The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Fort Lauderdale (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Ft. Lauderdale

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 3, no. 7 (Apr. 5, 1974)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 9, 1976 called v.4, no. 27 but constitutes v.5, no. 1; issue for July 7, 1989 called v.18, no. 11 but constitutes v.18, no. 13.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44570954
lccn - sn 00229545
ocm44570954
System ID:
AA00014312:00190

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Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward


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Full Text
v*Jewish IFioiriidiiai in
OF GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE
Volume 10 Number 13
Fort Lauderdale, Florida Friday, June 19,1981
FitdSho^hti
Price 35 Cents,
Wall Street Journal Says: 'Send Israelis Vote of Thanks'
N*
In view of the world-wide furore that developed when
news of Israel's June 7 bombing of the Iraq nuclear
reactor capable of creating an atomic bomb
became known, and the fact that the U.S. suspended
temporarily four F-16s scheduled to be delivered to
Israel last Friday, the Wall Street Journal suggested "a
vote of thanks" to the Israelis instead of condemnation.
The Journal on June 10 editorialized: "Various gov-
ernments, including our own, and a lot of pundits have
been busily condemning Israel's raid on Iraq's nuclear
reactor. Our own reaction is that it's nice to know that
in Israel we have at least one nation left that still lives
in the world of reality."
It added: "Of course Iraq was building a bomb. Of
course its intended target was Israel... Its atom bomb
would have been a danger to all its neighbors. We all
ought to get together and send the Israelis a vote of
thanks."
The day after this editorial appeared, the Community
Relations Committee of the Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale, holding its regular monthly
meeting, adopted the following resolution which was
sent to the White House, to Broward's Congressional
legislators and to others:
"Whereas the government of Iraq has declared itself
in a state of war with Israel:
"Whereas Iraq has built a nuclear reactor which it
has stated time and time again will be used to destroy
I S r;II > 1 '
"And whereas this reactor was definitely at the stage
to become a hot reactor dangerous for the safety and
security of the Middle East and the world,
"It is hereby resolved that we firmly assert that
Israel, as a sovereign nation, dedicated to the (Survival
of its citizens and of its neighbors, did destroy this hor-
rible weapon of war at the proper time and in efficient
manner. The state of Israel, instead of censure,
deserves thanks and praise by its ally, the Government
of the United States of America."
________________\ See related stories Pages 2 and 5.
Total Now at $3,745,000
Contributions for 1981UJA Campaign Still Being Sought
Yasser Arafat, leader of the
Palestine Liberation Or-
ganization of terrorists, is noted
by the Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale as
thanking Jews "for not making a
pledge to the United Jewish Ap-
peal campaign."
Arafat's job of trying to
destroy the State of Israel "is
made easier" by those who fail to
support Jews in Israel, notes the
campaign material directed at
former contributors who have not
>'et responded with a pledge or
contribution.
The letter was issued just
before Arafat audaciously
boasted that Libyan-supplied
surface-to-air (SAM) missiles in
Lebanon were fired at Israeli
planes. He said Libyans have
been helping the PLO since 1972
in the PLO's continuing effort to
kill Jews and destroy Israel.
Despite the fact that some
20,000 pledges and contributions
1tave brought the active and on-
going 1981 UJA campaign total
to more than $3,745,000 this
month, campaign leaders feel
that there are many in the North
Hroward Jewish community who
t
have yet to make a commitment
in support of the humanitarian
needs of Jews in Israel and else-
where in the world.
The campaign to date rep-
resents more than a 30 percent
increase over the 1980 UJA total.
The number of contributors has
increased by almost 5,000, an in-
dication, campaign leaders say,
that the Jewish community
generally is supportive of the ef-
forts of the volunteers who have
been campaigning since last
November for funds for the 1981
campaign.
Victor Gruman, 1981 UJA
general chairman and now presi-
dent of the Federation since the
May 26 annual meeting, said: "It
is the human element in the cam-
paign which lends great relevance
to the work of the Federation
here and abroad. The dollar
figures are important in caring
for the elderly, providing services
to Jewish youth and adults, and
the great number of human
services extended to the entire
community in many ways, such
as education, family counseling,
hot Kosher meals, chaplaincy
services for hospitals and nursing
homes."
The entire community, he
added, can take pride in this out-
standing achievement to date,
considering the fact that North
Broward Jewry has only been an
organized community for just
about 13 years. In 1968 when the
Federation was incorporated
there were about 4,000 Jews in*
the area and the UJA campaign
that year raised $64,000.
"The needs in this com-
munity," Gruman said, "are
greater than ever with increasing
numbers of Jews moving into
North Broward each month. And
in Israel where Jews are under
greater stress because of the un-
relenting triple-digit inflation and
the current crises that strain at
Israel's ability to defend its
security, the cost of providing
critically needed human services
mounts tremendously."
By telephone, by mail, by pub-
lic appeal, the Federation's army
of volunteers is still on the job
seeking contributions for the
1981 UJA. The volunteers urge
those who have not yet made a
pledge to do so TODAY. A call
to the Federation office, 484-
8200, is all it takes to join the
20,000 who have made a 1981
commitment. CALL TODAY1
Violent Acts of Nazis Did Not Deter
His Determination to Serve Judaism
Four from Family Become
B'nai Mitzvah June 20
Truly out of the ordinary is the
first time four children from one
family will be called to the Torah
to become B'nai Mitzvah (Chil-
dren of the Commandment) at
the same time.
*Stcven Lehman and three of
his sisters, Elizabeth, Jacquelin
and Robin, four members of a
family of 15 children, all adopted
by their parents. Joan and
I Ugene Lehman of Plantation.
Mitzvah and B'not Mitzvah bles-
sings to be bestowed on them at
the Saturday morning worship
sen-ice, June 20. at the Temple
Kol Ami. 8200 Peters Rd., Plant-
ation. Kol Ami's Rabbi Sheldon
Harr will officiate.
The four children, each within
the traditional 12 years of age for
girls and 13 for boys to achieve
the Mitzvah blessing, will join
several others of their brothers
Rabbi David J. Matzner, who
is conducting services for the re-
cently organized Temple Israel
of Gait Ocean Mile, has joined
the volunteer corps of auxiliary
chaplains of the Chaplaincy
Commission of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort Lau-
derdale. In the latter capacity, he
will be serving Plantation
General Hospital, visiting the
hospital's Jewish patients. In
September, he will be the rabbi at
the auxiliary High Holy Days
services of Temple Sholom at
Palm Aire in Pompano Beach.
Palm Aire, where he now lives
with his wife, the former Lucia
Landerer, is a long, long way
from his birthplace and his wed-
ding ceremony in 1948 in Ger-
many.
In years between his birth in
Wiesbaden and his marriage,
David Matzner went to Palestine
in 1936 to continue his studies in
Jerusalem after the Nazis closed
Rabbi David J. Matzner
down all Jewish institutions ot
higher learning. He was a grad-
uate of Yeshiuath Torath Chayim
in Jerusalem where he was or-
dained in 1938, returning to
Germany to make use of the
"illegal underground" to get his
family into Antwerp, Belgium.
But as war was exploding all over
Europe, David went to France
seeking a supposed "safe haven"
for his family. Instead he was
arrested along with thousands of
other Jewish refugees and tossed
into a French concentration
camp.
The French later turned him
over the the Nazi SS who moved
him to Auschwitz, to other
camps, including Bergen-Belsen,
before liberation on May, 1945,
and return to Wiesbaden, learn-
ing that his mother had died in
Antwerp, and the rest of the
family had been deported to
Auschwitz never to be heard
from.
Standing on the side of the
destroyed Wiesbaden synagogue
where he had become a Bar Mitz-
vah, he pledged to rebuild this
House of Worship. And this he
did, he says, "with the help of the
Almighty and the most wonder-
ful assistance of the then U.S. Air
Force Chaplain William F. Dalin,
now of San Francisco." This was
the first synagogue built in West
Continued on Page 2
receive the traditional Bar Continued on Page 2
-
Pledge Payments Needed to
Meet Needs in Israel
The Diminishing Pledge
The Pledge
settlements, and a decided slowdown in the de-
velopment of the new settlements in the Negev
for those Jews who must leave the Sinai by
next April as a result of the Camp David
accords."
She added: "Though the Federation here
has become a leading community in forward-
ing cash collections to UJA and supporting its
own programs locally, we are facing a serious
economic crisis as far as funding projects in
Israel and locally. Cash payment of pledges
.outstanding will help pull us through these
V*teigh times."
She called for an all-out effort on the part of
the Jewish community to respond to this call
r
Cash Committee Chairperson Gladys
Daren, who is also president of the Women's
Division of the Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale, stressed the need for early
payment of pledges to the United Jewish
Appeal.
She said that the Jewish Agency in Israel,
which receives the major portion of its funds
from the United Jewish Appeal for the hu-
manitarian programs and projects in Israel,
has reached the limit of its borrowing capacity
and will have to make budget cuts.
The critical shortage of cash at the Jewish
Agency, she said, "means fewer teenagers in
Youth Aliyah programs, lessened support for
pioneering young families in new Galilee
Value
$1,000.00
.
AND THE INFLATION FACTQB: Israeli in-
flation coupled,with the weakening value of the
idobW, affects UJA pledges. This graph shows
'how paying a pledge LATE can severely
reduce its purchasing power/ CASH IS
NEEDED NOW! '.
Paid ,'
1 year late
Paid
2 years late
Paid
3 years late


Page2
The Jewish Piondian of Greater Port Lauderdale
Friday, June 19,19^
MitterandNot Likely
To OkayNewN-Plant
, By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS The new French ad-
ministration of President
Francois Mitterrand will
probably refuse to sign a
new contract for the re-
construction of the Iraqi
nuclear plant bombed
Sunday by Israeli planes.
Reliable French sources
said that France will
deplore the attack but re-
fuse to renew either the
former contracts or the
actual work."
Before his election, Mitter-
rand said that, bad he been in
power, France would not have
approved the Franco-Iraqi nu-
clear agreements signed under
President Valery Giscard
D'Estaing. Since Mitterrand's
election. May 10, leading mem-
bers of his administration have
reiterated this view while
stressing, however, that France
will honor all of the previous ad-
ministration's contracts and
commitments. Many observers
here believe that the Israeli raid
has actually helped Mitterrand
out of a thorny situation.
NEGOTIATIONS between
France and Iraq were started in
1975 when the then French
Premier, Jacques Chirac, paid an
official visit to Baghdad. Chirac
and Iraq's "strong man,"
Saddam Hussein, agreed to ex-
change oil for nuclear know-how.
In 1976. the official agreement
providing for the construction of
the Osirak reactor was signed
and in 1960 an additional agree-
ment provided for French
delivery of 72 kilograms and 93
percent enriched uranium which
the French said was too poor to
be used for military purposes.
Determination
Cob turned from Page 1
Germany following the war, and
during Hanuka 1946. the skid
was dedicated with the dedi-
cation speech delivered by Rabbi
Phillip S. Bernstein. Rochester,
N.Y., serving at the time as ad-
visor on Jewish affairs to General
Dwight D. (Ike) Eisenhower.
Two years after his marriage,
Rabbi Matzner and his wife came
to U.S.. to serve a congregation
in Wausau. Wise., where he also
attended Northern Wisconsin
University to improve his
English and was graduated with
a bachelor of arts decree
Still traveling, the Matzners
served a congregation in Water-
loo. Iowa, and another in Wash-
ington, Pa., retiring in 1978 to
spend two years in Israel before
deciding to make Palm Aire just
a year ago their permanent home.
Though he has taken on
several assignments. Rabbi
Matzner says: "Being retired
from fulHtime rabbinical duties,
I'm still active and consider my-
self primarily a teacher. That's
the tradition of the rabbinate in
all of our past, and such I con-
sider it to be my aim and my
purpose."
i-----------------:-----=--------:_*____:-----
B'naiMitzvah June 20
Continued from Page 1
and sisters who have received
theseatiyot (honors).
Mrs. Lehman, who is in real
estate management, and her
husband, married for 25 years,
have adopted their 15 children
over a period of 20 years. Eugene
Lehman, who is with the Post
Office Dept. in New York, moved
the family to Plantation about 18
months ago, but maintained their
home in Plainview, L.I.. while
two of their sons were continuing
their education there: Joel, at-
tending Brooklyn Polytechnic
Institute, and Ira who is being
graduated this month from Ken-
nedy High School.
Another graduate this month
in the family is Peter who is in
the graduation class at South
Plantation High School.
Peter is the oldest here of
of the 13 children in the
"family of love," as Mrs.
Lehman'terms her family, who
are living with her in Plantation.
The youngest is David, five. The
distance between New York and
Plantation doesn't deter this
family since they try to get
together eigher here or in New
York about once a month.
Mrs. Lehman says of her
family of love that "adoption
laws in New York are not as
stringent as they are in Florida
We found a need for loving these
children who needed a parent or
parents. We love them. They love
us. We care for them. They care
for us just as in any other
family." Mrs. Lehman, a New
Yorker by birth whose family,
name is Newman, said that her*!
husband, who was bom in Cali-
fornia, is hoping the family will
be living all together soon in
Plantation.
PLANNING A TRIP
Travel with National Council of
Jewish Woman. For naw 1961
Brochure dsacribtng cn.
satlonal tours to ISRAEL, with
extensions to EGYPT, GREECE
and ITALY; Highlight. In Europt,
China and the Orient, Mexico
and the Canadian Rockies.
Pleas* call Lillian Schultz
742-3531 or Elsie Porman
741-4053.

