The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 3, no. 7 (Apr. 5, 1974)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 9, 1976 called v.4, no. 27 but constitutes v.5, no. 1; issue for July 7, 1989 called v.18, no. 11 but constitutes v.18, no. 13.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44570954
lccn - sn 00229545
ocm44570954
System ID:
AA00014312:00194

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Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward


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Full Text
fiJems,
WiKJiiiaiin
OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE
Volume 10 Number 17
Fort Lauderdale, Florida Friday, August 14,1981
I fndShochtl
Price 35 Cents
U.S. Military in Saudi Arabia; Investing in Stability or Disaster?
The Defense Monitor, a publication of the Center for Defense
Information which is a project of the Fund for Peace with Rear
Admiral Gene R. LaRoque (U.S. Navy, Ret.) as director, hasits VolX,
So. 4 issue devoted solely to the U.S. involvement in Saudi Arabia. In
light of the Reagan Administration's plan to submit to Congress soon,
the proposed sale of the most advanced offensive military weapons
and planes to Saudi Arabia, the map and material, excerpted from the
Defense Monitor, is presented here in line with the publication's
comment: "It is time for the Congress and the American people to
take a close look at the U.S. role in the arming of Saudi Arabia."
for oU relationship ruels the
The Defense Monitor makes
this brief summary:
Saudi Arabia is the Number
One U.S. arms customer. It has
, purchased some of our most ad-
vanced weapons.
The proposed sale of five
I AW ACS aircraft, seven tanker
aircraft, and armaments for 60
previously purchased F-15
fighter aircraft would add to
[Saudi Arabia's offensive military
(capability and would not meet
any new Saudi defense need. It
Iwould heighten regional tensions.
Saudia Arabia has hired the
S. Army Corps of Engineers to
build a vast array of military and
rivilian projects at a cost of
^24,000,000,000 (twenty four
aillion dollars for 16 projects
(0 of which are spotted on the
map. including a military
academy at Riyadh, costing S2.6
illion.)
U.S. military and civilian mili-
tary engineers are so deeply in-
volved in the Saudi military
Btructure that we may be drawn
ito combat in the area at a time
iot of our choosing.
The U.S.-Saudi Arabian "arms
oU relationship ruels
Middle East arms race and in-
creases the likelihood and de-
structiveness of war in the area.
The introduction of Soviet arms
and Soviet military activity also
increases the likelihood of war in
the region.
Saudi Arabia is being milita-
rized with the world's latest,
most complex weapons. Saudi
Arabia ranks sixth in world mili-
tary expenditures (10 years ago it
ranked 35th1 and spends more on
military per citizen than any
other country.
Saudi Arabia does not have the
manpower or the know-how to
maintain and operate many of the
U.S. military systems already
provided.
Saudia Arabia is a major sup-
porter of and source of funds and
arms for the Palestine Liberation
Organization (PLO).
In its conclusions, published
on the 12th page of the report,
with the notation that the
principal analyst for the issue
was Stephen D. Goose, The De-
fense Monitor, which notes it re-
ceives no funds from government
or from military contractors, and
is financed solely by voluntary
tax-deductible contributions
mailed to Fund for Peace, 122
Maryland Ave., NE., Washing-
ton, 20002, offers these com-
ments:
The U.S. should undertake
serious review of its military rela-
tionship with Saudi Arabia. The
U.S. should rely far more on
diplomatic and economic initia-
tives, not such a purely military
response to the complex and ex-
plosive problems of the Middle
East-Persian Gulf Region.
In U.S.-Saudi relations, the
primary trade has been "arms for
oil." The U.S. should tempor-
rarily suspend major new weap-
ons sales to Saudi Arabia.
It would not be in the interest
of the U.S. to sell AWACS air-
craft, aerial refueling aircraft,
advanced air-to-air missiles, and
fuel tanks to Saudi Arabia. None
of these items, especially the
AWACS planes, are essential to
the Saudi military.
The U.S. should postpone any
new Army Corps of Engineers
projects in Saudi Arabia until
after an intensive Congressional
investigation The U.S. gov-
ernment should impose tighter
restraints on the type of activ-
ities that U.S. government and
private persons perform for for-
eign military forces.
The U.S. should not seek per-
manent American military bases
in Saudi Arabia. Such bases
could engender hostility from
most of the Arab world toward
both the U.S. and Saudi Arabia,
could increase the risk of direct
U.S. involvement in regional con-
flicts, and could spur expanded,
more permanent Soviet military
involvement in the area.
ederation Joining National UJA Mission
A golden opportunity to rejoice with Israelis during one
[of the happiest of Jewish holidays, the Festival of Sukkot
(Feast of Tabernacles), awaits a limited number of North
lliroward residents, it was reported by Victor Gruman,
president of the Jewish Federation of Greater Fort
[Lauderdale.
He said that the National United Jewish Appeal has
I invited a number of Federations around the country to join
the National UJA Mission this year. It will begin Sunday,
(Kt. 11, two days before Sukkot, andconcludeon Wednes-
day. Oct. 21, the day of thanks for the Torah, the service
| concluding the festival.
Reservations should be made early, according to
jtichard llomanoff, general chairman of Federation's 1982
JA Campaign, who, echoing Gruman's comments about
II In wonderful opportunity to visit Israel diMng the Festi-
val week, said that Greater Fort I ihm|i i has been
allowed only a limited number of spaces for tflrMission.
In addition to enjoying home hospitality in aSukka.
I.i said participants will be able to lake part in the Simchat
I Torah eve festivities, Oct. 20, the hAjpiest time of all when
lews dance and parade around antll&.vnanogues carrying
At the Western Wall, Sukkot is celebrated with blowing of
the shofar and waving of the lulav (date palm frond).
Torahs. Throughout the evening there is singing and
afterward, naturally, something sweet to eat.
Those are among the extras now being planned for the
Oct. 11-21 Mission. Also on tap will be meetings with
high ranking officials of Prime Minister Menachem
Begin's new government, including Cabinet officials.
Staff members of the Jewish Agency, the major reci-
pient in Israel for UJA funds which are used for the hu-
manitarian programs of absorption of immigrants, educa-
tion and scores of other programs, will take them on trips
to help them to appreciate and better understand the
unique character of the people and the land.
There will be opportunities to visit with Israelis, to
tour the country, to shop, to relax, and to enjoy the won-
ders of a land filled with the Biblical lore of ancient Jewish
heritage nad the wonders of modern-day technology in a
country which has developed so fast since its Declaration
of Independence in 1948.
For reservations and more information on the Mis-
sion, call Jan Salit. director of the Women's Division of the
Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale. 484-8200.
Begin Forms New Cabinet;
Sadat Mefcts Reagan
From JTA Sources
While Prime Minister Mena-
rhetn Begin was completing his
i new Cabinet with his 61-member
coalition in the Knesset in Jeru-
salem, Egypt's President Anwar
Sadat was arriving in Washing-
ton to meet with President
Ronald Reagan.
And both Begin and Sadat ap-
peared to be on "hard line"
courses, although both countries
had their representatives meet in
Washington with U.S. Secretary
of State Alexander Haig to sign
jthe formal agreement for the
| peacekeeping force that will take
over in the Sinai when Israel
gives up the land by next April to
I kgypt.
Begin named Ariel Sharon,
who led Israel forces in the 1973
| Yom Kippur War in the Sinai, as
defense minister, and pledged to
expand Jewish settlements in the
West Bank, block Palestinian
statehood, and adhere more
strictly to Orthodox Jewish law
in the country.
The policy guidelines of Be-
gin's new alliance commit the
government to renew talks with
Egypt and United States on Pal-
estinian self-rule in the West
Bank and Gaza.
And those talks were the
primary subjects of Sadat's
meetings with Reagan. Sadat, at
press time, was reported plan-
ning to urge a role for the Pales-
tinians, including the Palestine
Liberation Organization (PLO),
in the Middle East peace process.
Reagan, it was reported, was
almost sure to reject that recom-
mendation. White House spokes-
man David Gergen said: "The
United States has not changed
its position with regard to the
PLO."
At the Wednesday night State
dinner, Sadat, during his toast to
President Reagan, suggested
U.S. include the PLO in the peace
talks. Reagan made no comment.
Secretary Haig said the U.S.
position remains unchanged.
Reagan, following his meetings
with Sadat, will depart for an
August vacation in California.
Shortly after his return to Wash-
ington in September, Begin is ex-
pected to arrive in the U.S. and
have his "get-acquainted" meet-
ings with Reagan.
The day after winning Knes-
set's slim vote of confidence 61 -
58, Begin on Thursday morning,
Aug. 6, formally presented to
President Yitzhak Navon the list
Continued on Page 6
Slow Flow of
Cash Inperils Israel Aid
Members of the Cash Committee of the Jewish Fed-
eration of Greater Fort Lauderdale, headed by Gladys Daren,
president of Women's Division of the Federation, and John
Streng, Federation treasurer, are on a "closed door" United
Jewish Appeal Mission. Behind that closed door they are
busy trying to get the cash flowing on UJA pledges that have
been unpaid for sometime.
Their calls are without the fanfare and glamor of "Super
Sunday" phone-a-thons when pledges are made. Now those
pledges need to be paid, they said, and they are hoping that
contributors will clear their accounts in time to start the Jew-
ish New Year 5742 next month with a clean UJA account.
Mrs. Daren is fond of quoting a 16th Century sage who
said:
"He who gives quickly, it were as though he gave twice."
And, she adds, "Israel needs it twice as much today, be-
cause the slow flow of cash means that humanitarian and
social service budgets may be cut." She and John Streng
urge: "Please pay your pledge. Today."



