 through 12 have been par-
ticipating in this project since
September.
A special program that will
mark the end of the first tri-
mester will be held at the Jewish
Community Center Tuesday
evening, Dec. 15. Featured at
that time will be Yossi Shohat
who is the sheliach for CAJE.
Yossi, a former member of Is-
rael's Habimah Theater, will
present a unique program that
has delighted audiences of stu-
dents of all ages. Included in this
program will be a traditional
lighting of Hanukah candles
which will be followed by a party
for the student, of traditional
foods for the festival, displays
and songs.
The Judaica High School is a
community-wide school that is an
extension of Jewish education
beyond the seventh grade. Parti-
cipating in the project are
Temples Emanu-El, Beth Israel
(Fort Lauderdale), West Broward
Jewish Congregation, Ramat
Shalom (Plantation), BethTorah
(Tamarac), Beth Am of Margate
and Beth Orr of Coral Springs.
The curriculum, which has a
broad spectrum of courses, in-
cludes opportunities for students
in grades 10 through 12 to earn
college credits through a special
arrangement with Broward Com-
munity College.
The overall director of this pro-
ject is Abraham Gittelson, the
Federation-CAJE director for
Broward County. During the
months of November. December
and January, Stan Liedeker di-
rector for the Institute for Jewish
Studies for CAJE is coordinating
the educational projects for
Broward County while Gittelson
is on sabbatical leave.
The second semester of the
Judaica High School will begin
on Tuesday, Jan. 5 at the JCC
and Thursday, Jan. 7 at its
northern campus at Beth Orr.
Registration for any Jewish
boy or girl in grades 8 through
12, not affiliated with a par-
ticipating synagogue may be
completed at the CAJE office at
8360 W. Oakland Park Blvd.
(Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale) or call 748-8200.
Polynesian Gardens Honors Couple
Blanche and Max Lederman
will be honored by the Polynesian
Gardens Community of Plan-
tation and the community's Jew-
ish Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale 1982 United Jewish
Appeal committee. The event
coinciding with the lighting of
the eighth Hanukah candle will.
tfke plate at 7:3frpwtvSjundajr,
Dec. 27, in the Samuel K. Soref
Hail of the Jewish Community
Center of Greater Fort Lauder-
dale. 6501 W. Sunrise Blv.. Plan-
tation.
Sidney Karlton, Polynesian
Gardens UJA chairman, said
that one of Israel's distinguished
members of the foreign service.
Consul General Gerson Gan,
serving all of New England from
the Boston Israeli Consulate, will
be the speaker.
Karlton, and his co-chairper-
sons from the five buildings in
the community, Marian Klein,
Sylvia Kuritsky, Harry Torine,
Sidney Wadro and Paul
Schiliner, are planning some sur-
prises for the Hanukah cele-
bration in honor of the 1982 UJA
campaign, plus entertainement
and door prizes.
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In the world
Notsurprising.it's River-
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If you've ever worked with
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