RIVERSIDE
IN
NORTH BROWARD.

r
I
"

i
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vifc

Themost beautiful and largest Jewish funeral chapel in
Broward County;


Centrally located to Ft. Lauderdale and Pompano Beach serving the
entire Northeast and Northwest Broward areas. Convenient to highways
Ample parking.-^
6701 W^Commercial Blvd. (East of University Rd.), Tamarac/
587:8400 _
Alfred GoldenSec V.P./Arthur G^berg F.D.. y^g^^y F.D.? V.P./U^ck V.P.
t:

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Girl Grossberg
RIVERSIDE
Memorial Cuaft* l nt'FUnttWfitors tf
generations aflymbrj! or Jewish tradition. **0*i SKKTM
'------------------------------illlll'' "' ''''MVi'm'iV.'.'.V.VA'.'.V.-.'.-.V.-,- {- .. A'.V.V
'
- I


Friday. June 19,1081
The Jfwish,F[Uiridian of Greater f^rt Lauderdale
Page 3
Sherr Elected President of Jewish Family Service
Ellen Held of the Russian Re-
settlement Program, presented
Certificates of Awards to medical
and dental professionals and
those volunteers who help make
this successful program.
Rabbi David Shapiro
presented scholarships to two
Russian-Jewish children to at-
tend Hillel Community Day
School. These scholarships are
from the proceeds of the Gertrude
K. Ressner Memorial Fund. Mrs.
Charles Dubin. representing the
National Council of Jewish
Women, presented two scholar-
ships to two Russian-Jewish chil-
dren to be used towards college
tuition.
Guest speaker was Broward
County Commissioner Fran
Gross. The 19th Annual Report
relating to the development and
expansion of programs which
have been initiated during recent
years was presented by the Exec-
utive Director, Sherwin H.
Rosenstein.
ORT Supports New
Jewish High School
Rabbi Louis Herring, prin&fal
of the new South Florida Jewish?
High School, reported that
Women's American ORT will
participate in financial support of
the new all-day high school which
will have students from Broward
joining students from Dade
county.
The school, launched through
an original grant from the Foun-
dation of Jewish Philanthropies
of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation and support from the
Federations in South Florida,
begins its first year August 31 in
the Michael-Ann Russell Jewish
Community Center in North
Miami
Brian J. Sherr, partner in the
law firm of Ruden, Barnett,
McCloksy and Schuster in Fort
Lauderdale, was elected presi-
dent of the Jewish Family Serv-
ice of Broward County, a
recipient agency of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort Lau-
derdale. He has been active for
several years with JFS and has
been chairman of the Federa-
tion's Attorneys' Division and
was recently re-elected a member
of the Federation's board of
directors.
Installed with Sherr last
month at the annual meeting of
Jewish Family Service were Dr.
Robert Heller, first vice presi-
dent; Sheldon Polish, second vice
president; Steven Fayne, treas-
urer, and Natalie Graham,
secretary.
Also installed were the follow-
ing directors nominated by the
nominating committee headed by
Dr. Heller:
Melvin Beer, Selma Barron,
Ben Dantzker, Libo Fineberg,
Ellen Fischer, Steven Fraidstem,
Irving Friedman, Maurice
Fromer, Nancy Goldberg, Brenda
Greenman, Rabbi Sheldon Harr,
Natalin Heiden, Dr. Irving Kar-
ten, Ben Klein, Jeffrey Klein,
Janet Krop, Peter Lazarus,
Renee Lieberman, Dr. Gary
Magid, Leon Messing, Michael
Price, Joan Raticoff, Simon
Reichbaum, Israel Resnikoff,
Delia Rosenberg, Florence Roth,
Dr. David Sachs, Rabbi Albert I
Schwartz, Zelda Sepner, Florence
Straus.
Outgoing President Fred P.
Greene reported that the goals
established at the inception of his
term office had been met. He
stressed, however, the ever-
increasing demand for the profes-
sional services of the agency and
the concurrent strides made by
the agency to meet the needs of
the community. He was pre-
sented with the Esther Lowen-
thal Community Service Award
for his outstanding community
dedication.
Holiday Springs B'nai B'rith Install Officers
g Jfc

1 \ 1 >'
Dr. Bernard Rush was installed as president of
the B'nai B'rith Lodge of Holiday Springs at
ceremonies conducted by Harry Babush,
treasurer of B'nai B'rith International Other
officers (left to right): Aaron Leitman, Dr. David
Gersten, lice presidents; Michael Grossman,
financial secretary; Harvey Kombluth, corre-
sponding secretary; Leo Schildhraut, treasurer;
Milton Goldberg, vice president; Abe Lipstadt,
treasurer. Other officers are Sid Vogel, vice presi-
dent, andAl Gura, chaplain.
Terrorists Conduct Global Campaign
NEW YORK (JTA)
Right-wing and left-wing
terrorists are conducting a
global campaign against
the same targets western
democracies, Israel and
Jews and, in some cases,
have joined forces in that
campaign, according to a
study reported by Maxwell
Greenberg, chairman of the
Anti-Defamation League
B'nai B'rith. He said Israel
was a primary target for
both.
Greenberg told the ADL Na-
tional Commission at its meeting
here that terrorist violence in
Europe in 1980 and the recent
assassination attempt against
Pope John Paul II gave new
urgency to exposing and taking
action against the international
terrorist networks.
THE ADL study described
neo-Nazi and fascist terrorists
and propagandists as a "black"
'
STATE OF
ISRAEL BONDS
BOUGHTAND SOLD
Invest in
Israel Securities
WE'RE SPECIALISTS IN
ISRAEL SECURITIES.

TRANSACTIONS DAILY VIA TELEX
TO ISRAEL STOCK EXCHANGE.
Leumi
Securities
Bank LmUKt WvK B.M.
18 East 48th Street
New York. NY 10017
(212) 759-1310
Toll Free (800) 221-4838
network and used the term "red"
network for such groups as the
West German Baader-Meinhoff
Gang, the Italian Red Brigades
the Japanese, and other Soviet
oriented and sponsored groups,
like the Palestine Liberation Or
ganization, which the study said
operates with Soviet arms and
training.
Greenberg said "the ideo-
logical glue that binds the 'red'
and 'black' terrorists is "the
shared commitment" to destroy
democracy and freedom of ex-
pression. He told the meeting
that the two terrorist networks
have established links through
financial support, weapons and
joint terrorist training
operations.
According to the study, pre-,
BlueStar
Dr. Samuel Lazarus, president
of B'nai B'rith Blue Star Lodge,
and Norman Karr, Council repre-
sentative, will attend the 106Ch
annual convention of B'nai B'rith
District 5 June 28-30 at Hunt
Valley Resort Inn, near Balti-
more, Md.
Dr. William Korey, director of
the International's Policy Re-
search, will deliver the Keynote
address, with International
President Jack J. Spitzer speak-
ing at the awards breakfast.
Meyer Eisenberg will be installed
as the new president of District 5
succeeding Tommy Baer.
Dr. Lazarus is spearheading a
strong program for Blue Star
lodge to increase membership
and bring a closer relationship
with BBYO and Hillel.
BAT AMI HADASSAH
Pearl Goldenberg, former vice
president of the Florida Mid-
Coast Region of Hadassah,
inaugurated'a series of social af-
ternoons, titled "Getting to
Know Hadassah" this week for
the Bat Ami-Tamarac chapter at
Lillian Ginsberg's home in West-
wood section 24. Mrs. Golden-
berg, fund-raising chairperson for
the region, will speak at three
more such meetings, according to
Dorothy Pittman of Tamarac,
membership chairman, who is
handling reservations.
Mrs. Pittman reported that the
chapter received an award as the
second best chapter in the region
at the recent regional conference.
pared by Jerome H. Bakst, ADL"
research department director, the
terrorist networks are backed by
powerful propaganda machines
that attack western societies and
disseminate anti-Zionist and anti-
Semitic materials.
Beverly Minkoff, national
president of ORT, and Sidney E.
Leiwant, president of American
ORT Federation, joined in a
statement that this is ORT's first
participation in the Jewish Day
School system in the U.S. ORT is
providing a sophisticated
computer training program as
part of the school's curriculum.
Mrs. Minkoff said ORT's sup-
port for the South Florida Jewish
High School "will not deflect
from our nationwide campaign to
promote career education and
upgrade our vocational and
technical schools in Israel, Ar-
gentine, Brazil, Chile, Peru, and
other countries. ORT's interna-
tional network includes some 800
schools."
More than 100 applications,
including at least 10 from the
Greater Fort Lauderdale area,
have been made for admission to
the school's first year, according
to Principal Herring, whose
report on the faculty selected for
the school was noted in the May
22 issue of The Jewish Ploridian.
He also noted that it was the first
time, to his knowledge, that a
Federation took the initiative for
creating a high school. He wel-
comed ORT's support. The com-
bination of Federation backing
and support from others helps, he
said, "to make a quality high
school possible right from the
outset.,f
The Jewish
Community
Has A Right
To Know:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
There are several funeral chapels in South
Florida that claim to serve those of the
Jewish faith.
THOSE SAME CHAPELS ARE NOT
JEWISH OWNED.
Even more disturbing, they do not make this
fact apparent to the Jewish community.
MENORAH CHAPELS ARE THE ONLY
JEWISH OWNED CHAPELS BETWEEN
HOLLYWOOD AND WEST PALM BEACH
AND THE OLDEST IN BROWARD COUNTY.
At Menorah Chapels, unlike the others,
serving the Jewish community is more than
a business it's a way of life.
We wanted you to know. Because at the death of a loved
one, the traditions of our faith and the concern of our
people should be genuine. It's your right, and our religion.
QjapelS
742-6000
Dade. 945-3939.
Palm Beach. 833-0887.
Serving chapels throughout the U.S. and Canada.
With locations in Sunrise, Deerf itU Beach and Margate.