VUlKt I'UI L I MUM""
\.~~.\ -.
Page 2
The Jewish Fbridian of Greater Fort LauderdOe_
Friday ;AtfguaVU,
1981.
Second Season of Adult Education Begins in October
of Jewish
learning, Heritage
Music, Hebrew for beginners.
Adult Bnai Mitzvah studies,
Jewish arts and crafts. Yiddish
Israeli dancing, Ethics of the
Fathers and other courses as in-
terest develops.
Fees for courses will be $5 per
course for persons affiliated with
Jewish Life lecture series
featuring nationally known
speakers, will be expanded from
four presentations to six lecture
during the w inter semester
Further
Midrasha
plans for the entire
program and the
lecture series will be considered
Sonsoring organizations of Mid- ^ the AA.lt Education Con?
rha. and $10 for non-members. nutteeat lU. meeting at 10 a.m.,
The Midrasha brochure detailing Thursday. Sept 3 in the office of
the courses at the various insti- the Jewish Federation. Mrs
Crowd assembled last March to hear Lecturer Albert Vorspan.
The second season of the North
Broward Midrasha (institute) for
Adult Education, sponsored by
the Education Committee of the
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale and synagogues
of North Broward, begins during
the week of Oct. 26, at the con-
clusion of the fall High Holy
Days services.
Helen Weisberg, administrator
of Midrasha for the Federation
and Central Agency for Jewish
Education, reported that courses
and new programming open to
the entire community will be
planned.
During the fall semester, a
Yiddish film festival will be
offered, and the popular commu-
nity lecture series will be high-
lighted in the winter semester.
The season will begin with a
Middle East Update and regis-
tration during the Oct. 26 week at
the participating institutions:
Temples Beth Am, Beth Israel,
Beth Torah, Emanu-El, Kol Ami.
Sholom, and Ramat Shalom Syn-
agogue, Sunrise Jewish Center,
and the Jewish Community
Center of Greater Fort Lauder-
dale.
Classes will begin the following
week. Courses will vary from The
Jewish Family, Ulpan Hebrew
tutions will be available in Sept-
tember at the Federation, JCC
and the synagogues.
The Yiddish Film Festival will
be held on four Thursdays in
November and December, dates
to be announced, with the
showings of such films as Singing
Blacksmith, Kol Nidre, The
Great Advisor, Power of Life, to
be screened at Temple Beth
Torah in Tamarac. Tickets will be
available at the door at $1.50 for
members of the sponsoring orga-
nizations and $2 for non-
members.
Administrator Weisberg said
that the Contemporary Issues of
Jewish
Weisberg can be reached at tl
Federation office, 484-8200,
PLANNING ATRIP
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ie Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 3-
At-Home Interfaith Dialogues Planned for Oct. 18
The Interfaith Council, organ-
ized through the coordinated
efforts of the Community
Relations Committee (CRC) of
the Jewish Federation of Greater
For Lauderdale and other inter-
ested groups, will sponsor "At-
Home Interfaith Dialogues"
Sunday afternoon, Oct. 18, in
eight North Broward homes with
eight to 10 participants in each
home.
Members of the Council, repre-
senting CRC, Broward County
-Clergy Council (BC3), Church
Women United, Urban League,
National Conference of Chris-
tians and Jews, Women's Divi-
sion of the Jewish Federation, are
conducting their own dialogues
this week in preparation tor a
training session for hosts,
moderators and facilitators. This
session is scheduled for Sunday,
Sept. 20, to brief the principals on
the ways to have people of dif-
ferent backgrounds discuss com-
mon problems and to help dispel
myths that they may have about
each other.
The date selected for the
dialogues, coming during the
middle of one of the happiest
holidays of Jewish heritage, the
Festival of Sukkot, and conclud-
ing the fall season of High Holy
Days, may provide a starting
point for dialogues in some of the
homes, according to Council Co-
Chairmen Rev. Donald Bautz of
BC3 and Samuel K. Miller of
CRC. They have already received
offers from several persons who
have offered to serve as hosts in
their homes for dialogue par-
ticipants. They include Irving R.
Friedman, CRC chairman; Flor-
ence Straus, Federation board
member; Bishop Richard E.
Dreus and Father Thomas Wis-
niewsky of the Catholic archdio-
cese of Miami.
Persons interested in taking
part in the dialogues, either as
hosts or as a participant to be
assigned to a home where the di-
alogue takes place, are asked to
call Larry Schuval, CRC director,
as the Jewish Federation office,
484-8200.
Washington's Mayor Speaks of Jerusalem Visit
WASHINGTON Mayor
; Marion Barry of Washington,
[D.C.. brought an enthusiastic
.report of his first visit to Jerusa-
lem when he addressed employ-
ees of the Department of Housing
and Urban Development recently
in the Nation's Capitol. The
meeting drew an audience of
more than 200, including many
Black employees.
Barry said he had been im-
pressed especially by the energy
and dedication of Jerusalem's
Mayor Teddy Kollek, whom he
described, admiringly. He had
also been impressed, he said, by
the diversity of the population
and the city administration's
ability to provide equal education
for all the minority groups with-
out pressing for integration.
'When I went to school, we
had separate but unequal
facilities," Barry said, "but in
"Jerusalem the various groups
preserve their ethnic identities
and cultural differences on an
equal basis." It was an experi-
ence, he said, that led him to con-
sider that "We may have to re-
think our own attitude" on some
aspects of integration.
Barry said he had been sur-
prised by the large number of Je-
rusalemites in all walks of life
who owned a cooperative or
condominium apartments, a situ-
ation made possible by generous
state subsidies. In Washington
conversion of apartments to
tenant ownership had led to dis-
placement and economic hard-
ship, but in Jerusalem ownership
of apartments was made feasible,
he said, even for many of modest
means. It was a condition he said,
he would like to see established in
his own city.
Visits YadVaahem
Among other experiences,
Barry recounted his visit to Yad
Vashem, the memorial to the
6,000,000 Jewish victims of
Nazism. The visit, he said, had
led to a deeper understanding of
the meaning of the Holocaust and
of Jewish people's sensitivity to
what they consider derogative
comments, however unintended.
This was an apparent reference to
Barry's own remark early in May
to a group of Black leaders in
Atlanta that if the murdered chil-
dren in that city had been Jewish,
there would have been swifter
and more effective action to find
the killers. The statement drew a
storm of protests.
Barry dealt directly with the
issue for the first time in reply to
a question from the floor. He said
his remark had been taken out fo
context ot a long speech and had
been misunderstood. He had in-
tended only to convey the need
for Black people to emulate the
Jews in fostering unity and
strong organizations that are po-
litically potent, he said. From his
own experience, Barry said, he
was aware that "Jews are always
in the forefront" of the fight for
freedom for all minorities. The
mayor said that on the advice of
Jewish friends, he had previously
refrained from commenting on
the issue, until the controversy
over his remark had "cooled."
SftSJS^ASSSS^AWSSS^SSSSSKSKT^W^'
CORRECTION
In the Congressman Dan
Mica's report in the July 31
Jewish Floridian issue about
Medicare's charges, it was noted:
"Medicare approved charges of
$25 for an initial visit to the
doctor's office. If a Medicare
recipient received a bill of $35, he
knows he will be reimbursed $25
of the cost by Medicare and the
remaining $10 would be (the re-
cipient's) out-of-pocket expense."
A nurse in a doctor's office called
to report that Medicare would
pay only 80 percent of the $25 so
that the Medicare recipient's ex-
pense would be $15, not $10.
Community Relations
Committee Role Defined
The Community Relations
Committee (CRC) of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort Lau-
derdale is one of more than 100
local agencies and 11 national or-
ganizations that make up the Na-
tional Jewish Community Rela-
tions Advisory Council, known as
NJCRAC. The CRC meets on the
first Wednesday of each month
for a luncheon meeting. Many is-
sues affecting the Jewish com-
munity are discussed with guest
speakers often in attendance.
NJCRAC is the umbrella or-
ganization which, with help from
its constituent groups, provides
guidelines for local Jewish
communities to evaluate
developments of concern, seeks
consensus on joint policies and
develops guidelines for ap-
propriate action.
The essential purpose of Jew-
ish community relations ac-
tivities is to foster and enhance
conditions conducive to secure
and creative Jewish living .
that includes freedom of religion,
thought and expression, equal
rights, justice and opportunity
and a social climate in which
differences among groups are
accepted and respected.
Through a coordinated pro-
gram of activity the Community
Relations Committee of the Jew-
ish Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale seeks to interpret Is-
rael's position and needs to the
public; to share a profound con-
cern for freedom of Soviet Jews
and oppressed Jews throughout
the world; to insure that anti-
Semitism will not flourish ever
again here or in other countries;
and to guarantee social and eco-
nomic justice here in the United
States.
CRC plans to issue a monthly
update on local, national and in-
ternational issues of concern to
the Jewish community, serving
as the voice of the organized Jew-
ish community..
The member agencies for
NJCRAC pool their ideas, in-
formation and experience, seek-
ing agreement on the major pro-
blems facing the Jewish com-
munity at any given time, how
these problems can be dealt with
and their order of their priority.
Irving R. Friedman, is chair-
man, with Joseph Kaplan as co-
chairman. Both are members of
the Board of Directors of Fed-
eration. For further information
about the CRC, contact Lawrence
M. Schuval, CRC Director at
Federation, 484-8200.
MAI Lost $47.5
Million in 1981
TEL AVIV (JTA) El Al
lost $47.5 million last year, ac-
cording to its annual budget.
Nevertheless, the airline's
management expressed satis-
luclion with the deficit, pointing
out that it was about half the loss
it incurred in 1979. They said this
was the result of strict measures
luki-n to reduce expenditures.
()! I hf total deficit, $38 million
was an operational loss with an-
other 19.5 million due to payment
of severance pay to pilots and
others persuaded to retire as an
economy measure. El Al director
general Yitzhak Shander said the
airline will ask the new govern-
ment, as soon as it is formed, to
improve the capital structure of
i In' company.
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1981
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PI
H*"
Page2
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fnrt i*iul-*W
Pig;*- Th^J^iA^hriddanMOre^erPort^^^.
Friday, August 14r1981
Jewish Floridian Aug. 15 is Little Known Festival ofAv 15
ol Greater Fort Lauderdale Fred Snooel
FREOSHOCMET SUZANNE SHOCMET MAX LEVINE
Editor and Publisher Executive Edllof Production Editor
Published Br Weekly Second Claw Pottage Paid at Mallandale Fu USPS 899420
FORT LAU0ER0ALEMOLLYW0O0 OFFICE. Am Savings 2500 Bldg .
2500 E Mallandale Bear* Blvd Suite TOrQ. Mallandale. Ri 33009. Phone 4S4 0466
Abraham B M.lpem, AdverKalng Supervisor
Mamoitice 120NE6tn St.Miami. Fla 33132 Phone i 3M4605
ormeeter fctm 7treturns to Mmttti FlorkHtn. P.O. Box tl-nn. Miami. Fit. 3310
Member JIA Seven Arts. WNS NEA AJPA and FPA
Jewish Floridian Does Not Guarantee Kashrulh ol Merchant'.-.. A.iverhtp.-i
SUBSCRIPTION RATES Local Area 11 45 Annual I? Year Minimum $7 90i or r, memi-oiw. '.
Federation ol Greater Foil LaudnMaMi "f*> NW 3.--.I Aw Fnn laitnWnaK Pi* li
Ph.. i^ k.w n,r -Mpn.,#w.
Friday, August 14,1981
Volume 10
14 AB 5741
Number 17
__ _^ em a, .",
It's Temperature Time
s
g
We devoutly hope that the American Jewish jlj:
:: community would stop taking its pulse and temper- $':
| ature in public as assiduously as it has been doing in
?! the recent past. :j
We refer to the just-announced findings of an
American Jewish Committee-sponsored Yankelovich
report on the status of anti-Semitism in America
today. This is not meant as criticism of the American
Jewish Committee, which does much excellent work
in the cause of the community. We are certain that it
was felt that yet another study of just how many
people hate Jews or Israel today would be most help-
ful.
Still, it does seem that a more pleasant approach
might be to wonder: Who cares? Surely, we have
enough statistics on this and releated matters
amassed during the last few years to serve our in-
formational needs for a long time to come. Small
swings in one direction or another can not be of such
monumental consequence as to evoke other dangers
in the process.
e

