The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 3, no. 7 (Apr. 5, 1974)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 9, 1976 called v.4, no. 27 but constitutes v.5, no. 1; issue for July 7, 1989 called v.18, no. 11 but constitutes v.18, no. 13.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44570954
lccn - sn 00229545
ocm44570954
System ID:
AA00014312:00197

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Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward


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Full Text
~(*)a tfike&m 5742
Kfewisti Fioridli<3i r>
Volume 10 Number 21
Two Sections
OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE
Fort lauderdale, Florida Friday, September 25, 1981
FnO Shochti
Price 35 Cents
Jew Year Greetings From Federation, Rabbis
Victor Gruman
()n behalf of the officers and directors
the Jewish Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale. I extend best wishes to the
Jewish community as we welcome the New
fear ">742.
We pray for a just and lasting peace in
the Middle East. because there is no end
to the role the State of Israel must continue
to play for Jews throughout the world.
We must increase our efforts to secure
freedom for Jews everywhere. The chal-
lenges that face us intensify our commit-
ment to be of help.
As we reflect on worldwide needs, we
must not lose sight of our own community's
needs and the support we must continue to
give to the aging, the poor, the infirm, the
children, the youth and the young adults.
We pray that our people will respond to
the challenges in the year 5742, and as we
hear, once again, the resounding call of the
Shofar ushering in the New Year, we pray,
too, for a year of peace, health and happi-
ness for all.
Victor Gruman, President
Jewish Federation meaning to all Jews within the Family of
of Greater Fort Lauderdale Judaism. Their primary purpose can be dis-
Rabbi Sheldon Harr
LSHANATOVA!
The High Holy Days have special
cerned from the translation of the Hebrew
Rush Hashanah and Yom Kippur. During
these days of Penitence, commencing with
the New Year and ending with the Day of
Atonement, we are bidden to examine our
lives and recount the times gone by: to give
thanks for the blessings which have been
bestowed upon us; to appreciate with
greater sensitivity the beauty of life and the
love of family and friends; and to seek for-
giveness for missed opportunities and acts
of commission which led us astray.
As each of us gathers in our respective
Temples and Synagogues during this
0riod, it is my privilege to extend to the
Jewish Community greetings from the
North Broward Board of Rabbis.
It is our fervent wish that the coming
year might find our Jewish Community
going from strength to strength and from
simcha to simchain the year 5742 which lies
ahead. May you be inscribed in the Book of
Life for a Happy and Healthy New Year.
Rabbi Sheldon J. Harr, President
North Broward Board of Rabbis
Autonomy Talks Resuming Between Israel and Egypt
From JTA Sources
Palestinian autonomy negotiations, long post-
oned, were scheduled to resume this week in Cairo
nth the U.S. expected to send an envoy to join the
sraeli and Egyptian delegations in the talks.
Th.it. plus an agreement for "strategic coopera-
tion iM'tvwt'n the U.S. and Israel, and Israel's con-
linucd opposition to the sale of AWACS to Saudi
I appeared to be the outward extent of the meet-
I ill Prime Minister Menachem Begin had with
'resident Konald Keagan in the White House during
> i-it to the U.S.
n concluded his stay in the U.S. with a senti-
mental reunion with former President Jimmy Carter in
Plains, (ia.. on Tuesday. Sept. 15.
Meanwhile there were conflicting reports con-
cerning Israel's position in the so-called strategic co-
operation'' or "partnership because of the Administra-
tion's all-out effort to get Congress to approve the $8.5
billion arms package sale to the Saudis.
Secretary of State Alexander Haig warned that
failure by the Senate to approve the sale would have a
serious impact on US Middle East policy includ-
ing the new "strategic cooperation" with Israel. He
made that remark last week on a flight to the U.S. after
meetings with Saudis Foreign Minister Prince Saud Al
Faisal in Spain and with officials in West Germany.
But in Washington a State Department official
agreed with Begin that there is no direct link between
the outcome of the AWACS vote and the agreement
reached "for broadened security cooperation between
the U.S. and Israel."
Several days later, however, Saudis Prince Faisal
said "mutual alliance" between U.S. and Saudi Arabia
would be affected if the sale isn't consumated. He said
his country needs the AWACS. calling Israel the "real
threat' in the Middle East. He praised the Soviet posi-
tion on Palestinians and said he "hopes the Soviet role
will become the stabilizing one in the Middle East."
Good New Fellowship Salutes Israel With Festive Evening
*^
s
srarawwr

'?

J,'
H;
Mr and Mrs. Derek Prince of Good News Fellowship are
pictured mil, Israeli Consul General Joel Arnon one of the
Weaker* at the -For Israel with Lot*" show. Mr. and
Mrs. Prince, in Israel, deih-ereita message, filmed at the
Musical Theatre audience.
"love for Israel-fest" produced by
the fundamentalist organization
which has established similar
churches and fellowships in other
parts of the country and tht:
world, spurred by the efforts of
the founder, now an elder of Good
News Church, Derek Prince. He
and his wife, now in Israel where
they are building a home in Jeru-
salem, were pictured in a film in
Continued on Page 3-A
Western Wall. One of the church s group of young dancers
is pictured as are Rabbi Albert B. Schwartz, director of
Chaplaincy Commission of the Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale. and Pastor Jim Croft as they
joined in the concluding prayers.
By Max Levine
Federation -Floridian Staff
"We're taking time out to say
thank you' to the Jews,"
declared Pastor Jim Croft of the
Jjood News Fellowship Church of
Lauderdale, starting a
ammoth musical production
Israel with Love last week in
ont of a jam-packed Sunrise
And for next three hours,
including an intermission during
Pastor Croft mingled with the
audience, which included officials
of the Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale, rabbis
of congregations, it was a fre-
quent hand-clapping, foot-
stomping cadence to the music
and singing of Hebrew songs and
English songs based on Biblical
verses.
By the time the Jim Letizia-di-
rected Good News Orchestra
opened at 8 p.m. with Oseh
Shalom, it was SRO (standing
room only) in the 4,200-seat
theatre. Later Pastor Croft said
that probably about a thousand
people had to be turned away
from the free show. "But," he
added, "we'll make up for it.
We'll do two shows next time."
He said: "We thank the Jews for
their contributions to our culture,
every culture, in medicine, music,
the arts, education and the
sciences."
This was the third annual
\UJA Urges Year End Increase in Cash Payments
NEW YORK United Jewish
Appeal National Cash Chairman
Edgar Cadden this week called for re-
newed efforts to increase the cash flow
pf paid-up contributions during the
t four months of 1981. Cadden
d rabbis and communal leaders,
reaching their friends and congre-
ants during this holiday season, to
^ress pledge payments as an ex-
pression of Jewish brotherhood and
mutual responsibility.
"Cash is vitally needed throughout
the year to maintain our human sup-
port programs and to assist Jews in
crisis," Cadden said. "Without it, the
Jewish Agency and the American
Jewish Joint Distribution Committee
(JDC) will be forced to make tragic
cuts in their programs and services.
and our fellow Jews throughout the
world will pay a severe price for our
lack of responsiveness.
"Let us make Rosh Hashanah 5742
a watershed in our cash mobilization
drive, and let us end 1981 with the
greatest cash collection record in
UJA's history."
Gladys Daren, president of the
Women's Division of the Jewish Fed-
eration of Greater Fort Lauderdale,
co-chairman with Federation's Treas-
urer John Streng of the Federation's
Cash Committee, echoed Cadden's
call and urged payment of outstand-
ing pledges as soon as possible to
Federation's new address, 8360 W.
Oakland Park Blvd., Fort Lauder-
dale 33321.



*A. I x*
. i ,...___.l^^W^M.
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M
North Broward Fnai B'rith
Meets Monday Morning
The North Broward Council of B'nai B'rith lodges will hold a
ombined executive board and general meeting on Monday, Sept. 28,
it 9:30 a.m. at the Boca Raton Savings and Loan Assn. Margate
>ranch, State Rd. 7 at Coconut Creek Parkway.
The joint meeting is necessary to avoid conflict with the high holy
Jays beginning at sundown that same date.
Plans for the community voluteer service program, "food for
riends" and arrangements for a Dec. 6 symphony concert at Broward
ommunity Colleges Bailey Hall will be discussed.
Council President Victor Glaz-
er of Kol Haverim Lodge has
named Eli Topel, Woodmont
ixxlge, as membership chairman
co spearhead a campaign to enroll
10 lodges and 3,000 new mem-
bers. A preliminary planning
session on Sept. 14 at Sambo's
Restaurant, Margate, saw the
foundation laid for the drive
which will culminate with a rally
on March 28.
Topel, a veteran B'nai B'rith
leader and former president of the
Northeast district, retired
recently from a successful busi-
ness career. "The threat of Anti-
Semitism as evidence by terror-
ism in the Middle East, in Vienna
and other European cities and in
Argentina as well as in the
United States makes our efforts
to build a strong B'nai B'rith im-
perative," he said.
The North Broward Council
consists of 21 lodges located be-
tween Oakland Park Boulevard
and the Palm Beach County line.
! YSKy The Broward members of the Rabbinical Association of
? ^^p^ rjrwteM^^
r entlrecommunltyforahappYandhealthYNewYear
- '------- -..-- Rabbi Sheldon J. Harr
Rabbi Samuel Z. Jaffe
Rabbi Carl Klein
Rabbi Phillip A. Labowitz
Rabbi Morton Malavsky
Rabbi Samuel April
Rabbi Jeffrey L. Ballon
Rabbi Joel C. Dobin
Rabbi Avrom L. Drazin
Rabbi Robert P. Frazin
Rabbi Seymour Friedman Rabbi Jacob I. Nislick
Rabbi David W. Gordon i Rabbi Paul Plotkin
Rabbi Harold Richter
Rabbi Ben A. Romer
Rabbi Emanuel Schenk
Rabbi Bernard P. Shoter
Rabbi Bernard A. Silver
Rabbinical Association
of Greater Miami
4200 Biscay ne Boulevard, Miami, Florida 33137
Telephone576-4000 _^ m
RABBI NORMAN N. SHAPIRO RABBI SOLOMON SCHIFF
President ___________Executive Vice President
RIVERSIDE
IN
NORTH BROWARD.
I
2

The most beautiful and largest Jewish funeral chapel
Broward County.
in
6701 WestCommercial Blvd. (E^of University Rd.),Tamarac,
I
RIVERSIDE
Memorial Chapel, inc./ Funeral Directors ^"^
For generations a symbol of Jewish tradition.


W.'.'.1.IJ
Salutes
\.\mx Haiti singing "Jerusalem of Gold," the Halleluyah
sung by Jeanne Veltz with the Good News Fellowship
Continued from Page 1-A
\ront of the Western Wall, firing-
I ing greetings, including, what he
termed paying part of "the
Christian debt we owe the Jews
I for everything that is Christian."
Don Bohl, a Good News elder,
I was producer of the show which
was elaborately staged and
costumed. In his introduction of
the segment o the Derek Prince
film. Our Debt to Israel, he said
I Good News plans on making a
full-length movie about Israel
I that will have nationwide distri-
bution.
The singing, dancing, and
musical talents of the members of
the Good News Fellowship
church was outstanding, with
particular mention noted of the
Singers, Larry Schuval, director of Jewish
Community Relations Committee.
Federation's
which
resounding applause
greeted Amy Bohl singing
Jerusalem of Gold, Judie Wolfe
singing The Sabbath Prayer,
Fiona Watson of a fellowship in
Bagor, North Ireland, singing
Let All That I Do Be Done for
Zion while Deborah Oehrke
danced.
Introducing a group of young
dancers from the church, Pastor
Croft, who served as master of
ceremonies, said: "Take parti-
cular note of the young girls in
the group, because two of them
are my daughters."
Muriel Nussbaum, an actress
from Norwalk, Conn., re-created
a talk that Henrietta Szold,
founder of Hadassah, gave in
Cong. Mica Meets With
Prime Minister Begin
Congressman Dan Mica, (D.,
Fla.), a member of the House
Foreign Affaire Committee, was
among those who met with Prime
Minister Menachem Begin of
Israel during his visit to Capitol
I Hill.
Mica and other members of the
[House Foreign Affairs Commit -
I tee had the opportunity to
[discuss several items of mutual
[concern with Prime Minister Be-
gin. Included in those discussions
were the issues of the sale of
AW ACS planes to Saudi Arabia,
the Middle East situation, and
I Israeli andtAmerican relations.
Within the next few weeks, the
'House Foreign Affairs Commit-
Itee will be considering the pro-
I posed AW ACS sale prior to the
full House taking up this matter.
Mica stated, regarding the
Begin visit, "It was indeed a
pleasure to meet with Prime Min-
ister Begin and hear his views on
many of the issues that are of
direct concern to Israel. Israel
has long been a faithful ally of the
United States and its security
should be a major consideration
in any moves we make in the
Mideast."
Regarding the AW ACS sale,
Congressman Mica noted, "it is
always difficult to predict
whether any measure will be ap-
proved by Congress. However, at
the present time, I do not believe
there is sufficient support in
either body for the sale of these
high technology aircrafts to
Saudi Arabia. I know that I can-
not support such a sale not only
because of the effect it would
have on Israel but the effect of
such a sale on the United
States."

Candlelighting Time
Friday, Sept. 256:56
Monday, Sept. 286:51
Tuesday, Sept. 297:51
One Hour After Sundown
Friday, Oct. 2Shabbat Shuvah6:48
Ba-ruch A-tah Ado-nye, Elo-haynu Melech Ha-olam,
Asher kid'shanu B'mitz-vo-tav, V'tzee-va-nu
L'had-leek Nayr shel Shabbat.
Blessed art Thou, O Lord our God, King of the Universe,
Who has sanctified us with Thy commandments
And commanded us to kindle the Sabbath lights.
sMMtaMMMMMMMMMMM
Israel on her 80th birthday to a
group of young people beginning
an aliya.
Tribute to the Hadassah
founder was paid by Consul
General Joel Arnon of Israel's
Southeast U.S. consulate in
Atlanta, Ga., who said she was
there in 1934 when he landed in
what was then Palestine to begin
his aliya as his parents wanted to
save him from the terror that was
being inflicted on Jews in Ger-
many. He said: "Ny wife and I
owe our lives to Henrietta Szold.
Our parents let us go. They per-
ished, were murdered, brutally
burned, along with six million
other Jews by the N azis.
He said to Pastor Croft: "I
come from Israel with love to
you, from my government and
from the people of Israel. I thank
you for honoring all these people
here, and I wish you a good new
year and peace." He said he had
to leave immediately because he
had to get a 5 a.m. plane to fly to
Plains, Ga., for Prime Minister
Menchem Begins meeting with
former President Jimmy Carter.
Greetings from the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale were extended by
Lawrence M. Schuval, Federa-
tion's director of Community Re-
lations Committee, and bene-
diciton was pronounced by Rabbi
Albert B. Schwartz, director of
Federation's Chaplaincy Com-
mission who then ended up doing
a dance with Pastor Croft to the
amusing cheers and applause of
the audience.
A great burst of applause
greeted Schuval's remark that
"we would like to thank Rev.
Croft and members of his congre-
gation for their continued
support of the State of Israel
through the Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale."
CONSERVATIVE SYNAGOGUES AFFILIATED WITH
GUnited $ynagogue of America
SOUTHEAST REGION-SOUTHERN COUNCIL
1110 N.E. 163rd Street North Miami Beach, Florida 947-6094
1
FRANKLIN D. KREUTZER
Regional President
HAROLD WISHNA
Executive Director
RENEEJ. GREENE
Youth Director
WISHES ALL A HAPPY AND HEALTHY NEW YEAR
AND INVITES YOU TO AFFILIATE WITH AND TO
WORSHIP IN ONE OF THE FOLLOWING CONSERVATIVE
SYNAGOGUES IN SOUTH FLORIDA
iMiar, naiis wk
B'NAI TO RAH CONGREGATION
1401 N.W. 4th Avenue, Boca Raton
392 856*
RABBI NATHAN ZELIZER-
CANTOR BEN ADLER
Mr. Saul Glueckman, Pre*.
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
Celebrating our 70th year
2626 S.W. 3rd Avenue, Miami
864-3911
7500 S.W. 120th Street, Miami
238-2601
RABBI DAVID H. AUERBACH
CANTOR WILLIAM W. LIPSON
Mr. Donald R. Teacher, Prea.
Mr. Sheldon G. Mills, Exec. Dlr.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
1701 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach
538-2503
RABBI DR. IRVING LEHRMAN
CANTOR ZVI ADLER
Mr. Carol Greenberg, Prea.
TEMPLE BETH I8RAEL
7100 W. Oakland Park Boulevard
Sunrise
742-4040
RABBI PHILLIP A LABOWITZ
CANTOR MAURICE A NEU
Mr. Al Lang, Pre*.
Mr. Jules Shapiro, Proa. Emerttua
TEMPLE OR OLOM
B755 S.W. 16th Street, Miami
221-9131
RABBI SAMUEL RUDY
CANTOR P. HILLEL BRUMMER
Mrs. Linda Hornlk, Prea.
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
2225 N.E. 121st Street North Miami
891-6508
RABBI LOUIS LEDERMAN
CANTOR BERNARDO FRIEDLER
Mr. UHot BMnwn, Prat.
Mr. Irving Janet Exec D*.
Rabbi Emeritus
Joseph A GarfInkel, PHD
TEMPLE MENORAH
620 75th Street, Miami Beach
8660221
RABBI MAYER ABRAMOWITZ
CANTOR MURRAY YAVNEH
Mr. Jo* Gray, Pies.
Marsha Levy, Exec Sec
TEMPLE SINAI
1201 Johnson Street, Hollywood
920-1677
.RABBIS. FRIEDMAN
CANTOR R. UNGAR
Rabbi D. Shapiro, Rabbi Emerttua
Dr. A. Roaenthal, Pres.
TEMPLE ZION
8000 Miller Drive, Miami
271-2311
RABBI DR. NORMAN N. SHAPIRO
CANTOR BENJAMIN DICKSON
Mr. Joseph S. Zipper, Pre*.
Mrs. Dorothy H Grant, Exec DlrJAdm.
TEMPLE NERTAMHD
7902 Cartyte Avenue. Miami Beach
6868346
RABBI EUGENE LABOVTTZ
CANTOR EDWARD KLEIN
Mr. MofTy Nathanson, Prw,
BETH TORAH CONGREGATION
1061 North Miami Beach Boulevard
North Miami Beech
947-7528
RABBI MAX A UPSCHITZ
CANTOR ZVEEARONI
Mr. Marsha N Ba Ituch, Praa,
Mr. Harvey L Brown, Exec Dtr.
AVENTURA JEWISH CENTER
2372 A ventura Boulevard
North Miami Beech
9360686
RABBI DAVID B. SALTZMAN
CANTOR LAWRENCE TUCHINSKY
Mr.Rey8agar.Pna.
TEMPLE SHOLOM
132 S.E 11th Avenue
9428410
RABBI SAMUEL APRIL
CANTOR JACOB J. RENZER
Dr. I
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER
9110-15 N.W. 57th Street
TAMARAC 33321
RABBI ISRAEL ZIMMERMAN
CANTOR HENRY BELASCO