Page 4
The Jewish Floridian Of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, June 19, 1981
NEAR EAST REPORT
Sadat On Jerusalem
That agile master of diplomatic ambaguity,
President Sadat, has done it again, this time with a
declaration on Jerusalem. As usual, the wily states-
man's timing was magnificently upsettinga week
before his meeting with Prime Minister Begin. He
proposed that May 30 be declared an "international
day for Arab Jerusalem" and he urged Muslims "'to
cooperate so that the banners of freedom, justice and
peace will be raised over Jerusalem".
May 30 is the day in the Muslim religious calen-
dar on which Muhammed is believed to have made
his night journey from Mecca to Jerusalem, whence
(at the future site of the Dome of the Rock) he
ascended to heaven. "Therefore," Mr. Sadat assert-
ed, "Jerusalem is holy to Arabs and Muslims, anc
the Palestinian people have an eternal, national and
religious right to it...Jerusalem should be a symbol
of peace and cooperation. It is unfair and unjust to
have it tarnished by the occupation."
The statement is a masterpiece of calculated
irrelevance.
Arabs, Muslims, Christians, Jews
First, there is the blurring of distinctions be-
tween Arabs and Muslims. Not all Muslims are
Arabs most are notnor all Arabs Muslims. And
while Jerusalemor, at any rate, the great Mosque
at the Domemay be sacred to Muslims, that surely
doesn't make it "Arab" or "holy to Arabs". An "in-
ternational day" for "Arab Jerusalem," therefore, is
religiously and historically just a garble.
Moreover, the entire city, not just a single holy
place, is not less sacred to Christians, the vast
majority of whom are not Arab. Why, after all, did
Muhammed choose to journey to Jerusalem, rather
than stay in the holier city of Mecca, for his ascen-
sion? Precisely because he accepted that the city, and
the entire country whose spiritual center it was, had
been made sacred for Islam by the life of Jesusand
in the first instance, by Judaism and the "People of
the Book".
Then there are the subtle insinuations that
"freedom, justice and peace" are absent from Israel's
capital, that the city is "tarnished" by its Jewish
"occupation". The truth is that under Arab and
Muslim occupationfrom the city's conquest in 638
until the demise of Ottoman rule in 1917 and, again,
under Jordan's heel from 1948 to 1967there was no
freedom or justice for Christians and Jews. It has
been only since Israel's liberation of Jerusalem in
1967 that the city has become untarnished, with full
freedoms practiced equally by all.
It is a giant leap from all this to the grandiose
claim that "the Palestinian people have an eternal,
national and religious right to Jerusalem." The reli-
gious rights of the Palestinian Arabs, Christians and
Muslims, are freely available under Israeli law. The
"Palestinian people," however, can hardly claim a
national right to Jerusalem, inasmuch as the city has
barely figured in that "people's" collective con-
sciousnessand certainly not an "eternal" right,
since, whatever the "Palestinian people" consists of,
its origins barely antedate World War I.
To a group of visiting Israeli Legislators he put
a different face on it: "... a solution of the Jerusa-
lem problem should be satisfactory to the claims of
Jews, Muslims and Christians This can be done
by keeping Jerusalem a unified city, administered by
a joint Arab-Israeli municipal council." This gloss
brings it much closer to a position that Israel and the
Jewish people can treat with. To the same visitors,
the President vowed that Egypt "would never turn
back from peace with Israel under any circum-
stances".
His commitment to peace seems total and per-.
manent; he has reiterated it even in the face of
possible war between Israel and Syria. All peace-
lovers must pray for his good health, long life, and
unyielding determination to pursue peace.
Editor's Note: Sadat joined the clamor of con-
demnation against Israel's raid on Iraq's nuclear
plant.
Saudi-Soviet Accord Why?
Jewish Floridian
ol Greater Fort Lauderdale l fl%a Shochet
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REPORTS of a renewed
alliance .between Saudi Arabia
and the Soviet Union make little
sense on their face. Second
thoughts put the reports into two
categories of possibility. The first
would see such a resumption in
diplomatic arrangement in much
the same way as history teaches
us to view the pre-World War II
accord between Hitler Germany
and Josef Stalin's Kremlin:
1) A desperate scrambling for
time by the Saudis to shore up
their crumbling imperial regime
before, like Iran's, it falls prey to
internecine struggle betweeen
political and religious extremism;
2) A daring ploy on the part of
the Russians to return to the
Middle East arena in force, until
now dominated by the United
States, even if through some un-
likely a back door as the royal
house of Saud. In this scenario,
the Saudis respond seductively.
THE SECOND category
suggests that the Saudis are
attempting to put the squeeze on
Washington, particularly in
terms of the AWACS sale to
them, which is meeting strong
opposition in the Congress, but
which is also causing angry
counter-offensive action in the
form of threatening Ad-
ministration warnings to the
American Jewish commuity and
the Government of Israel to
abandon their orchestrated
criticism of the sale.
There is nothing like the
potency of reports of a renewed
Soviet-Saudi alliance to give the
Administration and the Saudis
whatever they want the
Congress, the American Jewish
community and Israel be
damned.
As of this writing, it is still too
early to tell which of these two
categories of possibility is
correct, or even if both are wrong.
Thus far, it can only be a matter
of educated speculation but. if in
the end. the reports are verified
as true, we are all of us in for a
heap of trouble. For both pos-
sibilities are clearly linked, and
either one will show the real ex-
tent of the weakness of Saudi
Arabia and the collateral ab-
surdity of the U.S. effort to cast
King Khalid in the role of reliable
and effective military ally. As for
the Russians, there is no limit to
the mischievousness they can
make wherever they are invited
in.
A MORE "optimistic" view
would be to focus on the second
possibility suggested here in
terms of raw power. If the news
reports have been orchestrated to
manipulate American public
opinion toward an underwriting
of the Reagan Administration's
decision to sell the Saudis a wide
I
range of strategic weapons, in-
cluding the AWACS, what is the
purpose of the orchestration
beyond the sale itself?
The answer is more than an act
of successful Saudi manipulation
in itself. It is manipulation
toward what was previously an
unachievable goal the sale of
strategic weapons to an Arab
entity capable of being turned
upon the Israelis in response to
the recent Saudi called for a jihad
against them. This means the
U.S. currying of Saudi favor as
an ally to the disadvantage of Is-
rael, a second ally. It means by
extension the expendability of
Israel as a fact even if not as a
principle in the highest halls of
American governmental enter-
prise.
Such a view can be put to work
to reassess the role of the Saudis,
not as weak sycophant chasing
after American favor, but as
potent Arab power-brokers
capable of political, as well as
fiscal savvy. As second in com-
mand after Egypt, temporarily
out of the picture because of the
Camp David agreements, the
Saudis can be limned as rep-
resenting more than just the new
political and economic strength
of the Arab people. There is also
their joint military capability,
which western strategists tend to
demean as insignificant when
poised against Israel's.
STILL, the figures are im-
pressive: 1,214,500 men capable
of being deployed in the event of
war; 2,443 advanced combat
plains: 13.534 tanks; 10,945
armored carriers; 9,027 artillery
pieces. All this puts the forces of
the North Atlantic Treaty Or-
ganization to shame, where on its
northern and central fronts
NATO can claim by contrast a
mere 626.000 men. some 7.000
tanks and only 1,900 aircraft.
In short, the Arabs today can
emerge in our assessment of them
as controlling the largest arsenal
of arms in the world after the
United States and the Soviet
Union. The Arabs today are
spending more than $40 billion
annually on maintaining this
massive array of weapons and
men to operate them; and of this
Friday, June 19,1961
Volume 10
17 8IVAN6741
Number 13
figure, it can be computed that
Saudi Arabia kicked in over 327
billion in 1980 alone.
These statistics are Shlomo
Vrgov'a who is Israel's A
bassador in Ixuidon. Th. y
statistics he used in an analy
of the European Economic Com-
munity's competitive "peace ini-
tiative" with the Camp David
accords during his recent Selig
Brodetsky Memorial Lecture at
the University of Leeds in
England. One can, I suppose, re-
ject them as subjective and self-
serving.
BUT IT would be foolish to do
so, especially because most
studies of Saudi strengths spe-
cifically and Arab strengths
generally are a fantasy in the
study of power. They ignore the
lethal lack of consensus as to
basic national purposes among
the Arab peoples.
For example: the civil war in
I/ebanon between Christians and
PLOdominated Muslims; the
religious tension in Syria, where
the Moslem Brotherhood has
carried out acts of violence and
assassination against what it
considers to be the illegitimate
Alawi-operated regime of Presi-
dent Assad; the unease in Libya,
as Col. Qaddafi continues his war
against opposition elements in
his country who seek to over-
throw him. and his takeover in
Chad; the metamorphosis in
Iran, where the stable Pahlavi
government fell to the radical
rule of the Ayatollah Khomeini, a
fanatical religious seer; Egyptian
wariness of extreme Islamic ele
ments in her own midst, and her
oppression of the Christian i
Copts, no less than clear evident'"
from time-to-time that Cairo
considers the peace with Israel as
merely a temporary ac
enmmodation: Jordanian control
Continued on Page 15
Reader
Writes
EDITOR.
The only Yiddish daily striving
to keep the prophets of doom
from sealing the fate of the Yid-
dish language is the Jewish Daily
Forward.
A campaign is under way to
raise $600,000 in the next five
years to keep this newspaper
afloat. Many of us will recall that
our parents or even grandparents
relied on the paper's internation-
al, national and local news, to say
nothing of the heart-rending tales
delineated in the "Bintel Brief".
In today's world, many elderly,
confined to their homes or living
in institutions rely entirely upon
this paper to keep them mentally
alert and to shed light upon the
outside world.
Each year, for at least a half
dozen years now I have made it
my business to ask friends,
neighbors and relatives to contri-
bute to this worthwhile venture.
No sum is refused. Perhaps many
of your readers can do likewise,
others may care to send their
contributions by themselves.
Address all to Jewish Daily
Forward, 45 E 33rd St., New
York City, 10016.
Many folks residing in Florida
can not purchase the paper at
their local newsstands. To them,
I say do what I did. Have it sent
from NYC. There are five publi-
cations each week, Tuesday,
Wednesday, Thursday, and Fri-
day and a Saturday-Sunday
weekend edition which includes a
very special English newspaper
enclosure with diversified topics
ranging from labor history and
literature to current events and
controversial topics. Daily
editions can be subscribed to
without the weekend edition and
vip-versa. *
SYLVIA ROSENBEC*
Deerfteld B*ch
~"