1
1j
By ABRAHAM J. GITTELSON
Federates Director of Education
. tea r^rs:^'^^
in certain ways to Yom mppur ana ,s
UTWlnl, One of the most fascinating of the **&*&
sciousness during the long centuries of the Diaspora. Lurrem y
being called 'Festival of Dance.
of Av. It was noted that the sun
began its period of decline at that
time, and only after exactly six
months, on the 15th day of
Shvat, Tu B'shvat, would the
birthday of the newly grown trees
be celebrated.
This aspect of the holiday was
reflected in the 15th of Av, or Tu
(15 in Hebrew letters) B'Av,
being known as "The day of the
breaking of the axe". A symbolic
ceremony of the breaking of an
axe was held, signifying that the
trees would be free to grow with-
out interference during the com-
ing months of autumn and
winter.
As with other Jewish holidays,
Tu B'Av became identified with
historical and religious elements
as well. It was on this day, ac-
cording to tradition, in the 40th
year of the wanderings of the
Israelites in the wilderness of
Sinai, that those of the new
generation born in the desert
realized that all those of the pre-
vious generation had finally died
out, and they themselves were
not ready to enter the Promised
Land.
For example, does it not strike the American
S Jewish community, as it does us, that few if any oth-
* er minority or special interest group go around the
;S country with such regularity, such devotion to sta-
S tistics, such assiduous dedication to the highly in-
S accurate methods of social science in the cause of dis-
:| covering just who loves them at the moment and who
% does not.
On the other hand, what does the publication of
jij: the results of this compulsive, doubtfully accurate
' testing accomplish? Is it beyond the realm of prob-
ability to argue that announcements that anti-
Semitism has increased in themselves encourage it to
increase? And reckoned in terms of the ancillary
matter of Israel, what group gives such a commo-
dious theatre as do American Jews to discovering
; through a public opinion poll whether or not a par-
: ticular country should continue to exist? This is not
only gratuitous, it is absurd.
May we politely suggest: less compulsive test-
3 ing please. Less attention for a while to discovering
|: just who loves us and who does not. What is impor-
S tant is for us to love ourselves as Jews, and each
g other.
Double Denials
Israel denies vociferously that it has dealt with ?;
the Palestine Liberation Organization in acceding to ;
a ceasefire in Lebanon. Yasir Arafat denies equally #
vociferously that his PLO has dealt with Israel in ::
acceding to a ceasefire in Lebanon.
For both, the issue is that each refuses to rec-
ognize the legitimacy of the other and that, there- ?!
fore, acceding to the ceasefire was a larger gesture in '.
the name of peace rather than a specific act with an ?
illegitimate entity.
In the end, what is important is the reiteration ?!
of the PLO refusal to accept Israeli national integrity %
under any circumstances. We are at a loss to under- |
stand how any of Israel's so-called friends can there- ?!
fore insist that it is Prime Minister Begins alleged ?!
intransigency or Israel's that is at the root of the i?
failure to achieve peace in the Middle East. That all f
Israel has to do to achieve it is to make friends with ?!
Arafat.
i
We are at a loss to understand how they do not ?!
perceive that only Israel's dissolution will satisfay ?:
this Muscovite puppet.
::
Concerning this day, the great
sage of the Mishneh, Rabbi
Shimon ben Gamliel declared,
"The Israelites had no joyous
holidays as the 15th day of Av
and Yom Kippur, for on those
days the daughters of Jerusalem
used to go out in white, borrowed
garments and dance in the vine-
yards. And what did they say?
'Young man, lift up your eyes
and see whom you choose for
yourself. Choose not for beauty,
but rather for family lineage'."
Our sages suggested that it
was on the 15th day of Av after
the settlement of Israel in the
time of the Judges, that the bar-
riers against marriages between
members of the different tribes of
Israel were set aside, and on the
Yom Kippur of the Jubilee year,
that the custom was fully estab-
lished. Thus, the 15th of Av be-
came a day of matchmaking, an
opportunity for young men to
choose their brides.
As in every Jewish festival,
unique moral values were incor-
porated into what may have been
originally an agricultural festival
marking both the end of summer
and the grape harvest. Borrowed
dresses were worn by the girls so
no one would have special status.
The link with Yom Kippur em-
phasized that the same atmo-
sphere of purity and holiness that
characterized that day should be
revident in the sacred act of
choosing a mate.
Nevertheless, agricultural ele-
ments remained part of the ob-
servances of the day. In the land
of Israel, all felling of trees for a
particular year ceased on the 15th
It was also on this day, cen-
turies later, at a time when the
Holy Land was divided between
the kingdoms of Israel and
Judea, that Elah, king of the
northern portion, removed the
guards that had prevented the
Israelites of the north from wor-
shiping at the center of Jewish
religious life, the Temple in
Judea, in the south. The two pre-
viously hostile, brother kingdoms
drew closer together and made
peace between them.
Still later, in 135 CE, during
the Bar Kochba revolt against
Rome, it was on Tu B'Av that
thousands of slain Jewish
fighters were allowed to be buried
after their corpses had lain un-
covered in the vineyards of the
Roman leader, Hadrian. The sig-
nificance of this event was of
such importance in the eyes of
the sages, that they composed a
special blessing that became part
of the Grace after Meals.
During the following two mil
lenia, only in isolated communi-
ties like Caucasia, in southern
Russia, and Shiraz, in Iran, did
the festival retain its vigor. In
those places the day was cele-
brated with drums and feasting
and dancing in the towns or the
nearby vineyards.
Only the rebirth of the Jewish
people in the land of Israel has
renewed the observance of Tu
B'Av in the mainstream of Jew-
ish life. In many kibbutzim and
settlements dance festivals mark
the day, with many of the themes
taken from verses from the Bibli-
cal book. The Song of Songs.
Perhaps communities in the
Diaspora as well should revive
the spirit of thanksgiving for the
harvest, the historical remem
brance of past struggles, the cen-
trality of marriage in Jewish life,
and the joys of the dance, and re-
new the festival of Tu B'Av.
M *^ (and fathers) have traditionally boasted, and iustifi-
SS1; ch,ldren's professional achievements. But in hcJmany
r^GHT!" 3 J PareM Pr0udly proclaim: "Meet mY E
Certainly Scotland must stand in the forefront. In recent
years Scotland produced three Jewish Knights, two Jewish Mem
bers of Parhament, a Lord Provost (mayor), and the on v lewtsh
pipe-band in the entire world! '. y Jewish
AnA a ^C^ Scotland's m" famous product is scotch whiskv
^u^


