The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 3, no. 7 (Apr. 5, 1974)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 9, 1976 called v.4, no. 27 but constitutes v.5, no. 1; issue for July 7, 1989 called v.18, no. 11 but constitutes v.18, no. 13.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44570954
lccn - sn 00229545
ocm44570954
System ID:
AA00014312:00195

Related Items

Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward


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Full Text
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viriiain<3i in
OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE
Volume 10 Number 18
Fort Lauderdale, Florida Friday, August 28,1981
FndSfocnn
Price 35 Cents.
Federation's 'Floridian' Going Weekly
^Jewish Flcridlian
Two months short of 10 years
ago the first issue of the The
Jewish Floridian edition sponsor-
ed by the Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale was
published.
Now, almost on the anni-
versary of that first issue, in re-
sponse to the greater number of
Jews living in North Broward,
and in the search by those Jews
for more involvement in the unity
of the Jewish community, The
Jewish Floridian, Greater Fort
Lauderdale Edition, is going
WEEKLY.
Now, continuing to mature
after 257 issues, published every
two weeks since Oct. 22,1971 (see
partial reproduction of Page One
of that Vol. 1, No. 1, issue), The
Jewish Floridian will be the
weekly voice of the Jewish com-
munity of North Broward'8
cities, synagogues, fraternal, so-
cial, and condominium organiza-
tions beginning with the issue
dated Friday, Sept. 11.1981.
The "newsroom" of the
Greater Fort Lauderdale edition
will continue be in the offices of
the Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale. Max Levine of
the Federation staff, who has
been serving as news coordinator
for the past two years, will con-
tinue in that capacity.
Victor Gruman, Federation
President, announcing the
change to weekly editions in ac-
cord with an agreement with
Miami Publisher Fred K. Shochet
whose family has been publishing
English-Jewish newspapers for
53 years, said this will enable a
better means of communications
throughout the Jewish com-
munity
He said the Federation's edi-
tion of the newspaper, the oldest
English-Jewish newspaper in
North Broward and the only one
whose entire circulation is dis-
tributed directly to homes by
mail, will be mailed to more than
16,000 families who contribute to
the United Jewish Appeal in the
area that stretches north from
South Broward's Griffin Road to
the Palm Beach county line. This
includes the cities of Fort Lau-
derdale, Lauderdale-by-the-Sea,
Lighthouse Point. Pompano
Beach, Deerfield Beach, Margate,
Coral Springs, Tamarac, Sunrise,
Coconut Creek, North Lauder-
dale, Lauderdale I hill, Plantation, Davie, and Unin-
corporated areas.
Gruman added that the Fed-
eration hopes "to develop more
effective communications be-
tween our newspaper and syna-
gogues and other institutions and
agencies so that we can help build
their membership rolls and at-
tendance at meetings. Vibrant
organizations go hand-in-hand
with a vibrant newspaper such as
The Jewish Floridian has been."
Several past presidents of the
Federation have noted that "over
the years, the Federation's news-
paper has earned the right to be
called 'the Jewish voice of the or-
ganized Jewish community in
North Broward.' "
The Greater Fort Lauderdale
edition of the The Jewish Flori-
dian office is located in the Fed-
eration's new offices at 8360 W.
Oakland Park Blvd., Fort Lau-
derdale, Fl. 33321, telephone 748-
8200. News releases, announce-
ments of meetings, special e<
vents, and items for Browsin'
thru Broward, a feature of the
paper, are welcome and should be
sent to this address at least two
weeks prior to the issue in which
the news should appear.
ol \Oltril IINOW.IK0
Volume 1 Numbei 1
Fort Lauderdale, llaicla Octobe* 22. 1971
Pnc 20c
No. Broward Jewish federation Holding Annual Meeting
Principal iprak.r si Sunday1. -.
I p.m. annul mr> iuik uflbf^BpVa**1
ton Fffdrraitunj*t_i^*"*
Tuicim*J peahif at Sunday-* j "%\&***'~
in annual mr. luig ul 1^^-i-i*"^ *
TV* **"^ odep'lden Kto5*
In T. n ,.,'
rn.ci.lnt'
r. M 1*1)1 i
Arthur S.l
JinuuflcttlL
Acconluvl
drnt aUrill
sr.tm \U )
rv,oc1. the ,
cul award
coupto in ibl
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(wc ikia.7.' as -" whkn -* .l-bha.*u wi atkln.t 4i/. tr,-n the Sm"lw*ton lra.li-
- ** ____l- 1 ;. I t. b\ b*
I THE JEWISH FEDERATION
OF NORTH MIOMARO
Oototer 22, 1971
rr
ltj
Itie Jeelen rtderetlon or north Brwero la
ploeood to announce tint it to Joining wlttl
The Jnia riorlolui of Oreater meal In
ringing to thto eannltg a quality neve-
papar featuring aitanalva coverage of local,
national ana international nava of Jevleb.
Intaraat and concern.
It la our hopa and Intantlon that thla project
... Tho Jleh Floridian of Mortn Irooord
liriacoaa a cceatunllr lnetltutlon, roriactlnf
tha actl.ltlaa of all eoaewnltj organ la a done. .
In doing aa, so alii ee helping to craata a
tr.e aanae or cnaamlt, In this area.
urge your cooperation tilth the Federation In
klnc thla venture a auocaaa, and va will aa
lntereatad In bearing your co
a tea prograaa.
iti art erltleL
> ecklnu
nominated
I)* KKMIOIl m .<- .------..-
nidi .* ,.ubo.u wiin a-----
pare trw.t the Scwttwnuin lnli-
lulun. nuk.. it lairnoilar'-
- (i.Hr.li" ""
- ,.^.T ill-."
;t-a
Ilncereli,
jr.ism ramo ar na movmq
Raril.ii FrlJovlcri, rraalOant
Federation is Moving: New Address. Phone
Effective Monday, Aug. 31, the
Jewish Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale, and its various committees
[United Jewish Appeal, Women's Divi-
sion, Chaplaincy Commission, Com-
munity Relations, Young Leadership,
bookkeeping, etc.], will be located in
offices at the Southern Building, 8360
W. Oakland Park Blvd., Fort Lauder-
dale 33321. The new telephone number is
748-8200.
::%:W::W::::W^
Israel Gets Planes; Begin to Meet Reagan
By JT A Sources
F-15 jetfighters. the most sophisticated in the U.S.
arsenal of war material, and the F-16 fighter bombers,
are expected to be arriving in Israel "momentarily,"
now that President Ronald Reagan lifted the em-
bargooa he imposed following Israel's bombing of the
I raq nuclear reactor with F-16s.
The 16 planes were expected to be delivered before
Prime Minister Menachem Begin leaves for Washing-
ton for his Sept. 8 and 9 meetings with President
Reagan. Before going to the U.S., Begin was scheduled
to hold meetings with Egypt's President Anwar Sadat.
Samuel April New Rabbi at Temple Sholom
served a congregation in Miami before
occupying pulpits in the Northeast, has
returned to Florida to become spiritual
leader of Temple Sholom, Pompano
Beach.
He is the son of Rabbi and Mrs. Simon
April of Miami Beach. His father is a
past president of the Greater Miami
Rabbinical Assn.
Born in Butler, Pa., educated at
Yeshiva University, Rabbi Samuel April
earned a masters at Columbia Uni-
versity, and was ordained in Israel.
Jewish Theological Seminary will confer
an honorary doctorate on him this year.
He served as spiritual leader of
Temple Or Olom in Miami for eight
years, then served congregations in
Philadelphia, where he was active in the
Rabbinical and Ministerial Assn. for 10
years, and more recently with Temple
Beth El in Massapequa, N.Y.
Rabbi April is married to the former
Judith Holober of Lakeland, Fla. Their
children, both born in Miami, are Max
Michael, entering his first year at Boston
University Medical School, and Lizabeth
Rabbi Samuel April, son of a promi- Cara, a freshman at Brandeis Univer-
M Miami rabbinical family, who also sity.
Strategy for the resumption of West Bank
autonomy talks is expected to be discussed in Alex-
andria and in Washington.
And when Begin arrives in Washington, the Ad-
ministration may be offering Israel some other con-
cessions in an effort to get Congressional approval for
the sale of AW ACS radar planes to Saudi Arabia.
Following the announcement of the lifting of the
embargo. Secretary of State Alexander Haig was re-
ported considering an offer of sensitive electronic
equipment and additional satellite intelligence to help
offset the advantage the Saudis would have if the
AW ACS sale is approved.
Haig reportedly is suggesting that, as part of the
sale, Americans would be stationed on the ground in
Saudi Arabia to help analyze the data from the planes,
making sure that the AWACS are not spying on Israel.
He is also reported to be considering a plan to buy more
military supplies and services from Israel. He would
like Begin to start consulting moderate Arab leaders
from the West Bank and Gaza as a way toward ulti-
mate peace.
Israel Defense Minister Ariel Sharon is reported to
be working toward that latter point, hoping to get some
Arabs into the Palistinian-autonomy talks when they
are renewed following Begins return to Israel.
Rabbi Mirsky at Deerfield's Beth Israel
Rabbi Samuel April
Rabbi Leon Mirsky, who served a con-
gregation in West Haven, Conn., for 30
years, has become spiritual leader of
Temple Beth Israel at Century Village
East of Deerfield Beach.
Beth Israel President Joseph Lovy re-
ported that Rabbi Mirsky, who was
president of the West Haven Clergy
Assn. for five years, and served as chap-
lain at Yale's New Haven Hospital and
the Connecticut Hospice at University of
New Haven, assumed his duties earlier
this month.
Rabbi Mirsky received his education
at the Rabbi Jacob Joseph School, Ye-
shiva University and the University of
Bridgeport. He and his wife, the former
Georgette Cohen of New York City, have
three married children and seven grand-
children.
Mindy and Mark Plostock are in
Sciota, N.Y.; Karen and Bernard Lip.
man of Silver Springs, Md., and Joanne
and Howard Griffel of Minneapolis.
Howard Griffel is budget and planning
director for the Jewish Federation of
Minneapolis.
,/?a66i Leon Mirsky


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Page 2
'aev 16

n of Greater Fort
\-r*r VS
Friday, August 28,1961
Florida Medical Center Hosts Chaplaincy Seminar
Florida Medical Center will be host to the Chap
laincy Commission of the Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale for a seminar and luncheon at 11 a.m.,
Tuesday, Sept. 1, in the hospital's Medical Library,
5000 W. Oakland Park Blvd.
Six rabbis and two lay people who have been active
in the hospital and nursing home visitations in North
Broward will be honored at the luncheon which will be
highlighted by a discussion on the role of chaplaincy in
the Jewish community.
Dr. Alvin Colin, chairman of Federation's Chap-
|W:ft:W
Commission, announced
, that honors will be
S&ri to B.bbi A.b._ N. Try *J*
Center; Rabbi Joseph Berglas ot
gation Beth Hillel; Rabbi Morris A Skop who recently
retired as spiritual leader at Temple Sholomn Pomp
ano Beach, and retired Rabbis Mordeca. BrdlL David
Gordon and Nathan Friedman. Also to ^ honored are
Ruth Horowitz, chairman of the nursing home volun-
teers sponsored by Federation and Jewish Community
Center-supported WECARE program, and Sol Gruber
who served as cantor at religious services at nursing
homes.
nomes. .........*MM&M!NS88SSft3
Rabbi Albert B. Schwartz^ Chaplaincy Com-
mission director, announced that Rabbi Solomon Schiff
will conduct the seminar. He said that Rabbi Schiff is
director of chaplaincy of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation, executive director of the Rabbinical Assn
of Greater Miami, and has been chaplain for 25 years at
Mount Sinai Medical Center in Miami Beach.
The Chaplaincy Commission has expressed its
appreciation to Dr. Maxwell Dauer. head of the Florida
Medical Center, for hosting the seminar and providing
the kosher lunch for those who will be attending the
ujum u jyiiuinnnnnnmim ----------------------------------
Tor Israel, With Love'Musical Show Is Free
Pastor Jim Croft
Two hours of musical enter-
tainment, titled For Israel, With
Love, sponsored by the Good
News Fellowship Church of Fort
Lauderdale. will be presented at 8
p.m., Monday, Sept. 14, at the
Sunrise Musical Theatre.
This evening of song, dance
and entertainment is the third
such event sponsored by the
church to promote camaraderie
between the Christian and Jewish
communities and to show the
Good News Fellowship contin-
uing support for Israel.
Jim Croft, pastor of Good
News Fellowship, will be the
master of ceremonies. Featured
on the program will be Israel's
Consul General Joel Arnon of the
Israeli Consulate in Atlanta. He
will speak following a brief bio-
graphy of Henrietta Szold, by
Don Bohl of the church, and a
vignette about the founder of
Hadassah by Muriel Nussbaum.
The Good News Fellowship
orchestra directed by Jim Letizia,
and the Good News Fellowship
singers will lead the audience in
singing Shalom Alechim with the
words of these and other Hebrew
songs transliterated in English
and projected on a screen so that
all can join in singing
Among other features of the
show are the Fellowship dancers.
The Derek Prince film Our Debt
to Israel, Judy Wolfe singing the
The Sabbath Prayer," a 1981
conversation between God and
Moses; Amy Bohl singing Jeru-
salem of Gold.
The entertainment is free but
admission will be by tickets
They are available at the Good
News Fellowship Church, 2301 N
Federal Highway: Jpwish
Federation at its new offices
8360 W. Oakland Park Blvd '
Sunrise City Hall. 10770 W Oak-
land Park Blvd.. Jewish Com-
munity Center. 6501 W. Sunrise
Blvd., and Lauderdale Lakes
branch library, 3531 N\V 43rd.
Ave.
RIVERSIDE
IN
NORTH BROWARD.
The most beautiful and largest Jewish funeral chapel in
Broward County.
Centrally located to Ft. Lauderdale and Pompano Beach serving the
entire Northeast and Northwest Broward areas. Convenient to highways.
Ample parking.
6701 West Commercial Blvd. (East of University Rd.),Tamarac/
587-8400
RIVERSIDE
Memorial Chapel. Inc./ Funeral Direclors
For generations a symbol of Jewish tradition.