Friday, June 19. 1981
The Jewish Floridjan of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 5
Israel's Bombing Iraq Nuclear Plant 'Self-Defense'
Against mounting criticism throughout the world,
and with his political opponents questioning the timing
of the bombing raid against the nuclear plant in Iraq,
Israel Prime Minister Menachem Begin declared it was
"supreme legitimate self-defense."
The nuclear plant was almost totally destroyed in
the raid by Israel's F-16 and F-15 planes on Sunday,
June 7. Begin said that the Iraqis had indicated that
the nuclear reactor would be used to make atomic
bombs and that these bombs would be used against
Israel.
Because some Administration officials in Wash-
MusicalProgram Marks 4th Anniversary m
ington had condemned the daring raid which had the
planes flying over Jordan and Saudi Arabia to reach
Iraq as a possible violation of the U.S. sale of planes to
Israel solely "for self-defense," Begin charged that if
the destruction of the plant hadn't taken place, there
was danger that another Holocaust could happen. He
said: "Never again."
Although Labor party officials who are seeking to
win the Knesset elections on June 30 applauded the
need for the raid as Israelis throughout the country
cheered the audacious accomplishment, they ques-
tioned the timing, indicating that it was a political
move designed to increase the chances of Begin's Likud
coalition to win the elections.
The Iraq plant was built by French and Italian
technicians. France shipped 22 pounds of highly en-
riched uranium fuel to Iraq in March 1980 for the initial
loading of the reactor.
Prof. Yuval Neeman, a right-wing candidate for
the Knesset, said: "There's no question we would have
been target No. 1" of an Iraqi nuclear bomb. He said it
would probably take Iraq three years to reach the same
stage in its nuclear program in reconstructing
bomb-damaged plant.
the
MROffiiiiiiiiiinflHnflnHBMHm
At Jewish Federation's Nutrition Site Interf aith Council Meets June 22
The fourth anniversary of the
opening of the Kosher nutrition
site in the Jewish Federation
building, 2999 NW 33rd Ave.,
will be marked Friday, June 19,
with a concert for the elderly.
George Shwiller, the multi-
talented musician, and his
equally talented singing partner.
Sol Gruber, will entertain the
diners. They'll also play a
musical tribute to those who
attend the daily luncheon who are
observing birthdays or anniver-
saries this month.
George and Sol, two profes-
sionals who have performed at
various condos and public insti-
tutions, are volunteering their
Children Give for
Israel's Children
In a delightful gesture of
Tiedakah (righteousness),
following a talk by their teacher,
Lucille Coplen, the children of the
Alef and Bet classes of the
Primary Department of Temple
Beth Am Religious School con-
tributed dimes, quarters and
more to make up a total of
"double chai" and more and
asked that it be given to the
Israel Emergency Fund of the
United Jewish Appeal. The six-
year-olds and seven-year-olds of
the classes, in response to their
contribution of $36.60, received
an appreciative letter of thanks
and commendation from UJA on
behalf of children in Israel whose
humanitarian programs are
supported by such contributions.
services for the nutrition site an-
niversary. Shwiller is an excellent
violinist, pianist and accordionist
who has performed with Maurice
Schwartz. Gruber was busy in
recent weeks serving as a cantor
at the Passover Seders presented
at nursing homes in cooperation
with the Federation's Chaplaincy
Commission and Jewish Com-
munity Center's WECARE
nursing home volunteers.
CHINA
Original
and
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$3545. each
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TOTAL COST FOR ALL
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overnight rest stops at
Narita, Japan and
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Leaving Oct. 23,1981
Fully guided by native
Chinese-American
guide for entire
trip. '
For information, please
contact
JOB TRAECER, Conductor.
605 S.W. 1st Ave.
Phone (305) 373-3838
Miami, Fta. 33130
The Interf aith Council of the
Greater Fort Lauderdale area
which developed as a result of the
Interfaith Forum sponsored last
February by the Community Re-
lations Committee of the Jewish
Federation, is planning a "Living
Room Dialogues" project.
Details for establishing the
project, which would involve
small groups of peoples of differ-
ent faiths meeting in homes of
people volunteering to serve as
host or hostess, will be discussed
at the Interfaith Council meeting
to be held at noon, Monday. June
22, in the Federation's board
room, 2999 NW 33rd Ave.
Representatives of Broward
County Clergy Council, Church
Women United. Broward County
Human Relations division, CRC,
Federation's Women's Division,
Urban League, National Confer-
ence of Christians and Jews, In-
terfaith Council of South Brow-
ard, American Jewish Committee
and AJCongress, and other orga-
nizations are expected to attend.
Those planning to attend have
been asked to call Helen Steig-
man at the Federation office, 484-
8200.
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w .
The JeWWPlbridlah ofJ^aie^FMLauderdale '

Friday, June 19,1981

Notice to Organizations
Carolyn Gutman, vice praeideat of education
for the Women's Division of the Jewish Fedora-,
tion of Greater Fort Lenctodale, and Min
Graman, Women'* Division historian and eon
pUer of the Community Calendar which appears
regularly in The Jewish Floridian, met recently
with presidents and program chairpersons of
Jewish organisations.
It was suggested that since notice had gone oat
to presidents who were completing their term of
office, that organizations, such as Hadaaaah
chapters, OUT chapters, B'nai B'rith lodges sad
B'nai B'rith Women's chapters, Jewish War Vet-
erans Posts and Auxiliaries, and al the other or-
ganizations, should send notice of their 1961-82
officers to the Jewish Federation office. 2999 NW
33rd Ave., Fort Landerdale 33311.
Mrs. Graman compiles the informstion re-
ceived at the Federation office for the Community
Calendar and if notices of meetings are sent to
other offices it may not be delivered to the Fed-
eration to meet the copy deadline for the issue
listing dates covering those notices.
Mrs. Graman has sent to the organizations a
form to be used in submitting information for the
Community Calendar, in addition to recording the
dates of Jewish and other pertinent holidays for
the guidance of the presidents and publicity
chairpersons of the organizations in scheduling
events and meeting deadlines for submitting copy
for The Jewish Floridian.
Community Calendar
SUNDAY, JUNE 21
Men's Club-Temple Sholom:
Film, Journey to Jerusalem,
starring Leonard Bernstein,
Isaac Stern, Jennie Tourel, 10
a.m. Minyan at 9 a.m. Breakfast,
Sholom Social Hall, Pompano
Beach. $2.60 per person.
Men's Club-Sunrise Jewish Cen-
ter: Sidney Glugover, speaks:
"Senior Citizens and the Criminal
Justice System." Breakfast,
Sunrise JC, 9 am.
MONDAY, JUNE 22
Temple Emanu-El: Games, 7:16
p.m.
Hsdsssah-Tamar Chapter: Board
meeting, Lauderdale Lakes
Library, 10 am.
Jewish War Veterans Coral
Three Strikes
And You're Out
Jewish Floridian Staff Report
In 1979, while the French
were at work under a $260
million contract from Iraq
to deliver an Osirak nuclear
reactor to Baghdad, plastic
explosive was used to blow
up parts of the reactor due
shortly to be delivered to
Iraq's new nuclear facility
outside of Baghdad.
The explosion occurrec
at a warehouse at the port
of Seyne-sur-Seine on the
French Mediterranean
coast. The saboteurs have
never been identified.
AT THE beginning of the Iraq-
Iran war, on Sept. 30, 1990,
Iranian jet fighters attempted to
bomb the Iraqi facility situated
in Tawaitha, 19 miles southeast
of Baghdad. The reactor is part of
the Tammuz nuclear complex
there. At the time, there was
widespread speculation and
charges that the bombing at-
tempt was in fact made by Israeli
war planes with Iranian mark-
ings. Jerusalem vigorously
denied the reports.
Last Sunday's strike by the
Israel Air Force was the third
attempt to destroy the Osirak
reactor, and it is now suggested
that the unidentified saboteurs
who initially attacked the reactor
parts at Seyne-sur-Seine in 1979
were Israeli secret servicemen.
There have been persistent
fears over the years that Iraq did
not want its French-built reactor
for peaceful purposes that ir
fact it was designed to develop a
nuclear weapons capability.,
These fears were heightened by
Iraq's repeated refusal to accept
anything but highly-enriched
uranium fuel from the French to
fuel their reactor.
THE FRENCH in the begin-
ning attempted to deliver low-
enrichment uranium. This would
be suitable for research purposes,
but difficult to use in the produc-
tion of atomic weanons.
Washington columnist Jac
Anderson, has meanwhile
reported over ABC-TV's "Good
Morning America" that U.S.
intelligence authorities knew of
the Israeli plan to destroy the
reactor as much as eight months
ago, and that the Administra-
tion's position that the Israeli
action came as a surprise is un-
warranted."
Condemnation of the operation
has been worldwide, coming from
all the Western nations de-
pendent on Arab oil, as well as
from the Arabs, themselves.
Of special interest was Egypt
President Anwar Sadat's re-
action, which called the bombing
"an irresponsible and unjusti-
fiable crime." Egypt's Foreign
Minister Kamal Hassan Ali said
that "It marks a sharp escalation
of the explosive situation in the
Middle East."
SADAT'S REACTION is of
such heightened interest because
the Israeli operation came on the
heels of his meeting last week
with Prime Minister Menachem
Begin at Ophira (Sharm el-
Sheikh). The meeting was widely
assessed as a Sadat assist to
Begin's election campaign.
Sadat is seen as hedging his
bets. While it is understood that
he would prefer Labor Opposition
Chief Shimon Peres to win, he is
reading the election polls care-
fully, which indicate that Begin
and his Likud Party have caught
up and may well win in the
balloting on June 30.
Nothing of substantive im-
portance may have emerged at
Ophira, but it is clear that Begin
did not tell Sadat anything about
the planned raid, and Sadat's
friendship with Begin, which
places the Egyptian leader in the
Arab world's doghouse, may well
be strained as a result.
Springs, Post and Auxiliary:
meeting, Temple Beth Orr, 8 p.m.
TUESDAY, JUNE 23
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale: Board meeting,
7 p.m.
Hadassah-Somerset Shoshana
Chapter: General meeting, Re-
creation Hall, Somerset Phase I,
Noon.
B'nai B'rith Women-No. Brow
aid Council: Meeting, David
Park Pavilion, Margate, 1 p.m.
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24
Temple Beth Israel: Games, 7:30
p.m.
ORT-Ramblewood East Chapter:
Board meeting, Ramblewood
EastCondo, 12:30 p.m.
THURSDAY, JUNE 25
Temple Beth Israel: Games,
Lunch may be purchased, 12:30
B'nai B'rith-Deerfield Beach:
General meeting, Temple Beth
Israel, Deerf ield Beach, 8 p.m.
ORT-Tamarac Chapter: General
meeting, Noon.
Hadaaaah-Ilana Hawaiian Gar-
dens Chapter: Study Group.
Sons of Israel-Fort Landerdale
Lodge: General meeting, 7:30
p.m.
Temple Emanu-El: Board of
Trustees meeting, 7:46 p.m.
SUNDAY, JUNE 28
Temple Beth Torah-Tamarac:
Games, 7 p.m.
Temple Beth HUM: Games,
Early Bird, 7 p.m.
MONDAY, JUNE 2
Temple Emanu-El: Games, 7:16
p.m.
TUESDAY, JUNE 30
Hadassah-Rayns Tamarac Chap-
ter: Luncheon and Card Party,
Tamarac Jewish Center. Contact
Min Tilles Belitsky for in-
formation, Noon.
WEDNESDAY, JULY 1
Temple Emanu-El Men'a Club:
Board and General meetings,
p.m.
Brandeis-Pompano Beach Chap-
ter: Board meeting, 9:30 a.m.
American Mizrachi Women-
Masada Chapter: Meeting,
Broward Federal, 3000 N. Uni-
versity Dr., Noon.
Temple Ohel B'nai Raphael Sis-
terhood: Board meeting, 10 a.m.
THURSDAY, JULY 2
B'nai B'rith-Lakea Chapter:
Board meeting.
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Thara ara many waya to do It, but thoy
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2999 N.W. 33rd Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Fla. 33311
484-8200
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TIRED OF JOD INSECURITY
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WeU. M you hove o Hebrew background, we invite
you to kiss thot rut ooodby* and soy hello to Israel.
If you ore o social worker (MSW 0SW) teacher or
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o most exciting ond personally rewording career awaits you
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Interviews will be conducted in the United States Contoct us
immediately for pre-interview information session.
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CENTER
4200 Biscay ne Blvd.
Miami, SS137
(505)575-2556
There is much to be done by our generation in Israel.
Let s stop talking and start doing.
A