rant
W i*.
*-/!
...... fri i
-vii .,r _
rnaiy, September 26,l*ji
i^i11 ii ii|i^>il-|-|-|-
Jewish Floridian
of Greater Fort Laudardala
FH60K.8HOCMET 8U2AcNNF^^,~
Editor and PuDiiahar Exacutlva EdlKK
PuBHahad WaaMy Mld-Saptambar throwon Mid-May BMMaakly baianca of yaar.
Sacond Claaa Poataga Paid al Hallandala. Fla. USPS 888420
PIf Sam Few *OT rntrnm ta JaiWi Hirfan. P.O. 81 un, at. n. MW
Advartlalno Suparvlaof: Abraham B. Halpam
Fort Laudardala-Hollywood Advartlalno Ofllca: Am. Savinoi 2S00 Bldg.
2500 E. Hallandala Baach Blvd., Suit* 707-Q, Hallandala. Fla. 33008 Phona 454-0486
Plant: 120 NE6h St., Miami, Fla. 33132 Phona 1-37*4805
Matnoor JTA, Savan Arta, WNS. NEA, AJPA and FPA
Jawlah Fiondian Ooaa Not Guarantaa Kaatiruth ol Marchandlaa Advartlaad.
Qraatar Fort Laudardala Nawa Of (lea: 8380 W Oakland Park Blvd., Fort Laudardala.
Fla. 33321 Phona 74*8200'
Max Lavlna. Nawa EdM-jr
SUBSCRIPTION RATES2 Yaar Minimum $7.80 (Local Araa $3.86 Annual) or by mambaranip
Jawlah Fadaration of Qraatar Fort Laudardala. Victor Qruman. Praaldant;
Lathe S. Qottllab. Exacutlva Dlractor. 8360 W. Oakland Park Blvd.. Fort Laudardala. Fla. 33321
For a New Year Without Shelters
Friday, September 25,1981
Volume 10
26 ELUL 5741
Number 21
One People Indivisible
The essential ritual of Rosh Hashana is the
sounding of the shofar. The clarion blasts of the
Shofar sound during this joyous holiday to mark the
start of the year 5742 the 34th year of the State of
Israel in the common era of the world of nations.
This is a time for reflection upon the past and a
look to the future. It is also a time for action. A time
for Jews to remember that, more than ever, "We Are
One," and, more importantly, that we must be "One
People Indivisible."
Divided, our enemies can destroy us and as
the thousands in the communities of North Broward
flock to worship services during these High Holy
Days, in greater number than at any other time of
the year, the shofar awakens us from our slumbers
and cries out to us of the challenges that face the
Jewish people worldwide.
The shofar heralds the beginning of the peniten-
tial season from Rosh Hashana to the Day of Atone-
ment, Yom Kippur. During these Days of Awe we
must be aware of those challenges, and join together
in accepting them. So during these days, as we pray
for forgiveness for the wrongs to which we confess,
let us rejoice, too, for a New Year, and note that the
Midrash declares "Happy is the people that know the
sound of the shofar."
May you be inscribed in the book of life for a
good year.
CRC Creating
Mailgram The Community Relations Committee is
establishing a mailgram bank to help world Jewry
in time of crisis. Irving R. Friedman, CRC Chair-
man, announced that as there are many issues
facing the Jewish community, it was essential
that our legislators hear us in time of need.
Mailgrams will only be sent when an issue
requires immediate attention, Friedman said,
adding that CRC will send the mailgrams and
have them billed to the individual's home tele-
phone number.
The cost for mailgrams of 50 words or less is
$3.90. Participants in the mailgram bank will re-
ceive a copy of the mailgram, and be billed direct-
ly by the phone company.
To participate in this effort, please return the
form below to Federation. For further informa-
tion, contact Larry Schuval, CRC Director at
Federation, 748-8200.
MAILGRAM BANK
I Want To Help World Jewry In Time Of Crisis.
NAMK
ADDRESS
PHONE
ZIP
I aii thorite the iwe of my name, and you may char|(e
_Z___3 4 5 8 (PleaHe Check One) TeleKram(H)
To My Telephone Number During A Jewiah CriiuK.
THE USUAL COST IS KMKJ PER MAILGRAM.
SIGNATURE
DATE
Hlv KetoliiOaiailllre
ml Cmtrr Fart Uaawdalr
I Part Hlva.. fart laiairiil r I tU.'l
_____.

As we observe the New Yur,
we must assume a greater
responsibility and a deeper per-
sonal involvement in helping Is-
rael solve its major problems.
The economy is in difficulty
because of the heavy demands of
defense and triple-digit inflation.
Relieving these pressures is a
task of the highest priority, for
an improved economic situation,
like peace, is the key to reducing
emigration and increasing immi-
gration from Soviet Russia and
elsewhere.
The development of new areas
of economic growth is a central
purpose of the Israel Bond pro-
gram which has been in the fore-
front of expanding Israel's eco-
nomic horizons for the past 30
years.
ADL Honors Anita Perbnan
By Joel Reinstein,
General Chairman
North Broward Israel
Bonds Organization
Three years have passed since
the Camp David agreements. The
peace process moves forward
slowly in Washington. Jerusalem
and Cairo.
At Kiryat Shmona and Ma-
hariya, there is still the possi-
bility that some inhabitants may
have to spend the New Year or
part of it in underground
shelters. The terroist threat re-
mains alive.
In the New Year, Israel Bonds
will face the challenge of pro-
viding the seed money for one of
the most ambitious development
projects in Israel's history. Prime
Minister Begin has asked the
Bond Organization to bring to
realization Theodor Herzl's vis-
ion of a canal from the Mediter-
ranean to the Dead Sea to help
meet Israel's energy needs.
Our prayers for peace in the
year 5742 must be accompanied
by the resolve to give Israel the
economic means to achieve a
better life for its citizens and for
all those who come to its shores
in the year ahead.
Let us all hope that no Israeli
children will have to spend even
one hour in an underground
shelter in the coming year.
Anita M. Perlman, past presi-
dent of the Women's Division of
the Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale, past president
of the Jewish Community Center
of Greater Fort Lauderdale, and
past international president of
B'nai B'rith Women, will be
presented with the Torch of
Liberty Award from the Anti-De-
famation League (ADL) of B'nai
B'rith.
The honor will be bestowed at
ADL's eighth annual breakfast
to be held this year at 9 a.m.,
Sunday, Nov. 22. at the Hallan-
dale Jewish Center. The event is
sponsored by the South Broward
Region of B'nai B'rith with Ben-
jamin R. Epstein, former ADL
national director and presently
executive vice president of ADL
Foundation, as principal speaker.
Mrs. Pearlman, born in Butte,
Montana, where her father was a
charter member of B'nai B'rith,
and her late husband, Louis L.
Perlman, were long active in
Jewish communal affairs and
general community interests, and
were among those foremost in
building and strengthening Jew-
ish life in Greater Fort Lauder-
dale. Individually and together,
she and her husband received
many awards and honors, pres-
ented by such organizations at
B'nai B'rith Women. B'nai B'rith
Youth Commission, B'nai B'rith
Girls, City of Chicago. March of
Dimes, ADL Humanitarian
Award. Leo M. Levi Hospital in
Hot Springs. Ark.. Jewish Na-
tional Fund.
Mrs. Perlman, who resides in
Fort Lauderdale and Chicago,
has two married children, Mrs.
Dome Dunkleman. and Theodore
Perlman, and four grandchildren.
They took part in the dedication
ceremonies early last year when
the Jewish Community Center
dedicated its 6501 W. Sun
rise Blvd., 16-acre property as the
Perlman Campus.
Enjoy the good life
at the new Hyatt Tel Aviv.
Begin the day with a glorious view from your own
private balcony Then refresh with a swim in the blue
Mediterranean or in the largest pool in Tel Aviv. Hyatt is
just minutes from downtown and ancient Jaffa and
across from the new World Trade Centre. Exclusive
Regency Club accommodations available. Corporate
Rates. Come enjoy a touch of Hyatt, at new Hyatt
Tel Aviv.


HYATTJ(I)1lAVIV
CAPTURE THE HYATT SHRn.V\rORU>Ar1De
i&EmmassaesKSm
L~~-
mrvMi

Friday. September 26,1961

The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Hebrew Day School
Has Holiday, Music Program
h
In preparation for the High
Holy Days and their own service
at 10 a. m., Monday, Sept. 28, in
Soref hall on the Jewish Com-
munity Center campus, the
Hebrew Day School students
have been expiencing the sounds,
sights and traditions of Rosh
Hashana and Yom Kippur in
their classes this month. In-
Rosh Hashana
Message
FromCJF
H.v
MORTON L. MANDEL,
President
Council oi Jewish Federations
NEW YORK Each year our
High Holy Days are a time for
solemn reflection, self-searching
and prayer. We turn to the time-
less riches of our Jewish heritage
lo judge ourselves as individuals
and as a community.
The challenges facing us in the
year 5742 intensify our need for
guidance and renewal. The needs
of our society's most vulnerable
members the aging, the poor,
the infirm, children continue
to grow. Yet the level of public
funding for programs of human
compassion and social responsi-
bility may be reduced.
Abroad, a new wave of terror-
ist attacks against Israel has
brought more bloodshed and the
loss of innocent Iive9. The flow of
Jewish immigration from the
Soviet Union has declined under
the impact of repressive policies.
\nti-Semitism seems to gaining
in many countries.
'i ft the message of our Days of
Awe is not discouragement, but
hope. We emerge with a renewed
sense of our Jewish commitment
and faith in the strength of our
people. Our local Jewish commu-
nities in the United States and
Canada have never been
stronger, more cohesive, surer in
purpose. Our unity as a national
community has never been more
of a reality. Our support for Is-
rael and Jews around the world
has never been more forceful.
We go forth from these days of
reflection with a new vision of the
ideals to which we are committed.
Working together, we will make
5742 a landmark year in the his-
tory of the Jewish people.
'Sock Hop'at Beth (kr
A Saturday night "Sock Hop"
will take place at Temple Beth
Orr on Oct. 10, at 8 p.m. in a nos-
talgic return to the dance music
and dress of the 1950s.
This open event will feature a
popular local disc jockey, lots of
old records and an era costume
contest. In addition to submarine
sandwiches and liquid refresh-
ments, there will be a Hoola
Hoop contest and a trivia con-
test. Prizes will be awarded in all
events.
Tickets at $10 for Temple
members, $12 for others, are
available at the Temple office at
Riverside and Royal Palm Blvd.
or by calling 753-3232.
eluded has been practice on a
Shofar, sounding it just as it is
done each morning during the
month of ELUL.
School Administrator Fran
Merenstein said that the staff
and students wish the com-
munity L'Shana Tova "May you
be inscribed and sealed for a good
life."
She said that the first of a
series of four programs, illu-
OUR VITAMINS
New Haw Til*
KASHftUTH LAMNUTOmit
MM. OF APPROVAL
0417
strating with music and words
the elements of an orchestra, was
presented last week by the PACE
(Performing Arts for Community
& Education, Inc.) Orchestra's
quintet of musicians who play
brass instruments.
Another program will
presented in October and two in
December, covering the string,
woodwind and percussion sec-
tions of the orchestra.
These programs for the entire
student body from pre-Kinder-
garten through 5th grade has
been made possible by a grant
from the Moses Feldman
Cultural Fund which was
established by Dr. and Mrs.
Sheldon Feldman. The grant
enables the orchestral groups to
provide a "different experience"
and will conclude with the
student body attending one of
the public concerts of the PACE
orchestra.
The students will have another
new experience this year with the
appointment of Arlene Rimer to
teach art classes. The program
will combine various craft pro-
jects, including macrame, de-
coupage, water colors and
tempra.
Fort Lauderdale Man
Accused of Nazi Crimes
South Florida, once again, is
the scene of a U.S. government
effort to revoke the citizenship of
a man accused of killing Jews in
Europe during the Nazi era of
terror. The first was that of
Feodor Fedorenko, accused Nazi
death camp guard, who was tried
originally in Fort Lauderdale in
1978, and who was convicted of
lying to gain his citizenship here.
He has been ordered deported.
This time, Bohdan Koziy,
owner-manager of Fort Lauder-
dale's Flying Cloud Motel and
Bahama Hotel, is charged with
lying when he entered this coun-
try. U.S. Justice Dept. lawyers
have videotaped depositions
made in Poland and the Soviet
Union which will be aired durinp
the trial which began last week
before U.S. District Judge James
C. Paine in the federal building
in West Palm Beach.
Koziy, 56, has been charged
with covering up his activities ot
aiding the Nazis when they occu-
pied the Ukraine in 1942. Michael
Wolf of the Justice Dept.'s spe-
cial team of investigators, during
the trial, has the videotaped ac-
counts by witnesses who said
that Koziy became a policeman
for the Nazis and that he took
part in the killing of Jews, in-
cluding a four-year-old child.
When Koziy came to this coun-
try in 1949, he said he had been a
tailor's apprentice in Poland. In
1955, when he filed for citizen-
ship, he listed "Boy Scouts" as
the only membership he had in
organizations.
Enter the Mazel Tbv Sweepstakes
Win 3*1,000 catered party from Maxwell Hous^Coffee!
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CITY_
STATF-
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MAIL TO Moaiiv,
P.O. I
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26.1981
Browsin^ thru
roward
with max levine
Lots of talent coming this way:
Susan Starr of Philadelphia, will
be piano soloist with Broward
Symphony Orchestra Nov. 14 at
Broward Community College*s
(BCC) Bailey Hall Robert
Goulet will be there May 28 .
Israel's Shalom '82, under
sponsorship of Israel Ministry of
Education and Culture:
Saturday night, Feb. 6 at BCC's
Omni Bldg. and the next day,
matinee and evening, at Bailey
Hall where the great Molly Picon
and Second A venue Vaudeville
Revue put on two performances,
Sunday, March 14, matinee and
evening.
Alan Beshany of Plantation,
senior account executive at
Bache's Plantation office and
financial commentator on WINZ
Radio, was elected a member of
Better Business Bureau of South
Florida. BCC is offering
Continuing Education Courses
for Nurses who must renew their
licenses by January 1983 .
Jeryl B. Sincoff, formerly with .
Boca Raton PK firm, is now an
account rep for Fort Lauderdale's
WFTL Radio Larry Luzner
of Tamarac, 19, who's majoring
in journalism at University of
Fla. in Gainesville on a four-year
scholarsmp 'sponsored by tort
Lauderdale News, was awarded
third prize in an essay contest
sponsored by Brigham Young U.
and Society of American Travel
Writers.
Miami Opera Singers will
perform in benefit show for
Sunrise Lakes B'nai B'rith at 8
p.m., Oct. 16 at Bailey Concert
Hall Saul J. Cahan ot
Coconut Creek, retired Boston
lawyer and judge, has been
appointed to that community's
Library Board That change
in dates for the second primary in
this fall's elections announced by
Gov. Bob Graham because of
conflict with Sukkot was based
on his receipt of a 20-year calen-
dar showing Jewish holiday
dates. Similar calendars were
distributed by Jewish Federation
of Greater Fort Lauderdale to
Broward County's 155 school
principals and scores of other
officials in the north of Broward
county to make them aware of
the changing dates in the course
of the years aheadaccounting
for the seven leap years in the 19-
year cycle of Jewish years.
Max Cohn, a principal and vp
of Plantation's Creative Develop-
ment Corp. of Broward is now
developing The Villas of Capri at
Springtree Lakes in Sunrise after
completing the Boulevard Woods
North project at Inverrary .
. Zayre's, anticipated for quite
some time, is preparing to open
by Nov. 1 its store where
Richards used to be in Lauderhill
Mall And JC Penny is
dickering to sell to sell the 73-acre
tract extending drom the Oak-
land Park Blvd. and State Rd 7
east and south several blocks.
Norway's Lt. Gen. Fredrick
Bull Hansen, 54, wUl head the
multi-national Sinai peace-
keeping force of 2,500 troops
beginning next April when Israel
relinquishes the territory.
Troops from Columbia. Uruguay
and Fiji will join some 1100 US
Army troops Isaac Bashevis
Singer's new book. Lost in
America, is getting favorable
reviews from book reviewer -
. Robert Lerner. founder and pre-
sident of Windotint USA, 547 K
Oakland Park Blve., claims to be
the first such firm to go national
franchising the operation nation-
wide Moshe Oysher and
Herschd Bernardi star in The
Singing Blacksmith movie that
opens the Yiddish Film Festival
Nov 5 at Temple Beth Torah in
Tamarac, sponsored by
Midrasha.
Jan Migdal, former account
rep for Miami radio station, now
married to Atty. Lawrence
Rothenberg of Sunrise, is active-
ly solicting accounts now for Fort
Lauderdale-Hollywood WLQY .
Sharon Solomon, administra-
tive assistant to Broward County
Sheriff Bob Butterworth, has
been appointed a member of
North Broward Hopital District
Board of Governors. Other
members of that non-paid board
of seven members which hopes to
build a hospital in Coral Springs
include Hamilton Forman and
Max Hammer, both of Fort
Lauderdale Mayor John
Lomelo of Sunrise got a big hand
at last week's For Israel with
Love production when Pastor
Jim Croft of Good News Fellow-
ship Church announced the
Mayor made possible the use of
Sunrise Musical Theatre without
charge.
JWB, supported by
Federations and Jewish Com-
munity Centers, awarded $60,000
in scholarships to 20 students
attending graduate social work
schools of universities and
college. The students are
training to be professional staff
members of JCCs .United
Way in Broward county was
hoping for 25 percent of its $4.3
million 1981-82 goal to be record-
ed at this week's first report
meeting of the new campaign .
. Sam Perlis, who is managing
the Federation's Kosher
Nutrition site at 4322 N. State
Rd. 7. and his wife, Sara, a real
helpmate volunteer there, are
holidaying in Potomac, Md., with
son Barry a chemist and assis-
tant to the president of a
Washington firm, his wife, Linda,
a Hebrew school teacher, and
their three sons.
Because of the holidays, newg
for the October issues of the
Floridian and this column MUST
be in the Federation office, 8360
W. Oakland Park Blvd., Fort
Lauderdale 33321, at least two
weeks before the issue is to
appear. For instance, today
(Sept. 25) is the deadline for the
Oct. 9 issue.
And to all L'Shana Tova -
from all of us at the Federation.
SanKP son*,
SanKP -3
KCCfimtx)
Its such great fun sharing the excitement of your latest
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your guests to good times and a good cup of Son**
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I mmrt o* Oantca Food*
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Page 8-A
7% Jciris* Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, September 25, 1981
jcc
Spotlights:
DAVID GROSS, JCC Treas-
urer, has been a member of the
"enter's Board since its in-
ception.
Since his graduation from Rol-
lins College, he has served in
several positions at Peerless Uni-
form Service, Broward Linen
Service and Hospital Linen
Systems. He is currently, serving
is vice president of Mercury
Services, Inc.
David, a native of Atlanta,
Tew up in Fort Lauderdale. He
ives in Coral Springs with his
vife Dotty, daughter Jennifer
aid son Daniel.
David has many goals and ob-
ectives for the JCC among which
-e to strengthen the committee
'stem, increase membership,
novate the campus, establish
lid long range planning, and
velop programs for every seg-
ent of our community,
hrough the Center," said he, "I
>uld like to make a meaningful
ntribution to better the quality
life in our community.
Book Chib Meets
The Jewish Community Center
ook Club braved the Tornado
atch to hear Betty Ravitch lead
well-developed and interesting
iscussion on "The Books of
achel" by Joel Gross.
This summer group that has
(tended its meeting into the fall
ason, will meet at 8 p.m.,
ednesday, Oct. 14 on Perunan
unpus to discuss "Chamber
usic" by Doris Greenbach. Lil-
in Rubinstein describes this
>ok as a novel written as an
tobiography with much depth.
Aerobic Dancercize
The Aerobic Dancerciae Eve-
ing Class wifl meet at JCC on
londays and Thursdays. 7:16-
15 p.m., beginning Thursday '
ct. 22 through Monday. Nov.'
>. The second moot*, it will be'
tairsday. Nov. 19 through
^ursday, Dec 17. The fee is $18
This a dance exercise class u
ared and programmed into the
inds of Neil Diamond, the
inter Sisters, Barbra Strei
*. and other favorites, in a
J motivational Aerobics Fit-
s Program.
PLANNING A TRIP
ifww with MttiofMl Council of &
Jewish Women- for new 1M1 !
Broehuro describing
isttonsi torn to ISRAEL, with
wrtenetons to eoypt, oreece,
nd ITALY; Highlights m Europe.
CMna and the Orient, Mexico
nd the Canadian Rockies
PUees rail Lillian Malts'
742-1631 or Elsie Forman
741-4063. _
ffigh Holy Day8 Services Arranged for the Deaf
Through the cooperation of Temple Emanu-
El's Rabbi Jeffrey Ballon and the Temple's exec-
utive director, Morris Watkins, the Jewish Com-
munity Center's Assn. of The Deaf, will realize
their dream, said JCCAD Director EUi Levy, of
holding services in a synagogue.
Utilizing the all-purpose room in the syna-
gogue at 3245 W. Oakland Park Blvd., while the
congregation attends its own High Holy Days,
services at Parker Playhouse, JCCAD will begin
Rosh Hashanah services at 7:30 p.m., Monday,
Sept. 28, resume at 10 a.m. Tuesday, Sept. 29.
For Yom Kippur, the services will start at 7 p.m.,
Wednesday, Sept. 7, resume at 11 a.m., Thurs-
day, Sept. 8. William Colin, the lay reader, will
"sign" the services. Mrs. Levy will vocalize for
others.
In preparation for this significant occasion,
members of the organization constructed then-
own aron Kodesh (Holy Ark) and two sterns. A
Torah, loaned from Moshe Stem of Masada
Judaica Shop, will be in the ark.
Mrs. Levy, during a visit to Israel, pur-
chased a Shofar for the congregation which will be
sounded during the services. When she returns to
Israel next month, she'll try to get a Torah for the
group.
In addition to the 'signed" services, a verbal
interpretation will be provided for hearing fami-
lies and friends who wish to attend.
Mrs. Levy, at JCC 792-6700, has further in-
formation for those interested in attending the
services.
JCC Spirit
The Outdoor Arts and Crafts
Festival and Collector's
Exhibition is working full steam
ahead. Chairman Harold Gold-
stein and wife Sylvia returned
from an extended vacation,
traveling through the U.S. and
Canada, and Co-chairman
Adolph Greenbaum and wife
Jeannette returned from their
London sojourn. Mark your
calendar for Nov. 1 on Perlman
Campus, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. It will be
a Festival.
You had to be there to really
appreciate the experience of re-
living a JCC highlight-the 1979
production of "Come Blow Your
Horn." Allen Cohen, who played
the same role as Elliot Gould, and
wife Linda, who produced the
production, Ron Wellekoff,
director and wife Susie, and Mor-
ton Pine, sound and lighting, and
wife Ruth who nursed this first
Theatre Guild effort, did just
that at the Burt Reynold's
Theatre. A hilarious time was
had by all. Neil Simon's lines still
tickle the funny bone but the
backstage memories of our own
wonderful production were en-
joyed over and over again. Oh
yes, to top it all, a backstage visit
with Elliot Gould and family.
What a blast. It had Spirit!!
This year. Theatre Guild is
producing "The Happy Time"
under the direction of Marion
Barnes. Make it a highlight in
your life. Join the production
staff. Cute and bright, Jessica
Lynn, the delightful daughter of
JCC President Michael and
Susan Weinberg is celebrating
her second birthday this month.
Happy Birthday Jessica!! ..
Summer vacation time is coming
to a close. Old friends are begin-
ning to return to our campus. Do
not forgot to register early for the
JCC programs. For good seats,
purchase your tickets for Wo-
man's Showcase, and Murray
Horowitz, as soon as possible.
The 18-35 Singles Group of the
JCC will meet every Thursday
night from 8 to 10 p.m. in the
Jackowitz Youth Lounge to meet
people, play pool, ping pong,
Atari and have coffee.
Sorry, Tzinderella is sold out.
Jack and Rae Fishman are doing
something right. They appreciate
Spirit!! The JCC Officers, Board
of Directors and Staff extend to
members and friends their wishes
for one and all L'SHANA
TOVA HAPPY NEW YEAR.
Statement By
Rep. Shaw On
Defense Spending
The five-year, $1.5 trillion de-
fense budget proposed by the
Reagan Administration will not
provide a simple solution to U.S.
arms needs, according to U.S
Rep. Clay Shaw (R., Fla.), who
says that it is "irresponsible
management to exempt the mil-
itary from the demand for fiscal
austerity."
Compared to the Soviet Union,
we come up short in terms of mil-
itary armament," Shaw said.
"We've got to make up that dif-
ference. We're not doing the
country any good, however, if we
throw our money away.''
"To achieve our military ob-
jectives, we must insist that
every last penny in our defense
budget be spent efficiently,"
Shaw said.
"The true conservatives in
Congress must demand efficiency
and accountability from the
Pentagon, and they must not
condone excessiveness," he said.
"We can achieve the stated
goals of the Reagan Administra-
tion, and for the sake of our na-
tion we must achieve them,"
Shaw said. "But we can do it
without writing the Defense De-
partment a blank check while
depriving every other federal
agency and program."
Shaw said he would
"vigorously support" reductions
in the military budget only as
long as the "window of military
vulnerability now open to the
Soviets is closed."
Happy
NewVfear
from TWA.