!
Merest Building for Sukkot Mission to Israel
The Jewish \ Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale reported
this week that a number of North
Broward residents have indicated
that they will participate in the
National United Jewish Appeal
Sukkot Mission to Israel.
Sukkot (Feast of Tabernacles)
this year extends from Oct. 13
through Oct. 21, Simchat Torah,
Feast of rejoicing of the Torah.
The UJA Mission departs
Sunday, Oct. 11, returning Oct.
21.
The Bible commanded the
Jews to make a pilgrimage to the
sanctuary in Jerusalem three
times a year: on the harvest
festivals of Passover, Pentecost
and Tabernacles.
These occasions were among
the highlights of the year, when
hundreds of thousands of Jews
Young Couples Visit Israel, Europe
By ZVI HOENIG
NEW YORK Sixteen
American Jewish college stu-
dents, ages 17 to 21, travelled to
Hungary, Austria and Israel this
summer for the 1981 United Jew-
ish Appeal University Programs
Summer Mission. The three week
trip, which included one week in
Eastern Europe and Austria
followed by two weeks in Israel,
was organized around the theme
"From Holocaust to Rebirth."
Through in-depth encounters
with other students and Jewish
leaders, the young Americans
learned the effects of the Holo-
caust on Eastern European Jew-
ry, the decline in the quality of
Jewish life there, and the signi-
ficance of Israel as an inde-
pendent Jewish state.
In Israel, the students
travelled from F.lat in the south
to the Golan Heights in the
north, visiting sites of historical
importance and getting a first
hand look at human programs
and services of the Jewish Agen-
cy and the American Jewish
Joint Distribution Committee,
both UJA beneficiary agencies.
The Mission included ex-
tensive tours of the Negev and
Arava, a visit to recent excava-
tions in the Old City of Jerusalem
and Kabbalat Shabbat services
at the Western Wall, and stops at
mitzpim (pre-settlements) in the
Galilee. The students also parti-
cipated in a special memorial
service at Yad Vashem. the
Memorial to the Six Million in
Jerusalem, and were on hand for
the opening of the Maccabiah, Is-
rael's Olympic games.
Their stay in Israel presented a
stark contrast with their visits to
remnant Jewish communities in
Europe. Nancy Raffle of Youngs-
town, Ohio, put it this way: "In
Europe I felt depressed and had
to face the death of European
Jewry. But in Israel. I feel happy.
I feel like I have come home, even
though it is my first visit."
"In Europe you see old people
living in the past in dying Jewish
communities, but in Israel you
see young people with spirit who
want to convey that spirit to
vou," observed Lois Solomon, a
UJA dorm chairman at the Uni-
versity of Michigan. "It is a joy-
ous experience."
Steve Kaufman, a student
from Stanford University in Palo
Alto, California, who just con-
cluded a semester's study in Ger-
many believes "Jews should feel
great pride in Israel. When the
world talks about the European
economic miracle, it is nothing
compared to the work done in Is-
rael making the desert bloom
and building cities and homes for
victims of oppression.
In Vienna, the students met
with representatives of HIAS,
the Hebrew Immigrant Aid
Society, JDC and the Jewish
Agency who work with newly
arrived Russian Jewish immi-
grants to help them rediscover
their Jewish heritage and adjust
to life in freedom.
The Austrian leg of the jour-
ney also included a visit to
Mauthausen Concentration
Camp, where more than 120.000
people were murdered during
World War II. The experience
was a powerful one for mission
participants. Many, like David
Shulman of Palm Beach, Florida,
expressed anger at what they
perceived as the tendency of
Austrians to understate their na-
tion's involvement in the Nazi
slaughter. Others, like Craig
Hopen of Fort Lauderdale,
Florida, saw the Camp as an ob-
ject lesson for their generation.
"We must keep our eyes open so
that it never happens again," he
said.
Andrew Zacks of the Uni-
versity of California, Santa Cruz,
spoke about the emotional im-
pact of the visit for all when he
described his reaction, simply:
"It made a mess of me."
In Hungary, informal visits
with Jewish students in Buda-
pest were for most mission parti-
cipants the highlight of the Mis-
sion. For Wendy Gray of Mun-
ster, Indiana, there was sadness
mixed with joy.
"It was wonderful meeting our
contemporaries," she said. "We
shared many conversations and
discussed our common destiny as
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Jews. But the Jews of Hungary
can't really identify as Jews in
the community at large. The ex-
perience was sobering and made
me feel more Jewish."
The group visited a syangogue
and kosher kitchen for the elderly
poor funded by JDC. In the
synagogue a handful of Jews
prayed survivors of a once vi-
brant religious congregation
and in the kitchen, old, im-
poverished Jews, also Holocaust
survivors, received a hot lunch
from American Jews who care.
JDC lifeline program in Europe
and in Israel are funded with
money allocated from annual
UJ A-community campaigns.
For Wendy, this experience
strengthened "my own commit-
ment to UJA in its work to re-
vitalize Jewish life around the
world" and her personal deter-
mination "to fight anti-Semitism
by my involvement in Jewish
causes."
The group's trip to Hungary
ended with an emotional farewell
at the Budapest airport, with
their new friends among the
Hungarian Jewish youth watch-
ing in tears as the Americans
boarded the plane for Israel.
The Mission experience was
perhaps best summed up by one
college student who wrote in her
diary:
"In Eastern Europe every-
thing appears dark. Nobody
smiles. But here in Israel, our
people dance in bright colors.
Here they have a future. We are
part of that future."
from the Land of Israel and from
the Diaspora converged on Jeru-
salem and assembled in the
courtyard of the Temple.
The picture here shows Jews
worshipping at the Western Wall
during Sukkot carrying lulav and
esrog the classic indication
that even after the destruction of
the Temple, the tradition of pil-
grimage continued as a living
force.
Victor Gruman, Federation
president, and Executive Vice
President Richard Romanoff,
General Chairman of the 1982
Federation-UJA campaign, ex-
tending the invitation to the
community to join this Mission,
note that "today, the tradition
"has been colorfully renewed. The
journey to Israel is no longer a
long and difficult undertaking.
It's a glorious time to commingle
with the Jews of Israel and those
from other parts of the world
during this festival season."
Other special treats await
those who join this Mission to
Israel, including meetings with
top officials of the Israel govern-
ment, tours through the land,
and time for leisure and shopping
expeditions. For reservations and
more information, call Jan Salit,
director of the Women's Division
at Federation's new telephone
number: 748-8200.
Cash Drive Continues
Contributors to the United Jewish Appeal campaigns of
the Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale are re-
sponding to cash mobilization drive for payment of outstand-
ing pledges. The need for cash is great because of the severe
cuts in Jewish Agency programs and services in Israel. And
locally, with the Federation getting ready to have its own
computer, it is hoped that contributors will leave little, if any,
unpaid pledge outstanding.
Members of the Cash Committee of the Jewish Fed-
eration of Greater Fort Lauderdale, headed by Gladys Daren,
president of Women's Division of the Federation, and John
Streng. Federation treasurer, are on a "closed door" United
Jewish Appeal Mission. Behind that closed door they are
busy trying to get the cash flowing on UJA pledges that have
been unpaid for sometime.
Their calls are without the fanfare and glamor of "Super
Sunday'' phone-a-thons when pledges are made. Now those
pledges need to be paid, they said, and they are hoping that
contributors will clear their accounts in time to start the Jew-
ish New Year 5742 next month with a clean UJA account.
Mrs. Daren is fond of quoting a 16th Century sage who
said:
"He who gives quickly, it were as though he gave twice."
And. she adds. "Israel needs it twice as much today, be-
cause the slow flow of cash means that humanitarian and
social service budgets may be cut." She and John Streng
urge: "Please pay your pledge. Today."
CRC Creating Mailgram 'Bank'
The Community Relations Committee is
establishing a mailgram bank to help world Jewry
in lime of crisis. Irving R. Friedman. CRC Chair-
man, announced that as there are many issues
facing the Jewish community, it was essential
that our legislators hear us in time of need.
Mailgrams will only be sent when an issue
requires immediate attention. Friedman said,
adding that CRC will send the mailgrams and
have them billed to the individual's home tele-
phone number.
The cost for mailgrams of 50 words or less is
$3.90. Participants in the mailgram bank will re-
ceive a copy of the mailgram, and be billed direct-
ly by the phone company.
To participate in this effort, please return the
form below to Federation. For further informa-
tion, contact Larry Schuval, CRC Director at
Federation, 748-8200.
MAILGRAM BANK
I Want To Help World Jewry In Time Of Crisis.
NAME
PHONE
ADDRESS
JZIP
I authorize the use of my name, and you may charge
2 4 fi 8 (Plans* Check One) Telegram(s)
SIGNATURE
To My Telephone Number During A Jewish Crisis.
THE USUAL COST IS $3.90 PER MAILGRAM.
J)ATE
Mail to Community Relations Committee
Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale
8360 W. Oakland Park Blvd., Fort Lauderdale, Fl. 33321