Friday, June W.-1981
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fqrt Lauderdale
Page 7,
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Page 8
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday. June 19,1981
Electronic Miracles on Israel's TV Screens
The director lifted his finger,
Moshe Dayan spoke into the mi-
crophone, and the electronic
signal was launched on an
amazing journey. By wire it
ascended to the roof of the studio
and from there was beamed by
microwave to the ground station
at Emek Haelah, not far from Je-
rusalem. At that point it was im-
mediately given a good shove
into space, and leaped 36,000
miles to the Atlantic Satellite
circling the earth. It bounced
neatly off the Satellite and by
adroit maneuvering that would
be the envy of any billiards
player, hit the receiver at Etam,
in West Virginia, another 36,000
miles away. From there to the
ABC Studios in Washington and
thence to millions of television
sets all over America was child's
play compared to the previous
steps of its journey. The entire
procedure took something like 58
seconds.
That was an on-the-spot live
interview with Gen. Dayan by a
team from ABC's "Issues and
Anownrs" which we watched, but
it was a little different from
luiijiudti of other similar broad-
casts which take place regularly
from the House of Magic, better
known as the Herzliya Studios.
When Margot Klausner
founded the Studios in 1948 for
the production of films, this at a
time when the guns of the War ol
Liberation had not yet been
silenced, people thought she was
crazy. Since then the Studios
have produced well over a thou-
sand feature films, and countless
thousands of documentaries and
television program.
WHEN SHE later borrowed to
the hilt, and put $500,000 into
linking her Studios with the
Western world through Comm-
sat, the Communications Satel-
liic Iier friends thought she had
had a mental breakdown. The
value of such a connection in this
age of electronic media no longer
needs explanation.
Mrs. Klausner died a few years
ago, but her aggressive and
creative general manager, Yit-
zhak Kol. became president of the
company, and carries on. The
Studios are a family corporation.
We do.business
the right way A
1700W. Oaklan* Pw* WoO
FtLaa4irtlli.Wa.Wt
MlOTic7M-1S
:
AKLAND TOYOTA
owned by the son and daughter of
the founder.
Kol not only runs the business,
but he also produces, stages,
directs and thinks up new
projects. If one looks carefully,
the rambling grounds, just off
I hi very heart of downtown
Herzliya, bear a resemblance to
the old style Hollywood lot. It
was here that the Blaumilch
Canal was built for Kishon's
famous film; here rose a replica of
Tevye's shtetl. Here, soon, will be
shot much of a new four-hour film
of Paramount, to be broadcast in
the U.S. in the fall. It will be
known succinctly as "Golda".
IN CONJUNCTION with its
affiliate, Berkey Pathe Hum-
phries, the two are jointly known
as United Studios of Israel. They
enjoy a near monopoly on high
level film and television
production because of the wealth
of sophisticated equipment they
have accumulated, and the skill-
ful professional manpower they
have attracted. Almost every
major overseas television broad-
HabibBack
On Shuttle
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Philip Habib, President Reagan's
special envoy to the Middle East,
left Washington to return to the,
area, the State Department
announced.
Meanwhile, the White House
announced that President Anwar
Sadat of Egypt has accepted an
invitation from President Reagan
to visit Washington Aug. 5 to 6
and that Premier Menachem
Begin of Israel agreed to come
Sep. 9 to 10, assuming he is still
in office. White House spokes-
man Larry Speakes said the in-
vitation to Begin would apply to
his successor if Begin's Likud I
Party is defeated in the June 30
Knesset elections.
cast from Israel originates in
their studios. As Varda showed
us about we checked the names of
the world's leading TV broad-
casting companies on the doors of
the private laboratory and
editing facilities which each
maintains here. Next time you
see a live broadcast from Isi,<\
remember that 36,000 miles up -*
and back again.
Yitzhak Kol now has his eyes
on acquiring the rights for a
second television channel one
which will provide a much-needed
injection to official Israel TV
which, he feels, has become jaded
for lack of competition. Even if
someone else"gets the franchise,
they'll have to come to Herzliya
to use its facilities, just as Israel
TV does.
It is not merely a figure of
speech to say that this company
aims high, for Kol has more am-
bitious plans up his sleeve. Yet
things were not always that way.
There were slow days and
months, when business did not
warrant the enormous invest-
ment. And there were times when
he bit his fingernails off. He
recalls one such incident.
YOM KIPPUR day. 1973. the

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BUMMER SUPER SAVING VACATIONS
THE FAMILY JACOBS' 50th YEAR
2 Meals Dally Complete
Breakfast, Full Dinner
3 Meals Shabbos
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Sugar and Salt Free Diets
Free Chaise Lounges
Nightly Programs Shows
All Rooms Color TV,
Regrigeralor
first live action films from the
battle front were being developed
in the Herzliya Studios, and Kol
got on the wire to Commsat to
ask for an immediate channel to
the States. There were fewer
"lines" in those days, and the
only suitable beam had been
ordered by an outfit which was
broadcasting, live, an important
bullfight from Spain to'
Argentina.
After much transatlantic
yelling, it was finally agreed that
after the bull had been killed, Is-
rael could have the beam for the
fairly lengthy period during
which the bull's body was
dragged out of the arena. The
picador seemed to take his time
but the matador finally dis-
patched his animal and the
first films of the Yom Kippur
War hit the television screens of
the world.
A footnote. Margot Klausner
was a firm believer in spiritu-
alism and parapsychology.
Before she died she told Kol she
would keep an eye on him. To
make things easier for her, he has
kept her original chair next to his
desk, always empty and well
dusted. At least it looked empty
when we gazed at it.
\
the Hebrew Day School
0F FORT UtaDERDHLE
6501 W SunnwBlvd Plantation, Florida 33313 13051 583 6100
Goldfarb Wins Radio
Rabbi Yossi Kessler of the
Chabad Lubavitch of South Flor-
ida took part in the Kabbalat
Shabbat service at the Hebrew
Day School to present to first-
grader Jonathan Goldfarb the
first prize in the essay contest
conducted by Chabad House for
the 1,800 children in 25 religious
schools in Dade. Broward and
Palm Beach counties.
Jonathan, wrote an essay on
"How Our Family Celebrates
Pesach," received a radio from
Rabbi Kessler. At the conclusion
of the service, a drawing was held
with Michael Frieser the winner
of a watch.
' >
LagB'Omer Celebration at School
Inessa Oks and Sandi Kurtz take part in an
Israeli dance at the Lag B'Omer celebration last
month at the Hebrew Day School with 65 chil-
dren from the Jewish Community Day School of
West Palm Beach. Making human pyramids,
playing games, singing, a picnic and special
treats combined for a day filled with friendship
for the children from both schools.
OCEANFRONT
BOARDWALK
25th COLLINS
MIAMI BEACH, FLA. 3$13$
ERIC JACOBS Owner-Mfmt
Fathers Day June 19 22
4 Days 3 Nights
SCQ p' Person
05/ Doub Occup
Mtalt Included
$93 Single Rate
Welcome Gilt
Summer Week-Ends
Are Joyous Holidays
Pleasureful Always
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Labor Day Sept 4 7
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Meats Included
FOR INFORMATION/
CALL 1-558-5721
Z,ayde wore
kilts!
t.
Although Jews have a tradition of maintaining their cultural heritage,
they also have the reputation of becoming an integral part of the community they
live in. And Scotland is no exception.
Glasgow prides itself on having the only Jewish pipe-band in
the world. And one of the city's largest kilt-makers is Jewish.
Scotland's most famous product is fine Scotch whisky. And
America's favorite scotch is J&B. We carefully select the finest scotches j
and blend them for smoothness and subtlety. The result is why we say
that J&.B whispers.
No matter where your friends or guests come from, serve them
J&B to make them feel at home. 1C"T> ~tf '1 '
J&li it whispers.
86ProolBlen)3ScoK*iWhul.y.OleiThPad(ngionC 1


Friday, June 19,1981
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 9
ewish Community Center Honored Its Campus Founders
* /
ztOh
Harvey Kopelowitz and Dr. Jon Jacobs co-chaired the
Founders Evening honoring the Founder contributors who
aided in the acquisition of the 6501 W. Sunrise Blvd. site
of the former Florida Air Academy helping concert it as
the Jewish Community Center Perlman Campus. Next to
them are Dr. Abraham Fischler, president of Nova Uni-
versity, who spoke to the group, and Richard Goldman,
one of the 450 Founders, now president of Ramat Shalom,
and next to them are Victor Gruman, newly-elected presi-
dent of the Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale,
and Anita Perlman, who has served as president of JCC
from (he time it acquired the property until she completed
her second one-year term this month.
Mrs. Perlman dedicated the Founders Plaque which
was placed in the Samuel M. Soref Hall.
All those attending were guided to Soref Hall by a
candlelit path which marked a self-guided tour of the
facilities.
Greeting the group. Dr. Jacobs said: "It is inspiring
and gratifying to visit with so many Founders who have
made a total commitment to the success of JCC."
Co-Chairman Kopelowitz, reporting on the progress of
improvements to the facilities, in his remarks, said: "It
has been a most pleasurable evening shared with and in
tribute to the more than 450 Founders who have supported
JCC from its inception with their generous gifts."
JCC
Spotlights:
Florida Council of JCC's Holds First Conference
Louise Feller, Chairperson of
JCC's Physical Education
committee.
Louise was born in New Ro-
chelle. NY. Holder of a BA
degree, she taught school in
Manhattan before moving to
^ Florida six years ago with her
fljifuisband. Steve. The Fellers and
their six-year-old son Sean and
three-year-old daughter Jayne
live in Lauderhill. Steve is a
member of the Board of Temple
Kol Ami.
In addition to her work with
the Phys-Ed committee. Louise is
a member of the Day Camp com-
mittee, Membership committee
and Mr. and Mrs. committee. She
is also one of the creators of the
Toddler Work Shop Program.
Her most recent endeavor is
coaching son Sean's T-Ball Team,
which is one of six teams in the
Centers T-Ball League.
"I would like to see the Center
~"*dfaw from the total community
and develop more programs to
serve the needs of young
families," said Louise. "I would
like to continue my involvement
through my children to serve
their needs and interests."
Singles 18-35
- The Singles 18-35 are planning
ifBrunch on Sunday, June 28 at
11 a.m. at the Center. The
purpose of the Brunch is to in-
crease membership in the group.
"We're very anxious to get
new people involved and inter-
ested in this particular age
group" says Selma Telles, staff
worker for the group.
Couples Bowling League
A bowling league for adult
> ^.couples is scheduled to begin in
September and continue through
next June. The group will bowl
once a month and conclude the
season with an awards banquet.
The deadline for registration is
July 26. Contact Ed at 792-6700,
for details.
A statewide conference of new
Jewish communities in Florida
was held on June 6-7 at the Dip-
lomat Hotel in Orlando, with the
assistance of National Jewish
Welfare Board (JWB), the major
service agency for the Jewish
Community Centers and Camps
in the U.S. and Canada.
Nathan I-oshak, executive di-
rector, Tulsa (Okla.) Jewish
Community Council, delivered
the keynote on "Emerging Sun
Belt Jewish Communities: The
Challenge of the Eighties."
The two-day meeting was the
first major event of a new Florida
Council of Jewish Community
Centers, formed recently by lay
and professional leaders from
Florida communites "to provide
mutual help, support, guidance
and aid to existing and emerging
JCCs in Florida."
Anita Perlman, president of
the Greater Fort Lauderdale JCC
and acting chairperson of the
Florida Council, said: "JWB,
which is responsible for providing
service to Jewish Community
Centers throughout North Amer-
ica, has been of great assistance
in helping us to launch this
project."
Communities in the Florida
Council of JCCs are Fort Lauder-
dale. Orlando. Palm Beaches,
Sarasota, St. Petersburg,Tampa,
Venice, Clearwater, Fort Walton
Beach, Hollywood, Jacksonville
and West Pasco County.
A unique, experiential "Center
Purposes Auction" took place at
a plenary session at the June 6-7
conference in Orlando.
Workshops were held on lead-
ership development, setting prio-
rities in planning facilities, re-
cruitment and retention of Center
members, increasing the Center's
outside sources of income, telling
the Center story, and reaching
and serving different age groups
and families with particular
needs.
Arthur Sterngold, marketing
consultant, was the resource
person for the workshops on
"Marketing, Membership
Retention" and "Marketing
The Image of the Center." A
workshop on "Funding Gov-
ernment and Private Sources"
had Ed Finkelstein, Executive
Director, Tampa JCC, as the re-
source. Marvin Friedman,
Executive Director, JCC of
Central Florida, ser\*d a similar
role at a workshop on "Outreach
and Involvement of Newcomers."
Loshak was the resource person
for the "Facility Development"
workshop.
Mrs. Perlman said: "Among
the agenda items of the Florida
Council were the following: The
setting up of a system to track
the relocation of Jewish com-
munal leaders to Florida commu-
nities; community-to-community
consultations, using the Florida
center's lay and professional
leaders; the development of a
way for strengthening Center-
"Also," she said, regional iza-
tion of program services, such as
teen tours to Israel, young adult
services, older adult services,
cultural arts performances;
specialized help for communities
that do not have professional
leadership but have a great need
for a close source of ideas and
methods of strengthening their
emerging JCC programs."
JWB consultants for this proj-
ect were Sherwood Epstein and
Leonard Rubin. They served as
facilitators at the "Center
Purposes Auction." Epstein was
the resource person at the work-
shop on "Leadership Develop-
ment." He is director of Human
Resources Development for
JWB.
JWB is supported by Jewish
Federations, the UJA-Federation
Campaign of Greater New York,
and Jewish Community Centers.
It conducts a vast array of
programs designed to strengthen
the bonds between North
America and Israel, and it is a
member of the World Confedera-
tion of Jewish Community
Centers.
It is the U.S. Government-
accredited agency for providing
the religious, Jewish educational
and morale needs of Jewish
military personnel, their families
and VA patients. JWB is also the
sponsor of the Jewish Media
Service, JWB Lecture Bureau,
Jewish Book Council, and Jewish
Music Council.
Showcase Theatre Plans Series of Events
JCC announces the Woman's
Showcase Theatre will launch a
season of activity Sept. 26-27 in
Soref Hall with a Stars Weekend
and Meet the Artist Party plus a
one-woman photography ex-
hibition. A wine and cheese
buffet after each performance will
bring the artists and audience
together.
The schedule of events in-
cludes:
Kosher Nutrition
Program
The Service Agency for Senior
Citizens Nutrition Program
provides a hot kosher meal five
lays a week Monday through
Friday at the Jewish Community
Center and the Jewish
Federation.
The purpose of the program is
to provide nutrition and
socialization for seniors over the
age of 60, who reside in Broward
County. Exercise classes,
speakers and other programs of
interest to seniors are provided
before the meals are served. The
participants are not required to
pay for the meals but daily con-
tributions are solicited.
Transportation is available
through Broward County Social
Service Transportation. For
information call JCC 792-6700, or
Service Agency for Senior Citi-
zens 563-8991.
Oct. 17, 18 Her Story in
History Part I Mother
Courage Bertold Brecht, A
Doll's House Henrik Ibsen,
Mrs. Warren's Profession
George Bernard Shaw.
Feb. 27.28 Taproots Part
1, The Jewish Wife Bertolt
Brecht, The Diary of Anne Frank
Francis Goodrich, A Portrait
of Golda Meir.
Part 2 The Children's Hour
- Lillian Hellman, The Glass
Menagerie Tennessee
Williams. Getting There (an
original composition of today's
woman, as depicted by Neil
Simon and the TV Medial, (De-
scription The two part narra-
tion).
March 27, 28 Taproots
Part 2, The Caged Bird Sings (an
anthology of black women poets,
to include music and dance)
Scenes from a Raisin in The, Sun-
Lorraine Hansberry; A two-part
presentation of poetry,' dramatic
literature and prose dealing with
minority women.
May 1,2- Women Of A Cer-
tain Age, A cavalcade of comedy,
song and improvisations with
audience participation.
The entire series is $10 for
members of JCC $15 for non-
members. Individual
$2 for JCC members -
members.
tickets are
$3 for non-
Planning Arts Festival
Ruth Baker is chairperson of
the Cultural Arts Committee
which is preparing for an Outdoor
Arts and Crafts Festival to be
held next Nov. 1 on the JCC
campus in conjunction with a
Collectors' Exhibition to be held
in Soref Hall.
Registration applications are
now available at the office. AH
media and all crafts, provided
they are original, will be ac-
cepted. The fee is $5. Ribbons will
be awarded by a jury of experts.
Registration deadline is Oct. 15.
Seniors Summer Programs
Susana at JCC 792-6700 has all
. the information you need to get
jC.C Happenillffs involved in the summer programs
for Seniors.
Federation relations.
JCC Theatre Guild
Auditions have been scheduled
by JCC's Theatre Guild for The
Happy Time which requires eight
males (including a 13-year-old)
and four women. Maxine Barnes,
who is directing the show, invites
actors, actresses and stage pro-
duction people to the auditions at
7:30 p.m., Monday, and Tuesday,
June 22 and 23.
Two musicals are also planned
for the '81-'82 season under the
direction of Richard Ryan and
Irene Unterman. Auditiqns for
"Milk & Honey" are scheduled
for the fall.
Ryan would like to hear from
anyone interested in doing the
choreography, assistant produc-
tion manager, costumes, or work-
ing on the sets, and acting as
stage manager.
Interviews will be arranged bv
She says: "Finally what you
have been waiting for! Your own
parcel of land to plant whatever
your heart desires! The Garden
Club will begin meeting on June
29."
Learn
enamel.
the art
make
of decoupage,
doughb lends.
' flowers, planters and much more
by signing up for Art Potpourri
with Ruth and Lee Friedman be-
ginning June 23.
Singles and couples are wel-
come to Folk and Fun Dancing
with Nat and Ida Wolfson begin-
ning June 23.
Spend a "Day at the Beach".
Join Susana at John Lloyd State
Park for a fun day on Wednesday
June 24. (Transportation in-
cluded.)
Toddler Workshop
Summer Session
Ruth Pine.
Toddler Workshop is a social
interaction group for two-and-
three-year-old children. The class
tries to help the child learn to
deal with others in a variety of
situations, including arts and
crafts, music, story time, acting
out stories, manipulative play,
creative movement, creative
play, outdoor activities and
much, much more.
The children must be well on
their way to toilet training. The
six week session which begins
June 29 is being offered from 9:15
a.m. to 12:15 p.m. on Monday,
Wednesday and Friday, or Tues-
day and Thursday, or all five
days.