This year; take advantage of TWA's
great service to New York, St Louis
and cities throughout the Midwest
\bure going to like us



Friday* September 26,1981
Doctors, Lawyers,
Others Invited to
Ethics Course
The JeiS&Cbiondlan of Greater Fort Lauderdale
P*ge>A-.-.v
Bosh Hashana Services Begin Monday Evening Sept 28
Rabbi Phillip Labowitz
Rabbi Phillip Labowitz of Fort
Lauderdale's Temple Beth Israel
will lead a seven week course on
the moral and ethical issues re-
lated to professional and personal
\tves titled "Ethical Issues of My
Profession."
The doctor, lawyer, nurse, so-
cial worker, business person and
others will deal with these issues
and how they are viewed by Jew-
ish historical and ethical teach-
ings.
Registration will begin on Oct.
27 at 7:30 p.m. The course is
offered at Temple Beth Israel,
7100 W. Oakland Park Blvd. on
Tuesday evenings 8 to 9 p.m. The
fee will be $5 for members of
Midrasha institutions and $20 for
non-members. "Ethical Issues of
My Profession" is offered
through the North Broward Mid-
rasha of the Central Agency for
Jewish Education of the Jewish
k Federation of Greater Fort Lau-
JWfrdale (748-8200).

ORTHODOX
Temple Ohel B'nai Raphael, 4351 W. Oakland Park
Blvd., Isadore Small, Shachris; Rabbi Nathan Fried-
man; at Banquet Hall, Oakland Plaza, Benjamin
Kiegelman, Shachris; Rabbi Isadore Rosenfeld, Cantor
Samuel Hoch.
Young Israel of Deerfield Beach, 1640 W. H ills bom
Blvd., Cantor Sol Chazen officiates.
o ,Tn Trad'tion"l Synagogue of Inverrary, Broward
Bridge Center, 44th and Inverrary Blvd., Rabbi Yitz-
hak Marcus of Miami.
Traditional services are also held at Temple
Emanu-EI, 3245 W. Oakland Park Blvd.. Rabbi David
W. Gordon, Cantor Robert Goodman.
CONSERVATIVE
Temple Beth Israel, 7100 W. Oakland Park Blvd.,
Sunrise, Rabbi Phillip A. Labowitz. Cantor Maurice
Neu; Auxiliary services at Holiday Inn-Plantation,
1711 University Dr., Rabbi Arnold Lasker, Fred Green,
cantor; at Justin's, 3841 N. University Dr., Sunrise,
Dr. David Lasker, rabbi; Dr. Andrew Katz, cantor; at
Inverrary Country Club. Rabbi Emanuel Shenk, Cantor
Sol Schwartz; and at Sunrise Lakes Phase III, Rabbi
Mordecai Brill, Cantor Edward Altner.
Temple Beth Am, 7205 Royal Palm Blvd., Mar-
gate, Rabbi Dr. Solomon Geld, Cantor Mario Boto
shansky.
Sunrise Jewish Center, 8049 W. Oakland Park
Blvd., Sunrise, Rabbi Albert N. Troy, Cantor Jack
Marchant; at Sunrise Lakes Phase II, Main Recreation
Hall, 8120 Sunrise Lakes Blvd., Hal Lewis and Cantor
Sydney Golembe.
Congregation Beth Hillel, 7640 Margate Blvd.,
Margate, Rabbi Joseph Berglas, Cantor, Sam Spitz-
berg.
Temple Sholom, 132 SE 11th Ave., Pompano
Beach, Rabbi Samuel April, Cantor Jacob Renzer;
Auxiliary service at Palm Aire, Rabbi David Matzner.
Temple Beth Torah, 9101 NW 57 St., Tamarac,
main sanctuary, Rabbi Israel Zimmerman, Cantor
Henry Belsaco; Auxiliary service in the Temple's social
hall, Rabbi Daniel Sloan, Cantor David Leon.
Temple Beth Israel, 200 S. Century Blvd., Deer-
field Beach, Rabbi Leon Mirsky, Cantor Joseph
Schroeder.
Hebrew Congregation of Lauderhill, Camelot Hall,
49th Ave. and 21 St., Lauderhill, Rabbi Nahum Simon,
Cantor Labele Feldman.
Hebrew Congregation of North Lauderdale,
Western School, 8200 SW 17 St., North Lauderdale.
Unable to use the school for the High Holy Days, its
members will be scattered at various locations: Lauder-
dale West, Bermuda Club, and at synagogues.
REFORM
Temple Emanu-EI, 3245 W. Oakland Park Blvd.
Congregation holds services in Parker Playhouse, Fort
Lauderdale, Rabbi Jeffrey Ballon, Cantor Jerome Kle-
ment.
Temple Kol Ami, 8200 Peters Rd., Plantation,
Rabbi Sheldon Harr, Cantor Gene Corburn.
Temple Beth Orr, Coral Springs: Services at Coral
Springs High School, Rabbi Donald R. Gerber, Monday
evening and Tuesday morning. Tuesday evening and
Wednesday morning at the Temple, 2151 Riverside Dr.,
Coral Springs.
RECONSTRUCTIONIST
Ramat Shalom, Plantation, services at Piper High
School, Rabbi Robert A. Jacobs.
LIBERAL
Liberal Jewish Temple of Coconut Creek, services
in sanctuary of Calvary Presbyterian Church, Coconut
Creek Parkway, Rabbi Bruce Warshal, Cantor Leo
Mirkovic.
LIBERAL REFORM
West Broward Jewish Congregation, services in
Bailey Hall, Broward Community College, 3501 SW
Davie Rd., Davie, Rabbi Sol Landau.
Keter Tikvah Synagogue, services at Nova Uni-
versity campus in Coral Springs, Rabbi Leonard Si
Zoll.
.
Volunteers Assist on Medicare Problems
Fifteen volunteers have been
assisting the recently-established
Medicare Information Service of
Broward County which is funded
in part by the Jewish Federation
of Greater Fort Lauderdale.
Almost all of these volunteers
helping to provide service to
250,000 or more recipients of
Medicare in Broward County are
on the Medicare rolls.
Peter R. Deutsch, MIS
director, said: "This program
has been in operation only two
months, but in that short time we
have received about 500 calls,
handled 30 appeals, and con-
ducted 18 community seminars,
explaining the service we're pro-
viding. We couldn't have done
this without these volunteers."
-Sherwin Rosenstein, executive
director of Jewish Family Service
UFS) noted that "some of the
problems and sufferings related
to unresolved Medicare pay-
ments we see everyday are heart-
breaking. We feel our agency is
making an effort to alleviate
some problems."
Deutsch said moat of the MIS
*l}inteers are members of the
Broward chapter of the American
Society of Retired Attorney*.
The chapter adopted a resolution
authorizing its members "to
assist the Jewish Family Service
in helping and assisting those
people having Medicare pro-
blems." The resolution
drafted this way because the re-
tired lawyers cannot give "legal
advice."
With the objective to serve,
and since they themselves are
aware of Medicare provisions,
Isabel Greenwald, a vice presi-
dent of the law group, Sid
Bruskin of Sunrise and Nat
Blaker of Tamarac, also mem-
bers, note "the people we have
assisted are grateful. We can re-
late to their problems and we
reach an immediate rapport as we
talk with them.
Lou Goldblatt of Sunrise has
been aiding a person who was
denied Medicare payment of a
cardiologist consultation fee.
Another assisted a woman for a
CAT scan, another at a Medicare
hearing, and Chapter President
Harry Ehrlich has been providing
community outreach activities in
various cor.dos.
Other volunteers include a
husband and wife team, Doris
and Sy Alenier of Pompano
Beach, Murray Perelstein of
Plantation, Herb Hirschman,
Jack Crilly. Janis Elias, all of
Lauderdale Lakes; Sara Miller of
Tamarac, Joe Tipner of Miramar,
Dianne Solomon of Hollywood.
The Aleniers told Deutsch that
"people are blessing us more than
we need. We think we're making
history. Programs like this
should be instituted everywhere
in the country."
Beach's Fiiest Glatt Kosher Cmium
Open Again For The HIGH HOLIDAYS
With your hosts Sam and Morris Waldman, Gary Sher. David Diamond
ROSH HASH ANA-YOM KIPPUR
SERVICE CONDUCTED BY CANTOR ADOLPH FISHMAN
IN MAIN LOBBY SYNAGOGUE
1 O Days I 2 Nights (Sept. 27-Oct. 9) from $345
Includes 2 Meals Dally 3 Meals Sabbath and Holidays
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EARLY RESERVATIONS SUGGESTED *"*c"v
Phone Sam Waldman: 538-5731 or 534-4751
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>AKLAND TOTOT
:
5742
North Broward
State of Israel Bonds Organization
2767 E. Oakland Park Blvd. No. 407 Ft. Lauderdale
Tel.: 564-4551
@u*30tk
,
RUBIN L.BREQER
Executive Director
JOEL REINSTEIN
Campaign Chairman
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JESSTPH????
Jewish Books in Review
Were Joan Comay's TAe Dias-
pora Sfory a scholarly contribu-
tion to Jewish historiography,
criticisms would immediately be
raised about the inevitable gaps
in attempting to span so much of
our history in one limited volume.
But this richly illustrated and
beautifully photographed in-
formal history of Jewish life in
the lands of their dispersion over
more than 3,000 years and across
six continents is an art book. As
such it doesn't need to conform to
strict methodological canons.
And like most pictorial studies, it
doesn't attempt to offer a pro-
found reinterpretation of the his-
tory of Jewish exile. Rather, it
permits the documents and art
collection reproductions, derived
from Tel Aviv's Museum of the
Jewish Diaspora to tell the story
of Jewish survival within both
accepting and hostile host
societies.
Part I explores the varieties of
synagogue, communal, life-cycle
and linguistic rites, activities and
expressions which contribute to '
the uniqueness of Jews from each
of the corners of the world.
Part II attempts a brief history
of the toleration of Jews from the
eighth Century BCE to the
present. The final chapter
examines the imDulses and mot-
ivations which led the Jewish
return to Zion in our era.
In each section, the narrative is
interrupted by frequent digres-
sions underscoring either a par-
ticular event, personality, or arti-
fact which highlights the period
or institution under study. The
Diaspora Story is for scholar and
layman alike an enjoyable work
which whets one's appetite to
visit the Israel-based center
which inspired this book.
Mdrasha Offers
Israeli Dancing
Yusi Yanich, a prominent
South Florida Israeli dance
instructor, will teach Israeli
Dancing at the Jewish Com-
munity Center, 6501 W. Sunrise
Blvd., Plantation, starting Nov.
8, Sundays from 7:30 to 9 p.m.
Beginning and Intermediate
dancers will enjoy Israeli folk
dancing with all its vibrancy and
spirit. This is a way of combining
physical fitness with art of the
Jewish heritage. Registration will
be at the Jewish Community
Center on Oct. 29 at 7:30 p.m., or
Nov. 8 prior to the first dance
class. The fee will be $1.50 per
class for people who are members
of Midrasha institutions and
$2.50 for non-members.
Israel dancing is being offered
through the North Broward Mid-
rasha of the Central Agency for
Jewish Education of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort Lau-
derdale. For further information
call 748-8200. '
STATE OF
ISRAEL BONDS
BOUGHT AND SOLD
Invest in
Israel Securities
WF RE SPECIALISTS IN
ISRAEL SECURITIES.;