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Page 4
Page 16
The Jewish FhriP- -j"-"" Fort Lg Friday, Augort 28,1981
Je wish Flor ldian
Comparing Black and Jewish Struggles
FfSO BhOChet
MAX LEVINE
Production Editor
gSSSS5SML.~
^^rsJKiffiSBKBSSSsa 1S=?ss?ws
FRED SHOCHET SUZANNE SHOCMET
Editor and PuMlarwr Executive Edlto-
FOWT LAUDERDALE HOLLYWOOD ADVERTISING OFFICE: Am Saving 2900 Bldg
2500 E. Hallandala Baach Blvd.. Suits 70TQ, H.n.nd.io. Fl. MOW. Phona 454-0*66
Abraham a. HUsim, ASaarttatns SMpacnaor
Main Oftlo: 120 NE 8th St., Miami, Fla. 33132Phona 1-3734605
MtaMatsc Form M7t ratama to Jfrlt* FtorMaa, P.O.Box 01 73. mimml. a- JJffll
Mamoar jta. savan Art., wns, nea, ajpa .nd fpa Some of Israel's intense Baw^nai*-" -* comparable to
Jawlah Fkxtdlan Do.. Not QuarantaaKaahrulh olMarchandlaa Advartlaad ...llani ..- nf trairic experiences. These experience* nit'f ,*" j^
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: Local Araa $385 Annual (2 Yaar Minimum $7.90), or by mambar.h.p Jaw,.h Creative USe Ot tragic e*pi j^jun identity and Culture Ul the
Fao*ratlcfloQraatarFortUudardalae3eOW.OaWandPan\Blvd.,FortUudardala,FI.33321. our ancestor S neTOlC sirugj humiliating experiences,
Phon.74M200 Man n*,. copy l0 Fadarattonottica. {ace 0f slavery and oppression^ AjJtfcJS/taJ the Israelis bringtheir
Friday, August 28,1981 28 AB 5741 and some Blacks r __,..
Volume 10 Number 18
Black community. They make
break, thinking '"thank God I am
not one of them."*
Lne of Israel's intense determination flows from ter people s
destiny of your people.
face
and some 1
experiences out into the open.
It's About Time
Perhaps the worst-kept secret in the brief his-
tory of the Reagan Administration was that the
President would lift the embargo on the F16 fighter
planes to Israel.
In reacting to the inevitable, Prime Minister
Begin cut through a lot of U.S. political and journal-
istic nonsense by stating a simple fact: The planes
composing the backbone of the Israeli air force are
Israeli; they are not American. They were made in
America, but they were sold to Israel. The gratuitous
and ubiquitous reference to them as American
planes, whether on Capitol Hill or in the columns of
American newspapers, is therefore an absurdity.
Worse, it is designed to enflame the understand-
ing of the American public with ill-conceived notions
that Israel is being given the use of American planes
out of some super-duper altruistic motive in the
sentimental cause of Israel's self-defense.
While Administration officials, including Sec-
retary of State Alexander Haig, know better, still
they continue to contribute to this propagandists
charade. It was therefore heartening to see Prime
Minister Begin's sharply-worded setting of the
record straight.
\ \\o
_, "a
iWxWxWx^^^
U.S. Navy Downs
2 Libyan Planes
In the wake of the U.S. Navy shooting down two Soviet-
made Libyan planes that fired on Navy planes 60 miles off Libya
over the Mediterranean Sea, several of Col. Moammar
Khadafy's radical allies are suggesting an oil embargo against P.
theU.S.
The Navy's Sixth Fleet was conducting training exercises
at the time of the firing of missiles by Navy pilots in US-built
F-l 4 Tomcat fighters.
Radical Palestinian guerrillas called for strikes against UJ.
atareata.
Iran called the American action ''bloodthirsty" and a
"crime against oar Moslem brothers." Israel praised the
"iifiBil i" action of the U A
The U.S., through Secretary of Defense Caspar Weinberger,
after filing a formal protest of the Libyan action with the United
Nations, warned that "any farther attacks against U.S. forces
uyatlng in international water and airspace will also be
iisJatiit with force if necessary."
First, a bit of history. Jewsi
lived in Israel for 4,000 years,
until they were forcibly dispersed
into Asia, Africa arid Europe.
This followed the destruction of
the Temple in Jerusalem by the
Romans in 70 A.D. and is known
as the Diaspora.
Jews in the Diaspora felt they
would eventually recover their
homeland if they could keep their
faith alive and maintain a Jewish
identity wherever they wandered.
Their faith was a rallying call to
reunite.
Israelis have kept this story
alive through the Museum of
Jewish Diaspora, which included
many artifacts which illustrate
how the Jews survived. Israel
also uses the past at Yad
Vashem, the "Martyrs and
Heroes" memorial in Jerusalem.
It commemorates the victims of
the Holocaust the destruction
of six million Jews by Nazi Ger-
many as well as non- Jews who
aided survivors.
The story of the Six Million is
told so that the world will never
forget or allow this to happen
again. Through Yad Vashem, Is-
rael is saying, "The Jewish peo-
ple have not been destroyed. We
have built upon our suffering and
look where we are now." There's
something heroic in that.
For Black Americans, Yad
Vashem has a special meaning,
since parts of our past were un-
glamorous, humiliating, and de-
structive of family and com-
munity. Because slavery was so
destructive of our people's per-
sonality and soul, many Black
Americans want to forget it.
There is a lesson for us in their
determination to maintain their
community and to practice their
beliefs.
One of our problems is that
some of our most talented people
separate themselves from the
I believe these young emigres
were saying that that was a les-
son of the Holocaust.
During the Holocaust, the
Nazi "nightriders" came, not just
for peasants, but for professors
bankers, and the learned ones
those who enjoyed classical'
music and great works of art.
They were attacked because
they were Jewish and they could
not escape the destiny of their
people. These young emigres had
learned that lesson.
When the nighriders come
after Blacks, they don't pass by
the professor, doctor, the artist or
the lawyer. They don't care what
degrees we have. They care only
that we are Black!
Black people in America must
always remember their ties to all
other Blacks and the Black com-
munity. When the Black com-
munity prospers, we and our chil-
dren find that our chances for
success and safety are greatly en-
hanced. While we may appear as
separate as fingers on a hand, we
are inextricably bound, one to
another.
THE RECONSTRUCTIONIST SYNAGOGUE *
Ramat Shalom is Plantations exciting, Innovatlveandvlbrant congregation!
we seek to provide a traditional yet creative alternative In Jewish prayer.
we emphasize individual and family participation in our synagogue through
the usual breadth of synagogue committees, social programs and
celebrations.
we also offer the opportunity for participation in Havurot, regular shabbat
ESS?8 ^h,ch ,nclude onegs and lsrae" f'k-danclng. special Shabbat
retreats, and parental participation in religious school education!
' l?l2L22i?tt,nB Jew,8h pr,orlt,es and minding Jewish lifestyles wilt only
^SSSSS^SZcreat,ve approach t0 the trad,t,on wmch
lUiagmed challen9es "r grandparents and great-grandparents never
' IrJESSL ?nd,VKUr Pravers: Share w,th a verV committed
group in a quest to establish Jewish meaning in our lives.
* tt&SSSmZXtt"' *"**J0,n us excltln New
tSS^'Asragfarsmz
Rabbi Mordecai M.
with Theological
Ramat Shalom
747S Northwest 4th Street
Plantation, Florida 33317
Robar. A. Jacob., Rabbi ,cn.rd N. <,, Pf,sld,n,
PhllllsChudnow, Ballgiou, school Director
" "Olcoma your mambanhlp,
Por further Information, call (JOS, SB J-7770


Friday, August 28, 1981
=3SI
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 5
Browsta' thru
roward
with max levine
Dr. Justin May of Tamarac has
been appointed chief of staff at
Tamarac's University Com-
munity Hospital Aaron Hel-
ler of Lauderhill, chairman of
B reward's delegation of the
Silver-Haired Legislature, is
hopeful funding can be found to
continue this "mock" legislative
process Leslie I. Kay, a
management consultant of North
Lauderdale, son of Mary Kay of
Oakland Park, received a doc-
torate degree in business ad-
ministration at Nova University.
He is also an instructor at Brow-
ard Community College Ilene
Liebennan of Lauderhill was
named PR director for Central
Lead Systems of Sunrise.
Among local area residents
taking part in Elderhostel pro-
grams at University of North
Carolina, Charlotte, were Mary
Friedman, Lillian Weisman. Ann
and Reuben Silver, Beatrice and
Irving Tabachnikov. all of Mar-
gate, and Minerva and Hyman
Kaplan of Lauderhill Irving
Libowsky, member of the Fed-
eration's Board of Directors, had
an extra thrill on his Israel visit
this month: attending grad-
uation of pilots at Israel's Air
Force academy Also recently
returned from visit to Israel and
Greece: Anne and Francis
Marbowitz of Plantation's Lau-
derdale West.
? Rabbi Donald Gerber of Coral
Springs' Temple Beth Orr has set
a goal of 1,000 pints of blood to
be donated by his congregants
starting at next month's Rosh
Hashana to next year's Jewish
New Year Shlomo Glickstein,
Israel's top-ranked tennis player
who has been winning in tourna-
ments in this country, led the
parade of athletes at the opening
ceremonies of the Israel Mac-
cabiah Miriam Miraky, who
- is on the staff of West Palm
-^Beach Jewish Federation, is a
sister-in-law of Rabbi Leon
Miraky, the new spiritual leader
at Deerfield Beach's Temple Beth
Israel.
New radio program. The Jew-
ish Sound, hosted by Rabbi
David Eliaarie, chaplain and di-
rector of Chabad House at Uni-
versity of Miami, airs Sundays
from 2 to 3 p.m. on WLRN-FM
91.3 .. First rehearsal of all-vol-
unteer Lauderhill Pops Sym-
phony is 1 p.m.. Monday, Sept.
17, at Senior Center, 1176 NW
42nd Way, Lauderhill. Roz
Hirach, activities coordinator at
Center, has more information for
"" those interested ... Dr. Keith
Samuels is director of newly-
opened fully-equipped Allied
Health instruction facilities at
Broward Community College's
Central Campus. Jan Moskowhs
is supervisor of the Dental
Assistance program. Classes
began this week.
Elaine B. Friedman of Pom-
pano Beach has been named sales
associate for The Hammocks of
Coconut Creek Lenny Yellin
was promoted to manager-dis-
tribution center at American Ex-
press in Plantation Julian
Graenstein, guitarist, provides
the musical accompaniment for
the "open house" Shabbat serv-
ice Friday, Aug. 28, at Ramat
Shalom, The Reconstructionist
Synagogue, with the synagogue's
new rabbi, Robert Jacobs, of-
ficiating.
Bruce Syrop in Coral Springs
is enlisting volunteers to take
* Dart in the Muscular Dystrophy
Labor Day telethon Arthur
Teiulbaum,Florida Region di-
rector of Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith, will speak
at the Nov. 4 meeting of the
Community Relations Committee
of Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale Laora and
Gary Glass of Margate are host-
ing the Sept. 12 paid up member-
ship party of Temple Emanu-El's
Couples Club Congressman
E. Clay Shaw announced Nova
University has been awarded a
grant of $99,756 to fund a second
year of research on tracing levels
of pollution in coral reefs. The
work is being done at Nova's
oceanographic center.
Max Krasner, adjutant of
Pompano Beach JWV Post, re-
ported that Veterans Ad-
ministration hospital officials in
Miami, sent letters of com-
mendation for the Post's monthly
games at the hospital and the
contribution of granny squares
lap robes crocheted by members
of the Ladies Auxiliary. The Post
meets Thursday, Sept. 17, in
Pompano's Recreation Bldg. .
Ludwik and Jacob Brodzki,
North Broward's representatives
on the executive committee of the
World Gathering of Jewish Holo-
caust Survivors, will be attend-
in a meeting in New York in
September to evaluate the his-
toric gathering held in June in
Jerusalem.
Maxwell Schaefer reports Sun-
rise B'nai B'rith lodge is sponsor-
ing Miami Opera Singers Sunday
evening, Oct. 18, at Bailey Con-
cert Hall Robin Elsenberg,
educational director at Boca
Raton's Temple Beth El, was
elected a vp of Jewish Council of
Early Childhood Educators of
South Florida. Marlene Kunin
of Ramat Shalom has been
named to the national committee
compiling a new Reconstruction-
ist prayerbook Itzhak Perl-
man, celebrated violinist, will ap-
pear in a special Fort Lauderdale
performance Jan. 31 at War
Memorial Auditorium Rabbi
Howard Bogat, UAHC director
of curriculum development, will
conduct a teacher workshop at
7:30 p.m., Thursday, Sept. 10, at
Temple Emanu-El, 3245 W. Oak-
land Park Blvd. All religious
school teachers in the area are
invited to attend.
B'nai B'rith's Award of Merit
was presented to Tamarac Coun-
cilman Philip B. Kravitz, presi-
dent of the Woodlands lodge, at
the recent District 5 convention
in Maryland Former US VP
Walter Mondale will receive the
Human Rights Award presented
by Soviet Jewry Council Sept. 13
in Philadelphia Ynval Ml
is leaving the staff of Israeli
Consul General Joel Aim in At-
lanta to become consul for infor-
mation at the Israeli Consulate in
Boston George Kottler. vp of
Independent Mortgage Co. of
Philadelphia, is heading up the
IMC office just opened in Fort
Lauderdale Ben Dinkes of
Coconut Creek is looking for vol-
unteers to join him in an all-Jew-
ish archeological dig in the Negev
next year under the supervision
of Tel Aviv Universitv.
Put a new bright taste into your brisket
Garden Vegetable Master* Sance
h cup green beans. 1" pieces.
fresh or froien
V, cup diced celery
% cup chopped onions
ti cup cauliflower florets, fresh or froien
6 tablespoons Gulden's Mustard
2 tablespoons Pineapple juice
Blanch all the vegetables in boiling water for 7
minutes; drain. Combine with Gulden's Mustard
and pineapple juice. Store in refrigerator. Serve
with cold or hot meats such as brisket, pas-
trami, corned beef, salami and bologna.
Makes approximately 2 cups.
Cook
it with
GULDEN'S'
Fruity Mastard Saace
'i cup chopped apple
Vi cup chopped pear
ft cup chopped canned
cling peaches
Vi cup raisins
6 tablespoons Gulden's Mustard
I tablespoon cling peach syrup
WIDENS
">euv sow-.
MCSTAR0
Blanch apples and pears in boiling water for S
minutes; drain. Add peaches, raisins. Gulden's
Mustard and peach syrup; stir well. Store in re-
frigerator. Serve with cold or hot meats such as
brisket, pastrami, corned beef, salami and
bologna. Makes 2 cups.
The Mustard good enough to cook with
For rfatctomrv cool
MraRiarWfie rerfa&nrnarFi,
nNronwa yntr' nrana
^^TSSH Pfaee one rounded
.' SP-.V** tap**, Sato* hiontor
Prxe-PriaW Psi iiffiiinitsiI Cione 111 hiH
okm. Stir in lojposld water. Add ice end serve
vwaHooomond sugar, if you want.
\bt1 htm a daghrfut summer cooler. Rkh.
ndoafa4^97%ce**\U.AndK<>*m,
too. Sof^*fatoinmarbuchorrarhaieh--
tfcwnwt of your summer should only be to
fOtlOsniOQl
KOrtrfied Kosher
$ wet owi >* eww
BSBShPHHI