^^
Pag* M> -f
Th* Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, June 19,mi
V
Browsm' thru
reward
with max levine
Reflections as the 1981 UJA
campaign is drawing to a close:
The first Federation-conducted
campaign in 1968. headed by Dr.
Alvin Colin, raised $65,000 from
less than 500 contributors. Victor
Gruman, chairing the current
campaign and still seeking more
dollars and more contributors, is
up to $3,745,000 and almost
20.000 contributors More
historical notes: North Brow-
ards first cemetery was located
on land bought by Sam Lerner in
1935 Moe Katz was first
president of the first synagogue,
Temple F.manu-El. established
that same year Dr. Albert E.
Kaufman was first president for
the first (1940) Bnai B'rith lodge
. Paul Epstein was first ADL
chairman Dr. Samuel Towbin
was first president of Pompano
Beach's Temple Sholom founded
in 1960 hidwik Brodzki was
first president of Jewish Federa-
tion of Greater Fort Lauderdale
when it was incorporated in 1968
. And Federation made
possible the start of the Jewish
Community Center in 1975 with
programs conducted in the
Federation building.
Rabbi Sheldon Harr of Temple
Kol Ami conducts the Jewish
Workshop Hour on WPLGTV
Channel 10 at 8 a.m.. Sunday,
June 28 Incidentally, the
week before that date, June 21,
Kol Ami breaks ground for the
12-classroom religious school ad-
dition to its 8200 Peters Rd.
facility in Plantation Henry
Keaaler, a founder of the old Mar-
gate Jewish Center-Temple Beth
Am nd its third president, and
Bettf Gndes were married May
24 aijd are still receiving con-
gratulations in the community
where Kessler has been among
those increasing Beth Am's
current membership to 1,500.
Mrs. Kessler 9ays: "Henry will
keep serving the community with
all the precious faculties at his
command."
Physicians are among the lead-
ers in South Broward's Federa-
tion: Dr. Saul Singer was named
chairman of the 1982 UJA cam-
paign there by Dr. Robert S. Pit-
tel, Federation's president .
And Dr. Herbert Brizel and his
wife, Nancy, who is general
chairman of South Broward's
Women's Division UJA, will lead
TAPES
CARTONS
HANGERS
POLYETHYLENE
BUSINESS FORMS
TAGS LABELS
BAGS BOXES
WIPES
the Hollywood area residents on
a Mission to Israel next October
. Speaking of Women's
Division: Bernice Waldman of
West Hartford, Ct., was inau-
gurated president of the National
UJA Women's Division with
Harriet Sloan of NYC succeeding
her as chairman of the national
division Hadassah holds its
67th national convention Auk. 9-
12 in NYC. Hadassah lost one of
its leaders of the past: Jerusalem-
born Tamar de Sola Pool who was
national president from 1938 to
1943 died this month. She was 90.
For $3.50 you can see Phyllis
Green, Solomon King and Hal
Fisher act (refreshments, too)
sponsored Sunday night at 8,
June 20. by the Men's Club at
Temple Beth Torah, Tamarac .
Speaking of shows: Shalom
Singers (directed by Ethel
Binder) and Dancers (led by
Berte Resnikoff) pool the
honoraria they receive for per-
forming during the year and then
spread it among charitable
service organizations in-
cluding a generous contribution
to the United Jewish Appeal
campaign of the Federation .
More than 90 percent of Israel's
fresh agricultural produce is sold
in Europe, also 85 percent of its
textiles and half of its chemical
products .Top Israeli exporter
is Iscar Blades Ltd. in Naharyia.
Plant manager Stef Wertheimer
received a special export prize
from Israel President Yitzhak
Navon. The firm produces
500,000 airfoils daily for Israel
Air Force planes and for some of
the largest airlines in the world.
Aaron Heller of Lauderhill, a
Silver Haired Legislative
Senator, is chairman of the
Broward delegation planning to
go to the Silver Haired Legisla-
ture sessions Aug. 2-7 in Talla-
hassee. The local delegation has a
number of bills they want
adopted to be presented to the
next session of the State Legis-
lature Carolyn Kayne, co-
ordinator for Broward County
Historical Commission, reports
the Commission is offering cash
prizes for best pictures with a
Broward County theme for the
1981 Pioneers Days celebration.
Deadline for entries: Oct. 14 .
Prof. L'ziel O. Schmelz of Jeru-
salem's Hebrew University
776-6272
ROWARD
"ape* a
ackacinc
1201 N E 45 STREET
FORT LAUDERDALE
OFFICE 491-0700
RESIDENCE 564-1444
MILTON M. KATZ
REALTOR ASSOCIATE
SPECIALIST
IN BETTER HOMES AND CONDOS