TRANSACTIONS DAILY VIA TELEX
TO ISRAEL STOCK EXCHANGE.
NA'
I Bank Laumi te-lt ral B M
18 East 48th Street
New York N Y 10017
Securities (2121759-1310
Corporation Ton Free <8ooi 2?' -jese
Leu mi
For the coming Rosh Hashana Bank Leumi
wishes you everything money cannot buy.
Breger Named
No. Broward
Bonds Director
Rubin L. Breger has been
named Executive Director of the
newly created North Broward
State of Israel Bonds Organiza-
tion, according to Campaign
Chairman Joel Reinstein. The
North Broward Campaign was
previously connected with the
Miami area Israel Bonds office.
Reinstein noted that because of
the tremendous growth of the
North Broward community and
the potential for sales of Israel
Bonds, the Bond Organization in
New York decided to create an
independent campaign headed by
Breger.
"We are fortunate that Rubin
Breger has been chose to lead our
efforts," Reinstein said, "because
be has vast experience in fund-
raising and the financial field."
Breger has been with Israel
Bonds for 10 years and most re-
cently served as Executive Direc-
tor of the Greater Hartford,
Connecticutt and Springfield,
Massachusetts i
.Jf
He also served Israel Bonds as
a member of the national Com-
merce and Industry Division in
New York City.
Breger has been associated
with the American Red Cross,
B'nsi Brith, Anti-Defamation
League and the America Israel;
Public Af faiis Committee.
He resides in Sunrise Lakes
his wife Shirley-
Israel's first and largest banking group (and one of the 100 largest banks in the world)
serves you with a network of 442 branches, subsidiaries and representative offices
including 63 overseas.
BANK LEUMI LE-ISRAEL HEAD OFFICE
24-32 Yehuda Halevi St., Tel Aviv 65546, Israel, Tel. (03)632111, Telex 033586 IL
BANK^^--fftf^^S^^.fiStf-** "" "^
H!U4i!7.,?,??ln ?'d M*U- Mhmi *****> "ofW* 33139, U.S.A.. Tel (3051531-3378/9 1H. 7 pmiADEUHiA! 1511 wan* s,, pwuddiw,. p." imoSusX. Si:m*)3.2o8 r'uS^iiii <**"3

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nday, September 25,1981
. The Jewish Ploridianvf Greater Fort Lauderdale
Vg9WA
v' '
MAYTHE SOUND OFTHE SHOFAR AWAKEN US
TO THE FLIGHT OF TIME AND
SUMMON US TO SPEND OUR DAYS WITH PURPOSE
RQSH H7ISH7IN7IH 5742
1982 UJA
Richard Romanoff
General Chairman
Campaign
Ethel Waldman
Co-Chair

Regional Chairmen
Edmund Entin-East Sydney Spewak-Central Joel Reinstein-West
Jewish Federation off Greater Fort Lauderdale
8360 W. Oakland Park Blvd., Fort Lauderdale 33321
CALL 484-8200

Victor Gruman
President
lHlll' *".
. *- ^>~wtitt.^^;\ ui b> nwrnr a* raw ww t
Leslie S.
Executive birector
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Community Calendar
THURSDAY, SEPT. 24
Temple Emanu-El: Board meet-
ing, Temple, p.m.
HADASSAH:
Pompano Chai Chapter: Gen-
eral meeting, Pompano Recrea-
tion Center, 1801 N.E. 8th St., 11
a.m.-3 p.m.
Scopus Deerfleld Beach Chap-
ter: Short General meeting and
Dessert-Card Party, Activities
Center (Le Club), Century Village
East, $2. noon-3:15 p.m.
B'NAI B'RITH:
Plantation Lodge: Board
meeting, Community Room,
Southern Federal Bank, Sunrise
Blvd. and Sunset Strip, 8 p.m.
Hope Chapter: General meet-
ing, Deicke Auditorium, Refresh-
ments. For information, call
Pearl Pfeffer.
Free Sons of Israel-Fort Lauder-
dale Lodge: General meeting.
Whiting Recreation Center. N.W.
.4th Ave. and N.W. 24th St..
730 p.m.
FRIDAY. SEPT. 25
Workmen's Circle-Branch 1046:
General meeting, Lauderdale
Lakes City Hall. 7:30 p.m.
SATURDAY, SEPT. 26
Jewish Community Center:
Showcase of Stars Weekend,
Benefit performance for Wo-
man's Showcase and JCC, 8 p.m.
SUNDAY, SEPT. 27
Jewish Community Center:
Showcase of Stars Weekend,
Benefit performance for Wo-
man's Showcase and JCC, 8 p.m.
Temple Beth Am-Margate:
Board meeting, 7 p.m.
MONDAY, SEPT. 28
B'nai B'rith-Decrfield Beach
Chapter 1552: General meeting,
Temple Beth El, Deerfield Beach.
12:30 p.m.
EREV ROSH HASHANAH
TUESDAY, SEPT. 29
Holiday: ROSH HASHANAH
WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 30
Holiday: ROSH HASHANAH
THURSDAY, OCT. 1
Jewish National Fund: Execu-
tive Committee meeting, af-
ternoon.
Brandeia-W. Broward Chapter:
Board meeting, American
Savings Bank, Commercial
Blvd. and St. Rd. 7. a.m.
b'NAI B'RITH:
Lakes Chapter: Board meet-
ing.
Sunrise Chapter: General
meeting, Nob Hill Recreation
WLFsNew
Chapter
Organized
Beverly Lustig, newly-
installed chairman of the new
Women's League for Israel chap-
ter. Tree of Life in Plantation,
announced the group will be
meeting the third Monday of the
month at member's homes. At
last week's meeting at the home
of Irene Powell in Jacaranda, the
other officers were introduced:
Nancy Calosso, treasurer; Barber
Gurtov, secretary; Gloria Sch-
wartz, financial secretary; vice
chairmen: Jeanne Diahowitz,
program; Sara Gorfin, member-
ship; fundraising. The chapter's
representative to the Florida
Council is Helen Zieky.
The Florida Council. Muriel
London, chairman, reported, will
hold an executive board meeting
at 9:80 a.m., Friday, Oct. 9, in
the home of Secretary Jan ZeJt-
Kn, Wynmoor.
Woodland* WLI chanter will
have ka first New Members'
Coflee at 10 a.m.. Monday, Oct.
12, in the home of Ann Monarch.
of Ike Futore,'
in Israel,
the
will be
Center, Sunset Strip, noon.
Plantation Lodge: General meet-
ing, Deicke Auditorium, 8 p.m.
Tamarac Chapter: Board meet-
ing, Tamarac Jewish Center, 9:30
a.m.-noon.
ORT-No. Broward Region: Board
meeting, Lauderdale Lakes City
Hall. 4300 N.W. 36th St., 10 a.m.
MONDAY, OCT. 5
Workmen's Circle-Branch 1046:
Executive Committee meeting,
Suite 121. Loft Mall. 5460 N. St.l
Rd. 7, 7:30 p.m.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL:
Couples Club: meeting, p.m.
Games, 7:15 p.m.
ORT:
Woodlands No. Chapter:
Board meeting.
Hillsboro Chapter: General
meeting, Community Room.
Broward Federal Savings &
Loan. Centurv Plaza 2. noon.
HADASSAH:
Armon Castle Chapter: Gener-
al meeting, Castle Recreation
Hall, noon.
Sunrise Shalom Chapter:
Board meeting, Broward Federal
Bank, University Dr.. 10 a.m.
Masada Margate Chapter:
Board meeting, Boca Raton
Bank. Basics Plaza, St. Rd. 7 and
Coconut Creek Pkwy.
Bat Ami Tamarac Chapter:
General meeting, American
Legion Hall, 8551 W. McNab
Rd.. Tamarac, noon.
B'NAI B'RITH: Lauderdale
Lakes Lodge: Board meeting,
Hawaiian Gardens, 10 a.m.
Lauderhill Lodge: Board meet-
ing. Men's Card Room, Castle
Gardens Recreation Hall. 10 a.m.
Deerfield Beach Chapter 1552:
Board meeting.
Temple Kol Ami Sisterhood:
Board meeting, 8 p.m.
TUESDAY. OCT. 6
Temple Emanu-El Sisterhood:
Board meeting, 11 a.m.
Hadaeaah-Rayua Tamarac Chap-
ter: Board meeting, Tamarac
Jewish Center, noon.
B'nai Brith-Ocean Chapter:
Board meeting.
Pioneer Women-Hatikvah Chap-
ter: General meeting, Whiting
Hall, Sunrise Lakes, 11:30 a.m.-
2:30 p.m.
Temple Sholom Slsterhood-Pom-
pano: Board meeting, Temple Li-
brary, 10 a.m.
Temple Beth Torah Sisterhood:
Games, 12:15 p.m.
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 7
Brsndeis-Pompano Beach Chap-
ter: Board meeting, 9:30 a.m.
American Mixrachi Women
Masada Chapter: General meet
ing, Broward Federal Savings &
Loan, 3000 N. University Dr.,
Sunrise, noon.
National Council of Jewish
Women-No. Broward Section:
Board meeting, Meeting Room.
5171 W. Oakland Park Blvd..
Lauderdale Lakes, 10 a.m.
HADASSAH:
Inverrary Gush Chapter:
Board meeting Colonnades Club-
house, 10 a.m.
Golds Meier Chapter: Board
meeting at members' homes, 10
a.m.
THURSDAY, OCT. 8
Holiday: YOM KIPPUR
ORT Ocean Mile Chapter: Break
The Fast. Jarvis Hall, Lauder-
dale-by-the-Sea. Contact Mrs.
Paula Pollock. 7 p.m.
*'
Dormant has a 2\. Naturally.
Dorman's sliced natural Swiss, sliced natural Muenster and natural
Baby Muenster have something different. Kosher certification. Naturally
Enjoy these great-tasting packages of natural goodness. Produced
under strict Orthodox Rabbinical supervision.
H. Dorman A Company Inc.. Syosset NY 11791
The cheese with the paper
between the slices.

jm wishes you a
happy new year
filled with peace
and contentment
We hope the coming months will be
tilled with many shining moments
Including the warmth ot new friendships
and the joy of old ties with those you
love and surmounting them all. the
happiness of dreams come true.
'marsh
I A UMI 0 AuifDSIOWS
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SHOP JM DAILY. 10 AM T09PM: SUNDAY. 12 NO( SSS^T
WaV. dodetond. 163rd 9:30 p.m.)
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Emanu-El Using New Prayer Book
Josephine Newman, vice presi
dent, religious affairs, for Fort
Lauderdale's Temple Emanu-El,
reported that each congregation-
al family has received the new
Mahzor-Shaare Teshuvah, Gates
of Repentance with which the
Temple will usher in the year
5742.
She said that this prayer book
includes "some of the moving
poems and meditations in the
Hebrew language. Throughout
Jewish history, Jews have been
composing new prayers and this
prayer book for the High Holy
Days is an example of this
creative process."
Gait Services
Temple Emanu-El's Rabbi Jef-
frey L. Ballon announced that he
and Cantor Jerome Klement will
once again resume Twilight Serv-
ices at the Fort Lauderdale
oceanside. These services, held
once a month, will be in a new
location, the Gah Ocean Mile
Hotel, beginning at 6:30 p.m.,
Friday, Nov. 14, and continuing
through April on4he second Fri-
day of every month.
TEMPLE BETH AM
Temple Beth Am in Margate
will have services at 8 p.m., Fri-
day/Sept. 26, with Temple Presi-
dent Harry Hirach conducting
the service, assisted by the Tem-
ple's first vice president, Alfred
Cohen. Cantor Mario Botoonan-
sky will conduct the Hebrew
liturgy. The following morning
the Cantor will lead the Hebrew
prayers with Rabbi Dr. Solomon
Geld interpreting the Sabbath
Sedra.
Pearl Davidson, Rose Hersh,
Anne Klempner and Miriam
Martin honored the birthday of
their friend, Besse J. Masover, by
providing the Bimah flowers Fri-
day night in her honor.
RAMAT SHALOM
Members of the congregation
of Ramat Shalom in Plantation
will join the synagogue's Rabbi
Robert A. Jacobs in the 8:15
p.m., Friday, Sept. 25, service
and study period.
Nancy Ziegler, membership
chairlady, reported some tickets
still available for the High Holy
Days services which will be con-
ducted at Piper High School,
Sunrise.
Norman Schulberg reported
that J. D. Terziu, 10, son of
former synagogue board secre-
tary Marti Terziu, played a part
in the TV Channel 7 crime stop-
pers series dealing with the tragic
disappearance and death of
young Adam Walsh of Holly-
wood.
TEMPLE SHOLOM
Temple Sholom of Pompano
Beach will hold its annual service
at the Star of David Cemetery, at
2 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 4. The
cemetery is in the Forest Lawn
Memorial Gardens, 200 NW 24th
St., Co pans Rd Pompano
Beach.
B'naiMitzvah
BETH ISRAEL
Kenny Braun, daughter of Re-
nee Braun of Plantation, will be-
come a Bat Mitzvah at the Fri-
day evening, Sept. 25, service at
Temple Beth Israel, 7100 W.
Oakland Park Blvd.
The following morning at the
Temple, Robert Feldman, son of
Bonnie and Stanley Feldman of
Coral Springs, will become a Bar
Mitzvah.
KOLAMI
Edward Boreth, son of Phyllis
and Harry Boreth of Plantation,
became a Bar Mitzvah at the
Saturday morning, Sept. 12,
service of Temple KoWfcii, Plan-
tation.
BETH AM
Michelle Rich man, daughter of
Maxine and Roddy Richman of
Coral Springs, will become a Bat
Mitzvah at the Saturday mor-
ning, Sept. 26, service of Temple
Beth Am, Margate.
m
WEST BROWARD JEWISH
CONGREGATION
announces
High Holy Day Services
CONDUCTED BY RABBI SOL LANDAU
Bailey Hall
Broward Community College
3501 S.W. Davie Road
Davie, Fla.
Rosh Hoshana
Sept. 28-8:15 P.M.
Sept. 29-10:00 A.M.
Spt. 30-10:00 A.M.
Yom Kippur
Oct. 78:15 P.M.
Oct. 8-10:00 AM.
Oct. 8-4:00 P.M.
Donation $25.00 Per Boat
Mr. Alvin Rudnitsky, concertmaster with the
Broward Symphony Orchestra
will perform the Kol Nidre.
FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CALL
791-5925 or 748-1988
Star of David
Memorial Gardens, Cemetery
Mausoleum &. Funeral Chapel
ANNUAL HIGH HOLY DAY MEMORIAL SERVICE
OFFICIATING: Rabbi Israel Zimmerman
Temple Beth Torah Tamarac Jewish Center
DATE: Sunday, October 4, 1981
TIME: 11:00 A.M. Promptly
PLACE: STAR OF DAVID MEMORIAL GARDENS
7701 Bailey Road, Tamarac, Florida
(305)721-4112
We are proud to serve the Jewish Community on this occasion, and wish you peace, joy. great
happiness and a healthy and happy new year.
It would give us a great deal of pleasure to have you share this Memorial Service with us.
tf ..
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Ramat Shalom is Plantation's exciting, innovative and
vibrant congregation! We seek to provide a traditional
and yet creative alternative in Jewish prayer.
me fa??' tnat.,?etting Jewish priorities and building Jewish
lifestyles will only be enhanced by our warm, creative
approach to the tradition through which we confront the
challenges our grandparents and great grandparents
Share your dreams with us and your prayers;
Join with people who will become your friends; join us for
an exciting New Year as we welcome our new Rabbil
High Holy Days. 5742
The Yamim Nora-im: A time for reflection, prayer,
& renewed commitment to
one another.

ROSH HASHANAH
ion., Sopt. 28th
Tues., Sopt. 20th
Wed., Sopt. 30th
YOM KIPPUR
Wd., Oct. 7th
Thurs., Oct. 8th
<
Ramat Shalom
7473 Northwest 4th Street
Plantation, Florida 33317
PhyWa Chudoow, Reltgiou. School Director
SJ f\
W. wteomo your m.mb.r.hlp. For furth.r Information, C.N: (305) 583-7770.