Friday, August 14,1981
_______.....
The Jewish FloHdian of Greater Fort Lander dale
p*gfr
JWV Invites Public to
Convention Sessions
The 86th national convention
of the Jewish War Veterans will
be held Aug. 19-22 at the Diplo-
mat Hotel in Hollywood.
Because of the interest
developing among persons who
want to hear some of the speakers
at the convention, JWV has
made available to the Com-
munity Relations Committee of
the Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale a number of
tickets for those sessions.
Wednesday, Aug. 20, at 2 p.m.,
Charles R. Allen Jr., author of
Nazi War Criminals Among Us,
will be the speaker.
Two concurrent sessions are
scheduled at 10:15 a.m.,
Thursday, Aug. 10. At one, Fred
Jones of the Black Veterans
Assn., Florida State Rep. John
Plummer, and Circuit Court
Judge Henry Latimer will dis-
cuss Black Jewish Relations and
the View from the Black Com-
munity.
The other session at that same
time features Dr. Fred Crawford,
professor of Sociology at Emory
University and director of the
"Witness to Holocaust Project,
speaking about "The Holocaust
and the Big Lie."
That afternoon, 2 p.m., Thurs-
day, Aug. 20, Admiral Noel Gay-
ler, former director of National
Security, will be the speaker.
Admission to these talk ses-
sions is by ticket only. Tickets
may be secured by calling Law-
rence M. Schuval, CRC director
at the Jewish Federation office,
484-8200.
Readers Write
EDITOR:
I have always been an avid
reader of The Jewish Floridian
However, I am very much dis-
appointed in your article "Half
Truth Respoken" (Page 4, July
31, The Jewish Floridian).
In the first half, you state very
well that the Reagan ad-
ministration is taken in by half
truths of the PLO. You negate
everything by starting with "On
the other hand."
Here you state "of the stinging
criticism voiced by major Israeli
newspapers."
, You had no business to print
that statement even if it were
true. If an Israeli paper made
such a claim, it could be con-
structed as political by a rival
political party and of very little
consequence. But when you print
it in an American paper and add
"we are not in position to judge
but we certainly wonder," this
certainly puts a doubt in Israeli
cause for bombing Beirut and a
justification for the PLO claim of
the bombing which the American
administration swallowed in the
first place.
I don't know the reason for
your putting doubts in your
article, but your doubts could be
of great consequence to the
Reagan administration view-
point. I feel you should retract
that whole article or you will
alienate all your Jewish readers.
Samuel M. Scherer
LauderhiU
P.S. I doubt that you really
meant to cause such uproar. If
you didn't then it must be of poor
journalism on such a delicate
subject.
In-Service Session Set for Teachers
Courses in Bible, Hebrew Lit-
erature, Educational Methodolo-
gy and the American Jewish
Community will highlight the
second In-Service Summer
semester conducted by the
Central Agency for Jewish Edu-
cation (CAJE) for the teachers of
the Jewish schools of South
Florida at CAJE headquarters,
4200 Biscayne Blvd., Miami.
. Dr. Yehudah Shamir, formerly
director of Jewish Studies at the
University of Miami, will conduct
a course on "Medieval Hebrew
Literature" from Monday to Fri-
day mornings, Aug. 17-21, from 9
a.m. to noon.
The course will focus on
various aspects of Hebrew Liter-
ature of the Golden Age of Spain.
Included will be poetry taken
from the works of Halevi, Ibn
Gabirol, Ibn Ezra; philosophy
from the book, Kuzari; moralistic
literature from Sefer Hasidim
and selections from Kabbalistic
books including the Sefer
Habahir.
Shamir has written widely in
the history and literature of
Medieval Jewry and has taught a
variety of courses in the Institute
for Jewish Studies for CAJE.
A course conducted during the
same hours, 9 a.m. to noon from
Aug. 17-21 is that of enhancing
effective teaching led by Malvina
Liebman adjunct professor in
education at the University of
Miami. The emphasis in the
course will be on effective class-
room management with focus on
techniques, strategies and ap-
proaches to assist the teachers in
strengthening their own teaching
styles. Video taping will be
utilized to provide analysis of the
individual teaching acts.
Mrs. Liebman is a highly
respected educator in the com-
munity, formerly serving as the
director of Elementary Education
for the Board of Public Instruc-
tion of Dade County, and as con-
sultant in Education to the Uni-
versity of Mexico.
In the afternoons of the same
days, Aug. 17-21, from 1 to 4
p.m., Stephanie King, education-
al consultant, will conduct a class
in American Jewish History-
American Jewish Classroom
together with members of the
CAJE Executive Staff. She will
emphasize an overview of Ameri-
can Jewish History with concen-
tration on those events that have
shaped the American Jewish
community of today.
The second half of the course
i will focus on two aspects of class-
room instruction creative
teaching and the use of the multi-
media. Dr. Sandy Andron, direc-
tor of youth programming, will
highlight broad areas of creative
teaching that can be applied to
the Jewish classroom.
Stan Liedeker, new CAJE staff
member, will devote his session
to a hands-on approach to basic
audio-visual equipment and re-
sources for the classroom teacher.
On Thursday evenings from
Aug. 27 through Sept. 24 from 7
to 10 p.m. Dr. Howard Messin-
ger, adjunct instructor at the
Florida International University,
will conduct the program, high-
lighting concepts as Creation,
Revelation, Chosen People, Israel
and the climatic events of the
wanderings in the wilderness.
The courses are part of an on-
going program of the Institute
for Jewish Studies which pro-
vides pre and in-service profes-
sional growth courses for the
teachers in the Early Childhood,
Sunday, Weekend and Day
Schools of South Florida. For
further information about the
courses call CAJE's Broard
number, 925-6244.
,' PASTA AND VEGETABLES SUPREMEN >______________________%
The Jewish Home maker's Guide to Delicious Italian Cooking \
Gets its Zest from Chef Boy-ar-dee Ravioli.
2 tablespoons chopped parsley
Vt cup chopped onion
1 tablespoon butter or margarine
1 can (15 oi.) Chef Boy-ar-dee
Cheese Ravioli in Tomato Sauce
1 cup water
1 packet G. Washington's Golden
Seasoning and Broth
1 cup chopped red pepper
1 package (10 oz.) frozen com.
. cooked and drained
1 package(10 oz.)chopped
broccoli, cooked and drained
1 cup sbced mushrooms
'' cup butter or margarine
(4 tablespoons)
1. Saute chopped parsley and onion in 1 tablespoon butter.
2. Combine parsley, onion, Cheese Ravioli, water and G. \Abshington's in
2 quart sauce pan. Cover, simmer for 10 minutes.
3. Meantime, saute red pepper in 1 tablespoon butter. Remove to warm
serving dish.
4. Continue to saute each vegetable separately in 1 tablespoon of butter.
Remove each vegetable to separate warm dish. Serves (our.
N
Begin Forms
New Cabinet
Continued from Page 1
of his Cabinet appointments. He
also reported he'll be meeting
with Sadat at Alexandria later
this month before going to
Washington. He repeated his
denunciation of the PLO and said
whether the delivery of F-16
fighter bomber planes scheduled
for Israel remain on "hold," he'll
still meet with Reagan.
Meanwhile, a cease-fire exists
in the Middle East. Reagan's Ad-
ministration is hopeful that the
UN force in Lebanon can be ex-
panded to reduce the tensions
there, that the flow arms from
Libya, Saudia Arabia and Russia
to the PLO and the Syrians can
be curtailed, and the responsibil-
ities of the Lebanese government
improved.
Reagan's special envoy to the
Middle East, Philip C. Habib,
whose efforts produced the cease-
fire, including the cessation of
rocket attacks by PLO guerrillas
into northern Israel border
towns, is expected to go back to
the area later in August to confer
with the leaders of the Middle
East countries.
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The Jewish Floridionot Greater Fort Lauderdale
^"

.Friday, August 14,1981
Communal Workers Meet in Israel
Abraham J. Gittelson, director
of education for the Jewish Fed-
eration of Greater Fort Lauder-
dale and associate director of the
Central Agency for Jewish Edu-
cation, is attending the fifth
Quadrennial of the International
Conference of Jewish Communal
Service, Aug. 23-28 in Jerusalem.
While in Israel, Gittelson will
also be attending the World Con-
gress on Jewish Studies and an
international Conference on Jew-
ish Heritage.
Jewish communal pro-
fessionals from throughout North
and South America, Europe, Is-
rael, Australia, and South Africa
will attend the Quadrennial.
Herbert Millman, president of
the Jewish Communal Service,
reported that the delegates will
hear a keynote that will deal with
"A Global View of the Jewish
Condition," take part in three
forums and discussion groups on
"Strengthening the Jewish
Family," Educating Jews to Live
More Effective Jewish Lives,"
and "Jews on the Move."
In a background paper to be
presented at the Quadrennial,
Ralph I. Goldman, executive vice
president of the American Jewish
Joint Distribution Committee
(JDC), asserted that the pro-
fessionals "have a responsibility
to the Jewish communities of the
future," and challenges them to
bring to their work a "flexible
outlook," a "vision of the Jewish
future."
"It is the professional who is
on the front lines," Goldman
wrote. "We must develop a corps
of trained, competent Jewish
professionals. A well-trained pro-
fessional, supported by a rep-
resentative and committed
board, is in the best position to
participate fully in the develop-
ing and shaping of policy through
their commitment and knowl-
edge, management skills and
leadership quality the In-
ternational Conference should
provide a forum for review of the
international issues of concern
which bind us together through
Jewish physical and spiritual
survival."
Two Big Events Set for ARMDI
Two big events are on tap for
September and October for the
benefit of the American Red
Magen David for Israel (AR-
MDI) through the cooperation of
the Sunrise chapter of ARMDI
and its co-sponsor The Good
News Fellowship Church of Fort
Lauderdale.
On Sept. 20, the two organiza-
tions are co-sponsoring the 10-
kilometer "Run for Israel" at 9
a.m., Sunday, Sept. 20, with a $5
pre-registration fee for runners
and $6 on the day of the run. Pro-
ceeds will go to ARMDI which is
the sole support arm of Magen
David Adorn, Israel's first aid
and health service comparable to
the American Red Cross.
A little more than a month
later, Sunday, Oct. 25, the two
sponsors will join forces again to
try to fill the 4,000-seat Sunrise!
Musical Theatre at 7:30 p.m. that
day for an entertaining musical
revue.
The Sunrise Symphony Pops
Orchestra, returning to this
popular production by popular
demand, will provide the musical
accompaniment for Richard
Ryan, singer-composer, baritone
soloist; also for Phyllis A rick,
operatic soprano; and "the Clown
in a Gown," Dory Sinclair, come-
dienne.
Tickets for the musical revue,
which has filled the Sunrise
Musical Theatre in the past, are
priced at $4, $5, $6, and $10. Max
Bezozo, president of Sunrise's
ARMDI, and Betty Schulberg,
ARMDI's administrator, both of
Sunrise, have ticket information.
Arafat, Evron
Affirm Denials
WASHINGTON Both
the Israeli Ambassador to
the United States and the
head of the Palestine
Liberation Organization
denied strongly in na-
tionally televised inter-
views that the ceasefire
means that Israel and the
PLO had negotiated with or
Reserve Now For The
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^ Jewish National Fund Concert!
33 Century Village-Deerfield Beach 3^
Sunday, Sept. 13,1981 7:30 P.M. W
Temple Beth Israel
200 South Century Blvd.
Honoring
Al & Molly Fishman
Guest Speaker
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz
Temple Menorah, Miami Beach
Guest Artists
LOIS YA VNIELLI, Star of Israeli Opera
11 CANTOR ZVI ADLER. of Temple Emanu-EL. Miami Beach
CANTOR SAUL H. BREEH. of Temple Beth Raphael. Miami Beach
CANTOR EDWARD KLEIN, of Temple Ner | Tamid. Miami Beach
At the Piano: MAESTRO SHMUEL PERSHKO