'
Page6
*
The Jewish Fhridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale_
Friday. August 28,1981
Oldest Synagogue Getting New Look
from the left to right sidej>f the
photo to bring natural light into
the synagogue.
The bottom left photo shows
the construction in progress
along the Oakland Park Blvd.
front of the synagogue creating a
walled garden with a reflecting
pool and water fountain inside.
Onthe right is a picture of the
glass block that is being usedI in
building a new Ark for the
Torahs which will be illuminated
from the inside.
"Natural light and the truth
and beauty of nature" is the basic
premise of Architect Donald
Singer of Fort Lauderdale in
doing what he calls "wdl be the
re-birth of Temple Emanu-El
when the construction is com-
pleted."
Temple EmanuEl's Rabbi
Jeffrey Ballon said the bimah is
being re-located so that congre-
gants will be facing and looking
beyond it. through a clear glass
wall, to the walled garden. Above
the bimah, the Eternal Light will
illuminate a Hebrew phrase em-
blazoned on the overhead span
between the two columns at the
front of the tri-level bimah. In
keeping with the theme of the
construction of the Temple,
which was the first congregation
in Broward County in 1937 and
which dedicated its present loca-
tion in 1969, the phrase is Or
Zaruah L'Tzadik (light is Sown
for the Righteous). The phrase is
in the High Holy Days liturgy.
Frances Smith, Temple
Emanu-El's president, said the
project is being financed through
anticipation notes of $500 each
with the Temple paying interest
and redeeming the notes at the
end of two years. Funds from un-
redeemed notes, if any, will be
added to the Temple's Endow-
ment Fund.
v.
Upper photo shows the con-
struction in progress to relocate
the bimah of Temple Emanu-El,
3245 W. Oakland Park Blvd..
PLANNING A TRIP
Travel with National Council ol
Jewish Women. For new 1981
Brochure describing sen-
sational tours to ISRAEL, with
extensions to EGYPT, GREECE,
and ITALY; Highlights In Europe,
China and the Orient, Mexico
and the Canadian Rockies.
Please call Lillian SchulU
742-3531 or Eleie Formu
741-4053.
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e Complete Line of Candy Supplies and Molds
e Candy Classes Now In Session
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fl


Friday, Auguat 28,198}
Council Plans Dialom
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdgle
Pae7
Among those present when the Interfaith
Council, organized by the Community Relations
Committee of the Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale and other groups, planned to
hold "at home" or "Living Room Dialogues" in
eight homes in North Broward were (some of
whom are visible in the photo taken at the time):
Rev. Thomas Wisniewski. representing the
Catholic Diocese of Miami; L.D. Gainey of Brow-
ard's Urban League: Kay Zwick of the Broward
County Human Relations Division; Leslie S.
Gottlieb, executive director of the Federation;
Esther Cannon, representing Hadassah and
Pompano Beach Interfaith Committee; Janet
Oppenheimer of the Coral Springs Coalition of
Jewish Organizations; Samuel K. Miller, CRC
member serving as co-chairman of the Interfaith
Council, Larry Schuval, CRC director.
Also Rev. Don Bautz, program coordinator of
Broward County Clergy Council and chairman of
the Interfaith Council; Alice Solomon, associate
director of National Conference of Christians and
Jews; Rev. William Compton, director of Special-
ized Urban Ministry; Marge Hellgren, Church
Women United; Irving R. Friedman, CRC chair-
man; Molly and Rabbi Leonard Zoll of Coral
Springs; Bishop Richard R. Drews, and Arthur
Chaiken of the Coral Springs Coalition.
The dialogues, following a training session
for hosts, will be held Sunday, Oct. 18.
The Council also re-affirmed its decision call-
ing on churches, synagogues and other organiza-
tions to consider Interfaith Observances during
the weekend of Friday, Feb. 19 through Sunday,
Feb. 21.
cemroE
SBObOm
HEBREW-SCHOOL
at
132 S.E. 11th Ave., Pompano Beach, Fl.
PRIMARY THROUGH
BAR-BAT-MITZVAH
PRE-CONFIRMATION
CONFIRMATION
REGISTRATION-SUNDAY
SEPTEMBER, 13th-1981
9:30 A.M.
CALL TEMPLE OFFICE-942-6410


^.


The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, August 28,1981
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PageS _________The Jewish FloruUan of ureater ran. ut****~-~
Traditional Mock Wedding Performed by 4th Graders at JCC Day Camp
In keeping with Orthodox tradition, boy and girl
campers at Jewish Community Center's Day Camp,
participating in the "mock" wedding in Samuel M.
Soref Hall, were separated on two sides of the Hall,
awaiting the procession of bridal party while the
"bridegroom" seated left in front of the "rabbi" signed
the ketuba (marriage vows} in front of two witnesses.
In photo at left the bridal couple Alex Levine and
Jennifer Conan with "best man" and "maid of honor"
stand under the tallit (prayer shawl) serving as the
chupa (canopy) in front of "Rabbi" Philip Rackin. And
when the "groom" stomped on the glass with his foot, a
mighty chorus of Mazel Tov came from all the young
sters. The production was coordinated by Elli Levy,
Hebrew specialist at the camp.
JCC
Spotlights:
Enthusiastic about Cultural Arts at JCC
JCC Spirit
IVY LEVINE, the only woman
vice president on the JCC Board,
and one of the dynamic1 compon-
ents that make JCC work. Ivy
and husband, Larry, and their
three sons, Howard, Glen and
Ronnie, can be found on campus
throughout the season. They are
an active family, interested in
sports. Ivy takes time from her
business, "Freckles," a children's
clothing store, to coach T-Ball.
This energetic lady really partici-
pates.
"I want to see the JCC become
a vital part in the lives of the
entire Jewish community. We
want to provide recreational
facilities for the children in our
area so that they will grow up in a
Jewish environment with Jewish
friends."
Ivy has many interests. She is
the immediate past chairperson
of the Cultural Arts Committee.
She directed Puss 'n Boots for
the Children's Theatre, having
had experience in both legitimate
theatre and childhood education.
She's quick, she's efficient, and
manages to cook and bake up a
storm. The Jewish holidays are
important to the Levine family.
Ivy makes them so with her
culinary talents, and her family
oriented planning.
CATALOGERS
NEEDED
We are about to start a
new JCC venture. We
wish to develop our
Judaic Library. We
need volunteers to work
on cataloguing our in-
ventory. Call Ruth at
792-6700, if interested.
By RUTH PINE
JCC Staff
"As far back as I can remem-
ber, I have always been involved
in everything that was the best in
the world of cultural arts, and I
have searched for it wherever I
have been." Ruth Baker spoke
these words with conviction and
authority.
At the present time, Ruth is
the hard-working JCC Cultural
Arts chairperson. She and her
committee have been working
diligently to create a cultural
mosaic of programs of quality for
the JCC members and their
friends. As she spoke she remem-
bered fondly that her mother was
a very creative person and helped
develop her love of things beauti-
ful. She studied the piano from
ages eight to 18. In fact, she re-
ceived a scholarship to eoncert-
ize.
However, she found that other
interests superseded, but those
who know her will agree that her
musical interest has never
wavered. Voices and speech pat-
terns, language and literature
took over as her major interests.
This is still evident. As Ruth
speaks, one surely notices that
she is extremely articulate and
her speech pattern is melodious
to the ear.
Since she had a strong interest
in theater, she studied at Colum-
bia University receiving her MA
in Speech and Drama and a Ph.D.
in education there, and an Ed.D.
at NYU. She established com-
munity theatres in Stamford.
A complete listing of
JCC programs is avail-
able by contacting
Sandy at 792-6700. Just
ask for the "Fall Pro-
gram Brochure."
Ruth Baker
Conn, and Mt. Vernon, N.Y., and
directed many of the plays per-
formed there.
She has been a teacher of
teachers at the college level in
New York as well as the Univer-
sity of Miami. With these creden-
tials, Ruth has enjoyed the aca-
demic world, while the theatre
and the world of entertainment
continued to play a large part in
her life.
Don Baker, her second hus-
band, was a many-faceted enter-
tainer. Ruth worked along with
him and ran a talent agency in
Miami for many years. "It seems
as if I've been involved with per-
formers and the entertainment
business all my life. My uncle
was a talent scout and booking
agent and I met many entertain-
ers such as Al Jolson while
growing up."
As a Hunter High School and
Hunter College alumna, She
extols the education she received
at these schools. This is why she
feels indebted to the community -
at-large. She said: "I have al-
ways felt that I must give some-
thing back to my community be-
cause of the marvelous free edu-
cation I got at the Hunter
Handwriting Analyzed
Ellen and Lowell Shoenfeld (standing at left) conducted
analyses of handwriting recently at the JCC. Among those in
attendance when the picture was taken: Leo Bhomgarten.
standing right; and seated'Elayne Mandell, Florence Molomut,
Sylvia Grossman, Eve Hracklin.
Schools. I feel that everyone
should be involved, and give of
their talent to their community.
My involvement with the JCC
can be called somewhat selfish. It
satisfies my need to be involved
while it gives me pleasure to be a
part of the Center which is so im-
portant to us all."
Ruth finds working with the
younger women at JCC exciting.
"I love their enthusiasm, and the
excitement they generate. They
are helping to make things hap-
pen even while their responsibil-
ities at home are still demand-
ing," she said. "I particularly
appreciate my peers who are wil-
ling to share their time and expe-
rience as they help us develop
project discovery '82."
Ruth Baker is a loving, capable
and productive woman and it is
an inspiration to work with her.
Ruth's enthusiasm for what she
is doing is carried with her
wherever she goes. She is a true
public relations spirit for the
Jewish Community Center. She
has told the JCC story wherever
she goes and she has involved
many along the way.
"The JCC is proud to have
Ruth Baker part of its growing
cultural arts program. With Ruth
at the helm of this committee, we
can expect a flourishing and
innovative series of cultural
events at the JCC. We truly
admire her," said Ruth Pine,
Cultural Arts Director.
WANTED
JCC can offer a tax de-
duction on a gift of a
Kiln or will purchase.
Call Ruth at 792-6700.
Minerva and Hy Kaplan, just
back from a six-week trip, at-
tended the Book Club discussion
of "I'm Dancing As Fast As I
Can" by Barbara Gordon. Evelyn
Kaye did an excellent job as dis-
cussion leader. The Kaplans had
been at the University of Char-
lotte, N.C., for a week of intellec-
tual stimulation. While there Hy
dropped in for a visit with Harold
Cohen, our former Assistant
Director, who is now Director of
the Charlotte Jewish Community
Center. Isn't Jewish geography
great?
The Book Club has opted to
continue its summer romance
with contemporary literature. On
Wednesday, Sept. 9 at 8 p.m.
Betty Ravitch will lead the dis-
cussion on The Books of Rachel
by Joel Gross. It is recommended
that those attending read the
book.
Glad to hear that Dorrie
Bloomfleld is home recupera-
ting nicely The Arts and
Crafts Festival committee awaits
her return.
Seeing is believing. Yes that
was snow you saw the camp
youngsters having fun with one
hot and sultry afternoon. If you
have the right SPIRIT miracles
can happen! It was a sweltering
time. The campus abounded with
the joyous noises of our camp
youngsters in costume, having
fun. And there was chaperone,
Louise Feller, in the midst of it all
dressed up in a yellow wool cap
pulled down over her ears. Her
argyles pulled up over her jeans
wearing a shirt targe enough for
two. "All the children are in cos;
tume so I decided to join them."
This is typical of Louise. She's
got the JCC SPIRIT.
Cultural Arts Plans Reception for Pianist
irrr STW" Pnir a "UArts committee at her lOHM where a
Patron Reception will be held Feb. I in horn of
liamst Janla Fialkowika Others pict
Selma Streng and Jud.th Soffer sian.ng ui
TSU^S 'lft;,Id Ka***> "<- ">-
ChalZr ""*'" *'"V Kay ana nm,
nairpersnn Ruth Bak..