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Jewish Floridian
i of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, September 25,1961 Section B
On Rosh Hashanah
Our thoughts tuwi to PRayeR an6 Jewish SurvivaI
AT THE approach of Rosh Hashanah, our
thoughts turn to prayer itself, its meaning to us
as Jews and its value in Jewish survival. In dip-
ping through basic Jewish classics, I find that
even the great philosophers, theologians and reli-
gious leaders and spokesmen probe the meaning
of prayer, and come up with different concepts.
We all stand in judgment before God during
the High Holy Days and, of course, we pray, both
as individuals and as members of a community
for forgiveness. Abraham Joshua Heschel, in
"Man's Quest for God," tells us the following:
"IT IS not safe to pray alone. Tradition
insists that we pray with, and as a part of, the
community; that public worship is preferable to
private worship."
Then he added, "Those who cherish genuine
prayer, yet feel driven away from the houses of
worship because of the sterility of public worship
I > HI II
ii iisriii
today, seem to believe that private prayer is the
only way.
Yet, the truth is that private prayer will not
survive unless it is inspired by public prayer. The
way of the recluse, the exclusive concern with
personal salvation, piety in isolation from the
community is an act of impiety."
PERHAPS these words, clearly and plainly
enunciated, explain why Jews, sometimes in-
different to synagogue attendance during the rest
of the year, fill their houses of worship during the
Days of Awe
Dr. Heschel made another penetrating point
I abouc Judaism, and relates it to prayer in com-
munion with others:
I "Judaism is not only the adherence to par-
ticular doctrines and observances but primarily
Hiving in the spiritual order of the Jewish people,
the living in the Jews of the past with the Jews of
the present.
"Judaism is not only a certain quality in the
souls of the individuals, but primarily the exist-
' ence of the community of Israel. It is not a
doctrine, an idea, a faith, but the covenant be-
tween God and the people. Our share in holiness
we acquire by living in the Jewish community.
What we do as individuals is a trivial episode;
what we attain as Israel causes us to become a
part of eternity."
IN THIS striving for eternity, in this desire
for unity with one's own people Jews gather to-
gether on Rosh Hashanah when they cannot
seem to find the time to come together on other
holidays and pray. Thus, "the Jew does not
stand alone before God." according to Dr.
Heschel. "It is as a member of the community
that he stands before God."
Nevertheless, prayer is also an individual
phrased by Martin Buber, clarified the
significance of personal prayer in these poetic
words:
"Let everyone cry out to God and lift up his
heart to Him, as if we were hanging by a hair and
a trumpet were raging to the very heart of heaven
so that he did not know what to do, and he had
almost no more time left to cry out. And in truth
there is no counsel and no refuge for him to save
to remain alone and to lift up his eyes and his
heart to God and to cry out to Him. One should
do this at all times, for a man is in great danger in
the world."
"A man is in great danger in the world ..."
and if man the Jew recognizes himself as
part of his people, then man cannot but be
anxious not only about himself but his people.
THIS IS why the Jew responds to the call of
his fellow Jew everywhere in the world and why
Kol Yisrael Chaverim all Jews are Brothers.
Besides prayer in the synagogue both the
private and the public act what can we, as
Jews, pray for (as representatives of an entire
people) as we face the challenge of the New Year?
We can, and must, of course, pray for world
peace.
The Hebrew Prophets, fierce and demanding
as they were, understood that peace was primary
if there was to be progress in the world. In the
words of the Prophets do we find the most elo-
quent disposals for peace as is inherent in our
faith that we pray for and seek peace.
Other religions conquered by the sword, and
left trails of death, bloodshed and massacre in
their wake. This is foreign to the Jew. It has been
peace, not the sword for the Jew.
AND EVEN today, as the Jewish State of
Israel prays for peace, calls for peace sessions
with adamant and war-like enemies, the weapons
of the Jewish State are collected and purchased in
Continued on Page 14-
Blast of the Shofar
its Sound is the CenteRpiece op the high holy 6ay
By CHAIM BERMANT
BLAST!
One sound, and we all come to life, even those
of us who have been in shul since the service
began which, on Rosh Hashanah. can be as early
as 6:30 am.
There can be no doubt that the tekiat shofar
is the center piece of the festival, for, apart from
anything else, it is the one part of the service
which we can all understand. One doesn't have to
be able to read only to hear, for its very sound
proclaims its purpose. It is a clarion call, the
clarion call.
The Ram bam defined its message in the fol-
lowing terms:
Awake, O sleepers, from your sleep. O Slum-
berers, arouse ye from your slumbers and
examine your deeds, repent and remember your
Creator.
Which is perhaps why we begin blowing the
shofar a month before Rosh Hashanah so that,
when the festival comes, we should already be set
on the road to improvement.
THERE IS no doubt that, properly blown,
the shofar can have a significant, impact on even
the most desiccated soul. It can and, indeed,
should awaken the dead, for according to
tradition it will sound at the end of days to signal
the resurrection. But, in fact, very lew baalei
tekiah have the skills necessary for their job, even
where they have the wind.
In the Glasgow synagogue which I attended,
tekiat shofar was a time of high drama. The
elderly president had a chazaka and baal tekiah,
and whenever he put the instrument to his lips, an
expectant hush descended on the assembly
which is to say, they all expected him to fluff it;
and fluff it he did, though he huffed and he puffed
till he was blue in the face.
The junior warden then tried, with much the
same effect; then the financial representative, the
rabbi, the first reader, the secor ader, and so
on, all the way down to the shammos, who was in
fact no better, than the rest, but it was felt by
then the shofar had been duly sounded, if only in
aggregate, and they continued with the service.
THE ONLY shofar virtuoso in Scotland was
my late father, of Messed memory, but on Rosh
Hashanah he preferred to pray in a shtibL I have
inherited something of his skill, andpacfc up my
shofar in my old tallit beg, and smile, smile,
smile, but nobody asks me to play.
The shofar began life as a musical instrument
and was used in the Temple service together with
the trumpet. The trumpets were of silver, but the
shofar could be made out of any of a variety of
horns, including sheep, goats, antelopes and
gazelles, though the shofar used on Rosh
Hashanah must be a ram's horn because of the
connection between the festival and the binding
of Isaac (who was, of course, saved from sacrifice
through the timely appearance of a ram with it:
horns caught in a thicket).
We first hear of the shofar in Exodus
Continued on Page 14


Page2-B

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Egypt's Envoy Prim Back Sharon's Dove W.BankPblky
UNITED NATIONS Am-
bassador Ahmed Esmat Abdel
Meguid of Egypt praised the
"new lenient measures toward
Arabs on the West Bank initiated
by Defense Minister Ariel Sharon
(of Israel), who is a hawk."
Addressing a leadership mis-
sion of Agudath Israel of
America at the UN headquarters,
in which 125 members of the
organization participated,
Meguid said that the new meas-
ures would help in the "building
of confidence" between Arabs
and Jews. The Egyptian envoy
said that Israel should have
"patience" with the process of
normalization of relations with
Egypt and urged the Jewish
State to "take risks for peace."
ASKED "how Egypt can
expect Israel to trust the PLO,"
Meguid replied that "there are
non-radical elements amongst the
Palestinians that Israel could
talk to."
Meguid also said that the
peace process in the Middle East
"would survive (President An-
war) Sadat because it is the
genuine desire of the Egyptian
people." He invited the Agudath
Israel leaders to visit Egypt u
part of the "confidence builajn?
between Arabs and Jews toward
strengthening the peace procesi
UN Report by JTA
Waldheim's Hat in Ring Again
UNITED NATIONS (JTA)
- Secretary General Kurt Wald-
heim declared here that '"real
lasting peace" in the Middle East
can only be achieved "through a
comprehensive settlement. He
said that the solution of the
Palestinian problem is essential
to such a settlement.
Waldheim's remarks on the
Mideast situation were made
during his traditional press con-
ference before the opening of the
UN General Assembly. The 36th
session of the General Assembly
opened here Tuesday.
Waldheim, commenting on th*
present situation in the Mideast
expressed satisfaction that the"
ceasefire across the Israel
Lebanon border is holdin*
arSnJS SBSS 9tatmt,
Waldheim officially announced
his candidacy for a third term as
Secretary General for the next
five years. The Secretary General
is appointed by the General
Assembly and must be endorsed
by the Security Council.
Clearly indicative of the anti-Jewish passion the Kremlin seeks
to stir up in this cartoon printed on the front page of 'Peretz,'
the Ukranian humor magazine, and obtained by the Student
Struggle for Soviet Jewry. It shows a Streicher-like Jewish
figure, along with a gun-toting Nazi, under a harness bedecked
with a Star of David and dollar signs. They are pulling (not
seen) a garbage cart labeled "anti-Sovietism" and "Cold War. "
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WASHINGTON
SAVINGS
A DIVISION OF CITIZEN SAVINGS OF CALIFORNIA
is pleased to bring you the broadcast of the
HIGH HOLY DAY SERVICES
from Temple Israel
on WTMI-FM-STEREO
. 93.1 in Dade and Broward Counties
ROSH HASHONAH-THE JEWISH NEW YEAR
Monday, September 28 8:00 PM-10:00 PM
Tuesday, September 29 10:00 AM -12 Noon
YOM KIPPUR THE DAY Of ATONEMENT
Wednesday, October 7 8:00 PM-10:00 PM
Thursday, October 8 10:00 AM -12 Noon
3:00 PM-6:00 PM
In observance of the High Holy Days.
Washington Savings offices will be closed
Tuesday, September 29 & Thursday, October 8.
Happy
New Year
from
Delta
Air Lines*
Delta Air Lines extends best wishes to our Jewish friends for
the holiday season and for the year to come. May the new year
bring peace, health, happiness and prosperity for everyone.
L'shono
tf koseoci!
* Waste Management Inc.
800 NW 62nd Street
Fort Lauderdale, Florida
771-9850
-mi-.
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Religious Vandalism Illegal
ByJTA
TEANECK, N.J. Gov.
Brendan Bvrne sitrned into law at
a synagogue here a bill providing
for stiff penalties against acts of
bigotry such as the desecrations
and anti-Semitic daubings the
synagogue has suffered.
The law, signed in Congre-
gation B'nai Yeehurun, last
Thursday, sets penaties of up to
five years in jail and fines of up to
$7,500. Specifically, the bill is
aimed at persons seeking to incite
fear by burning crosses, painting
swatikas or defacing buildings or
property with threatening
slogans or symbols.
The Governor said, in signing
the measure, that it would "serve
as a representation of the senti-
ment of New Jersey residents
against that kind of bigotry and
attempts at terrorism."
Edward Weiss, chairman of the
New Jersey regional advisory
*board of the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith, said the
ADL had been in the forefront of
a two-year effort to get the bill
passed by the New Jersey
Legislature. Weiss called the
measure a "get tough" law.
an alley leading to the New Gate,
on the northern wall of the Old
City of Jerusalem. The group of
47 Catholic pilgrims returned
from a mass in the Church of the
Holy Sepulchre. As they stopped
to look at a souvenir shop, the
grenade was hurled at them.
TEL AVIV The director
general of the Prime Minister's
office and his aides were forced
by angry settlers to leave Yamit
Monday, when he tried to open
an office to deal with settlement
claims by residents of the region
who must evacuate by next April
under the Israel-Egypt peace
treaty.
Mattityahu Shmuelevitz began
meeting with some of the house
and shop owners who have
agreed to accept payment for
moving, when a group of other
residents opposed to the eva-
cuation broke up the meeting.
One threw a smoke grenade.
The protestors claimed that
Shmuelevitz was not properly
empowerea to discuss evacuation
and demanded that a ministerial
committee on withdrawal and
compensation should come to the
area, or send a duly authorized
representative with written
authority.
JERUSALEM Israel
Sunday accused Austrian
Chancellor Bruno Kreisky of
"openly encouraging acts of
terrorism." In a strongly-worded
official statement, the Israel
Foreign Ministry "rejected with
disgust" a series of statements
about the PLO made by Kreisky
in a weekend interview with
"Nouvelle Observateur," the
Paris magazine.
The Israel statement was
issued some hours after the
weekly cabinet meeting during
which Acting Foreign Minister
Moshe Nissim referred to
Kreisky "s "personal problem
about his Jewishness."
In the interview, Kreisky
distinguished between PLO
terrorism inside Israel and such
terrorism as perpetrated by
Bader-Meinhof or the Abu Nidal
group. The latter, he said, was
terror for its own sake, while the
PLO's actions were Dart of a
national struggle.
He also denied Jewish
Nationhood and said that were it
not for Hitler, the Jewish yishuv
would have remained a small
colony in Palestine.
JERUSALEM Chief Rabbi
Shlomo Goren issued recently a
halachik ruling that the "tunnel
next to the Wailing Wall is more
holy than the wall itself," it was
learned Sunday.
The tunnel, whose existence
was kept in secret from the public
until recently, was closed off to
the public by the police following
a violent clash between Jewish
and Moslem zealots over the
ownership on the place.
Goren ruled that "since the
tunnel is the closest spot to the
original temple area and the Holy
of the Holies, it is the most
important site at which Jews can
pray."
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TEL AVIV The Histadrut
convention ended in uproar in
the early hours last Friday morn-
ing after cudgel-wielding border
policemen were called in to
separate battling Labor and
Likud members. The uproar in-
creased yet further when one of
the Likud members was arrested,
hut died down somewhat when
the convention president per-
suaded the police to release him
but bar him from reentering the
-hall.
The meeting of the 1,501-
strong assembly had been noisy
throughout its four days of
deliberations, with frequent
interruptions of speakers,
especially by the Likud minority,
in scenes reminiscent of the
national pre-election period.
But the uproar rose to a peak,
culminating in fist fights and a
wild surge towards the platform,
L-when the Labor majority in-
troduced a vote re-designing
election districts to allow
members of kibbutzim to vote for
local Labor councils in nearby
towns. The reorganization plan
was carried by a majority vote,
while Likud speakers repeatedly
called unsuccessfully for a revote
and a recount.
JERUSALEM Some 100
Israeli and Egyptian civil ser-
vants began working here
Monday morning in four com-
mittees discussing aspects of
"normalization." Israeli sources
said after the morning's sessions
that the atmosphere was "warm
"and businesslike."
The talks opened formally the
night before, with the Chief
Israeli delegate. Foreign
Minister Assistant Director
General Shmuel Divon, taking
the opportunity to prod the
Egyptians to speed up the
normalization. Divon warned
that there was growing "con-
cern" and "disappoinment" in
Israel over the slow pace of the
peace process so far.
"Normalization is not an in-
terest of one side or another,"
Divon said. "It is the very es-
sence of peace without normali-
zation is of no meaning. People
in Israel are conscious of this and
have expressed concern about it.
It is these concerns that we must
assuage and assuage now."
JERUSALEM One Italian
pilgrim was killed and 28, most of
them pilgrims as well, were
twounded Saturday night in a
hand grenade attack in the Old
City ofJerusakm.
Three of the wounded were still
considered in bad condition
, Sunday morning.
The hand grenade was thrown
into':the group of worshippers in
At one time, it was the custom to leave loaves of Challah or' 'Showbread'' on
the Temple's altar, and to give the "rosh" or head of the dough to the priests.
Today, the dining table is an altar, and a small piece is removed from each loaf of
Challah and burned as a symbolic offering to the priests.
Homemade Challah is a warm tradition made simple, with rnELLMANN'S/
BEST FOODS Real MayonnaiseThe Kosher Mayonnaise.
CHALLAH
7 112 cups (about) unsifted flour
1 /4 cup sugar
2 pkg active dry yeast
1 tspsalt
1 1/2 cups warm water (120F to 130"F)
1/2 cup HEILMANN'S/BEST FOODS Real Mayonnaise
4eggs
1 tsp poppy seeds
Grease 2 baking sheets. In large bowl stir together 2 cups
flour, sugar, yeast and salt. With mixer at medium speed,
gradually beat in water; beat 2 minutes. At low speed
beat in 2 cups flour, Real Mayonnaise and 3 eggs. Beat at
medium speed 2 minutes. Stir in enough flour (about 3
cups) to make soft dough. Knead on floured surface 10
minutes or until smooth and elastic, adding flour as
needed. Place in greased bowl; turn greased side up.
Stover with damp towel; let rise in warm place 1 hour or
until doubled Punch down; divide into thirds. Let rest 10
minutes. From 1 /3 of dough form 3 (14") ropes. Place
side by side on baking sheet Braid loosely; pinch ends.
Repeat with another 1 /3 of dough; place on second bak-
ing sheet From remaining 1/3 of dough form 6 (16")
ropes. Make 2 braids Place small braids on top of large
braids; tuck ends under. Cover with towel; let rise 1 hour
or until doubled. Beat 1 egg shghtly; brush on loaves.
Sprinkle with poppy seeds Bake in 375F oven 35 min-
utes or until browned and loaves sound hollow when
tapped on bottom. Cool. Makes 2 loaves.
QUICK BANANA CAKE
2 cups unsifted flour
1 cup sugar
1 tsp baking soda
1/2 tspsalt
1 cup mashed ripe banana
2/3 Cup HElLMANNS/BESTFOODS
Reel Mayonnaise
1 /4 cup water
1 1/2 tsp vanilla
112 cup finely chopped nuts
Grease 9" x 9" x 2" baking pan. Stir together
first 4 ingredients Add next 4 ingredients. With
mixer at medium speed beat 2 minutes. Stir in
nuts. Four into prepared pan Bake in 350F
oven 35 to 40 minutes or until cake tester in-
serted in center comes out clean. Cool in pan.
Males 9 servings.
East <* Me Rockies In name is HELLMANN'S.
Wfcst it s BEST FOODS. By either name. HI the
same tme Rejl Mayonnaise
HELUVlAHMS/gEST POODS CARES P0g THE KOSHER KITCHEN.