I*
KilXK
Al!C*S
2301 IMPERIAL POINT DRIVE
FORT LAUDERDALE. FLORIDA 33308
I believes that by the year 2000,20
percent of the Jews living in the
Diaspora (the world outside Is-
rael) at that time will be over 65
years of age.
Temple Beth Israel, 7100 W.
Oakland Park Blvd., adds
Justin's to its list of places for
auxiliary services for the High
Holy Days. Others are Inverrary
Country Club, Holiday Inn in
Plantation and Sunrise Lakes
Phase III clubhouse Newly
organized West Broward Jewish
Congregation, with no regular
place for services at present, is
planning, according to Pro-Tern
President Don Workman, High
Holy Days services at Broward
Community College Mel
Yohman and his Mellow Dancers
will provide doozy-do music and
square dancing at the country
western Saturday night at 8.
June 27. at Temple Beth Orr.
Barbecue chicken, corn on the
cob, coffee and cake and dancing
arc on tap for $10 per person.
Non-members are invited to join
the fun.
Moshe Netanel has been
named manager of Israel's new
Southeast regional investment
and trade office just opened in
Miami. The office was moved
from Atlanta ,*. Florida has ex-
ported more than three million
dollars worth of goods to Israel
. David Rotlevy, Israel's
economic ambassador to the
U.S., says Israeli technological
innovations account for a third of
the nation's exports. Florida
businesses imported $32.7 million
of diamonds, chemicals, gold
necklaces and other products
during the year Dorothy
James, widow of Gen. Daniel
"Chappie" James Jr., first Black
four-star Air Force General, has
been named honorary trusteee of
the National Memorial of the
Jewish War Veterans who are
planning for a monument to
honor the Jewish war dead.
Among students earning a 4.0
average for 12 or more credit
hours during the year at Broward
Community College were Fern
Sarkell of Tamarac, Bonnie Katz
of Sunrise. Robert B. Goldatein
of Lauderdale Lakes Molly
Picon, who made her stage debut
in 1904, received a scroll citing
her "lifetime of excellence and
brilliance in the Yiddish and
American theatres, when Ameri-
can Jewish Congress Women's
Division honored her at a lunch-
eon in New York The second
annual Christian Celebration of
the Feast of Tabernacles
(Sukkot) will be held next Oc-
tober with the California-based
group calling for thousands of
Christians from all over the world
to "go up to Jerusalem."
Federation officials join his
family and friends in mourning
the death of Pincua Deren earlier
this month. He was the chairman
of the UJA committee in Water
Bridge condominiums .
Theodore R. Mann, noted Phila-
delphia attorney whose parents
live in Deerfield's Century
Village and former president of
National Jewish Community
Relations Advisory Council, was
elected chairman of the National
Conference on Soviet Jewry .
Marlene Kunin represented
Ramat Shalom at the Re-
constructionist Convention last
weekend at Grossingers in the
Catskills It's Mazel Tov to
South Broward Federation's
Rabbi Herb Tobin. and his wife
Nancy, who gave birth to a son
this month.
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Page 12
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Friday, June 19,1981
Helsinki Accords
They Haven't Restrained Moscow
By KEVIN FREEMAN
NEW YORK (JTA)
Ambassador Max
Kampelman, chairman of
the U.S. delegation to the
Madrid Review Conference'
of the Helsinki accords,
says that in spite of the ef-
forts of the Conference,
little improvement has been
achieved in regards to hu-
man rights practices in the
Soviet Union.
Kampelman and Prof. Telford
Taylor were presented with the
annual Solidarity Awards of the
National Conference on Soviet
Jewry at the Roosevelt Hotel
here as part of its three-day
policy conference.
Kampelman said that in spite
of the work done at the Madrid
Conference, "there have been 46
arrests of human rights activists
and no increase in the departures
of Jews" from the Soviet Union.
He noted that in 1980 alone, 242
Jews and non-Jews were arrested
by Soviet authorities thus rep-
resenting "the largest number of
arrests in the Soviet Union (of
this kind)tin 15 years."
THE MADRID Conference
started in November, 1980 as
part of a continuing review of the
Helsinki agreement adopted in
August, 1975 by 35 nations in-
cluding the United States and the
Soviet Union. The declaration in
part pledged the signers to
"respect fundamental freedoms,
including the freedom of thought
conscience, religion or belief."
Kampelman noted that at the
first review conference in 1978 in
Belgrade, Yugoslavia, only the
United States mentioned the
plight of dissidents in the Soviet
Union. He observed however that
ast least 11 nations at the Madrid
150,000 Stage Solidarity
Show for Soviet Jews
By KEVIN FREEMAN
NEW YORK (JTA)
About 150,000 people,
according to police esti-
mates, gathered at Dag
Hammarskjold Plaza,
across from the United Na-
tions, for the tenth annual
rally for Solidarity Sunday
for Soviet Jewry.
The marcher paraded for ten
blocks down Fifth Avenue ir
Manhattan, led by a group wear-
ing prison uniforms to represent
Jewish Prisoners of Conscience in
Soviet prisons and labor camps.
They carried pictures of Soviet
prisoners Anatoly Sharansky,
Vladimir Kislik, Kim Fridman
and those of many others jailed.
RICHARD ALLEN, National
Security Adviser at the White
House, was greeted with
boisterous chants of "No arms to
Saudi Arabia." Allen said that
the United States' "deter-
mination to oppose terrorism in
no way contradicts our support
for human rights." This state-
ment was greeted with more
chants.
Allen stressed that the foreign
policy of the U.S. is essentially
linked to human rights. Dr. Sey-
mour Lachman, chairman of the
Greater New York Conference on
Soviet Jewry, said Allen's ap-
pearance was the highest Presi-
dential representative sent to a
gathering of this kind. Lachman
also said that "this is the biggest
demonstration for Soviet Jewry"
in. the history of the dem-
onstrations.
Actress Jane Fonda, in what
was believed to be her first ap-
pearance at a rally for Soviet
Jews, said that Ida Nudel, now
serving a prison term on
trumped-up charges of hooligan-
ism, had been convicted for
"fighting for the right of Jews to
emigrate."
GOV. CAREY of New York
said that "we will not avert
our eyes or lower our voices or
lessen our concern" for the rights
of Soviet Jewry. "To do so would
be not only to betray Soviet Jew-
ry or Israel or our allies, it would
be to betray ourselves."
He also said "the Soviet Union
is put on notice that its violations
of human rights, abrogation of
international law, its in-
timidation of other nations and
its disregard for the dignity of
the individual, leave it outside
the pale of civilized nations."
Iosef Mendelevich, who was
released recently from a Soviet
prison and settled in Israel,
received from Mayor Edward
Koch the key to the dty he was
'recently awarded Mendelevich
told the crowd "because of vour
prayers and hard work, I was
finally able to leave the Soviet
Union and to resume the practice
ot my Jewish faith without fear of
persecution." Fonda, Carey and
Mendelevich were enthusiastical-
ly applauded at the rally.
Conference mentioned the names
of dissidents.
Kampelman said that when
"80,90, 100 names are mentioned
at an international forum, or
when 10,000 Jews are allowed to
emigrate" or when many Pri-
soners of Conscience are released
from the Soviet Union, then I will
accept this award with con-
viction." He added that this
award represents not the work
done in the past, but that which
is needed to be done in the future.
TAYLOR, prosecutor at the
Nuremberg war crimes trials, is
Nash Professor Emeritus of Law
at the Columbia University Law
School, and holds the Kaiser
Chair in Constitutional Law at
Cardozo School of Law, Yeshiva
University. He is author of
"Courts of Terror," describing
how he and a group of American
lawyers worked through the
Soviet judicial system to free pri-
soners convicted while trying to
emigrate to Israel.
Taylor received the award "for
his unwavering committment to
justice for all people and his ad-
vocacy on behalf of the Soviet
Jewish Prisoners of Conscience."
Taylor, who was presented with
the award by former Prisoner of
Conscience Hillel Butman, said
that it is Butman and his fellow
prisoners who deserve the
solidarity awards "because they
set the example for the awards
tonight."
The NCSJ also presented
awards to four organizations for
their activities on behalf of Soviet
Jewry. They are the Women's
American ORT for its "Free-a-
Family" program, the American
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Jewry (Miami) for the pub
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histories, and the Subcommittee
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June 19, 1981
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale
Page 13
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Page 14
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lauderdale'
Friday, June 19.19^1
Begin, Sadat Meeting Produces Flood of Good FeelingAnd That's All
BY DAVID LANDAU
And HUGH ORGEL
OFIRA, Sinai
(JTA) Premier Mena-
chem Begin and Egyptian
President Anwar Sadat met
for 90 minutes in a private
summit conversation in
this resort town, due to be
handed back to the Egyp-
tians next year, and both
leaders expressed
satisfaction with their talk.
Both hailed the Israel-
Egypt peace treaty and the,
Camp David accords as the1
only stable factor in a tur-
bulent Middle East.
Begin agreed to Sadat's sug-l
gestion that U.S. special envoy
Philip Habib should be given
more time to try and solve the
Syrian missile crisis by diplomat-
ic means, though Begin indicated
he was not prepared to give him
the open-ended opportunity
Sadat suggested. Begin also
rejected Sadat's request that
Israel halt its bombing and raids
on terrorist bases in Lebanon,
explaining that these were
essential to ensure Israel's
security.
Tamar De Sola Pool Dead at 91;
Was Wife of Distinguished Rabbi
NEW YORK- (JTA)-
Funeral services were held for
Tamar de Sola Pool, who died at
her home at the age of 91. Mrs.
Pool, a writer, educator, lecturer
and past president of Hadassah
was the widow of the Rev. Dr.
David de Sola Pool, the late rabbi
of the Spanish and Portuguese
Synagogue in New York.
The eighth national president
of Haddassah, Mrs. Pool served
in that capacity from 1939-1943
and prior to that was president of
the New York chapter, from 1929-
1935. At the time of her death.
she was one of the few surviving
presidents of Haddassah who had
worked with Henrietta Szold,
founder of the Women's Zionist
Organization.
DESCENDED from a long line
of rabbis and Israeli pidheers,
Mrs. Pool was born in Jerusalem,
the daughter of Chaim and Eva
Hirchenson, and brought to the
United I States at the age of 14.
She received the B A degree from
Hunter College in 1913, attended
the University of Paris as winner
of the first International Fellow-
ship, and a graduate student at
Columbia University from 1914-
1917. Later she taught French,
Latin and Greek at Hunter
College. She and Dr. Pool were
married in 1917.
Mrs. Pool was co-author with
Dr. Pool of "An Old Faith in a
New World" and "Is There an
Answer." She was editor of the
Hadassah Newsletter for 10
years.
THE OFIRA summit was held
in tight security and covered by
hundreds of newsmen from
Israel, Egypt and correspondents
I from North America and Europe.
Although Begin and his Likud
colleagues deny that the Premier
requested the summit for
political purposes, it will ob-
viously figure large in the Likud
alliance campaign, which is con-
centrating on the peace treaty
with Egypt.
Police and security forces made :
every effort to prevent any dem- j
onstrations during Sadat's visit'
to Ofira. But a group of Jewish
settlers due to move out of Sinai
next year, demonstrated with
posters, none of which were seen
by either Sadat or Begin. Sadat
met later with Ofira residents
who asked permission to remain
there when the Egyptians take
over.
He told them that under the
peace agreement all Israelis must
leave the area, though some
arrangements might be made for
some of them at least to return
there later to continue in tourist
projects in cooperation with the
Egyptians.
AT A PRESS conference
following their meeting, Begin
and Sadat both condemn-xl
Syria's presence in Lebanon as
the cause of that country's tur-
bulence and of the present crisis
in the area. Begin announced at
the outset of the press conference
that he and Sadat hope to meet
again in Alexandria soon. Earlier,
in a luncheon toast, Begin said
that meeting would take place by
next month.
Begin announced that they had
reached "important agreements
and serious solutions" during
their meeting here but would not
disclose the content of those
agreements or the problems to
which "solutions" had been
found.
THE RECONSTRUCTIONIST SYNAGOGUE
A WARM CREATIVE APPROACH TO JUDAISM
FOR HOME, SYNAGOGUE, AND COMMUNITY i
WE BELIEVE that JUDAISM is the evoking Religious Civilization of the Jewish
people.
WE BELIEVE that the fabric of the Jewish experience is multi-colored and many tex-
tured Woven over millennia in deserts and cities, ghettos and palaces, precious beyond I
valuation and yet never completed it is now in our keeping, in trust for future ',
generations. I
tWE BELIEVE that memories are not enough JUDAISM will survive only through
knowledge and understanding of our rich Jewish Heritage, combining the Jewish Ex-
{JJJjt f the Past> with a creative Jewish Present, thereby building a dynamic Jewish
Our services Include prayer, ceremony, study and celebration.
Members of the Congregation participate as lay leaders during the services.
Study of Torah and other Important Jewish teachings are a part of our
services during a study Period.
Music enhances the beauty and warmth of the Services.
Our Synagogue Torah School program encompasses the grades from Kin-
dergarten through seventh and Includes preparation for Bar and Bat Mltzvah
We participate in the Federation sponsored judaica High school.
Members are encouraged to Join a Havurah.
Our synagogue, was organized &11975, we welcome your membership.
For further Information,caM: (305) 583-7770.,
Jk
Friday, June 19-7:54
Friday, June 26-7:56
Friday, July 3-7:56
.cSiy
1 1 :i /?
T r T I V i"