Friday, August 28,1981
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 9
Israeli Children's Visions of Peace on Display in Palm Aire
My Shalom, My Peace, an exhibition of 29 draw-
?: ings and eight poems by Israeli Jewish and Arab chil-
;:: dren, organized by the United Jewish Appeal, opened
i t his week at the Palm Aire office of AmeriFirst Federal
1 Savings in Loehmann's Plaza, Powerline Rd. and
|; Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach.
The exhibit will be displayed through Friday, Sept.
?: 18, from 9 to 4 p.m., Monday through Thursday, and
Fridays from 9 to 6 p.m.
AmeriFirst's Palm Aire Manager Jerry Kislia met
:? with Federation-UJA campaign leaders from Palm Aire
V and officers of the Jewish Federation of Greater Fort
TS Lauderdale for the opening ceremonies.
Shlomit Grossberg, living in Jerusalem, was 14
three years ago when she and thousands of other Israel
school children submitted paintings, drawings and
poems in a contest conducted in Israel's schools.
Her poem, a portion of which is reproduced here,
was one of those selected by Uriel Ofek, Israeli writer of
books for young people, for the UJA exhibit, and Jacob
Zim, widely known Israeli artist and graphic designer
who also designed the book of the same name as the ex-
hibit. Translation of the poems were made by Dov
Vardi, a noted Israeli poet and writer.
Here is a portion of Shlomit Grossberg's poem:
What shall I ask You for, God?
You created the Land of Peace,
Where stands the City of Peace,
Where stood the Temple of Peace,
But where there still is no Peace. .
What shall \I ask You, for God?
Peace is what I ask for.
Only Peace.
Experts around the country, where the exhibit has ::
been on display, extol the appealing visions of peace jg
created in words and images as the dreams and yearn- S
ings of children whose young lives have been profound-
ly affected by shrieking sirens, who have spent too
many hours in shelters, and have become too accus-
tomed to military funerals and death notices.
CRC Alerted to Saudi Arms Sale
AIPAC, (American Israel
Public Affairs Committee), pub-
lishers of Near East Report,
informed the Community
Relations Committee of the
^flfewish Federation of Greater
"?6rt Lauderdale that when Con-
gress reconvenes on Monday,
Sept. 7, the Reagan Administra-
tion will seek approval for the
Saudi arms package.
President Reagan earlier this
month sent letters to leaders of
the Senate and the House of Rep-
resentatives telling them of his
desire to submit the package deal
to send AW ACS planes and F-15
enhancement equipment to Saudi
Arabia.
AIPAC said that White House
officials have said that when this
package is announced it will
reach Congress with a "big
blitz." After formal announce-
ment, both the Senate and House
will have the opportunity to
consider a resolution of disap-
proval. Both must vote disap-
proval to stop the sale.
CRC continued to receive mes-
sages from various Senators and
Representatives indicating their
opposition to the sale. AIPAC re-
mits that 252 members of the
ARMDI Revue Tickets Selling Briskly
Max Bezozo, president of the
Sunrise chapter of American Red
Magen David for Israel (AR-
MDI). reports a brisk sale in
tickets for the Sunday evening,
Oct. 25, musical revue to be
presented at Sunrise Musical
theatre in cooperation with the
Good News Fellowship Church.
"Proceeds of the $4, $5, 16, and
S10 donations for tickets will be
used as Bezozo says: "To help
keep the sick in Israel alive, be-
cause the Magen David Adorn,
Israel's equivalent of the Ameri-
can Red Cross, provides blood,
ambulance service, mobile
cardiac rescue service and emer-
gency medical treatment."
The Oct. 25 revue will feature '
singer-composer Richard Ryan,
baritone: Soprano Phyllis Arick,
and Dory Sinclair," the clown in
a gown," plus the return
engagement for the ARMDI
event of the Sunrise Symphony j
Pops Orchestra.
Essay Contest Sponsored for Adults
In anticipation of the observ-
ance of Jewish Book Month, JCC
.4 < sponsoring an Adult Essay
Contest with entries limited to
at? typewritten page and sub-
mitted to JCC, 6601 W. Sunrise
Blvd.. Fort Lauderdale 33313 be-
fore Nov. 1.
The sponsors of the contest
offer the following suggestions as
possible themes for essays:
1. Do you think the Jew is pre-
sented as a stereotype in today's
literature? Why or why not?
2. Is there some particular
aspect of Jewish life you would
like to see explored more fully in
a book? Would such a presenta-
tion help the non-Jew to under-
stand Jews better? In what way?
8. If you were to make a list of
P^t Jewish books what books
would you include and what
would be your rationale for in-
cluding them?
4. What is a Jewish author? Is
M-she:
a-a Jew who writes only on
Jewish themes (for example,
Isaac Bashevis Singer?)
.-- &ra Jew who writes in many
* Ufcrent areas (for example, the
Playwright Arthur Miller, or Neil
s'nvm. or Howard Fast?)
c-a non-Jew who writes on
ewbh themes (for example, the
*ph books, Young Joseph,
'wp/i in Egypt, etc. by Thomas
Mann).
Music, Music Music
A musicians that perform on
orchestral instruments are in-
*ed to call the Jewish Commu-
mty Center at 792-6700 (auk for
Jwh). if interested in joining the
M orchestra which is now being
y W'ed.________________
? THWART THE CULTS!
* "n trar- v<.siona'*s' ia'n
"'xx. me Honan 'j)*,- w ^>so
non.ni indxhty") -*i
M-.lOUil.f 1* ihis SAVC
xi'Voo '! laxr j; vkcK"
^ Seno V lor docmwi Thu l'rua
Au:- rship rflfle
& u.Becevue** <800.
Sy Sugar, the conductor, is
looking forward to conducting an
integrated orchestra of all ages.
He said: "I hope that the youth
of Fort Lauderdale will join us
and share their love of music with
the senior musical members of
our community. We are looking
for an orchestra that will be a
representation of the entire com-
munity."
House of Representatives and 55
Senators have signed letters ex-
pressing opposition to the sale.
CRC will continue efforts to
educate the community, and
through the community, to reach
out to the legislators to inform
them that the sale "is not in the
best interest of the United
States."
The arms package, AIPAC re-
ports, is priority for considera-
tion by the Jewish community.
But, AIPAC adds, so is the For-
eign Assistance Authorization
and Appropriation's bills that
neither House has passed; the
Sinai peacekeeping legislation,
'and overall U.S. support for
Israel's security.
Stars' Showcase
Wo-Man's Showcase Series
first performance, The Showcase
of the Stars, will be presented on
Saturday, Sept. 26, and Sunday,
Sept. 27. Angela Bomford, direc-
tor, in her British accent noted,
"We have a fantastic lineup of
talent that will surely wow the
audiences."
Some of the performers she
mentioned are the Black Renais-
sance Theatre doing a segment of
The Wiz; Audrey Schwartz in
mime; The Chorus of Hands (in-
terpreters for the deaf doing a
performance of their own.
Refreshments will be available
as the audience meets with the
stars and view the Photography
Exhibit by Debbie Emmons.
Reserved seating: S3 for mem-
bers, $5 for non-members. Call
Ruth at JCC for further informa-
tion.
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vour Hosts. MIc ia*i Letkowltz & Alex Smilovy


TBBT
PgelO

>Tke Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, August 28,1981
Mini-Marathon *Run for Israel'Sept 20
A mini-marathon of 10 kilometers (6.2144 miles) is being sponsor-1
ed by the Good News Fellowship Church of Fort Lauderdale to raise
money for the American Red Magen David for Israel (ARMDI) which
is the sole supporting arm in the United States for Magen David
Adorn, Israel's equivalent of the Red Cross.
The "Run for Israel," will take place in the city of Sunrise, begin-
ning and ending at the Sunrise City Hall on W. Oakland Park Blvd.,
Sunday morning, Sept. 20.
A trophy will be awarded to
the first male and first female to
cross the finish line. The first
three finishers in a variety of
categories will receive medals,
and the first 600 finishers will re-
ceive certificates. Special accom-
modations wfll be ma for
wheelchair participants.
The entry fee will be $5 for
those registering in advance with
Court Strikes Down
School-Prayer Statute
NEW ORLEANS The
American Jewish Congress has
hailed a decision by the Circuit
Court of Appeals declaring un-
constitutional a Louisiana
statute that authorized prayers
in public schools.
The AJCongress had filed a
friend-of-the-court brief in the
case challenging the school-
prayer law.
The court's 2-to-l decision was
handed down Aug. 5 in the case
of Karen B. v Treen, according to
Nathan Z. Dershowitz, director of
the American Jewish Congress
Commission on Law and Social
Action. The American Jewish
Congress brief was written by
Allen Wieder and Joel Katcoff,
New York attorneys, and Der-
showitz.
It involved Act 519 of the 1980
Louisiana Legislature, signed
into law last in July 1980 by
Governor David Treen and au-
thorizing local school boards to
allow teachers "to ask if a stu-
dent wishes to volunteer to offer
a prayer and, in the event that no
student does volunteer, to allow
the teacher to offer a prayer."
Following the enactment of the
law, the Jefferson Parish School
Board passed a resolution estab-
lishing "a moment of prayer and-
or silent meditation at the begin-
ning of each school day. ."
Appeal Expected
Several parents in the school
district challenged the resolution
in the U.S. District Court for the
Eastern District of Louisiana.
When the District Court ruled
against them, the parents ap-
pealed the decision to the Court
of Appeals, which has now up-
held their appeal. The State of
Louisiana is expected to appeal
to the U.S. Supreme Court.
We do business
the right way.
imm.ommmpmm*
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lying silkstreened designs ol Hebrew
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1M copy, $1 25 ea addl. (check or money
order) to WRDC.Dept. F, 623 Bambridge
Si.Philadelphia.PA 19147 (215)925 3121
In its ruling, the Circuit Court
declared:
"Since prayer is a primary reli-
gious activity in itself, its ob-
servance in public school class-
rooms has, if anything, a more
obviously religious purpose than
merely displaying a copy of a re-
ligious text in the classroom.
Even if the avowed objective of
the legislature and school board
is not itself strictly religious, it is
sought to be achieved through
the observance of an intrinsically
religious practice."
a $6 fee for those registering be-
tween 7 and 8 a.m. on the morn-
ing of the event in front of Sun-
rise City Hall. Checks must be
made payable to Red Magen
David Mini-Marathon and mailed
to P.O. Box 23687, Fort Lauder-
' dale 33307.
Race officials will distribute
race numbers to pre-registrants
and will handle race day regis-
tration prior to the start of the
mini-marathon at 9 a.m.
Aid stations will be located at
three points along the course of i
the Run for Israel.
The categories for runners
finishing among the first three
are for men and women: those 20
years of age and under; 21 to 26;
27-32; 33-38:39-44; 45-50; 51 to
56 for men, 51 and over for wom-
en, and 56 and over for men.
Magen David Adorn in Israel
provides ambulance service,
blood and blood products, mobile
cardiac rescue service and emer-
gency medical treatment. It is a
non-profit organization. Good
News Fellowship officials are
hoping sufficient money will be
realized through contributions of
those sponsoring runners in the
mini-marathon to provide an am- j
bulance for MDA.
HtWttMtl
cempfc
SBObOm
r
A CONSERVATIVE SYNAGOGUE
OF POMPANO BEACH, FL
If youare unaffiliated, we invite you to become a
member and worship with uson Friday eveningsat
132 SE 11th Avenue, Pompano Beach, Fl.
THE TEMPLE OFFERS AN EXCELLENT
PROGRAM FOR EVERYONE
Religious School
Hebrew School
Adult Education
Youth Group
Men's Club
Sisterhood
Couple's Club
1 Inspiring High Holy Day Services will be held at Temple
3 Sholom, led by Rabbi Samuel April assisted by Cantor
- Jacob J. Renzer.
S For information regarding Temple Membership
I and registration for religious, Hebrew school,
3 please call Temple Office at 942-6410 9 a.m. to
i 4:00 p.m. Monday through Friday.
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t, August 28,1981
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 11
Women's Division Magazine Grculates in Hungary
r