- __:ral*!"
Utf %.-'
.."_ /AT!^^K^Xiy4^~^y>iJ"^g1>^ar* tai^aaaatg"
Senate Lines Up
JSTopes to Sbc* SWAGS' In Close Vote
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
A dozen members of the Senate
have asked their colleagues to
join them in sponsoring a resolu-
tion to reject President Reagan's !
proposal to sell five AW ACS re-
conaissance planes and other
sophisitcated arms to Saudi
Arabia.
"We strongly believe that this
proposed sale is not in the best
interests of the United States,"
the 12 said in a letter initiated by
Sens. Bob Packwood (R., Ore.)
and Henry Jackson (D., Wash.).
"This sale seriously risks
jeopardizing the Middle East,"
Packwood said at a press con-
ference at the Capitol.
PACKWOOD was the initiator
of a fetter on June 24, which 55
Senators sent Reagan urging him
that he not send the arms
package proposal to Congress.
At the same time, more than 246
members of the House signed a
resolution to reject the safe.
But Packwood conceded that
only about 44 to 45 Senators are
at present committed to rejecting
the sale He said that about 37 to
38 Senators support the
President and the fight will be
over 17 to 19 Senators who are
presently undecided.
Congress began the 20-day
informal notification period in
which it can discuss the proposed
safe when it returned from its
summer recess. This will be
followed by a 30-day formal
notification period in which the
Senate and the House must reject
the sale in order to veto it.
Congress began the 20-day
informal notification period in
which it can discuss the proposed
sale when it returned from its
summer recess last week. This
will be followed by a 30-day
Most Israelis Favor Unlimited
Settlement on W. Bank, Polls Show
JERUSALEM (JTA) More than half the Israeli
public favors continued unlimited settlement in Judaea
and Samaria. Another fifth of the public favors restricted
settlement, and another fifth is entirely opposed to settle-
ment there. These figures, showing a distinctly hawkish
trend, emerged from a poll conducted by the Modiin
Ezrachi Applied Research Center on behalf of The Jeru-
salem Post.
JNF Forest Remembers Victims
. AMSTERDAM JJTA) An advertisement to
plant trees in a Jewish National Fund forest in Israel in
sympathy with the victims of the terrorist attack on the
Vienna synagogue has appeared in the Dutch press. It is
signed by parliamentarians of most of the Dutch political
parties and by representatives of the Protestant and
Roman Catholic churches and others. The initiative was
token by the Amsterdam Protestant cleric, Rev. Arnold
bpijkerboer. The attack on the Vienna synagogue Aue 29
left two people dead and 18 wounded. "
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formal notification penoa in
which the Senate and the House
must reject the sale in order to
veto it.
The letter signed by a dozen
Senators listed the reasons for
opposing the sale as follow:
It is unwise to sell our most
sophisticated airborne sur-
veillance systems to a non-
democratic, potentially unstable
nation because this could lead to
compromise of our technology:
IT IS UNWISE to accede to
Saudi pressure for this sale in
view of the absence of con-
structive participation by the
Saudis in the Camp David peace
process, the continued Saudi
financing of PLO terrorism, and
in view of Saudi policy that Israel
is her number one enemy;
And it is unwise to contravene
assurances that the capabilities
of the Saudi F-15s would not be
enhanced and it is also unwise to
rely on Saudi statements or
assurances, in whatever form
made that AWACS in any
configuration would not be
employed against America's key
friend in the region, Israel, in
some future pen-Arab war."
Also signing the letter were
Sens. Alan Cranston (D., Cal.),
Roger Jepson (R., Iowa). Rudv
Boschwitz A.. Minn.). David
the 12 Senators was Sen. Daniel
Moynihan (D.. N.Y.) who said
the proposed sale "would only
serve to destabilize an extremely
volatile part of the world."
Moynihan charged that the
Administration has talked a
great deal about secret
tiations to
Boschwitz IK., JEgMJ?ar negotiations to provide
Pryor (D., Ark.), Bill Bradley (K., safeguards on the sale, "but there
N.J.), Daniel Inouye (D..HI.
and Alfonse DAmato (R., N.Y.).
Immediately joining in with
is precious little information in
writing. This is not diplomacy, it
is intrigue," he declared.
$
May the beauty and
inspiration of the
High Holy Days
bring you happiness
throughout the year.
MIAMI BEACH/CORAL GABLES
HALLANDALE/HOLLYWOOD
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took the time to make fresh perked coffee
when you didn't!



Friday, September 26, 1961
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
...... ..' .-. V***^3
Huge Real Estate Co. Found Guilty of Dismissing Lone Jewish Staffer
By MAURICE SAMUELSON
LONDON (JTA) Britain's
second biggest real estate company has
been found guilty of dismissing its only
senior Jewish employee while trying to
obtain a big loan from Kuwait.
A three-member industrial tribunal
upheld the complaint of 44-year-old
Anthony Simmons that he had been the
victim of racial discrimination when he
was fired as assistant company secretary
a year ago.
THE CASE is expected to cause a sensation in
Britain's real estate world in which Jewish-owned
companies are prominently represented. It has
also focussed attention on the lengths to which
some British businesses might be prepared to go
for Arab financial backing.
MEPC, whose directors include Angus Ogilvy,
a cousin of the Queen, and Lord Boardman,
honorary treasurer of the Conservative Party,
had hired Simmons, a lawyer, as its assistant
company secretary early in 1973 and had told him
he might eventually become company secretary.
He was dismissed in September, 1980 when the
company was seeking to raise cash for a Euro-
dollar issue from the Kuwait International
Investment Company. MEPC had told Simmons
he was being dismissed because he had become
superflous and that he was no longer regarded as
qualified for promotion.
HOWEVER, two of the three members of the
industrial tribunal rejected this explanation and
concluded that the real motive was connected
with his being Jewish. Simmons, who had not
been asked about his religion on joining MEPC, is
a member of a Reform synagogue and has never
visited Israel.
Although this is not the first case in which
British firms are suspected ot having dis-
criminated against Jewish employes while
stepping up their contracts with the Arab world,
it is believed to be the first in which such an act of
discrimination has been proved in court.
There was, however, no proof that MEPC's,
Arab business partners had requested Simmons'
; dismissal and the tribunal passed no judgement
| on whether MEPC had come under such pressure
| or had fired him voluntarily.
; IT REMAINS to be seen whether the court will
award Simmons damages or costs. On dismissing
him, MEPC gave him severance pay, a year's
salary, a company car and other benefits. His
legal costs so far are calculated at between 5,000
and 10,000 Pounds Sterling. He has not found an
alternative full-time job and has had to move into
a smaller house in order to fight the case.
He told the Jewish Telegraphic Agency that he
had fought the case not for financial compensa-
tion but to clear his professional name and to
prove that he had been treated unjustly.
Jews Face Grim Prospect of Rising Neo-Nazi Tide
ByADELEASHER
JOHANNESBURG -
(JTA) The grim pre-
diction that increasing
rightwing and neo-Nazis
activities will drive South
African's 120,000 Jews out
of this country by the turn
lof the century is drawing
conflicting reactions in the
Jewish community.
Archie Shandling, outoing
chairman of the South African
Jewish Board of Deputies in Cape
Town, said he did not intend to
be an alarmist in voicing that
view. He observed, however,
"Many South Africans are con-
cerned about the sluggishness of
the government's attempts at re-
form and would like to see more
done to allay their fears."
Shandling, 58, a lawyer, is
widely respected in the Jewish
community. Many who disagreed
K"~~with his prognostication never-
theless shared his concern. Frank
Bradlow, national vice president
of the Jewish Board of Deputies
and a noted historian, said he was
disturbed by the situation but
added:
" I DON'T believe the Jews
will leave in any greater numbers
than any other section of the
community. However, I do agree
that South Africans should take
note of the growing signs of
fascism."
Shandling, who said he has no
intention of leaving the country,
said, "The question for us, as
always, is how long? My own
..private feeling is that there will
not be a Jew left in South Africa
by the year 2000. I am driven to
this conclusion because of the in-
creasing growth ot the rightwing
in this country. Jews have always
been a target for this sort of thing
for centuries. The strength of
these people cannot be ignored
especially in times of political un-
certainty." He urged the govern-
ment to look to the future care-
fully and to be wary of creating
an irreversible situation.
Harry Schwartz, a member of
Parliament of the Progressive
Federal Party, disagreed with
Shandling. "I believe there will
be Iota of Jews living here in the
year 2000," he said. "I recognize
the threat from the right but I do
not overestimate it''
RABBI Lawrence Sandier, the
chief Jewish chaplain of South
Africa's armed forces, observed
that Jews have put down strong
roots and are unlikely to quit the
, country. He said that although
'he found the rise of rightwing
sentiments disturbing, he felt
they were not particularly anti-
Semitic.
"The South African govern-
ment has always had a positive
attitude towards Jews and I feel
sure the government would take
steps to stamp out the victimiza-
tion of anv section of tht com-
munity, Sandier said. Shandlings remarks "un- Jews are a valued group m our belong here and we believe they
The pro-government news- necessary fear-mongering." An population and have made wide ^^ Soxxth Africa and fog people
paper, Die Transvaler, labeled editorial in the daily said, "The contributions in aU spheres of better than does Mr. Shandling."
community life They live and
May
the year
5742
__bless
you with
health and
happiness.

AMERICANS*
SAVINGS L^
AND IQAN ASSOCIATION Of HOWOA ^W
Morris N. Broad
President
Shepard Broad
Chairman
SERVING SOUTH FLORIDA SINCE 5711