For Ticket. Call: 4284513
Temple Office: 421-7060
ADMISSION: M.OOl W
recognized each other.
Ephraim Evron, the Israeli en-
voy, said on CBS-TV's "Face the
Nation" that Israel agreed to the
"cessation of hostilities" after
U.S. special Ambassador Philip
Habib assured Israel there would
be "no acts of violence against
Israel across the border" from
Lebanon.
EVRON NOTED that Israel
has always held the government
: of Lebanon responsible for ac-
tions that originate from its
territory, including the present
ceasefire. "We hold them
responsible for events in
Lebanon," the envoy said. "We
do not negotiate with the PLO."
He notes that it was the Arab
countries that permitted the PLO
to operate from Lebanon. "We
certainly cannot accept a situa-
tion when an independent group
can operate without any restric-
tions against us with the object
of killing us, murdering Israelis."
Evron said the ceasefire will hold
as long as the PLO does not
resume shelling of northern Is-
rael.
i
In an appearance from Beirut
on ABC-TVs "Issues and
Answers," PLO Chief Yasir Ara-
fat said the PLO accepted the
ceasefire in response to requests
from the United Nations Sec-
retary General Kurt Waldheim
and the Security Council. He said
there were no negotiations with
the U.S.
BUT ARAFAT said the PLO
has "the right to organize our-
selves," although he denied that
additional weapons and ammu-
nition are being sent to the
terrorist forces in south Lebanon
He said the PLO would not
recognize Israel until the Jewish
State recognizes Palestinian
rights which he defined as the
right to return to their "home-
land, the right of self-deter-
mination and the right to estab-
lish a Palestinian state.
But Arafat denied that the
PLO was seeking the destruction
of the Jewish State. Instead he
said he offered Israel "two solu-
tions, a Palestinian state in any
part of the area from which Israel
withdraws or a "democratic
state in which Jews, Christians
and Arabs will live. However, he
declared that the Palestinians as
an occupied people" have a
right to continue terrorist actions
against Israel.
American Working on
Israel Base Fired
For Hate Remarks
TEL AVIV The administrative director of an
American firm building a new Israeli air base in the Negev
which is to replace one in Sinai under the peace agreement
with Egypt has been dismissed and sent home after he
made anti-Semitic remarks, it was reported by Israel
Radio.
ACCORDING TO the report, Don Bast, administra
tive director of the U.S. firm, Air Base Contractors
(ABC), allegedly said during a quarrel with the wife of an
American Jewish engineer that "Hitler should have
finished the job he started," as well as other anti-Semitic
and derogatory remarks against Israel. Both the wife and
her husband, whose names were not disclosed, com-
plained to a senior official of the Defense Ministry. Upon
hearing the complaint, the Defense Ministry official dis-
missed Bast and ordered him to return to the U.S.
Officials of the ABC have protested the dismissal
claiming that the facts of the case were not as described
by the Jewish engineer and that the charge of anti-Semi-
tism is groundless. Bast left Israel last Thursday.
JTA Report
C7" Traditional T^
Community High Holy Day Services
Will be held at Temple Emanu El
3245 W. Oakland Park Blvd., Ft. Lauderdale
Conducted By
Cantor Robert Goodman
YOMKIPPUR
W*d.Oct.7.KolNMrt7pnv
TIhk Oct. t. Vom Klppur am
Yltkot 11.30 a.m.
Afternoon 3:30 p.m
Concluding Services 5 p.m.
For Ticket Information, Please Call 731-2310
[^_______________Limited Seating f\
Rabbi David Gordon
ROSH HASHANA
Mon. Sept. 28 Roeh Haahana Ee 7 30 p.m
Tim* Sepl 2S Roeh Haahana Morn am
*H Sept. 30 Roan Haahana Morn 1 am
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Friday, August 14, 1981
......
The Jewish. Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
'-"' '' -'''' i ...
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'.'. -
Page 8

~. .
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, August 14,1981
Director, Unit Heads Wind Up Another Community Center,
Selma Telles (extreme left), di-
rector of the Day Camp at the
Jewish Community Center's
Perlman Campus, 6501 W. Sun-
rise Blvd., Plantation, joyously
saluted her Camp Unit Heads as
the second four-week camp
season came to dose this week.
Pictured from left are Ed Basan,
Donna Basan, Scott Snyder,
Joyce Sprotzer, Herb Slusher,
and Claire Steingo.
They and their specialists in a
variety of categories for all ages
of the campers kept those several
hundred campers busy through-
out the eight weeks of camp
season from swimming, to play-
time, to overnight travel, to
sports, to a host of other activ-
ities, including inter-generational
Shabbat programs, a "Day in Je-
rusalem," and this week, the
fourth-graders, under the direc-
tion of Hebrew specialist Elli
Levy, put on a complete mock
wedding, strictly Orthodox, even
to the point of having the "bride"
walk around the "groom" seven
times, in JCC s Samuel Soref
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Dear Selma, Ed, Slush, and all
the counselors and helpers,
So often in our lives we take
time to criticize and complain
Wp^Lh f ,t?lti0n 0r <*"n*nce.
wouM i forget the P^ves. I
would uke to accentuate the
positive by sending roses and
hurrahs to the JCC Day Camp
My children have completed
t f0Ur, weeks with such
happmess and joy. The activities
were great but that was no
JCC Camp Gets Letters
!iiJ!igh0fpofint-,Per,hap8 il's th
WUOg of family, love and to-
SET"8 With,which these chil-
dren have ended their experience.
Perhaps the feeHng 0f
SBfe, -?y and oneness
which they shared making
such a positive statment. g
Thank you for caring, sharing
and simulating them" You are
doing everything right!
Fondly,
Linda Wachte1
Dear Everyone,
Thank you, thank you. thank
you!! Steve and I are so grateful
to all of you for making Shana.
Alex and Matthew's summer so
fabulous. They are eager to go
each morning and come home
filled wih experiences they want
toshan ,J1 at the same time!!!).
In oui family, the JCC is the
plau- to be!!
Sincerely.
Cheryl Levine


-*wn
JFridny. August 14, 1981

r, pay Camp Season
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 9
(A| for the entertainment,
e cation, and edification of the
i re camp.
idicative of how well parents
their children responded to
camp activity are the letters
commenting on the program.
Two of them are reproduced
below.
AN OPEN LETTER To Jewish Families in North Broward County
who are not affiliated with a synagogue or temple:
SHALOM: needs. It is an invitation which your family
The faith and values of Jews throughout the centuries have been shaped and strengthened by our synagogues. Our synagogues have helped to pass our heritage from generation to generation, from parents to children to grandchildren. In order to continue their vital services to today's Jews in our changing world, the synagogues must be kept vital and growing. Synagogue membership and support are important obligations of every Jewish family, not only for the synagogue's future, but for their own. The Jewish families of North Broward should accept. Listed below is brief information about our local congregations. If you would like more information or a personal contact, complete and return the coupon below to the Jewish Federation. It will be appropriately referred. Requests for special membership arrangements, if required, will be treated in strictest confidence by all congregations. There are no real barriers to affiliation. We urge that your family become congregation members and a link in the chain that unites Jews from generation to
generation. It will strengthen your family and your people.
County who are affiliated, the Jewish
Federation and the Synagogue Council Chaplaincy Commission Jewish Federation of
combine to extend an invitation to join a Greater Fort Lauderdale
synagogue which is responsive to your and North Broward of Rabbis
ORTHODOX Hebrew Congregation of Lauderhill
Temple Ohel B'nai Raphael 735-9738 2048 NW 49th Ave. 733-9560
4351 W. Oakland Park Blvd. Maxwell Gilbert, President
Lauderdale Lakes 33313
Nathan Grossman, President Temple Israel of Gait Ocean Mile
Meets: North Beach Medical Center
Young Israel of Deerfield Beach Rabbi David Matzner
1640 W. Hillsboro Blvd. 421-1367 Ben S. Marcus, President
Deefield Beach, 33441 4280 Gait Ocean Dr. 566-0954
Morris Septimus, President Fort Lauderdale 33308
The Traditional Synagogue of Inverrary Hebrew Congregation of No. Lauderdale
Dr. David Wolgin, President Meets: Western School
Moshe Stern 742-9244 Murray Hendler, President
4231 NW 75th Ter., Lauderhill 33319 Kal Blumenreich 721-7162
CONSERVATIVE REFORM 1
Temple Beth Israel 742-4040 Temple Emanu-El 731-2310
7100 W. Oakland Park Blvd. 3245 W. Oakland Park Blvd.
Sunrise 33313 Lauderdale Lakes 33311
Rabbi Phillip A. Labowitz Rabbi Jeffrey Ballon
Al Lang, President Frances Smith. President
Temple Beth Am 974-8650 Temple Kol Ami 472-1988
7205 Royal Palm Blvd. 8200 Peters Rd.
Margate 33063 Plantation 33324
Rabbi Dr. Solomon Geld Rabbi Sheldon Harr
Harry Hirsch, President Phil Fagelson, President
Sunrise Jewish Center 741-0295 Temple Beth Orr 753-3232
8049 W. Oakland Park Blvd. 2151 Riverside Drive
Sunrise 33321 Coral Springs 33065
Rabbi Albert N. Troy Rabbi Donald R. Gerber
Sam Wolberg, President Barry Kantrowitz, President
Congregation Beth Hillel 974-3090 RECONSTRUCTIONIST
7640 Margate Blvd. Ramat Shalom,
Margate 33063 The Reconstructionist Synagogue
Rabbi Joseph Berglas 7473 NW 4th St. 583-7770
Harry Fine, President Dr. Richard Goldman, President
Temple Sholom 942-6410 LIBERAL
132 SE 11th Ave. Liberal Temple of Coconut Creek
Pompano Beach 33060 Meets: Calvary Presbyterian Church
Rabbi Samuel April Arnie Nestel, Arthur Savitt,
Dr. Milton Isaacson, President Judge Harry Shooman, Presidium:
971-9729
Temple Beth Torah 721-7660 P.O. Box 4384, Margate 33063
9101 NW 57th St.
Tamarac 33321 LIBERAL REFORM
Rabbi Israel Zimmerman West Broward Jewish Congregation
Jack Weiner, President Don Workman, President 741-0121
P.O. Box 17440, Plantation 33318
Temple Beth Israel 421-7060
200S. Century Blvd., COMMUNITY
Deerfield Beach 33441 Rabbi Leon Mirsky Keter Tikvah Synagogue Meets: Bank of Coral Springs
Joseph Lovy, President Rabbi Leonard S. Zoll 752-3771
P.O. Box 8125. Coral Springs 33065
Herbert Ray. President
____ CLIP AND MAIL THIS COUPON_________
FOR- MORE INFORMATION PERSONAL CAI I
Synagogues) of Interest
Henri nf Family:
Add"'
Send To: JEWISH FEDERATION OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDAbF
2999 N.W. 33rd Avenue. Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33311
.