Si
ins rnx
,Vtfl$V$ BjpJr "^
.natf ^ n. v^rvzb
i ;
Ba-ruch A-tah Ado-nye, Elo-haynu Melech Ha-olam,
Asher kid'shanu B*mitz-vo-tav, V'tzee-va-nu
L'had-leek Nayr shel Shabbat.
Blessed art Thou, O Lord our God King of the Universe,
Who has sanctified us with Thy commandments
And commanded us to kindle the Sabbath lights.
-1
Religious Directory
LAUDERDALE LAKES
OHEL B'NAI RAPHAEL TEMPLE. 4351 West Oakland Park
Boulevard. Modern Orthodox Congregation. Saul Herman, Rabbi
Emeritus.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL. 3246 W. Oakland Park Blvd. Reform Rabbi
Jeffrey Ballon. Cantor Jerome Klement.
SUNRISE
BETH ISRAEL TEMPLE. 7100 W. Oakland Park Blvd. Conservative.
Rabbi Phillip A. Labowitx. Cantor Maurice Neu.
SUNRISE JEWISH CENTER, INC. 8049 W. Oakland Park Blvd.
Conservative. Rabbi Albert N. Troy. Cantor Jack Marchant.
LAUDERHILL
HEBREW CONGREGATION OF LAUDERHILL. 2048 NW 49th
Ave. LauderhilL Conservative. Maxwell Gilbert, president.
NORTH LAUDERDALE
HEBREW.CONGREGATION OF NORTH LAUDERDALE. 7 p.m.,
Friday; 9 a.m.. Saturday, in Western School. 8200 SW 17th St. Murray
Handler, president.
PORT LAUDERDALE
TEMPLE ISRAEL OF GALT OCEAN MILE. Conservative. Rabbi
David Matzner. 8 p.m. Fridays, North Beach Medical Center, 2836 N.
r -'
Ocean Blvd.
TAMARAC
. %z .
Rama t Shalom
MarttiVBulWino '
747S Northwest 4th street
Plantation, Florida 33317
TEMPLE BETH TORAH-TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER. 9101
NW 67th St. Conservative. Rabbi Israel Zimmerman. Cantor Henry
Belasco.
PLANTATION
TEMPLE KOL AMI. Plantation Jewish Congregation. 8200 Peters
Rd. Liberal Reform. Rabbi Sheldon J. Harr.
RAMAT SHALOM. Reconstructionist Synagogue. 7473 NW 4th St
Rabbi Rebecca Alpert.
POMPANOBEACH
TEMPLE SHOLOM. 132 SE 11th Ave. Conservative. Rabbi Morris A.
Skop. Cantor Jacob Renzer.
MARGATE
BETH HILLEL CONGREGATION. 7640 Margate Blvd. Conser-
vative. Rabbi Joseph Berglas.
TEMPLE BETH AM-MARGATE JEWISH CENTER 7206 Royal
Palm Blvd. Conservative. Rabbi Dr. Solomon Geld. Cantor Mario
Botoahanaky.
LIBERAL TEMPLE of Coconut Creek. Friday evening services
Calvary Presbyterian Church, Coconut Creek Blvd.
CORAL SPRINGS
TEMPLE BETH ORR 2161 Riverside Drive. Reform. Rabbi Donald S.
Gerber. Cantor Harold Dworkin.
KETER TIKVAH SYNAGOGUE. 8 p.m. Friday; 10:30 a.m. Saturday
in Auditorium, Bank of Coral Springs, 3300 University Dr. Rabbi
Leonard ZoU.
DEERFIELD BEACH
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL at Century Village East Conservative !
Cantor Joseph Pollack.
YOUNG ISRAEL of Daarfiald Beach. 1640 W. Hillsboro Blvd. Or-,
thodox.
_.__ ___ BOCA BATON
TEMPLE BETH EL. 333 SW 4th Avenue. Boca Raton. Rabbi Maria a
Singer.
B'NAI TORAH. 1401 NW 4th Ava.. Boca Raton. Conservative. Rabbi
Nathan Zatixer. Cantor Henry Perl
,, HOLLYWOOD
Y5,PL8RAJ:L 0F HOLLYWOOD FORT LAUDERDALE. 4171.
^tirkn| Rd^)rtbodox. Rabbi Moebe Botnxer.
I


i, June 19. 1981
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Lander dale
Page 16
^tc*>a4 f ^^^ta,<^a4^e B'nai/B'not Mitevah
[ore Confirm ands
ceived too late for publica-
fin the May 22 issue of The
tk Floridian are these
brts of confirmation
3nies during Shavuot serv-
fat Temple Kol Ami and Tem-
Jeth Israel.
Kol Ami
he confirmands at Planta-
T% Kol Ami were Garrett A.
\, Robert Chesal, Joni Fisher,
Mine B. Gitlitz, Randy J.
iman, Lori T. Hart, Andrea
R. Levine. Allison S. Roth, Alana
N. Schwartz, Sheryl Schwartz
Robert Zobel.
Beth Israel
At Beth Israel, 7100 W. Oak-
land Park Blvd., the confirmands
were Ian Berkowitz, Craig Feld-
man, Jackie Gordon, Marci Har-
ris, Craig Kamen, Craig Lustgar-
ten, David Zack, Beth Olshan-
sky, Lisa Pomeranz, Steven
Ravitz, Michelle Rosenbloom,
Sheri Stewart, Stacy Sakoff.
Israel Judge Speaks
. leading member of the Israe-
judicial system, Judge Moishe
cht was the featured speaker
last month, at the Tamarac
Jewish Center.
Judge Nacht was in Florida as
a guest of Robert Lockwood,
clerk of the courts of Broward
County. The two men met while
Lockwood toured Israel for the
express purpose of learning how
the courts were operated in the
Jewish State. During his stay in
South Florida, Judge Nacht
visited the courts of Broward,
Dade and Palm Beach Counties.
Commenting on the impor-
tance of Judge Nacht's address
at the Center, Rabbi Israel Zim-
merman said: "It was a distinct
honor for us in Tamarac to have
the distinguished Israeli Jurist
Judge Nacht address us."
Saudi-Soviet Accord
Continued from Page 4-
restless Palestinians un the
Bt Bank; and growing tension
fcthe feudal society that makes
|di Arabia so restive these
rhe West can not realistically
afely rely on the Arab world
lupply its needs," declares Dr.
Ydcchai Nisan, lecturer at the
preW University, whose less
j rosy assessment of the Arab
idle East domain I have here
ted. Says he: "Internal factors
instability, inter-Arab (or
er-Islamic) relations are also
lected by unpredictable
yt'lopments."
\E INCLUDES among these
[war in the Persian Gulf be-
en Iraq and Iran, the over-
^w of the Pahlavi regime, the
'-supported attack against
idi Arabia on the Great
Bque in Mecca in 1979. One
add dozens of other ex-
ples. In the end, "the Arab
tie built on this pillar of sand
I can be washed away with the
ling tide of political ex-
sm."
rhe ultimate conclusion is that
dominant feature in Arab
cty is the use of force, to
[ieve its conflicting political
9ses. For Arabs, violence re-
8 a common method of
iment action If this is the
Itical nature of the Arab-
nic world, how can it be
sidered a stable partner in the
tr\.- *&v '"
ie answer is that it can't.
until there is additional in -
nation available to us that we
interpret'/; those naked re-
about jk'Jfenewed Saudi-
liet alliance AB one more ex-
[>le of this&^jg Soviets thrive
bankrolla^c pariahs The
iis may rJnfjfret be that bad,
but perhaps they are getting
there.
If, more and more, the martial
tradition of Islam worries the
West PLO terrorism on the
streets of London, Iranian-Iraqi
feuds in Paris, Libyan killer-goon
squads in Rome the Soviets
may yet make Araby a better
bed mate than we can ever aspire
to.
Sunrise JC
The Oneg Shabbat following
services at 8 p.m., Friday, June
26, at Sunrise Jewish Center,
8049 W. Oakland Park Blvd.. will
be sponsored by Alice and Irving
Stein in celebration of the wed-
ding of their granddaughter
Jeralyn Brown to David Ellowitz.
Ram at Shalom
A Shabbat Seder at 7 p.m.,
Friday, June 19, will precede the
worship service at Ramat
Shalom, the Reconstructionist
Synagogue, 7473 NW 4th St.,
Plantation. The study period of
evening will include a 30-minute
Israeli Report film documentary,
featuring Perry Como's recent
visit to Jerusalem, and the Israeli
program of meeting the needs of
the elderly, the invalid, and chil-
dren.
At the June 26 service, the
study period will concentrate on
the Jewish Family, a theme ex-
plored at the recent Reconstruc-
tionist Conference. Dr. Richard
Goldman, Synagogue president,
will be the moderator.
Temple Sholom
Temple Sholom, Conservative
Synagogue of Pompano Beach, is
now accepting reservations for
the seating on the High Holy
days, celebrating the Jewish New
Year 5742, Rosh Hashana com-
mencing Tuesday, Sept. 29 and
Wednesday, Sept. 30. Yom Kip-
pur, the day of Atonement, will
start with Kol Nidre on Wednes-
day evening, Oct. 7 and Thurs-
day, Oct. 8.
Services will be conducted by
spiritual leader Rabbi Samuel
April and assisted by Cantor
Jacob J. Renzer.
Early reservations are sug-
gested due to limited seating. For
information call the Temple office
at 132 S.E. 11th Ave., Pompano
Beach, 942-6410.
Beth Israel
Michael Moakowitz and Lee
Silverstein will become B'nai
Mitzvah at the Saturday morn-
ing worship service, June 20, at
Temple Beth Israel, 7100 W.
Oakland Park Blvd. Michael is
the son of Mr. and Mrs. Norman
Moskowitz. Lee is the son of Mr.
and Mrs. Harvey Silveretein. At
next week's service, Saturday,
June 27 Joseph Godin, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Arnold Godin, will
become a Bar Mitzvah.
At services earlier this month,
Edward Coplon, son of Jackie
Coplon, became a Bar Mitzvah:
Laurie Ackerman, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Paul Ackerman,
became a Bat Mitzvah, and
Randy Dekh, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Charles Deich, became a
Bar Mitzvah.
BethTorah
Heather Geraten, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Edward Gersten,
will become a Bat Mitzvah at
Friday, June 19, service at Tem-
ple Beth Torah, Tamarac Jewish
Center.
The following morning, Steven
Sherman, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Stanley Sherman, will become a
Bar Mitzvah.
Tammy Gordon, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. David Gordon, will
become a Bat Mitzvah Friday,
June 26, and the following
morning B'nai Mitzvah honors
will be conferred on Steven Fried,
son of Mrs. Rise Fried, and
Douglas Kaye, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Stephen Kaye.
Emanu-EI
Amy Block, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Michael Block, will
become a Bat Mitzvah at 11 a.m.,
Saturday, June 20, service at
Temple Emanu-EI, 3245 W. Oak-
land Park Blvd.
Same day at 6:30 p.m., Hav-
dalah service, Bernard Zucker-
man, son of Michele and Joseph
Zuckerman, will become a Bar
Mitzvah.
f
.Levitt -\ 11
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k x- Page 16
I
The Jewish Floridian of Greater Fort Laudtrdale
Friday, June 19, ^
?"'",">"wc.a
If you smoke
Carlton lOO's because you
think, they're lowest in tar,
you're in for a little shock.
Carlton claims to be lowest
in tar. And injact, Carlton
and Now share the distinction
of being the lowest 80s Box.
And the lowest 85s Soft Pack,
regular or menthol.
But when It comes to
100s Soft Pack, regular or
menthol, youll note in the
chart on the right that
Carlton contains more than
twice as much tar as Now!
And when it comes to
100s Box, Now is lower by Jar
than Carlton. Injact. Now Box
100s is lower than any other
100mm cigarette anywhere.
NOW
There's no question
about it. Now is the Ultra Low-
est Tar brand.
And if that's what you'd
like in a 100s cigarette, there's
no question about what brand
you should be smoking.
NUMBERS DON'T LIE.
NOW 100s ARE LOWER THAN
CARLTON 100s.
tofl lUUS regular so/, KJUSmentru* lOO's**
NOW 2mg 2mg Less than O.Olmg
CARLTON 5mg 5mg lmg
All tar numbers are av per cigarette by FTC method
NOW
The lowest in tar of all brands.
laming: The Surgeon General Has Determined
Thai Cigarette Smoking Is OSngerous to Your Health.'

BOX. BOX 100's: Less than 0.01 mg. "tar". 0.001 mg. nicotine. SOFT PACK 85's FILTER. MENTHOL-1 mg "tar" 01 mq nicotine <**
SOFT PACK 100's FILTER. MENTHOL: 2 mg. "tar". 0.2 mg. nicotine, av. per cigarette by FTC method '


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