l:MBS


_ jgr^^x ^7^
PagaS-B

Friday, iMMiMKM. IWl
Stage Sit-in
ADL Chains Self in MAS Office
Bonn Tightens Security Around
Major Jewish Institutions
ByBENGALLOB
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Some 30 members of the Jewish
Defense League took over the
main offices of HIAS, and some
15 members chained the front
doors of the building which
houses the Jewish Agency and
the World Zionist Or-
ganization American Section.
Both actions, in different parts ol
Manhattan, were taken to protest
"lack of action" to rescue Ethio
pian Jews, Falashas, according tc
JDL director Arno Weinstein.
He said the JDL had presented
two demands to the HIAS of-
ficials. One was that HIAS
initiate an immediate rescue ef-
fort for the Falashas. The other
was for HIAS to undertake, as a
priority, to seek cooperation from
Federations throughout the
country for "an intensive aware-
ness program" about the
Falashas and thereby dramatize
the "obligation" of American
Jews to help them. Weinstein
said the HIAS officials to whom
the JDL members had talked to
refushed to consider either de-
mand and that the officials were
then "escorted" out of the office
by the demonstrators.
WEINSTEIN said that a
HIAS official, whom he identified
as Irving Haber, head of HIAS
administration, finally accepted
the two demands and that at that
point the JDL members left the
building peacefully. There had
been a large number of police in
front of the building but they
were apparently under orders not i
to use force to remove the
protestors. ,
Weinstein said Haber agreed
that the first demand would be
brought to the next meeting of
the HIAS board and that he also
agreed to the second demand to
send communications to all Fed-
erations.
Haber, responding to inquiries,
said in regard to the first demand
dthat HIAS had "always tried to
do what we can for Ethiopian
Jews and we have been helpful
but, obviously, we cannot pro-
mote mass evacuation of Ethio-
pian Jews." He said that issue
was dropped at that point.
In regard to the second de-
mand, Haber said he agreed to
send a telegram to the Council of
Jewish Federations and to four
Federations, in which HIAS
urged that an immediate pro-
gram of awareness be initiated
regarding the plight of Ethiopian
Jews and the American Jewish
obligation to help them.
HE SAID he considered the
demand that all 200 Federations
be contacted was "ridiculous"
and agreement was reached on
sending telegrams to the four
plus the CJF. He said the JDL
demonstrators then left peace-
fully. He added that HIAS would
not press any charges against
them.
A spokesman at the Jewish
Agency building said the demon-
strators left after several hours
and that the police had not been
called. Charlotte Jacobson, chair
woman of the WZO-Amencan
Section, in a statement, said that
"we do not need any demon-
stration to convince or persuade
us of the importance of doing
everything possible to save our
Falasha brothers. We know and
are confident that everything
that can be done is being done to
bring every Falasha we can save
to Israel. It is very sad that these
young and idealistic but mis-
guided young people do not have
more confidence in the leaders of
Israel."
BONN (JTA) Security has
been tightened around Jewish
institutions in this country
following reports that a German
neo-Nazi who was trained in
Palestine Liberation
Organization camps in Lebanon
is suspected of complicity in the
murder last May of Vienna city
councilman Heinz Nittel who was
also the president of the
Austrian-Israel Friendship
Society.
A security official said that a
full-scale investigation is going
on to determine whether there are
any possible plots against Jewish
personalities or friends of Israel
in West Germany.
THE OFFICIAL said that
about 10 neo-Nazis who were
trained in PLO camps are known
to be presently in Germany. He
could not say how many other
German neo-Nazis are still in
training in Lebanon
Karl-Heinz Hoffmann, the
leader of this group and the head
of a so-called sports group, his
woman friend and four other neo-
Nazis who received training in
PLO camps are in custody in
West Germany. Hoffmann is
also suspected of the murder of
the Jewish publisher, Shlomo
Levin, in Dec. 1980 in Nurem-
berg.
Begin's Eyes Water
As He Greets D.C. Jews
WASHINGTON Premier
Menachem Be^gin arrived here for
two days of talks with President
Reagan and was greeted by some
700 members of the Washington
area Jewish community with
declarations of support for Israel
and cries for peace. The
demonstration of welcome was
organized by the Jewish Com-
munity Council of Greater Wash-
ington and included people carry-
ing such signs as "No one Wants
Peace More Than Israel," and
children from the area's day
schools singing songs of peace
such as Aveinu Malkenu and
Avenu Shalom.
When Begin's limousine
arrived at Blair House, where the
Premier stayed, he noticed the
crowd of welcomers more than a
half block away and walked over
to them. He was accompanied by
his entire party, including Sec-
retary of State Alexander Haig,
who had welcomed Begin 30
minutes earlier at Andrews Air
Force Base, and the three Israeli
Cabinet Ministers accompanying
Begin Defense Minister Ariel
Sharon, Foreign Minister Yitz-
hak Shamir and Interior Minister!
Yosef Burg.
BEGIN SHOOK hands with
many in the crowd. He ap-
parently did not say anything to
the people, but many of the wel-
comers said he had tears in his
eyes.
Begin was officially welcomed
to the White House by President
Reagan. Meanwhile, the Premier
met with Haig. Afterwards, Haig
met with the President and De-
fense Secretary Caspar Wein-
berger for a preliminary dis-
cussion of the summit.
Before arriving in Washington,
Begin stopped over for a day in
New York City where he heldj
private meetings and prepared!
for his meeting with Reagan. He!
had a meeting with representa-
tives of the Conference of Presi
dents of Major American Jewish
Organizations in his suite at the
Waldorf Towers. During the 90-
minute meeting, Begin re-
portedly told the Jewish leaders
that Israel is deeply concerned
over the Reagan Administra-
tion's proposal to sell AW ACS to
Saudi Arabia.
HE ALSO reportedly said that
he would present Reagan with
the Israeli view that the AW ACS
aircraaft in the hands of the
Saudis is a fanger to Israel's
security. "The Israeli govern-
ment reached a decision terming
the Saudi AWACS a danger to
Israel's security and it is my duty
to tell the President Israel's point
of view," Begin was reported as
saying.
This JTA report was written
from dispatches by David
Friedman in Washington and
Yitzhak Rabi in New York.
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Friday, September 25, r9*l
Thi'tfiWkh FUirkUdh ft GrfateeV JMfciuteHfej*"'
fageVB
Thousands of Soviet Jews Lined Up to Bus l)riyer Foils Bombing
Visit Israel's Booth in Moscow
NEW YORK, (JTA) -
Thousand of Soviet Jews visited
the booth of the Association of
Jewish Book Publishers (AJBP)
at the week-long third Inter-
nationnal Moscow Book Fair, Sol
Scharfstein, president-elect of the
AJBP and president of Publish-
ing, said at a press conference
here. Dr. Israel Kugler, president
of the Workmen's Circle, told the
press conference that there was a
"hunger and need" for Jewish
books, records and educational
materials in Russian, Hebrew
and Yiddish.
Both Scharfstein and Kugler
were delegates to the book fair,
where they started the AJBP ex-
hibit at which tles of Jewish interest were on
display.
"We were overwhelmed by the
enthusiastic response of the
Soviet Jew, many of whom
traveled ten to twelve hours and
stood on line for several hours
just to attend the fair and to
touch their Jewish heritage,"
Kuglar said. The playing of
Hebrew and Yiddish melodies at
24,000 Jews
Living On
West Bank
JERUSALEM (JTA) Some
24,000 Jews now live in Judaea
and Samaria, the World Zionist
Organization settlement depart-
ment's chief, Mattityahu
Drobless. reported to the Zionist
General Council this week. Some
7,000 of them had moved in over
the past six months, a period of
stepped-up building and settle-
ment activity, he added.
f
The half-year period now
ending had seen the construction
of 1.870 homes, he said. Over the
past 12 months the number of
settlements put up in the area
was 23, Drobless said giving a
total of 82 Jewish settlements in
Judaea and Samaria (20 of them
in the Jordan valley rift).
REGARDING employment in
these settlments, Drobless dis-
tinguished between the more
veteran and well-established
settlements in which up to 80
percent of the people living in
them worked in them, too, and
the more recently established
settlements where most people
still worked outside and only
some 20-40 percent in the settle-
ments.
Giving figures for the immedi-
ate future, Drobless said some
2,000 to 4,000 new homes could
be put up in a relatiely short
time, in new and existing West
Bank settlements, providing the
.funding was available.
the booth during the six days of
the fair evoked a nostalgia among
older Jews and sparked a keen in-
terest among the younger
generation.
"FOR THE first time," Scharf
stein said. we have demon-
strated to the Soviet publihing
authorities the seiousness of our
mission and the possibilities for
opening up a two-way commer-
cial dialogue. Soviet publishing
officials will be visiting the
United States in the next few
months and have expressed a de-
sire to meet with us."
While the delegation was
enthusiastic over the public
response to the exhibit and the
cooperation of the book fair of-
ficials, they were nonethe less
disappointed at the practice of
censorship.
"It is ironic that two books
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censored this year had been ap-
proved for display in the past,"
Scharfstein said. The two works
banned for exhibit by Soviet
censors were the American
Jewish Yearbook published by
the American Jewish Committee
and the Jewish Publication Soci-
ety of America, and the children's
book, "My People: Abba Eban's
History of the Jews," published
by Behrman Hourse.
KUGLER SAID the Work-
men's Circle-produced plastic
records of Hebrew and Yiddish;
songs were not allowed by the
Soviet authorities to be dis-
tributed at the book fair, despite
the fact that similar records were
approved at the previous fair in
1979.
'.'All in all, it was an experience
we shall never forget," said
Scharfstein and Kugler, "and we
look forward to exhibiting at the
1983 Moscow book fair.
TEL AVIV (JTA) An alert bus driver, checking
his vehicle at its terminal station in Bat Yam near Tel
Aviv Tuesday, discovered a suspicious parcel and sum-
moned security guards. When the parcel was opened by a
police sapper it was found to contain a watch linked to ex-
plosives, forming a time-bomb due to go off shortly after-
wards. Police said 13 people were detained for
questioning.
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Page8-B
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lquderdale
Friday, Septnbar 25, iggj
EVERYONE in Jerusalem eats. Day and
night, old and young, visitors and residents. They
walk the streets, stop at the abundance of snack
bars with outdoor counters and the continue on
their way most often, eating.
Saturday evening is really the best time to ex-
perience the outdoor eating craze, which lasts at
least from May through October when the
weather is good (although it doesn't happen only
when the skies are clear. Winter is also a good
time for eating).
Let me guide you on a walk through downtown
Jerusalem for stand-up eating.
Take a map of Jerusalem in your hand and find
Jerusalem's department store, Hamashbir, on
King George Street. Cross the street and walk to
your left, down King George, toward Jaffa Road.
UNCLE SAM, 7 King George, is billed as
"America in Israel." The ads say, "I am the first
one in the.country to serve hot dogs and ham-
burgers to Jerusalem." Need one say more?
Steakburgers, burger sandwiches, fried fish
platters and french fries (all kosher) are on the
menu.
Ritchie's Pizza, 5 King George, is a hangout for
Americans. It offers ice cream, waffles, milk
shakes and naturally New York style pizza,
all kosher.
Here are some of the better places to try felafel:
Felafel Zalia, 5 King George, with freshly-
squeezed juices also available; Merkaz Felafel,.
(the Felafel Center), corner of Agrippas and King
George, also serves shwarma, defined below;
Mefech Felafel. (the King of Felafel), at the begin-
ning of A rippas Street.
FELAFEL PROBABLY came from Egypt,
where it is called ta'amia. It is said to have been
created by the Egyptian Christian Copts who
served up this dish during Lent when meat was
not eaten.
It is a combination of chick peas, garlic,
parsley, lemon juice, cumin, coriander, salt and
pepper; sometimes burgul, dry bread crumbs and
eggs ore added. The mixture is shaped into small
balls and deep fried in oil. Israeli vendors have a
clever gadget which scoops up the mixture and
then releases the formed ball into the hot oil.
Felafel is typically served inside half or whole
pita (Arab pocket bread) with a variety of salads
and sauces. Sometimes one gets a slice of dill
pickle and a salad of tomatoes, white and red cab-
bage or tomatoes and cucumber.
THERE ARE two sauces which you can spoon
nun
eating: A
nevR-en6inq
isRaeli activity
By SYBIL ZIMMERMAN
grill are the specialties.
MIXED GRILL is a combination of chicken
livers and hearts, turkey or beef pieces and
liions. The cook frequently holds a knife in one
i'and and tongs in the other. He tosses the pieces
continually (he tells me a portion takes four
minutes to cook) in a stiry-fry method of fast
cooking while constantly cutting the meat into
small pieces.
into the filled pita a white sauce made of
sesame seed paste called tchina and a red sauce
made of hot peppers and called harif (sharp) in
Hebrew.
Once in a while, one is privileged to find a piece
of fried eggplant, or even on more rare occasions
some french fries thrust into the pita.
Directly opposite Felafel Zalia, one can find a
number of ice cream stands and cafes:
Milk Bar Strauss, 2 King George, on the corner
of King George and Jaffa Road, specializes in ice
cream cones and dishes and light refreshments.
Cafe Babka, (formerly Marcus), 4 King George,
sweet cakes, cookies, pastries and ice cream; Cafe
Allenby, 6 King George, sweet cakes, french fries,
ice cream and (on occasion) freshly made potato
chips.
CONTINUE WALKING up the cafe side of
King George and make the first turn on your
right onto Agrippas Street. Here you find the two
felafel places already mentioned.
You will also find a man with a large container
on wheels selling sweet corn, wrapped in husks,
with salt on the side.
Continue walking up Agrippas Street on the
right hand side. When you recognize a huge shop-
ping center-office building-construction site, Clal
Center, you are at the corner of Agrippas and Kol
Yisrael Chaverim Street.
Steakit Makam, 44 Agrippas, can be recog-
niwd by the sign of a parachutist with an open
parachute and the word "kosher." The restaurant
has an open window to the street where a grill is
placed. Salads, humus (chick pea dip) and mixed
When cooked, the pieces go inside a piece of
pita with dill pickle and hot pepper. On the side is
mango sauce which has the smell and look of a
curry sauce.
At Steakit Makam one can specially request
tambusa, a Moroccan or Kurdi dish, which re-
sembles a large piece of fried fish. It is made of
chick peas, flour and spices which are deep fried.
An added novelty on the counter is a bowl of
parsley. Take a handful for freshening your
breath when you finish eating.
CONTINUE ALONG Agrippas past Mahaneh
Yehudah, Jerusalem's Jewish open-air food
market. At night, the market is closed except for
a few eating places which serve felafel, mixed
grill, humus, salads, etc.
If you come during the day, take a right hand
turn into Mahaneh Yehudah Street, the first
street on your right where cars can drive. Con-
tinue until you reach a small alleyway on your
left. This is known as the Iraqi market and daily,
until about 4 p.m., you will find a fascinating
bakery at work.
Bakery Abib makes pizza-size Iraqi pita right
before your eyes. The baker takes a piece of dough
and flattens it on a pillow. He throws it iiuide a
wall oven, then removes it with long tongs. A
branch of this bakery is also located at 60 Ussish-
kin Street.
Retrace your steps, and you will pass another
famous eating place, Abu Shaul's good for
grilled meats, kebab, humus, tchina, salads, etc.
When you return to Mahaneh Yehudah Street,
turn left to the corner, then turn right and you are
on Jaffa Road.
WALK DOWN, Jaffa Road until you see Clal
Center, the large shopping mall-office building on
your right. Enter the center, walk back on the
right hand side and down some steps.
Tokio Gelateria has been here for a while and is
one of four branches in Israel, developed by an
immigrant from Argentina. The Clal Center
franchise owner is David Sorfati, originally from
Tangiers hut whose wife is from Buenos Aires. He
reasons to buy jVQW
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Friday. 8eptambr 26,198!
The Jiwish Florididn of Greater Fort Lauderdale
PageS-R
Begin Tells U.S. Jews It's "New
Era' in American Relations
explains that the recipe for the ice cream and
flavors comes from Italy, and all fruit flavors are
natural with no coloring added.
Tokio is really out to develop Israelis' taste for
good ice cream, and rich it really is. Flavors of-
fered are lemon, strawberry, pineapple, banana,
mocha, chocolate chip, honey with nuts, duke de
leche (butterscotch) and another group where real
liquors are usnd: date with cognac, whiskey with
peaches and rum with raisins. Banana splits.
!own cups for children, dishes of ice cream, milk
shakes (so thick a straw stands up), sundaes,
pancakes, etc. are offered. You can also take ice
cream home in special boxes.
CONTINUE DOWN Jaffa Road, past the in-
tersection with King George Off the first alley on
your right you find Yanetz Street. On the right
hand side at the beginning and on the left hand
side at the end, are two nut and seed stores owned'
by the Bahari family.
These are Jerusalem's nut-seed stores par ex-
cellence every kind of nut and seed imaginable,
freshly roasted, including sunflower seeds, pump-
kin seeds, chick peas, peanuts, pistachio nuts, etc.
Miznon Yerushalayim. 47 Jaffa Road, is com-
pletely open to the street. On the right is a
counter for freshly squeezed juices grapefruit,
orange, carrot and sometimes apple.
Near the entrance on the left one buys shwarma
and felafel.
Shwarma is layers of boned turkey or lamb or
(>eef placed on a large vertical rotating spit and
cooked. When done, pieces are sliced thinly and
served inside pita with salad.
Mifgash Burekas (Burekas Meeting Place), 44
Jaffa Road, mustn't be missed.
THIN PHYLO dough leaves are sprinkled with
oil after being spread on a cookie sheet or flat
baking sheet. A- filling of spinach, potato or
butter is placed on top. Melted butter is poured
on top of this and the whole pastry is baked until
the top is brown and puffy.
These can be taken home in large slabs or cut
with a wood-handled cleaver into smaller eating
pieces.
Pizza Rimini, 43 Jaffa Road, is part of an inter-
national chain of pizzerias offering 20 varieties of
pizza.
All along Jaffa Road one can find tiny kiosks
selling bagels (read on for more information on
this), cold drinks, ice cream, candy and sweet
pastries.
Sometimes one also finds a cigar-shaped snack
called kibbeh, kubeh or kibby. This Syrian and
Lebanese dish is made by combining burgul with
onion and lamb, then shaping the mixture into a
torpedo shape shell which is deep fried.
Patus, 36 Jaffa Road, specializes in natural
fruit juices (they claim 18 different ones), as well
as some tempting fruit juices combined with
liqueur. Cold sandwiches, toasted sandwiches and
pancakes are also available to go.
Continue walking all the way down Jaffa Road,
past the Main Post Office to the corner of the Mu-
nicipality building. Turn left by Barclays Bank to
9 Kikar Zahal. Tucked against the wall is Marcus
Birunfeld Bagel Bakery.
These bagels are larger than ordinary bagels
and are hard and salty. The best time to come is
after 10 at night when the bagels are freshly
baked and still hot to the touch.
Retrace your steps back down Jaffa Road to
Zion Square and turn left up Ben Yehudah Street.
ALONG HERE are cafes, including Atara and
Alno, which have placed tables and chairs in the
street for cold drinks, light refreshments, ice-
coffee and tea. With the closing to traffic of part
of Ben Yehuda Street and its conversion to a mall,
you can sit undisturbed by cars and enjoy your
coffee in the middle of the street.
NEW YORK (JTA) Pre-
mier Menachem Begin told
American Jewish leaders here
that "new era" has begun in rela-
tionships between Israel and the
United States. He claimed that
the agreement for strategic coop-
eration reached during his talks
with President Reagan in Wash-
ington last week was "a turning
point" in ties between the two
countries.
Begin, addressing some 150
Jewish leaders, members of the
Conference of Presidents of
Major American Jewish Organi-
zations, who assembled to meet
him at the Waldorf Astoria
Hotel, said "We got the finest
hearing possible from President
Reagan" on the issue of the sale
of AW ACS reconnaissance air-
craft to Saudi Arabia and Israel's
contention that the sale poses a
danger to its security.
THE PREMIER spoke for
about an hour at the meeting
which was barred to the press.
The highlights of his remarks
were relayed to reporters af-
terwards by spokesmen for the
Israel Consulate in New York and
the Presidents Conference.
Begin said that there have
been three phases in relations be-
tween America and Israel. The
first phase was one of "great
friendship," dating from the rec-
ognition of the Jewish State by
President Truman in 1948, he
said. The second phase. Begin
asserted, came when President
Carter raised the possibility of a
formal defense treaty between
Israel and the U.S., and idea
which did not materialize, Begin
said.
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The Jewish Fioridian o{ Friday, Septembei-25.1981
U.S. Jews
Support UN by $12 Million Annually
By BORIS SMOLAR
Jews in the United
States estimated to number
about 6,000,000, are' con-
tributing to the United
Nations for its regular
budget and its specialized
agencies approximately $12
million a year through fed-
eral taxes, without even
being aware of it. The con-
tribution of U.S. Jewry is
many times the sum which
oil-rich Saudi Arabia pays
as its yearly allocation to
the UN budget. Until last
year, Saudi Arabia paid the
UN $1,095,000 annually.
The budget of the United
Nations is based on contributions
from its member states. The
allocations are fixed by the UN
General Assembly which opened
its 36th session in New York
Tuesday with several anti-Israel
items on the agenda and with the
ambition of the Arab delegations
to seek the ousting of Israel from
the world organization, with the
help of the Soviet Union.
The United States is providing
25 percent of the UN budget.
Official data now available for the
year 1974-75 reveals that the per
capita contribution of every man,
woman and child in this country
was $1.96 that year. The Saudi
assessment, as fixed by the UN
General Assembly, came to 0.23
percent not even a quarter of 1
percent of the UN budget.
INCREDIBLE as this may
seem, the assessment for Israel
was identical. How any UN body
could estimate that the income of
Saudi Arabia and Israel were
identical is beyond belief. The
assessments were revised slightly
for 1981-82, with Saudi Arabia
given a tiny increase to 0.58 per-
cent, which makes the payment
of the richest Arab oil country to
the UN upkeep somewhat over
one-half of one percent of the
budget.
Other
eluding
Arab oil countries, in-
Libya, Kuwait, Iraq,
contribute smaller sums than
Israel. Libya is assessed to pay
this year 0.23 percent of the UN
budget, while Israel's assessment
for this year is fixed by the UN as
0.25 percent. The assessment for
Iraq is 0.12 percent less than
half of Israel's. Egypt is assessed
to pay only 0.07 percent, and
Syria's allocation is fixed at 0.03
percent.
The U.S. is still assessed 25
percent, which is the maximum
amount. No other UN member
state approaches even remotely
the percentage paid by the U.S.
The Soveit Union's allocation to
the UN budget for 1981-82 is
11.10 percent; France if assessed
6.26 percent; and the United
Kingdom's contribution is fixed
at 4.40 percent.
SOME INFLUENTIAL
elements in the United States, in-
cluding the financial publication
"Business Week," suggest that
President Reagan, is looking for
places to cut the U.S. budget,
should reduce the allocation to
the UN budget which runs in the
hundreds of millions of dollars,
especially since the U.S. has be-
come the principal target of in-
sults" at the UN.
Jewish organizations consider
the UN generally to be a tool of
the Arab-Soviet bloc. They are
especially incensed by the
poisonous anti-Israel actions of
UNESCO the UN Educa-
tional, Scientific and Cultural Or-
ganization; by the "UN Decade
of Women," which started in
1976 and will continue until 1985;
and by other UN agencies
strongly under the influence of
the Arab-Soviet-Third World
bloc; not to speak of the anti-
Israel resolutions adopted during
the last six months of this year
by the Security Council against
U.S. opposition.
The Anti-Defamation League
of B'nai B'rith called upon
Reagan and Congress to withhold
all financial support from
UNESCO so long as this UN
body remains "a tool of Soviet
diplomacy and of Arab efforts to
destroy Israel." UNESCO is also
charged with subverting world-
wide freedom of the press and of
supporting the Islamic State
Broadcasting Association which
disseminates blatantly anti-
Semitic programs.
THE AMERICAN Jewish
Committee issued a warning to
community leaders that the
UNESCO World Heritage Com-
mittee is attempting to deny
Israel sovereignty over Jeru-
salem and that it has promoted
an extraordinary session for this
month in order to have Jordan
nominate the Old City of Jeru-
salem as part of "the cultural
heritage of mankind meriting
protection and conservation."
Approval of Jordan as a nominee
for Jerusalem's Old City is, in
effect, to deny that this is Israeli
territory, the Committee pointed
out.
The American Jewish Con-
gress has praised the efforts in
the House of Representatives to
eliminate a grant of $500,000 to
the UN "Decade of Women"
which at a conference in Copen-
hagen identified Zionism with
racism, against the opposition of
the American delegation at the
conference. The House Appro-
priations Subcommittee voted
unanimously to eliminate the
$500,000 appropriation and to
transfer the funds to programs
for assisting poor women in de-
veloping countries, carried out by
the Agency for International De-
velopment.
What can be done by the
United States to stop the un-
yielding Arab campaign in the
United Nations to delegitimize
Israel? How can the Arab inten-
tion to secure the ousting of
Israel from the United Nations be
thwarted? What can be done by
the U.S. to make the United
Nations once again a valid in-
strument for achieving a lasting
peace in the Middle East instead
of being an anti-Israel body
dominated by the Arab-Soviet-
Third World bloc?
THESE ARE questions asked
by an organized group of Ameri-
can scholars professionally con-
cerned with international affairs
including former American
delegates to the UN. The group,
known as Ad Hoc Group on the
United States Policy Towards
the United Nations, seeks a
reevaluation of the U.S. partici-
pation in the UN system.
Total withdrawal from the
United Nations, or absenting
itself from the General Assembly,
is not recommended by the
group, but "selective" partici-
pation in UN programs is urged.
Delaying payments of dues by
the U.S. to certain UN programs
like UNESCO and others as
a sign of displeasure with noxious
programs is also advocated.
A memorandum by the group
explains why it urges the White
House, the Congress and the
American people to "reexamine"
the American policy toward the
United Nations. It emphasizes
that this is suggested because of
"disquieting events" in the world
organization. It enumerates
among these events: failure of
the UN to deal with international
terrorism; twisting of rules by
the Security Council to seat the
PLO with all privileges of a mem-
ber state; the campaign to deleg-
itimize Israel; branding Zionism
as racism; calling on states to
desist from economic aid to
Israel; political abuse of UN
bodies, like UNESCO, the UN
"Decade for Women" and others
who ostracize Israel and promote
anti-Semitism.
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iday. S8ptamb 25,1981
The Jewish Fhrididn ojr Greater Fort Lauderdale
Pft*-B
^
U.S. Embassy in Rome
Refuses Visa to Capucci
WASHINGTON (JTA) The State Department
that its U.S. Embassy in Rome has denied a visa to
khbishop Hilarion Capucci, the former Melkite Arch-
hop of Jerusalem, to visit the United States because of
11974 conviction in Israel for gun smuggling.
State Department Spokesman Dean Fischer said that
Emigration and Naturalization Act makes "in-
bble" for admission to the United States persons who
Ivocate or teach violence." He said that Capucci's con-
lion in Israel "renders him ineligible." Fischer said the
|.sion was made in Rome by a Consular officer there on
)asis of an opinion from the State Department.
Welch Inc.
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Happy New Year To All
The Diet Workshops
8751 NW 57th St.
larac 726-3438
Happy New Year
Marvin C's
FOR COLLECTIBLES
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opy New Year To Our Friends & Customers
ilonial Garden Shops
4701N. Federal Hwy.
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A Happy, Healthy New Year To
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Britts Beauty Salon
3501 N. State Rd. 7
ierdale Lakes 566-9412
jroward, Palm Beach
Tractor Co. inc.
2511 Hammondiulle Rd.
pompano Beach
972-3525
Happy New Year
M
Happy and Healthy Naw Year
To our Jewish Iriends and customers
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7634100
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a good year"
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Pagett-B
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
:-.:/