r
-~-l

> '


Page 10-,
-
I_______
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday. August 14, 1981

Browsm' thru
roward
with max levine
r caJ. p.m., Monday, Aug. 17, at Bank
Monday evening, Sent, of Coral Springs Plaza Audi-
Circle this date
Sept.
14. Pastor Jim Croft of Good
News Fellowship Church of Fort
Lauderdale will have the entire
group of young singers, dancers,
soloists, orchestra and others, in-
cluding Israel's Consul General
Joel Arnon. taking part in a two-
hour "To Israel with Love"' spec-
tacular that evening at Sunrise
Musical Theatre. Admission will
be FREE but by ticket.
Tickets will be available at the
Church, at JCC. Sunrise City
Hall, and Jewish Federation .
Gil Mallinger, member of Temple
Emanu-El, was named a vp-
investments at Fort Lauderdale's
Shearson Loeb Rhoades securi-
ties firm.
Mary B. Klein, president of
Scopus Hadassah in Deerfield
Beach, is representing the chap-
ter at this week's Hadassah na-
tional convention Judy
Fischer, BBYO associate direc-
tor, reports a sizable delegation
of North Broward BBGs and
AZAers attending the Side by
Side with Pride international
convention at B'nai B'rith's Perl-
man Camp in Pennsylvania. A
highlight of the sessions will be
presentation of the Anita Perl-
man Award Hal M. Lewis
continues to expound on his
theory that you can live in
Florida on S 10,000 a year. This
time at 7:30 p.m., Wednesday,
Aug. 26, at Coral Springs library,
9571 W. Sample Rd. It's a free
program offered by Broward
County Library System.
Brian Ginsberg, 14-year-old
number one gymnast in the 13-14
age division and a member of the
U.S. Junior Olympic Gymnastic
Team, is the grandson of Betty
and Sam Diemar of Plantation.
Diemar reports Brian of Mobile,
Ala., will be seen on TV during
AAU meets in NYC and then will
tour with the team to several for-
eign countries Diemar, who is
also ADL chairman of Planta-
tion's B'nai B'rith lodge, with the
help of Maurice Stem, Harold
Schildkraut and Buddy Neustein,
is forming the Askelon chapter of
ARMDI. the U.S. support for
Magen David Adorn ^Red Magen
David in Israel).
Lillian Schoen, one of
WECARE's most active volun-
teers and member of Sunrise's
Temple Beth Israel, spent two
weeks at Ferium (VA.) College,
attending a variety of seminars
and classes, and meeting Rabbi
Herschel Matt of Highland Park,
NJ, who sent regards to his
former New Jersey colleague,
Rabbi Albert B. Schwartz, direc-
tor of Chaplaincy Commission of
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale Jerold Hoff-
berger, chairman of United Israel
Appeal, an arm of the UJA, will
lead a delegation of 200 from the
U.S. to the Jewish Agency
Assembly, Aug. 28-Sept. 1. when
340 members from 26 countries
will be in attendance at the once-
a-year event in Jerusalem.
Jerome Chanes of New York's
Anti-Defamation League reports
national and worldwide shortage
of Torahs is leading to black
market in the Holy Scrolls. Police
believe many of the Torahs stolen
in recent months from syna-
gogues in the Northeast are being
shipped to the Sunbelt states .
Torah scribes say it takes about a
year to do a complete Torah from
Genesis to Deuteronomy .
Hilda Ivera and Shirley Pock are
chairing Temple Eman El's Sis-
terhood rummage sale Sunday,
Aug. 30. Donations for the sale
are being accepted at the Temple,
3245 W. Oakland Park Blvd------
Janet Oppenheimcr reports Coral
Springs Area Coalition of Jewish
Organizations meets at 9:30
tonum.
Beth Orr's members are being
invited to a free Saturday night
at the movies, Aug. 29 at 8 p.m.,
for the showing of Mel Brooks'
film Twelve Chairs. Members
planning to attend must register
at the Temple office Shirley
MoskowRz, music teacher at
Temple Emanu-El, formerly affi-
liated with Central Synagogue in
NYC, is substituting for Cantor
Jerome Klement at Emanu-EI's
Friday night services, Aug. 14
and 21, as cantonal soloist. She
also sang at last week's service.
Sunrise Branch Library, 6600
Sunset Strip, has cut its hours to
9 to 1 p.m. daily while new air
conditioning system is being in-
stalled Morton L. Mandd,
president of Council of Jewish
Federations, reports the impact
on Federations of the Federal
budget cutbacks in social serv-
ices will be considered at the
quarterly CJF meeting Sept. 17-
20 in NYC Esther Wurm
brank is chairing and taking
reservations at $5 for B'nai B'rith
Women's Hope Chapters card
party and Chinese smorgasbord
luncheon 11:30 a.m., Thursday,
Aug. 27, at Golden Palace, 3801
N. University Dr.
Bob Jackson, president of
Plantation's B'nai B'rith lodge
reports that Alan Mendeleon,
WTVJ-Ch.4 investigative re-
porter, will be the speaker at the
lodge meeting. 8 p.m.. Thursday,
Sept. 3, in Deicke Auditorium
. Sam Fallenbaum, Temple
Kol Ami's education committee
chairman, planned the curricu-
lum and projects for the school
year under the continuing di-
rection of Principal Morris Ezry
. And still at Kol Ami in Plan-
tation, the Sisterhood, with
Linda Smith in charge, is having
a rummage sale beginning at 10
a.m., Monday, Aug. 17 and con-
tinuing through Aug. 18 and 19.
Judy Tekel, program registrar
at the Jewish Community Center
(792-6700), has copies of the new
JCC Fall Programs at the Center
brochure available. Michael J.
Weinberg, JCC president, and
Philip Cofman, JCC executive di-
rector, headlined Page One of the
12-page tabloid with the theme:
"Our Goal: A Home for the Jew-
ish A Creative Life for All
Generations."
Israel's Swiss Consulate
Defaced by Slogans
GENEVA (JTA) Slogans denouncing Israel
and Premier Menachem Begin for the bombing of Beirut
July 17 were daubed on the walls of the building housing
the Israel Consulate here. Also painted on the building
were Magen Davids with bombs in the center. Police are
investigating the incident.
MEANWHILE the Swiss Labor Party has asked the
government to call on Foreign Minister Pierre Auber to
condemn Israel for its bombing of Beirut, and other
"civilian centers" in Lebanon.
The Peace Now movement in Switzerland published a
statement deploring the recent Israeli raids and called for
negotiations with the Palestinians.
Mrs. Zelda Thau, civic and community leader who became a
legend in her own time by virtue of her dedicated and phil-
anthropic achievements on behalf of Hadassah, Douglas Gar-
dens, Bonds for Israel, and Jewish National Fund is congratu-
lated by Mr. Abraham Grunhut, President of the Greater
Miami Jewish National Fund on her selection as JNF Kerrh
Dorot Champion for 1981. Mrs. Thau is seen presenting a chtch
to Mr. Grunhut for 23 Keren Dorot Agreements which won her
MIAMI BEACH S ONLY B0AR0WALK KOSHER HOTEL
SUMMER SUPER-SAVING VACATIONS
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Evening, Sept. 28,8 p.m.
Morning, Sept. 29,10 a.m.
Children's Services at Temple Emanu El
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YOM KJPPUR
Evening, Oct. 7,8 p.m.
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Youth Qroup, 2:15 p.m.
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"


f, August 14,1981.