m
Alexander Scheiber, head of the Rabbinic
linary of Budapest, Hungary, right, reads an
\cle on Hungarian Jewry which appeared in the
1980 issue of the United Jewish Appeal
Omen's Division "Record," as rabbinic
dents look on. The article appeared after an
eement had been reached in February, 1980,
between the American Jewish Joint Distribution
Committee and the government and Jewish com-
munity of Hungary to provide programs and ser-
vices for the nation's Jewry. JDC funds came pri-
marily from the UJA which is supported by
monies collected in federation campaigns
throughout the country.
Organizations In The News
BATAMI-TAMARAC
[Burning Light," Bella Cha-
rs autobiography, illustrated
her famous artist husband
: Chagall, will be reviewed by
th Pine, cultural arts director
the Jewish Community Center
jreater Fort Lauderdale at the
ting of the Bat Ami-Tamarac
ipter of Hadassah, Wednes-
Sept. 912 noon at the
iarac Jewish Center, 9101
57th St., Tamarac. Meeting
knged from Monday because of
Labor Day holiday.
1 ini-lunch will be served prior
| the meeting. Boutique will be
from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.
aspective members welcome.
OCEAN MILE OUT
Joan Okun, ORT DAY chair-
an for the North Broward
>e at Libraries
[The Broward County Library
fstem offers a variety of free
vices at its various branches
roughout the county. During
kptember, a sampling of the
ograms at three of the North
oward branches are listed:
[At Lauderdale Lakes library,
121 NW 43rd Ave.. language
bses are available on a weekly
Isis: Advanced Hebrew, Mon-
lys from 7 to 8:30 p.m.; also on
londays, intermediate and
[vanced conversational French,
a.m. to noon; advanced
banish will be taught Wednes
lys from 10 a.m. to noon, and on
pursdays from 9:30 a.m. to
on, intermediate Hebrew will
[taught.
lAlso at Lauderdale Lakes:
x Denner will present a book
Jmatization of Lady and the
e by Ted Berkman about the
of Fanny Holtzman, Holly-
od lawyer active in the
priding of Israel and the United
?tions, from 2 to 3 p.m., Tues-
iy. Sept. 1. Reservations are re-
fred for the free tickets avail-
ge at the library. Also at Laud-
Pale Lakes, Allan Toor will dis-
ps with adults how to develop
^Wng skills from 7 to 8:30
on two Wednesdays, Sept. 2
116.
he Sunrise branch at 6600
"set Strip will present crochet
Bses for beginners with Sheila
denstein offering the instruc-
ts Pre-registration is required
1 information concerning ma-
pis needed is available at the
rary.
Jleedlepoint and crocheting
be taught at North Lauder-
' branch, 6601 Blvd. of Cham-
Jns. Sylvia Gordon will teach
ilepoint every Tuesday in
ptember from 1 to 3 p.m.
cheting will be taught during
same hours by Joan Fried-
fh during the four Fridays in
Ptember. Those attending are
ped to bring their own supplies.
Region, active in UJA, and a
charter member of ORT's Ocean
Mile Chapter, will provide com-
mentary for a film about ORT,
"Link in the Chain," to be shown
at the Ocean Mile Chapter's
opening meeting of the season at
noon, Tuesday, Sept. 1, at Jarvis
Hall. 4501 N. Ocean Dr.,
Lauderdale-by-the-Sea. Mrs.
Kitty Packman, chapter presi-
dent, said a mini lunch will be
served.
JEWISH WAR VETERANS
Jewish War Veterans Coral
Springs Post is inviting all veter-
ans, whether or not members of
the post, to a breakfast at 9:30
a.m., Sunday, Aug. 30, at Temple
Beth Orr, Royal Plam Blvd. and
Riverside Dr.
The season's first regular
meeting of the Post will be held
at 8:15 p.m., Tuesday, Sept. 1, at
the Temple.
B'NAI B'RITH
WOMEN
Dora Cohen was elected presi-
dent of the Leorah Council of
B'ani B'rith Women which held
its meeting early this week at
American Savings meeting room,
8352 W. Oakland Park Blvd.
Other officers of the Council
which consists of seven chapters
include Harriette Shulman, Har-
riet Weinroth, Mimi Savin, Sally
Chustek, Bertha Sheps, Ann
Okun, vice presidents; Helen
Friedman, Helen Paress, Isa Le-
vine, secretaries; Rose Sullaway,
treasurer; Ida Kostoff, advisor;
Muriel Eskow and Eddie Kantor,
region delegates.
,
WEST BROWARD JEWISH
CONGREGATION
(A Liberal-Reform Congregation)
announces
High Holy Day Services
Bailey Hall
Broward Community College
3501 S.W. Davie Road
Davie, Fla.
Rosh Hoshana
Sept. 288:15 P.M.
Sept. 29-10:00 A.M.
Sept. 30-10:00 A.M
Yom Kippur
Oct. 78:15 P.M.
Oct. 8-10:00 A.M.
Oct. 8-4:00 P.M.
Donation $25.00 Per Seat
Mr. Alvin Rudnitsky, concertmaster with the
Broward Symphony Orchestra
will perform the Kol Nidre.
FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CALL
791-5925 or 748-1988
T
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Page 12
The Jewish Flpridign.of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, August 28, 1981
Community Calendar
MONDAY, AUG. SI
Workmen. Ckde: Executive
Committee meeting, Loft Mall, i
5460 N. State Rd. 7, Suite 121,
7:80 pA|
Temple Emanu-El: Games, 7:15
p.m.
TUESDAY, SEPT. 1
Temple Emanu-El Siateriiood:
Board meeting, 11 a.m.
Pioneer Women-Hatikvah Chap-
ter: General meeting at Whiting
Hall, Sunrise, 11:30 a.m.-2:30
p.m.
Temple Sholom Sisterhood-Pom-
pano: Board meeting at Temple
library, 10 a.m.
Temple Beth Torah Sisterhood: ]
(James, 12:15 p.m.
WEDNESDAY, 8EPT. 2
Temple Emanu-El Meaa Club:
Board and General meetings, 8
6 m.
randeis-Pompano Beach Chap-
ter: Board meeting, 9:30 a.m.
American Mizrachi Women-
Masada Chapter: Meeting,
Broward Federal Savings, 3000
N. University Dr., Sunrise. Rabbi
Isidore Rosenfeld, guest speaker,
noon.
National Council of Jewish
Women-N. Broward Section:
Board meeting, 10 a.m.
Temple Ohel B'nai Raphael Sis-
terhood: Board meeting, 10 a.m.
Hadaasah-Inverrary Gilah Chap
Lucky tor us
ot trw Royal
ara auch God-faarlng r*4kjlous paopla and staunch supportars
Comrade Brezhnev' The Daily News
RITE-WAY SHORE REPAIR
WHILE YOU WAIT SERVICE
ORTHOPEDIC WORK ZIPPERS REPAincn
issssssr* -Sr
.ssssssssr "sssssr
open mono a y thru sa turd a y9autospm
WINN-DIXIE SHOPPING CENTER
4905 SOUTH STATE RD. 7 FT. LAUD.
GRIFFIN RD. 441 583-1070
THIS COUPON WORTH
S2.00 0n Anv Rp|r w*
^ of $5.00 or Mora
tettiple ernaraj-tt
A
DYNAMIC REFORM
CONGREGATION,
HIGH HOLY DA Y SERVICES
AT
a. PARKER PL A VHOUSE
ROSH HASHANA
Evening, Sept. 28,8 p.m.
Morning, Sept. 29,10 a.m.
Children's Services at Temple Emanu El
Sept 29,3:30
YOM KIPPUR
Evening, Oct. 7,8 p.m.
Yom Kippur Day, Oct. 8,10 a.m.
Youth Group, 2:15 p.m.
Afternoon Memorial and Concluding Services, 3 p.m.
3245 W. Oakland Pk. Blvd.
Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.
Telephone: 731-2310
tar: Board meeting, Colonnades
Clubhouse, 10 a.m.
Haitaaaah-Gokta Meir Chapter:
Board meeting at members
homes, 10 a.m.
ORT-Pompano Beach Chapter:
General meeting, Pompano
Beach Rec. Center, 1801 NE 6th
St., 1 p.m.
THURSDAY, SEPT. 3
Jewish National Fond: Execu-
tive Committee meeting, after-
noon.
B'nai B'rith-Lakea Chapter:
Board meeting
B'nai B'rith-Sunriae Chapter:
General meeting, Mini-lunch.
Guest speaker Dr. Gadi Gichon,
Medicine in Israel. Nob Hill Rec.
Center, Sunrise, 11:30 a.m.
B'nai B'nth-Plantation Lodge:
General meeting. Guest speaker
Alan Mendelson, Investigative
Reporter for TV Channel 4.
Deicke Auditorium, Plantation, 8
p.m.
B'nai B'rith-Tamarac Chapter:
Board meeting at Tamarac
Jewish Center, 9:30 a.m.
ORT-N. Broward Region: Board
meeting at Lauderdale Lakes
City Hall, 4300 NW 36th St., 10
a.m.
FRIDAY, SEPT. 4
Workmens Circle: 62nd Annual
Conference, Seville Hotel, Miami
Beach, Weekend.
Hadassah-Maaada Margate
Chapter: Board meeting, Boca
Raton Bank, Basic's Plaza, State
Rd. 7 and Coconut Creek Pkwy.,
10 a.m.
MONDAY, SEPT. 7
Labor Day
TUESDAY. SEPT. 8
Jewish National Fund: Board
I meeting, p.m.
Hebrew Day School of Fort Lau-
, derdale: Board meeting.
Jewish War Veterans-William
Kretchman Auxiliary: Board
meeting.
Hadaaaah-Arman Castle Chap-
ter: General meeting, Vice Presi-
dent Bobby Lucas reports on
Convention; Membership Skit,
Castle Rec. Hall, noon.
Temple Beth Torah Sisterhood:
Games, 12:16 p.m.
Hadasaah Ray us Tamarac Chap-
ter: Board meeting at Tamarac
i Jewish Center, 12:30 p.m.
Pioneer Women-Hatikvah Chap-
ter: Meeting at Whiting Hall,
Sunrise. Guest speaker Jack Pol-
insky will discuss Jewish Pride.
Mini-brunch, 11:30 a.m.
WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 9
Hadaaaah-Pompano Chai Chap-
ter: Board meeting, Pompano
Rec. Center, 1801 NE 6th St.. 10
N. Chapter:
Section Club-
ORT-Woodlands
General meeting,
house, noon. ,
Hadaaaah-Bermoda Crab Herri
Chapter: General meeting,
Bermuda Club Rec. Halt
ORT-Wynmoor Chapter: General
meeting, Coconut Creek Commu-
nity Center, 12:30 p.m.
B'nai B 'nth-Lakes Chapter:
General meeting at Lauderdale
Lakes City Hall.
Hadassah Hatikvah Cypraes
Chase Chapter: General meeting
at Lauderdale Lakes City Hall-
Safety Building, 12:30 p.m.
ORT-Hillsboro Chapter: General
meeting, noon.
THURSDAY, SEPT. 10
Temple Emanu-El: Executive
Committee meeting, p.m.
ORT-Sunriae Village Chapter N.
Broward Region 6: General
meeting at Nob Hill Rec. Center.
Hadaaaah-BIyma Margate Chap-
ter: Board meeting at Southern
Federal Bank Building. State Rd.
7.
Hadaaaah-Sunriae Shalom Chap-
ter: General meeting at Tamarac
Jewish Center, 11:30 a.m.
B'nai B'rith-Hope Chapter:
Board meeting at Deicke Audito-
rium, 10 a.m.
Hadasaah-Scopua Deerfield
Chapter: Board meeting, home of
Agnes Taylor, 10:30 a.m.
Temple Kol Ami: Board meeting
at Temple, Plantation, 8 p.m.
SUNDAY, SEPT. 13
I. L. Perete Yiddish School of
Workmens Circle: Registration,
Alphabetland School. 4366 N.
University Dr., Sunrise, 9:30
a.m.-12:30 p.m.
Temple Emanu-El: Membership
Party, p.m.
Temple Beth Am-Margate: Gen-
eral meeting, 10 a.m.
-A Traditional
Community High Holy Day Services
Will be held at Temple Emanu El
3245 W. Oakland Park Blvd., Ft. Lauderdale
Conducted By
"^
I
Cantor Robert Goodman
YOM KIPPUR
Wad. Oct. T. KM NMra M p.m.
Tmjfs. Ocl. 8. Yom K ippur I a m
Vltkor 11:10 a.m.
Mlncha 3:45 p.m.
Natlah 5:20 p.m.
For Ticket Information, Please Call 731-2310
_____________Limited Seating____________ f\
Rabbi David W. Gordon
ROSH HASHANA
Mon. Sapt 2* Rash Hathana Eva.-7:10 p.m
Tim* Sapt 2t RoaH Hainan* Morn I a.m.
Wad. Sapt. 30 Roah Haahana Mom.-O a.m.
HEBREW CONGREGATION
OF LAUDERHILL
Announces that they will hold
HIGH HOLY DAY SERVICES
at
CAMELOT HALL
ROSH HASHANAH: Tues. & Wed. Sept. 29-30 81
YOM KIPPUR: Wed. & Thurs. Oct. 7-8 81
RABBI NAHUM SIMON WILL OFFICIATE
WITH THE RENOWNED CANTOR LABELE FELDMAN
TICKETS AT $25.00 EACH ARE NOW
ON SALE AT OUR SYNAGOGUE
2048 N.W. 49th Ave., Lauderhill
Sundays Only 9 to 12
CALL 733-9580 FOR RESERVATIONS
cempi
sfiofcom
CONSERVATIVE SYNAGOGUE
HIGH HOLY DAY SERVICES
AT
132 S.E. 11th Ave., Pompano Beach, Fl
RABBI SAMUEL APRIL-CANTOR JACOB J. RENZER
SELICHOTH.SATURDAY-SEPT,19th-11:00 P.M.
Rosh Hashanah
Mon. Sept. 28,7:30 p.m.
Tues. Sept. 29,9:00 a.m.
Wed. Sept. 30,9:00 a.m.
Yom Kippur Mincha 6:45 P M
Wed. Oct. 7,7:00 p.m. Kol Nidray
vi*-. ^ Thur8Oct.8,9:00a.m.
Ylzkor Memorial Service 12 rioon
Join Our Temple Sholom Familv
We Need You You Need Temple Sholom X
accepted at Temple Office 942-6410
^
-- x >..,, ,.........iVN\VyN
.\ .