1
..
In Jerusalem
Archaeologists at Work on Wall
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
Supreme Court has issued
temporary order overturning
Education and Cultural Minister
Zevulun Hammer's suspension
for two weeks of the controversial
City of David dig. The ar-
chaeologists returned to the site
to resume their work and the
ultra-Orthodox Jews of the Mea
Shaarim Quarter also returned to
demonstrate against the ex-
cavation. Police were also on
hand to keep the peace.
The court's interim decision,
by a three-justice tribunal, was
welcomed by secular and
academic circles who had con-
tended that the original halachic
ruling by the Chief Rabbi?
banning any excavations at the
site was unjustified.
The Chief Rabbis maintained
that there was an ancient Jewish
cemetery at the site, but secular
and academic circles said there
was no evidence for this con-
tention and that in the four years
of the dig no evidence of a Jewish
cemetery was found there. The
court, in its ruling last Friday,
said it would publish the basis for
its decision at a later stage.
Pitney Bowes, Inc.
4201N. Andrews Ave., Ft. Land. 663-6693
New Year Greetings
COLLINS CHEVRON
STATION
8741 W. Broward Blvd., Fort Laudardale 472-7911
A Happy New Year To All
Realty fly The Sea
3360 NE 34 Street Fort Lauderdale
561-4000
Holliday Greetings
LARRY LARSON
Abraham And Shulant
Gittelson
Ora Masha, And Reva
Wish Their Relatives
__________A Very Happy New Ytar
Lord's Jewelers
1918 E. Sunrise Boulevard
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33304
764-6750
Happy New Year To All
Good Health A Happiness To
The Jewish Community
Ben Reiter, M.D.
100 N.W. 82nd Ave.
Phone 474-4401
Adjacent to Bennett Hospital
Plantation
Laury Lee Electric
5115 SW 64th. Ave.
791-3490!
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33314
New Year Greetings
Days Inn Of Pompano
1411 W. Atlantic Blvd.-972-3700
Happy New Year
Bro-Dade Inc.
279 SW 33 Ct. Ft. Lauderdale-525-6336
Happy New Year
Medical
Equipment Pool, Inc.
2586 N. Federal Highway
Fort Lauderdale. Florida 33306 -566*441
Happy New Year
Wishing All Our Friends
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Israel resolutions adopted during
the last six months of this year
V >U*"-L**mwr.u s


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'HS'j-i'iU*' -r"f*T*-
In Bucharest
Rabbis Urge Non-Violence at Dig
By EDWIN EYTAN
BUCHAREST (JTA) -
lie standing committee of the
inference of European Rabbis,
reeling here, has called on all
in Israel involved in the
jntroversy over the ar-
laeological excavations at the
of David in Jerusalem "to
Abstain from violence" and to use
"goodwill and persuasion" to
arther their views.
The Conference, which includes
Chief Rabbis from more than six
European countries, issued a
inimous declaration ex-
ssing its "growing concern"
jout the verbal and physical
clashes between members of the
religious and secular com-
munities in Jerusalem over the
dig, and asking for
"moderation."
THE DOZENS of rabbis,
teachers and community leaders
attending this first-ever major
Jewish meeting in an East
European country, have been
meeting here at the invitation of
Rumania's Chief Rabbi Dr.
Moses Rosen.
The declaration on the Citv of
David dig was issued after less
than two nours discussion. A
prominent Chief Rabbi told the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency that
"this was the furthest we could
go in disassociating ourselves
from the extremist elements in
Jerusalem." He explained that
the declaration's appeal for
moderation was addressed to all
the parties involved in the
controversy, but especially to the
leaders of the religious com-
munity.
The participants at the
Conference meeting, who toured
in parts of the country to meet
with members of Jewish com-
munities, discussed the issue of
Soviet Jews who decide, once
they arrive in Vienna after
having received their exit permit,
to settle in Western countries
other than Israel. Rosen favors
cutting off aid to these dropouts,
but most of the other rabbis,
including Britain's Chief Rabbi
Immanuel Jakobovitz, issued an
appeal for continuing aid to the
dropouts by such organizations
as HI AS.
AT ITS SESSION, the
Conference paid tribute to Rosen
for enabling the participants to
meet here and also addressed its
appreciation to the Rumanian
authorities and President Nicolae
Ceausescu for their friendly
attitude toward Rumanian Jews.
Many of the participants, in
Rumania for the first time, were
surprised and moved by the deep
religious and cultural Jewish lite
which continues to exist despite
the dwindling number of Jews in
the country: some 33,000 from a
post-war peak of 400,000.
Addressing the meeting, Rosen
said: It is rare, if not unique, for
a rabbi to be happy to see his
community steadily diminishing.
Over the last 33 years some 95
percent of Rumania's Jews went
to Israel." He stressed that they
"did not emigrate. They left for
Israel." He also pointed to the
paradoxical situation that
prevails in this country with
regard to the Jews.
According to Rumanian laws,
no religious or national group is
allowed to operate educational
institutions, receive money from
abroad, organize and publish an
independent newspaper or be
involved in politics as an in-
dependent group, Rosen ob-
served. "And yet, we do all these
things, not against Rumanian
authorities but with their
agreement and their active help,"
he said. He noted that "no one
can even imagine that the
country's Catholics can recite
prayers for Rome as we do for
Jerusalem, or for the Vatican as
we do for the State of Israel.
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Aword* into plowdkareA and tkeir &pear into pruningkookd; nation dkall not li\t up
6word against nation, neither okall tkey
learn war any more.
J^aiak 2, IV
Publix
'

Through the new year, may your family
share the blessings of peace, joy and love.
A Happy Rosh Hashanah
to your whole family from
the people at Publix.



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/n Paris
-r
UNESCO Votes for
Jerusalem Plan
PARIS (JTA) Tht
United Nations Edu-
cational, Scientific and Cul-
tural Organization
(UNESCO) has voted 14-1
with five abstentions to
accept Jordan's request to
place East Jerusalem on
UNESCO's World Heritage
Committee List. The vote,
which took place last
Friday after a two-day de-
bate here, in effect recog-
nizes Jordan's right to take
part in the international
supervision of cultural and
historical sites in East
Jerusalem.
Those voting for Jordan's
request were Argentina, Brazil,
Bulgaria, Egypt, Iraq, Cyprus,
Guinea, Jordan, Libya, Nepal,
Senegal, Tunisia, Zaire and
Pakistan. The United States
voted against the request. The
five countries abstaining were
Australia (which chaired the
meeting), France, Italy, West
Germany and Switzerland.
ISRAEL WAS barred from the
debate because it is not among
the 60 countries which signed the
convention which established tht
list of historical and cultural sites
worthy of international pro-
tection under the administration
of UNESCO.
The two-day debate centered
around a convention article which
states, "inclusion of a property
on the World Heritage List
requires consent of the state con-
cerned." Those supporting the
Jordanian claim cited another
article in the convention which
states: "The inclusion of a
property situated in a territory,
sovereignty or jurisdiction which
is claimed by more than one
state, shall in no way prejudice
the rights of the parties to the
dispute."
THE U.S. delegate argued that
Jordan had no right to propose
East Jerusalem as a site which it
should protect because Israel had
de facto control of the area, and,
therefore, was the "state con-
cerned" according to the con-
vention article. The Jordanian
delegate argues that its request
was not designed to further its
claims on East Jerusalem but
only to help protect the holy sites
there.
Switzerland's delegate argued
that neither Jordan nor Israel
was the "state concerned" as the
status of the area was unde-
termined. The U.S. delegate re-
buked UNESCO for turning a
purely cultural convention into a
political tool.
The U.S. delegate argued that i
Jordan had no right to propose
Jerusalem as Israel had de facto j
Israel Plans
'83 Ait Fair
TEL AVIV (JTA) Israel
will hold its first international air
show in August, 1983, Yaacov
Bar-Gera, director of the Israel
Trade Fair Center, has an-
nounced. The show, to be held at
Tel Aviv's Sde Cov Airport and
in the nearby Tel Aviv fair
grounds and Yarkon Park, will
display from 80 to 100 aircraft
and aviation equipment, with the
participation of an expected 300
rep^sentatives from at least 16
countries. Both Poland and the
Soviet Union have been invited
to participate but replies have
not yet been received.
control of Jerusalem and, there-
fore, was the state concerned.
JORDAN ARGUED that its
proposal was in no way designed
to further its claims to Jerusalem
but to help protect the holy
citadel's sites.
Switzerland argued that
neither Jordan nor Israel was the
state concerned as the status of
Jerusalem was undetermined.
Switzerland joined the other
abstentionists in calling for the
Heritage Committee to take over
the nomination of Jerusalem "to
remove the spectre of the Israel-
Jordanian dispute." This was
rejected.
The U.S. and Israeli represen-
tatives said the decision set a
precedent at UNESCO for Jor-
danian claims over Jerusalem,
although there was no chance of
the Jordanian plan for protecting
Jerusalem sites being enacted.
Jewish SuBvival
Continued from Page l\
the devout hope that they never will be utilized.
And so, as we pray this Rosh Hashanah for
individual souls and for Jewish souls all over the
world, we also pray that Israel remain secure and
be permitted to develop its cities, its soil and its
industry.
We must pray, too, for a continuation of the
partnership between the Jews of Israel and the
Jews of the United States, who represent the
greatest community, in numbers, of Jews in the
world.
It is possible, as the years stretch across this
decade, that the two Jewries will, sometimes,
misunderstand one another and will not always
speak the same language or see eye to eye on
critical matters. But the commonality of interest
ties us together in an unbreakable bond and we
must pray that it remains so.
WE MUST, therefore, pray that the Ameri-
can Jewish community deepens and extends
Jewish education in the United States an edu-
cation that is not superficial, an education that
sticks to the heart, soul and mind of the Jew, so
at, in the years ahead, Jews will continue to
recognize one another and help one another.
"A man is in great danger in the world t
Indeed, so is the Jew. And as he prays, in the
common language of Hebrew, and observes the
High Holy Days simultaneously with other Jews,
so shall he feel solidarity with his own people, as
an individual and as a member of the large Jewish
community.
Blast oC the ShofaR: Centeppiece of the high holy 6ays
Continued from Page 1
Levitcus as a portent of great and good events,
such as the giving of the Torah and the proclama-
tion of the jubilee year. The sound of the shofar,
properly blown, is inherently jubilant, and I
cannot understand how it came to acquire funeral
connotations.
I SUPPOSE, in common with much that is
iiH'lantholy in our traditions, they are the
products of exile, for if the shofar as heard in the
Bible generally has a cheerful and stirring note, in
Ihu Talmud it becomes lachrymose, and it came to
be used for funerals and fasts and exorcisms and
excommunications. It also acquired a practical
function and was used by the town crier to herald
l hi' approach of the Sabbath.
It was Rabbi Shlomo Goren who restored the
shofar to its original use when he sounded a tri-
umphant tekiah gedolah to celebrate the re-
unification of Jerusalem in 1967. Unfortunately,
he hasn't stopped blowing it since.
London Chronicle Syndicate
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rrmr
neJeuUPUrlLnolUreaterVortlaulriaie
f$ge ithn
\bout Strategic Ties
Much Talk But No Action
^SHINGTON The
sd States and Israel
agreed to work more
|y toward "strategic
ition" against the
of Soviet aggression
i Middle East as a
of Israeli Premier
kchem Begin's two
of talks with Presi-
igan, but no formal
i was worked out.
i emerged from statements
eagan and Begin as the
er left the White House and
.arks by Begin at a crowded
conference at a Washington
ater. Begin said the details
.-operation will be worked
,t ween Israeli Defense Min-
^riel Sharon and U.S. Sec-
of Defense Caspar Wein-
\ at a meeting later.
leaders said they were
by their White House
which Reagan called
lly and useful and pro-
fe," and Begin termed
fruitful." Reagan said a
iship and complete candor
kped between us," while
I said the talks were "candid
ail." The President added
talks "created new
of understanding between
LS. and Israel and renewed
lengthened our very spe-
itionship."
LOAN DECLARED that
and the U.S. have de-
a "partnership" to
all forces that threaten
idle East. Begin was more
in drawing a "clear
Lion" between a mutual
i agreement and the idea of
c cooperation.
defense of Israel is our
he said. "We will never
nation to send soldiers to
us." He repeated that at
ess conference, saying Is-
juld never ask "American
to shed blood" for the
i State.
[Begin said there is a "clear
lity of interest" between
I. and Israel against the
posed to the Middle East
ewhere by the Soviet Un-
le said the two countries
I make a "common effort"
Ih strategic cooperation
Je sake of mutual security"
' the entire free world.
PREMIER denied that
ategic cooperation concept
>mpensation" for Israel to
it over the Administra-
decision to sell AW ACS
aissance aircraft and en-
aent equipment for F-15
"-bombers to Saudi Arabia,
that what he called the
deal" the selling of
> and the F-15 embellish-
that would give them
ye capability is "a dan-
Israel's security."
i said Reagan allowed him
tier members of his party
Dut in full detail their con-
fer the AWACS sale. He
President and his aides
ve their reasons for going
[with the sale. But Begin
to call on Congress to
! proposed deal. Congress
the Administration s in-
notification of the sale
1 and has 50 days to veto it
) of both houses.
Bob Pack wood (R., Ore.),
heading the Senate fight
the AWACS sale, has
it a "signal" from Begin
needed to get Senators
on the fence to join the
in. But Begin said he
give no such "so-called
[' to the elective legislative
of another country. He
iwever, that he would con-
repeat his view that the
1 sale endangers Israel.
departing words to
Reagan said the U.S. will
?t and Israel build upon
treaty and "stand
ready to develop the peace
process." Begin said at his press
conference that the Ad-
ministration did not say who the
U.S. will send when the autono-
my negotiations resume in Cairo
Sept. 23 to 24. But he shot down
a suggestion that the meeting
mightbe held in New York.
He said that he and President
Anwar Sadat of Egypt had
agreed to resume the talks after a
14-month suspension and believe
they should be held in the region.
Begin said he thought the talks
should be held at least twice a
week and that unlike some
Egyptian officials, he didn't
think they should begin from
scratch because agreement
already has been achieved on
many points. Begin said he hoped
an agreement on full autonomy
could be reached by the end of
this year.
Asked about suggestions by
some in the U.S. that no progress
could be achieved as long as he
heads Israel's government, Begin
quipped, "What can I do if I was
reelected?" He said he was
elected democratically and that
he had never made a remark such
as that attributed to Gen. Sher-
man that he would not run, and if
elected would not serve. "I apolo-
gize to you (the press) that I was
reelected," Begin said.
HE ALSO denied that he was
inflexible He noted that in the
peace agreement with Egypt, Is-
rael gave up much, particularly
the Sinai oil wells which means
that it now pays Egypt $500 mil-
lion a year for oil, and also made
the "still painful decision" to
abandon settlements in Sinai.
Begin declared that Israel will
never negotiate with the Pal-
estine Liberation Organization
which, as in the past, he labeled a
"neo-Nazi organization." He
noted that El Fatah, the PLO's
military arm, at a recent con-
ference in Damascus, passed a
resolution calling for the
"complete liberation of Palestine
and liquidation of the Zionist
entity economically, politically,
militarily, culturally and psycho-
logcially."
Begin said that Israel takes
such statements "seriously" and
that no nation would negotiate
with an organization that wants
to destroy it. He added that at
the same confrence, the PLO
passed a resolution calling for
"strengthening the strategic al-
liance with the Socialist countries
headed by the Soviet Union." He
claimed that this proves the PLO
is a servant of Moscow.
fcEVITT -1 fE
EVITT WWEINSTE
memorial chapelt
MOCIVWOOO' '? > Rm0
NORTH MIAMI I1MS W Oiiw Hwy
WEST PALM BEACH 4 M<< I
Bfi-raos
115
1700
Rosh Hashana &Vbm Kippur.
The High Holy Days.
Celebrations of hope.
The shofar blows, heralding in the new year.
Traditionally, the end of the growing season, begun
as a harvest festival to give thanks for the earth's
richness and to seek God's forgiveness. Now, a time
for righting wrongs, mending relationships, starting anew.
Rosh Hashana. The first day, the beginning of the
Jewish religious life again with renewed dedication.
Yom Kippur. The tenth day, the most solemn of all
Jewish days of prayer and fasting to make
atonement for all that has past.
On these holiest of all days, Menorah Chapels offers the
blessings of hope and good will, in the tradition of our faith.
Chapels
The Oldest Jewish-Owned Chapels in Broward County.
Serving chapels throughout the U.S. and Canada.
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In Dade, 945 3939.
In Palm Beach. 833-0887.
6800 W. Oakland Park Boulevard. Fort Lauderdale.
2305 W. Hillsboro Boulevard. Deerfield Beach.
5915 Park Drive at U.S. 441. Margate.
And coming soon to North Miami Beach.
North Broward County's
only all Jewish Cemetery
now has its own
Funeral Chapel!
Now you can make all of your funeral
arrangements In one location. Our
new Funeral Chapel Is staffed by
caring, experienced professionals who
can assist you with arrangements for
a loved one or pre-arranged family
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Of course.we recommend pre-arrange-
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making funeral arrangements
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price increases under Florida Law.
Star of David Memorial Gardens
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chapel and complete funeral
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Star of David
Jacob Weiss, Licensed Funeral Director/7701 Bailey Road, Tamarac, Florida 33320/721-4112

Pre-Need Services Department
Ccm-A-Care Management Co., Inc.
P.O. Box 11960, Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33339
? I want more information on property selections at Star of David: DSouth Broward LJ North Broward
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