The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale

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p**12
'-J-:-"t-'--ril itif-
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
--------.................. n >~^
Organizations In The News
MONDAY, AUG. 17
Temple Emanu-El: Games, 7
6 m.
adaesah-Armon Castle Chap-
tar: Board meeting, Castle Re-
creation Hall, 9:30 a.m.
Hadassah Bat Ami Tamarac
Chapter: Board meeting, Tama-
rac Jewish Center.
Temple Kol Ami Sisterhood:
General meeting, 8 p.m.
National Council of Jewish
Women-Plantation Section: exe-
cutive Board Budget meeting,
Deicke Auditorium, afternoon.
TUESDAY. AUG. 18
Temple Beth Am-Margate:
Board meeting, 7 p.m.
Pioneer Women-Hatikvah Chap-
ter: Board meeting, Broward
Federal Bank, 3000 N. University
Dr.
Temple Beth Torah Sisterhood:
Games. 12:15 p.m.
WEDNESDAY, Aug. 19
Temple Ohel B'nai Raphael Sis-
terhood: General meeting, 12:30
p.m.
Sunrise Jewish Center Sister-
hood: Meeting at Temple, Mr.
and Mrs. Herb Aaronson of First
Dm Nazi War Criminals
Face UJ5L Deportation Action
By KEVIN FREEMAN
NEW YORK (JTA) Two
allugud Nu/.i war criminals face
rwocalion of their citizenship
and ilcpoi-iaiion for concealing
Ihvii punt activities during World
War II when applying for citizen-
ship to this country, according to
lwo separate complaints filed by
tin- Ic-dcral government.
Tin' government charged in
li-dcral District Court in
Newark, N.J. that 65-year-old
Juozu Kungys, had falsified in-
formation in his visa and citizen-
ship applications to conceal his
participation with German forces
in the firing squad murders of
2,000 Jews near the village of
Kedainiai around August 1941.
The complaint against
Kungys, a Clifton, N.J. dentist,
also said that he had not revealed
that around July 1941 he par-
ticipated in the killing of ap-
proximately 100 unarmed
civilians near Babences,
Lithuania. Kungys vehemently
denied the charges to reporters
last week, adding, "This it,
slander it's the Russians who
Coalition
Agreement
Signed
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The coalition agreement between
Prime Minister Menachem Begin
and the three religious parties
the National Religious Party,
Aguda Israel and Tami was
signed in a brief ceremony and a
round of "Le'chaims." The last
session of the outgoing cabinet
will take place August 5 at 9
a.m., and the first session of the
new cabinet will take place a half
hour later. The presentation of
the new government to the
Knesset will take place at 10
a.m., followed by eights hours of
debate.
Following is the list of min-
isters in the new cabinet. Mena-
chem Begin, Prime Minister;
Yitzhak Shamir, Foreign Min-
ister; Ariel Sharon, Defense Min-
ister; Yoram Aridor, Finance
Minister; Yaachov Meridor,
Economic Coordinator; Haim
Corfu, Transport Minister;
Mordechi Zipori, Commu-
nications Minister. These eight
ministers are all members of
Herat.
Elizer Chostak, Health Min-
ister. Chostak is a member of the
La'am Wing of Likud.
Simcha Ehrlich, Deputy and
Agriculture Minister; Gideon
Patt, Commerce and Industrial
Minister; Yitzhak Modai, Min-
ister without Portfolio; Avraham
Sharir, Tourism Minister; Moshe
Nissim, Justice Minister; Yitz-
hak Berman, Emergency Min-
ister. These six ministers are all
members of the Liberal Party.
Yoshef Burg, Interior, Rela-
tions Affairs and Police Minister
(with continuing involvement in
the autonomy talks); Zevulun
Hammer, Education Minister.
Both ministers are members of
the National Relations Party.
are doing this." He said he knew
of no mass slayings in either
Kedainiai or Babences.
Meanwhile, in Sacramento,
Calif., Otto Albrecht Alfried von
Bolschwing has been given until
Aug. 10 to respond to a com-
plaint filed May 27 by the Justice
Department for concealing his
membership in the Nazi Party,
the SS and the Sicherheitsdienst,
the SS intelligence and security
arm, when he obtained U.S.
citizenship in 1959.
Federal Bank of Miami will en-
tertain, refreshments.
THURSDAY, AUG. 20
Temple Emanu-El: Board
meeting, 7:46 p.m.
B'nai B'rith-Landerdale Lakes
Lodge: General meeting, Lauder-
dale Lakes City Hall, 7:30 p.m.
B'nai B'rith-Tamarac Chapter:
Benefit Luncheon and Card
Party for Children's Home in
Israel, Tamarac Jewish Center,
Esther Gornitsky and Ruth
Schweitzer, Ticket Co-chairmen,
noon-3 p.m.
B'nai B'rith-Golda Meier Chap-
ter: Luncheon and Card Party,
Nob Hill Community Center,
104th Ave. and Sunset Strip,
$2.50.
Sunrise Chapter: Luncheon and
Card Party, Oceanic Chinese
Restaurant, Noon. Donation
$4.50.
American Red Mogen David for
Israel: General meeting, Whiting
Hall, Sunrise Lakes, 11 a.m.
THURSDAY, AUG. 20
Free Sons of Israel-Fort Lauder-
dale Lodge: Board meeting,
Southern Federal Bank Building,
University Dr. and Sunset Strip,
7:30 p.m.
MONDAY, AUG. 24
Temple Emanu-El: Games, 7
Hadassah: Fort Lauderdale
Tamar Chapter: Board meeting,
Lauderhill Library, 10 a.m.
TUESDAY, AUG. 25
Hadassah: Bermuda Club Herd
Chapter: Board meeting.
Hadassah Masada Margate
Chapter: General meeting, Tem-
ple Beth Am, 12:30 p.m.
Temple Beth Torah Sisterhood:
Games, 12:15 p.m.
Pioneer Women-Debra Crab:
General meeting, Lauderdale
Lakes City Hall, noon.
WEDNESDAY, AUG. 26
Jewish War Veterans-William
Kretchman Auxiliary: General
meeting, Broward Federal
Savings and Loan, 3000 Univer-
sity Dr.. Sunrise, noon.
Friday, August 14, 1981
THURSDAY. AUG. 27
Temple Emanu-El: Board
meeting, p.m
B'nai B'rith-Plantation Lodge:
Board meeting, Community
Room, Southern Federal Bank,
Sunrise Blvd., and Sunset Strip,
8 p.m.
B'nai B'rlth-Hope Chapter:
Luncheon and Card Party
Temple Beth Am Margate:
Board meeting, 7 p.m.
Free Sons of Israel-Fort Lauder-
dale Lodge: General meeting,
Whiting Hall. NW 28th Ave. and
NW 24th St., 7:30 p.m
SUNDAY, AUG. 30
Temple Beth Israel of Deerfleld
Beach Sisterhood and Brother-
hood: Giant Jamboree, held at
Temple parking lot. Free admis-
sion, entertainment and dancing.
Refreshments.
WITH A
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The Jewish Ftoridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 13
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Open House at Kol Ami