iy,AatwC28,19ei
ish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale

Page 18
NORTON
SINCE 1924-
SAfETY
Effijj]
CENTER
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RELIABILITY
SATISFACTION

ny 'on you *
* ixcludM "Mirdi ami etmmtrcui eh,-

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PRICE
F.E.T.
30.54
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1.77
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IITEWALLS
IP195/70R13
P205/70R13
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HR78-15
81.51
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r i limy. n-u&aot "
^HPP
Jamboree at Deerfield's Beth Israel
Temple Beth Israel of Deerfield
Beach will celebrate the third an-
niversary of the dedication of its
synagogue at 200 S. Century
Blvd.. at the edge of Century Vil-
lage, with an all-day Jamboree
Sunday, Aug. 30, indoors and
outdoors.
Song and dance shows, com-
plete with skits, will be presented
in the synagogue's social hall at
11 a.m., 1, 3 and 5 p.m. Admis-
sion is free. Booths will be set up
where those who wish may pur-
chase food or bring their own to
have a picnic.
The day's entertainment and
socializing will give those in at-
tendance an opportunity to meet
Rabbi Leon Mirsky, Temple Beth
Israel's new spiritual leader.
J01/tyM
Candlelighting Time
Friday Aug. 28-7:24
Friday, Sept. 4-7:17
Friday, Sept. 117:10
Friday, Sept. 18-7:02 \
jdfltQ ij^p *r % ,; nns Tina
?natf bti ij phyb am
t i : : it :
Ba-ruch A-tah Ado-nye, Elo-haynu Melech Ha-olam, i
Asher kid'shanu B'mitz-vo-tav, V'tzee-va-nu
Lhad-leek Nayr shel Shabbat.
Blessed art Thou, O Lord our God, King of the Universe,
Who has sanctified us with Thy commandments
And commanded us to kindle the Sabbath lights.
Religious Directory
LAUDERDALE LAKES
OHEL B'NAI RAPHAEL TEMPLE. 4351 West Oakland Park
Boulevard. Modern Orthodox Congregation. Saul Herman. Rabbi
Emeritus.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL. 3245 W. Oakland Park Blvd. Reform Rabbi
Jeffrey Ballon. Cantor Jerome Klement.
SUNRISE
BETH ISRAEL TEMPLE. 7100 W. Oakland Park Blvd. Conservative
Rabbi Phillip A. Labowitz. Cantor Maurice Neu.
SUNRISE JEWISH CENTER, INC. 8049 W. Oakland Park Blvd
Conservative. Rabbi Albert N. Troy. Cantor Jack Marchant
LAUDERHILL
HEBREW CONGREGATION OF LAUDERHILL. 2048 NW 49th
Ave. LauderhiU. Conservative. Maxwell Gilbert, president
NORTH LAUDERDALE
HEBREW CONGREGATION OF NORTH LAUDERDALE. 7 p.m.,
Friday; 9 a.m.. Saturday, in Western School 8200 SW 17th St. Murray
Hendler, president.
FORT LAUDERDALE
TEMPLE ISRAEL OF GALT OCEAN MILE. Conservative. Rabbi
David MaUner. 8 p.m. Fridays. North Beach Medical Center 2836 N ,
Ocean Blvd. No services until September,
TAMARAC
TEMPLE BETH TORAH-TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER. 9101
NW 57th St. Conservative. Rabbi Israel Zimmerman. Cantor Henry
Belasco.
PLANTATION
TEMPLE KOL AMI. Plantation Jewish Congregation. 8200 Peters
Rd. Liberal Reform. Rabbi Sheldon J. Harr.
RAMAT SHALOM. Reconstructionist Synagogue. 7473 NW 4th St
Rabbi Robert A. Jacobs. I
POMPANO BEACH
TEMPLE SHOLOM.132 SE 11th Ave., Conservative. Rabbi Samuel
April. Cantor Jacob Renzer.
MARGATE
BETH HILLEL CONGREGATION. 7640 Margate Blvd. Conser-
vative. Rabbi Joseph Berglaa.
TEMPLE BETH AM-MARGATE JEWISH CENTER. 7205 Royal
Palm Blvd. Conservative. Rabbi Dr. Solomon Geld. Cantor Mario
Botoshansky.
LIBERAL TEMPLE of Coconut Creek. Friday evening services.
Calvary Presbyterian Church, Coconut Creek Blvd.
CORAL SPRINGS ,
TEMPLE BETH ORR. 2151 Riverside Drive. Reform. Rabbi Donald S.!
Gerber. Cantor Harold Dworkin.
KETER TIKVAH SYNAGOGUE. 8 p.m. Friday; 10:30 a.m. Saturday
in Auditorium, Bank of Coral Springs, 3300 University Dr. Rabbi
Leonard ZolL
DEERFIELD BEACH
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL at Century Village East. Conservative.
Rabbi Leon Mirsky. Cantor Joseph Pollack.|
YOUNG ISRAEL of Deerfield Beach. 1640 W. Hillsboro Blvd Or-
thodox.
Open House at
Temple Emanu-El
Members, and friends who are
un-affiliated, are invited to the
open house at 7:30 p.m., Sunday,
Sept. 13, at Temple Emanu-El,
3245 Oakland Park Blvd. Rabbi
Jeffrey L. Ballon and Cantor
Jerome Klement along with
Gladys Schleicher, principal of
the Religious School, and leaders
of the Sisterhood, Men's Club,
Couples Club and Youth Groups,
I will join them in providing infor-
mation on the first Jewish con-
gregation organized in Broward
county in 1937.
Further information is avail-
able by calling Temple's execu-
tive director, Morris Watkins,
during week-days at the Temple
office, 731-2310.
Nursery School
The Temple has also named a
new administrator-teacher for its
' Nursery school. Mrs. Sheila
Weinberg, a graduate of Univer-
| sity of Rhode Island specializing
in early childhool education, is
planning a curriculum of Jewish
substance as well as develop-
mental materials to prepare the
young students for future school
years.
LIBERAL JEWISH
TEMPLE
Liberal Jewish Temple of
Coconut Creek will hold High
'' Holy Days services in the Sanc-
tuary of Calvary Presbyterian
church on Coconut Creek Park-
way, opposite Wynmoor Village
at 8 p.m., Monday, Sept. 28, at 10
j a.m., Tuesday, Sept. 29; with
I Yom Kippur services at 8 p.m.,
Wednesday, Oct. 7, and 10 a.m.,
' Thursday, Oct. 8.
Penitential prayer service, in
conjunction with Shabbat serv-
ice, will be at 8 p.m., Friday,
Sept. 25.
Rabbi Bruce Warshal will
occupy the pulpit for all services
as he did for the High Holy Days
last year and at several of Shab-
bat services during the year.
Leo Mirkovic will be the cantor
I with Alfred Waidelich at the
I organ.
Charles Rubenstein, Arthur
Savitt and Arnie Nestel have in-
formation about tickets. Liberal
Jewish Temple receives mail at
P.O. Box 4384, Margate 33063.
WEST BROWARD
CONGREGATION
West Broward Jewish Congre-
gation will hold High Holy Days
Services, it was reported by Dr.
Jay C. Green of Plantation, at
Bailey Hall at Broward Commu-
nity College's Central Campus in
Davie.
Alvin Rudnitsky, concertmas-
ter for the Broward Symphony,
will perform the Kol Nidre,
Wednesday, Oct. 7. Donation for
the services is $25 per seat.
Shabbat services for the con-
gregation will be held at 8 p.m.,
Friday, Aug. 28, at Seminole
Middle School, 6200 SW 16th St.,
Plantation.
NORTH LAUDERDALE
CONGREGATION
Sidney Feld reported that the
Hebrew Congregation of North
Lauderdale is welcoming mem-
bership applications and inviting
participation in traditional
Conservative Shabbat services.
The congregation meets in Room
3, Western School, located at
8200 SW 17th St., North Lauder-
dale, opposite the Courtyard
Condominium.
TEMPLE BETH ORR
Temple Beth Orr, Coral
Springs, will be holding High
Holy Days services, once again,
at Piper High School in Coral
Springs.
Tickets for these services are
available to non-members at $40
per seat, plus $15 for a copy of
the holiday prayer book, [Temple
Gates of Repentance. Seats will
be available on a first call, first
serve basis. Synagogue officers
4 suggest immediate purchase of
I tickets and selection of early or
late service by getting in touch
with the Temple office, 753-3232.
The first day of Rosh Hashana
services will be at 8:45 a.m. and
11:30 a.m.; Kol Nidre, 6 and 8
p.m., and on Yom Kippur, 8:45
and 11:30 a.m.
Members will be able to get
their tickets beginning Sept. 1 at
the Temple.
B'nai Mitzvah
RAMAT SHALOM
Jeffrey Markal
Dews, an honor
roll student at
Nova Middle
School, will be-
come a Bar Mitz-
vah at the 10
a.m., Saturday,
Aug. 29, service
at Ramat
Shalom, the
Reconstruction- _
1st Synagogue in Plantation. The
Friday, Aug. 28, Oneg Shabbat
the synagogue will be sponsored
by Jeffrey's grandparents, Gracd
and Jack Pann.
George Hokrtein will become a
Bar Mitzvah at Saturday morn- .
ing, Sept. 5, service at Ramat
Shalom.
SUNRISE
JEWISH CENTER
Michael Marc Hyde, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Steven Hyde, will be-
come a Bar Mitzvah at Saturday
morning, Aug. 29, services at
Sunrise Jewish Center, 8049 W.
Oakland Park Blvd.
Last Saturday morning,
Steven Levy, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Charles Levy, became a Bar -
Mitzvah at Sunrise JC.
KOL AMI
Last Saturday at Temple Kol
Ami in Plantation, B'nai Mitzvah
honors were conferred on Kari
Levine, daughter of Sandra
Levine, and Peter Teaser, son of
Leslie and Arnold Tesser, all of
Plantation.
*f
Levitt -\ 11
EINSTEIN
memorial chapelt
MOUVWOOO *-"*"* tat
NOATM MIAMI IUM Do* Mwy
f ST PALM Sf ACM 44" OMKMM
M
Mi-rjoo
1S
700
M
Announcing
PHILIP WEINSTEIN
Jewish Funeral Director
Your Neighborhood Funeral Director
Providing the,Fmest in Jewish Funerai Service with
7 Conveniently Located Chapels
W A O. I -I Urn i
* A
OIONOUKK >OMNC II1CH tOCAIATOM Fl lAUMtVAll
41-4111 946-W00 3*5-1 MO 345 55*1
MIIHftO MACK MAIOAn COtAl iniMi
427-35*4 V73-7M0 7S3-4960
IN COOPERATION WITH KRAEER FUNERAL HOMES
The Jewish
Community
Has A Right
To Know:
1
2
3
4.
5.
There are several funeral chapels in South
Florida that serve those of the
Jewish faith.
SOME OF THESE CHAPELS ARE NOT
OWNED BY JEWS.
Even more disturbing, they do not make this
fact apparent to the Jewish community.
MENORAH CHAPELS ARE THE ONLY
JEWISH-OWNED CHAPELS BETWEEN
HOLLYWOOD AND WEST PALM BEACH
AND THE OLDEST IN BROWARD COUNTY.
At Menorah Chapels, unlike the others,
serving the Jewish community is more than
a business it's a way of life.
-*
J
The traditions of our faith and the concerns of our
people should be genuine. It's your right, and we are
proud of our religion.
CqapelS
742-
Dade, 945-3939.
Palm Beach, 833-0887.
Serving chapels throughout the U.S. and Canada.
With locations in Sunrise, Deerfield Beach and Margate
Coming soon to North Miami Beach. nrwrgaw.


ly, August 28,1981
The Jewish Floridianoftrineaier Port Lauderdale
Page 15
jffTiSr1 !* Some Changes in Tenth Knesset
kligious school registration
he new term is currently in
ss at Temple Beth Orr of
I Springs.
splicants for Sunday School,
rjous School and Judaica
School are now being ac-
._ for the school year which
Jis Sunday, Sept. 13 for Sun-
3chool; Monday, Sept. 14 for
nous School and Thursday,
17 for the Judaica High
khool Administrator, Barbara
ier, has already received reg-
Itions for over 50 percent of
chool's capacity. Newcomers
le area are urged to apply at
i to avoid a registration cut-
lult beginner and intermedi-
lebrew classes will begin at 7
Thursday. Sept. 17. These
es will be open to high school
lents as well as adults with
Regular Judaica High School
tming one hour later.
The Thursday evening sessions
were scheduled to offer parents
the convenience of attending
classes on the same evening as
their children. Parents of children
who will soon become B'nai Mitz-
vah are being encouraged to
attend the classes to enable them
to strengthen their skills. Other
adult education courses will be
offered Tuesday and Thursday
evenings and Tuesday mornings
beginning in October.
Temple Beth Orr is charging $5
per course per semester for Tem-
ple members with a maximum of
$10 for any number of courses per
semester. Non-members will be
charged $25 per semester for an
unlimited number of courses.
Classes will be on a tri-semester
basis.
The Temple office at 753-3232
has more information for those
interested in registering for the
classes.
jth Am Offers High School Study
lemple Beth Am's new school
ninisirator. Joy Kahn-Evron,
ccepting registrations for the
|aica High School's one-day-a-
courses for boys and girls of
grade and through high
I level grades.
! classes for Beth Am's
^gate students will be held at
Dple Beth Orr in Coral Springs
i joint program sponsored by
two synagogues in
Deration with the Central
icy of Jewish Education of
| Jewish Federation of Greater
: Lauderdale.
he school will be a satellite of
Judaica High School which
fins its third year of classes at
Jewish Community Center,
W. Sunrise Blvd., for other
school students throughout
th Broward. Information on
I satellite school and the school
fCC can be had by calling Mrs.
ti-Evron at Temple Beth Am,
8650; Barbara Fellner at
iple Beth Orr, 753-3232, or
graham J. Gittelson Federa-
l's director of education at
derations new phone number:
HJ200.
LOM HEBREW SCHOOL
ie education department of
Iple Sholom, Pompano Beach
lunces the registration and
\ of the Hebrew School year
unday. Sept. 13 at 9:30 a.m.
asses from the Primary
Ugh Bar and Bat Mitzvah,
^ed by Pre-Confirmation
confirmation will be taught.
information, call the
pie office at 942-6410 daily to
The Promise of
We Are One
SRUSALEM 'Don't take
Bung for granted in Israel.
fa)s remember that we live in
niracle." This advice was
M by President Yitzhak
on to 600 Israel Bond Orga-
tmn leadrrs from the United
Canada and Western Eu-
P who are attending the 30th
||versary conference of the or-
zation.
'ted that although the
^'- >t tru Jewish people is
i in I .usands of years,
iwi ; of time can be
Blv If Israel had been estab-
ten years earlier, hundreds
npusands or millions of Jews
have been saved, Navon
KOL AMI SCHOOL
Morris Ezry, principal of Plan-
tation's Temple Kol Ami Reli-
gious School, is anticipating a
record enrollment for the start of
the new school year, Sunday
morning, Sept. 13. He urges im-
mediate registration by parents
who have not enrolled their chil-
dren expected to attend.
Classes for kindergarten
through 6th grade are scheduled
on Sundays either from 8:45 to
10:45 a.m., or 11:05 a.m. to 1:05
p.m., with 4th through 6th
graders going to additional
classes either Wednesdays from
4:30 to 6:30 p.m. or Thursday
from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m.
Seventh graders will have
classes Tuesdays and Wednes-
days from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m., with
8th, 9th and 10th graders attend-
ing classes only on Tuesdays at 7
p.m.
HAIFA When the chairman
of the Tenth Knesset pounded hi;
gavel for the first meeting of that
body since the elections, he faced
a body of 120 members quite
different in composition from
that which had served in the pre-
ceding four years.
Some of the familiar (and
noisy) personalities of the past
were gone. Instead, there were
new faces, some of them no doubt
destined to become familiar. The
overseas observer might make
note of the following, about
whom much more will yet be
heard:
Yaakoy Meridor, shipping
magnate, and said to be the new
great hope for Likud's economic
program; Eliyahu Ben-Elissar,
Israel's first Ambassador to
Cairo; Hayim Herzog, already
familiar as former Israel
Ambassador to the UN; Prof.
Yuval Ne'eman, leader of the new
Tehiyah Party, which is hostile to
Begin because of the letter's
"moderation"; Avraham
Shapiro, (Agudat Israeli, head of
the Carmel rug company who,
the wits say, favors a wall-to-wall
coalition.
This is a young Knesset, and
the bulk of the members are in
their 40's or early 50's. At least
ten are under 40.
IN VIEW of the brutal and
wholly unnecessary projection of
the AshkenaziSephardi con-
frontation into the election camp-
aign, it is highly significant that
the electorate rejected that as an
issue. The three or four parties
which openly appealed for sup-
port on the basis of their
Sephardi composition polled a to-
tal of less than 50,000 votes from
the almost 2 million cast. There
can be nothing but condemnation
for Aharon Abuhatzeira who
made this issue his principal
plank, and thereby enflamed feel-
ings. Obviously, the Sephardi
electorate, who comprise almost
half the voting population, them-
selves refused to respond to this
appeal.
The fact remains, nonetheless,
that of the 120 Knesset members.
88 are Ashkenazi Jews, 27 non-
Ashkenazis, and 5 Arabs, this
according to a study by Prof.
Shevach Weiss, himself a new
member of the Knesset.
And speaking of under-repre-
sentation, there are only 9 women
among the 120, one of them the
colprful and irreverent Shulamit
Aloni, who survived the massacre
of the small parties and managed
to keep her seat as the sole
member of her dwindling Citi-
zen's Rights Party.
IN THE early days of the
State, kibbutz members played
an influential role in the Knesset
and in government. That role is
gradually being diminished. The
present Knesset contains only 8
kibbutz members, but even these
are 6.5 percent of the 120 mem-
bers, or double the ratio of
kibbutz population to the general
population.
One would expect to find the
legal profession well-represented
in a legislative body, but here
there is a surprise. There are only
17 members with legal training,
down from 26 lawyers in the out-
going Knesset. Even then, there
was considerable criticism of the
shoddy drafting of much of the
legislation.
There are five professors in the
Knesset: two in aeronautics, one
in law, one in physics, and one in
sociology. In addition there are
economists, architects, educators
and of course a considerable
number of just ordinary people
who happen to be active in
politics, but that's democracy,
isn't it?
And it was democracy that re-
tired from the last Knesset some
of the unusual personalities who
occupied seats there. Among
those who were rejected by the
voters were Shmuel Flato-
Sharon, the millionaire fugitive
from French justice; Meir Pa'il,
the noisiest heckler of the Parlia-
ment; and Yisrael Katz, said to
have been a highly successful
Minister of Social Welfare, who
made the mistake of throwing in
his lot with Moshe Dayans new
party, which did poorly at the
polls.
KRAVITZ, HERBERT
The American ORT Federation and the Florida
region of Men's ORT deeply mourn the sudden
and untimely passing of our officer and good
friend, Herbert Kravitz. We extend heartfelt
condolences to his family.
North Broward Cow
only all Jewish Ceme
now has its own
Funeral Chapel
Now you can make all of your funeral
arrangements in one location. Our
new Funeral Chapel is staffed by
caring, experienced professionals who
can assist you with arrangements for
a loved one or pre-arranged family
memorials.
Of course .we recommend pre-arrange-
ments to alleviate the stress of
making funeral arrangements
for the bereaved. Now
it is more convenient than ever to pre-
arrange both cemetery and funeral ar-
rangements. Remember, too, that pre-
arrangements are protected against
price Increases under Florida Law.
Star of David Memorial Gardens
feature the beautiful Har Tzion
Mausoleum, an open air meditation
chapel and complete funeral
arrangements in our Funeral
Chapel.
Star of David
Jacob Wetaa,Licensed Funeral Dtrector/7701 Bailey Road.Tamarm Florida 33320/721-4112
Pre-Need Services Depart merit
Ccm-A-Care Management Co., Inc.
P.O. Box 11960, Ft. Lauderdale. FL 33339
D I want more information on property selectioni ai Star of David: South Br.mnrd i North Broward
D I want more information on pre-arranged a lb I want more information on j our property exchange program.
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