j
Temple Kol Ami invites'
unaffiliated residents of Planta-
tion and neighboring areas to a
10 a.m. brunch on Sunday, Aug.
16, at the Temple, 8200 Peters
Rd., Plantation.
Questions will be answered by
Rabbi Sheldon Harr, by Vice
President of Membership Joel
Lefkowitz and members of his
committee, and also of Sister-
hood, President Linda Smith,
Brotherhood President Fred Ber-
man and B.Z. group President
Belle Guthman.
Temple Kol Ami offers the full
gamut of Temple activities an
active Sisterhood, Brotherhood,
B.Z. {Bubba and Zaidef group,
Youth group, Adult Education,
Religious School and Hebrew
School, a Pre-School program
and many other activities and
projects round out the Temple
program.
There will be an informal dis-
cussion of the Temple's religious
philosophy, school programs,
Sisterhood and Brotherhood,
B.Z. (Bubba and Zaidefi activ-
ities, youth groups, and adult ed-
ucation programs.
conducted Saturday morning,
Aug. 22, at Temple Kol Ami,
Plantation, with honors being
conferred on Karl Levine, daugh-
ter of Sandra Levine and Peter
Teaser, son of Leslie and Arnold
Teaser.
The following Saturday morn-
ing, Aug. 29, Jeffrey Levy-
Jacobs, son of Barbara Levy-
Jacobs, will become a Bar
Mitzvah.
BETH ISRAEL
Michael Stewart, son of Dr.
and Mrs. Roger Stewart of Fort
Lauderdale, will become a Bar
Mitzvah at services Saturday
morning, Aug. 22, at Temple
Beth Israel, Sunrise.
The following week, Aug. 29,
Bruce Greenatein, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Edward Greenstein of Sun-
rise, will become a Bar Mitzvah
at Beth Israel.
Adult B'nai Mitzvah at Kol Ami
Six adults who have been
studying Torah and other aspects
of Judaism with Rabbi Sheldon
Harr, spiritual leader of Temple
Kol Ami, for a year will have
their "graduation" in the form of
B'nai Mitzvah honors to be con-
ferred upon them at the Saturday
10:30 a.m. service, Aug. 15, at
the Temple at 8200 Peters Rd.,
Plantation.
Open House at Beth Orr
Two open house" events have
been scheduled by Temple Beth
Orr, 2151 Riverside Dr., Coral
Springs, for prospective mem-
bers. A "coffee session" will be
held at 7:30 p.m., Sunday, Aug.
16; a brunch will be served at 10
a.m., Sunday, Aug. 23.
Both sessions have been
designed to inform and instruct
those who are interested in Re-
form Judaism.
Rabbi Donald R. Gerber will
address the guests. Carol Was-
serman, vice president in charge
of membership, and her commit-
tee will also be present to answer
questions.
Reservations are suggested.
They can be made by calling the
Temple office, 753-3232.
Open House at Beth Israel
Three Sunday morning "open
house" sessions have been sched-
uled by Temple Beth Israel, 7100
W. Oakland Park Blvd., for pro-
spective members of the Temple
and its Religious School These
will be at 10 a.m., Aug. 16,23 and
30. School registration and class
assignment can be arranged at
these sessions.
BETH AM
Joy Kahn-Evron, Hebrew
school administrator at Temple
Beth Am in Margate, reported
that high school level Hebrew ed-
ucation courses will be offered at
the Temple. The one-day a week
schedule of classes will be open to
the children completing 8th grade
at the school and to those who
have already become B'nai Mitz-
vah. For further information,
Mrs. Kahn-Evron can be reached
at the Temple office, 974-8650.
RAMAT SHALOM
A Kabbal Shabbat Seder for fam-
ilies of Ramat Shalom, The Re-
constructionist Synagogue, at
7:15 p.m., Friday, Aug. 14, will
precede the Shabbat service to be
0toUMJ4>
Candlelighting Time
Friday, Aug. 14-7:37
Friday, Aug. 21-7:31 l.
Friday Aug. 2&-7:24
Ba-ruch A-tah Ado-nye, Elo-haynu Melech Ha-olam, |
Asher kid'shanu B'mitz-vo-tav, V'tzee-va-nu
L'had-leek Nayr shel Shabbat. I
Blessed art Thou, O Lord our God, King of the Universe,
Who has sanctified us with Thy commandments
And commanded us to kindle the Sabbath lights.
JDL Overreacting
in Long Island?
conducted by Rabbi Robert
Jacobs with Jillian Greenstein
providing the musical accompa-
niment.
The service Friday, Aug. 21, at
8:15 p.m., will have a study
period conducted by Ramat Sha-
lom President Dr. Richard Gold-
man. The subject will be
"Today's Jewish Family."
B'nai Mitzvah
BETH ORR
David Matthew Meyers, son of
Susan and Kenneth Meyers, will
become a Bar Mitzvah at Satur-
day morning, Aug. 15, service at
Temple Beth Orr, Coral Springs.
Craig Obrentz, son of Gail and
Martin Obrentz, will become a
Bar Mitzvah at Beth Orr at serv-
ices Saturday, Aug. 29.
At the Aug. 8 service at Beth
Orr, Darren Jay Finn, son of
Vicki and Ronald Finn, became a
Bar Mitzvah.
KOL AMI
B'nai Mitzvah services will be
A national official of the Jew-
ish Defense League has
responded to rabbinical and
police critics of the JDL's armed
auto patrols of synagogues in a
Nassau County area with the as-
sertion that the armed patrols
would continue and that most of
the patrol weapons are bats and
clubs.
But Dov Becker, JDL
assistant director, confirmed to
the Jewish Telegraphic Agency,
in a telephone interview with him
at JDL headquarters in New
York, that when the patrols
began in March, almost every
JDL member in the patrol cars
had firearms and that problems
with local police developed. At
present, he said, some, not all,
JDL patrol members carry fire-
arms as they have done since
they began patrolling.
BECKER SAID the patrols
are made up of three JDL
members per car, each car patrol-
ling three assigned synagogues
three to four nights a week, from
10 p.m. to 1 a.m., in Plainview,
Great Neck, Syosset and Jericho.
He added that, on any given
night, four to five cars are on
patrol.
Assignments are made out of
the recently-formed Long Island
JDL chapter. Its office is located
in the East Nassau Hebrew Con-
gregation in Syosset. Its rabbi,
Sol Appleman, is a JDL member,
Becker said.
He said Appleman and Dana
Goldstein in Jericho, the latter a
student at Queens College, are
coordinators of the JDL patrols.
He said Goldstein is a co-founder
of the Long Island chapter and
chairperson of a JDL chapter at
Queens College.
One of the critics of the armed
patrols is Nassau County Police
Inspector Kenneth Carey, head of
the county police task force on
anti-Semitism, who was under-
stood to have learned about the
JDL patrol from press reports.
BECKER SAID Appleman
met recently on the issue with a
group of Nassau county police of-
ficers, and that the police told the
rabbi that while they appreciated
all civilian cooperation in the
fight on crime, they preferred
strongly that the JDL patrol
members not carry firearms.
Asked specifically why the
JDL had ignored the police
request not to carry arms, Becker
said, "We had not notified the
police about the patrols. We
found no reason to contact
them."
He also was asked about criti-
cal comments from Melvin
Cooperman, Long Island regional
director of the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith; Rabbi
Simon Resnikoff, president of the
Long Island Board of Rabbis;
and Rabbi Gabriel Maza, presi-
dent of the Suffolk County Board
of Rabbis.
Cooperman said that the ar-
med JDL patrols were hurting
the Jewish community. He said
the Jewish War Veterans "have
done a nice job by posting them-
selves in buildings and being
prepared to summon police in the 'I
event of trouble. What the JDL is
doing is immature and
dangerous."
The celebrants are Mrs. Paul
(Judy) Frank, Mrs. Harold
(Linda) Smith, Mrs. Michael
(Marlene) Kimmelman, Mrs. Joel
(Adrianne) Silberman, and Bea
and Ben Cohen.
All the celebrants are hosting
the Oneg Shabbat.
Last week, at a regular Bar
Mitzvah for a 13-year-old, Ricky
Welsher, son of Stephen and
Sheila Vickness, was called to the
Torah.
pr1
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Lgust 14, IWI
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 15
Italian Jews Disturbed Over
Capucci's Unrestrained Activities
|yLIZABILLIG
J (JTAI The Italian
ommunity is seriously
by the Vatican's in-
or unwillingness to
fAsgr. Hilarion Capucci,
ner Mechite Catholic
j of Jerusalem, who has
[of late as the foremost
Mist for the Palestine
pn Organization in Italy
of Western Europe.
, the Vatican's pledge
Iwould not be allowed to
i activities "detrimental
ate of Israel." Capucci is
touring Italian cities
|ning the Palestinian
1 condemning Israel. His
self-dramatization has
kirn immense exposure in
ks, radio and television,
lia regularly refers to him
Vatican's ambassador
st affairs."
f n was convicted in Israel
9, 1974 of gun-running
eslinian terrorists and
to 12 years imprison-
lul he was released in 1977
lidenl Ephraim Katzir in
V to an appeal by Pope
J. The Papal intervention
tcompanied by written
Ices from the Vatican that
would be restricted
a to pastoral duties
urn ilie Middle East.
AFTER a brief stint in
unurica, Capucci brazenly
j the Vatican's solemn
fking by attending PLO
is in Syria and Lebanon
^uminn his propaganda ac-
ini behall of the terrorist
til Km Protests from Jew-
liniuniiv lenders have been
Euil.
I'uli'siinian connections
(m I \ convinced church
authorities that Capucci could be
"useful" in Vatican attempts to
mediate the Iranian hostage
crisis last year. He "intervened"
on behalf of the American
hostages without success but
with considerable publicity for
himself. Later, he played a role in
arranging an audience for Farouk
Kaddoumi, the PLO's foreign af-
fairs spokesman, with the
Vatican Secretary of State,
Cardinal Agostino Casaroli.
The Jewish community pro-
tested vigorously. Last Apr. 1,
the vice president and the sec-
retary of the Union of Italian
Jewish Communities, Tulia Zevi
and Alberto Levy, respectively,
were received by the Vatican Sec-
retary for Public Affairs, Msgr.
Achille Silvestrini who acknowl-
edged their protest. But the
Vatican never denied Capucci's
involvement in gaining an
audience for the PLO's No. 2 man
a clear violation of its promise
iluii he would not be allowed to
engage in political activities.
JEWISH COMMUNITY
leaders have been trailing
Capucci on his propaganda tour.
Hut their letters to the editors are
a weak response to the lengthy
interviews with Capucci pub-
lished in the newspapers of
Leghorn, Genoa and Padua.
His most recent stopover was
in Venice at the end of June. He
was received there by a com-
mittee of local political leaders
headed by Carlo Bernini, presi-
ilinl of the Venetian regional
government. Two days of din-
ners, speeches and press con-
l< iciices, attended by representa-
tives of the region and the
|novince, were arranged for
i upuoci by Walki Chazal, head of
iih I'LO office in Rome and
E
Announcing
PHILIP WEINSTEIN
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'OHHNO UACM
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Gianfranco Lai, leader of the
leftist Partito Democratico di
Unita Populare.
Capucci states that his ob-
jective is to "inform" public
program.'' He insists that his
motivation is "religious, not po-
litical."
"BUT HIS propaganda line is
identical to the most extreme
positions of the PLO. In an inter-
view published in tie Leghorn
daily, // Tirreno, oa May 24,
Capucci contended that Europe
must concentrate on "rec-
ognizing the inalienalbe national
rights of Palestinians, that is, the
right to national self-deter-
mination, to the return of the
refugees to Palestine, to the
build ling of an independent
Palestinian state and the recog-
nition of the PLO as the only
legitimate representative of the
Palestinian people."
While Capucci insists that his
aim is "peace and brotherly love,
particularly on the part of my
Jewish brothers," he fails to
mention the PLO's covenant call-
ing for Israel's destruction. He
insists, in fact, that Israel's re-
turn to its 1967 borders would be
only a first step toward a re-
unification into a single Pal-
estinian nation with democratic,
secular state in which three reli-
gions can live in peace"
Jews here are particularly con-
cerned by the way the Italian
media accepts Capucci's prop-
aganda without question while
ignoring his involvement
with terrorists. To overlook his
luloe claims to have been "Arch-
bishop of Jerusalem." a post he
created for himself, or to be now
the "representative of the Pal-
estinian (Christian! church in
exile" is almost farcical.
M LiUMIUU
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72-7340
coi waiNOi
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IN COOPERATION WITH KRAEER FUNERAL HOMES
Mora serious is the residue of
.inn Israel sentiment Capucci
k'uves wherever he appears.
Italian Jewry is looking to the
Vatican to keep Capucci in line
but so I.ii t here has been no move
in that direction.
cemPbe
sBotom
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RABBI SAMUEL APRIL-CANTOR JACOB J. RENZER
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Rosh Hashanah
Mon. Sept. 28,7:30 p.m.
Tues. Sept. 29,9:00 a.m.
Wed. Sept. 30,9:00 a.m.
Yom Kippur Mincha 6:45 P.M.
Wed. Oct. 7,7:00 p.m. Kol Nidray
Thurs. Oct. 8,9:00 a.m.
Yizkor Memorial Service 12 rioon
Join Our Temple Sholom Family
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Soviet Jewish Activist
Flees Moscow In
Advance of His Trial
:-::
I
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Boris Chernobilsky, a prominent
| Jewish activist of Moscow whose
trial on charges of "resisting a
representative of authority" is
pending, fled the Soviet capital in
defiance of Soviet warnings not
to do so, it was reported here by
the Greater New York Conference
on Soviet Jewry.
The Conference, which termed
the flight unprecedented in the
contemporary Soviet Jewish
movement, said that according to
information it received directly
from Moscow, Chernobilsky's
flight underground late last week
is being regarded by Jewish ac-
tivists in the USSR as an act of
resistance intended to underscore
his belief that the impending trial
would be a travesty of justice.
CHERNOBILSKY, who first
applied to immigrate to Israel in
May, 1975, was arrested May 10
at a gathering of Jewish refuse-
niks in a forest outside of Mos-
cow. Eye-witnesses report that
Chernobilsky refused to comply
when Soviet police ordered him to
1 leave the area schnell. schnell
A radio engineer by profession,
Chernobilsky has been refused an
exit visa, along with his wife,
Leah (YalenaO, and their two
young daughters, on grounds of
"state secrecy." Since his first
refusal, Chernobilsky has led
Moscow Jewish activists in
public demonstrations.
In 1976, he served a 15-day
sentence on charges of "malicious
hooliganism." Following a world-
wide campaign to secure his re-
lease, Chernobilsky was released-
without explanation by the
Soviet authorities. Since that
time, however, Chernobilsky has
been under almost constant KGB
surveillance.
EVITT If EINSTEIN
memorial chapelt
MOILVWOOO i' I
NOOIM MIAMI 11MS O.i*
WEST PALM BEACH M'' OM
1317200
MMS1S
MHfOO
The Jewish
Community
Has A Right
To Know:
1.
2.
3.
4
5.
There are several funeral chapels in South
Florida that serve those of the
Jewish faith.
SOME OF THESE CHAPELS ARE NOT
OWNED BY JEWS.
Even more disturbing, they do not make this
fact apparent to the Jewish community.
MENORAH CHAPELS ARE THE ONLY
JEWISH-OWNED CHAPELS BETWEEN
HOLLYWOOD AND WEST PALM BEACH
AND THE OLDEST IN BROWARD COUNTY.
At Menorah Chapels, unlike the others,
serving the Jewish community is more than
a business it's a way of life.
The traditions of our faith and the concerns of our
people should be genuine. It's your right, and we are
proud of our religion.
742-6000
Dade, 945-3939.
Palm Beach, 833-0887.
Serving chapels throughout the U.S. and Canada.
With locations in Sunrise, Deerfield Beach and Margate.
Coming soon to North Miami Beach.
(Meno&h
CtjapelS
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